Going Omnichannel | A Robust Framework for eCommerce Enterprises

Consumers in the digital age want an integrated shopping experience. They might browse an eCommerce website on mobile but ultimately make a purchase from desktop. Or they might pay online, but pick up the purchased item from the store.

Such user behavior has been highlighted by a 2014 GfK study: “With people constantly moving between devices, it is important for marketers to reach their audience across all platforms. Brand experiences should be consistent, allowing for people to begin an activity on one device and finish on another.”

In this post, we discuss a robust omnichannel strategy that can help eCommerce enterprises create such integrated experiences across devices. The strategy includes:

  • Understanding cross-device user behavior
  • Crafting smooth shopping experiences across channels
  • Forming organizational structures that support omnichannel

But before we begin, let’s see how an ideal omnichannel experience for a consumer, say “Sarah” would look like:

Sarah is checking Instagram from her mobile and likes a dress her friend is flaunting. She visits the retailer’s website on mobile. She adds the product to her “wishlist” on mobile. Later during the day, she accesses her wishlist on the desktop, with the decision to make a buy. She chooses the option “inform when available in my size” and 3 days later, gets an email notifying her about the availability of the dress. It also informs her that “click and collect” is available on the product. She decides to pick up the dress from a physical store.

So how do eCommerce enterprises go omnichannel successfully? Let’s talk about the three steps.

Tracking Cross-Device User Behavior

The fact that people toggle among multiple devices throughout the day makes understanding the cross-device user behavior an absolute essential for eCommerce enterprises. Traditional analytics tracking tools such as Google Analytics do not offer the scope for establishing a connect between users and their disparate gadgets. Cross-device tracking removes this barrier for eCommerce enterprises and enables them to understand their users’ behavior across all touchpoints.

Cross-device tracking allows enterprises to understand whether a person browsing a website from smartphone X is the same person who made the purchase from laptop Z. Such information is important to rectify conversion credit allocated disproportionately to the last device of purchase. So if the use of mobile devices leads to desktop purchases, eCommerce enterprises might want to spend more on mobile ads and mobile website optimization.

cross device user tracking
A simple representation of cross-device usage

There are two main methods to track cross-device user behaviordeterministic and probabilistic.

Deterministic Device Matching

This methodology makes use of user’s signin information. As users are required to sign in to the website on each device they use, enterprises can track their behavior across all touchpoints. User Authentication is a type of deterministic device matching. It uses specific identifiers such as a customer ID, signin information, and so on to study and form a link between user behavior across devices.

Probabilistic Device Matching

Unlike deterministic device matching, this cross-device tracking technique does not rely solely on the user’s signin information. As the name indicates, this method computes the probability that various devices belong to or have been used by the same individual. An example of how probabilistic device matching works is extrapolation. For example, if a mobile and a tablet use the same Internet connection, it can be extrapolated that they belong to the same household. Device Fingerprinting is another famous probabilistic cross-device tracking technique. It combines device settings and browser options with some other attributes such as WiFi info, IP address, and more to identify users.

Build Smooth Shopping Experiences Across Channels

The next step, after tracking and understanding user behavior across devices, is to create seamless experiences for your users.

Walmart CEO, Doug McMillon shares his thoughts on a seamless customer experience:

“Ultimately, customers don’t care about what channel they’re shopping in or about how we deliver them a product or service. They simply know they’re shopping with Walmart.”

For Walmart, no matter what channel their customers buy from, it is important that they recognize the brand and get the same shopping experience throughout. Creating cohesive, consistent brand voice/experience can help eCommerce enterprises pave trust and encourage strong engagement, and, therefore, improve sales.

Other than brand consistency, a smooth and seamless shopping experience also constitutes customer experience. Hubspot talks about Oasis, a UK fashion retailer, in their seven inspiring examples of omnichannel user experience. On entering one of their stores, you’ll find sales associates walk you through all the product-related information using iPads. So, just in case something  is out of stock, the staff places an online order for the customer and the item  is shipped directly to customer’s home.

Here’s how Oasis uses iPads in-store to assist customers:

Omnichannel Strategy Oasis
Source

eCommerce enterprises should focus on the following points for providing a superior omnichannel shopping experience:

  • Providing relevant local information
  • Ensuring faster, safer payment solutions
  • Providing personalization
  • Making use of advanced technologies

Providing relevant local information

 A post on Think with Google reports that 75 percent of the shoppers who find local retail info in search results helpful are more likely to visit stores. For eCommerce enterprises, this data opens up a number of opportunities. For example, eCommerce enterprises can  inform online customers looking for a particular item online about its availability at a nearby store. To make this activity more effective, they can use geo-targeting to drive more in-store purchases from people  from the local vicinity who have an intent to buy.  Moreover they can also provide information such as local store hours, directions to the local store, or any discounts running in the store. Providing local relevant information online can also help convert more of those shoppers who view shopping as an experience and not just a purchase activity. Retailers, on the other hand, can benefit from the impulse buying tendency of people who exhibit a search online, shop local behavior.

Ensuring faster, safer payment solutions

 A Search Engine Journal post lists 10 popular online payment solutions such as Amazon Payments and Google Wallet. As these options are trustworthy and secure, these will encourage users to pay from any channel that they use.

Deploying these payment solutions is a win-win for both the parties, because these solutions are  convenient, quick, and trustworthy.

Providing Personalization

The interconnected and digitally empowered consumer demands relevant and personalized experience. For an omnichannel player, this would mean understanding which devices are used by the consumers and how. For example, Evergage talks about how eBay creates omnichannel personalization for its users. The eBay mobile app allows users to enable push notifications, which informs them about the start or end of any auction. The desktop site, on the other hand, is designed for easy search and window shopping.

omnichannel strategy - ebay personalized push notification
Source

Advanced Technologies

Innovation and technology enhance the omnichannel experience both for buyers and eCommerce enterprises. Using virtual reality, for example, can help eCommerce players make use of virtual environments that are otherwise difficult to create inside a store. For the user, these technologies can address buyer’s uncertainty.

For example, before making a decision to buy a hat, a person would like to know which hat type, color, width, and so on would suit him the best. Without physically trying a number of different hats, he can use such technologies to find out what looks best on him. For the eCommerce enterprise, this means being able to provide their users with better services and experience even if all the types of hats are not physically in store.

Tommy Hilfiger also provides a fantastic in-store VR experience. As a result, shoppers can view virtual catwalks and shop the season’s runway styles.If you are looking for more on the who and how of virtual and augmented reality in retail and eCommerce, here’s a Forbes post to read.

The following image shows customers experiencing Tommy Hilfiger VR:

Virtual Reality in Tommy Hilfiger Omnichannel Strategy
Source

Forming an Organizational Structure that Supports Omnichannel

Customer experience might suffer if an eCommerce enterprise is not structured to meet the requirements of omnichannel retail. When departments operate in silos, the problem of sales attribution often arises. Such conflicts are unhealthy, as they can jeopardize the enterprise’s ability to deliver a smooth omnichannel experience.

An organizational structure that is better aligned for omnichannel, requires various departments within an organization to work together and be accountable to each other. Macy’s, for example, has also completely restructured their merchandising and marketing functions. They have also created chief omnichannel officer positions in their organization.

Keith Anderson, SVP Strategy & Insight, Profitero,  suggests the following when it comes to creating supportive organizational structures for omnichannel.

“Here is the approach I suggest:

  • Top-down commitment and support are essential. In the absence of the same, many organizations fail to prioritize or align on how to implement and execute on omnichannel.
  • Key functions should be responsible, but the whole organization is accountable. Certain teams or titles should be primarily responsible for doing the work of marketing and selling through all channels. But the entire business should be accountable. There is a risk in simply appointing a “head of omnichannel,” without anticipating the impacts on other functions such as customer service, finance, and logistics. Digital and omnichannel competency is necessary for all company functions and disciplines, not just an isolated, specialist team.
  • Definitions of success and incentives matter. Many companies that try to embrace omnichannel discover internal conflicts driven by misaligned incentives. For example, who gets the credit for an online sale fulfilled and collected in-store? How are inventory and labor costs allocated?

Ultimately, KPIs and incentives need to balance near-term and long-term goals such as maximizing profitability in the short-term versus growing market share. Also, enterprise success must always be prioritized over success in an isolated channel.”

Conclusion

While creating  customer-centric experiences is the key to succeeding with omnichannel, it begins with understanding user behavior and extends to framing the right kind of organizational structures. There is a huge scope for eCommerce enterprises to adopt and excel at an omnichannel level, given that they make use of user information, technology, customer service, and their internal structures efficiently.

Over to You

Have feedback on how eCommerce enterprises can develop a robust omnichannel strategy? Please leave a comment.

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Going Omnichannel | A Robust Framework for eCommerce Enterprises

Free Webinar: 5 Simple Steps to Profit with Google AdWords

This FREE webinar will be extremely valuable to you if: You’re just getting started with Google AdWords You’re already advertising but you want to improve your results When Is It? Tuesday, October 4, 2016 at 1pm Eastern. Here’s What This Free Webinar Will Do For You: You’ll learn how to identify the BEST keywords to advertise on, so you get more qualified leads and new customers (and avoid wasting money on irrelevant keywords or “tire kickers”). You’ll learn 2 key Campaign Settings that will instantly improve the quality of your traffic and help you generate more leads and customers from…

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Free Webinar: 5 Simple Steps to Profit with Google AdWords

Building Hybrid Apps With ChakraCore

There are many reasons why one may want to embed JavaScript capabilities into an app. One example may be to take a dependency on a JavaScript library that has not yet been ported to the language you’re developing in. Another may be that you want to allow users to “eval” small routines or functions in JavaScript, e.g., in data processing applications.

Building Hybrid Apps with ChakraCore

The key reason for our investigation of ChakraCore was to support the React Native framework on the Universal Windows Platform, which is a framework for declaring applications using JavaScript and the React programming model.

The post Building Hybrid Apps With ChakraCore appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Building Hybrid Apps With ChakraCore

Why We Started Treating Blog Posts Like Campaigns (and You Can Too!)

presidential-post-recap-blog-image

It’s easy to get stuck on the hamster wheel that is publishing three blog posts a week because that’s what we’ve always done.

At Unbounce, we still fall into the trap of publishing more versus publishing better, even though we know that one 10x post is always better than three mediocre posts.

However, as our team has grown, we’ve had the opportunity to step away from the hamster wheel to consider the most efficient and enjoyable way to spend our time while also providing value to our readers.

One such thing we’re experimenting with is treating specific blog posts like mini campaigns. That is, in addition to simply publishing well-written content, we’re also setting goals, implementing strategy and reporting on ROI. It’s something Joanna Wiebe touched on in her UFX talk.

On the verge of total content production burnout, Joanna and the team at Copyhackers changed the way they looked at, and thus produced, content.

They cut back their content production to just one epic post per month based on the hypothesis that if they made each post so valuable, so 10x, readers would be delighted to share their email address.

Turns out, they were right. According to Joanna,

We actually also got business growth out of it. We doubled the number of freelance copywriters on our list… and we sold out the next two Masterminds.

The blog team at Unbounce took a similar approach with this post by Aaron Orendorff.

Clinton vs. Trump presidential tear down post
In this epic post, Aaron and 18 marketing experts critique each candidate’s home page and donation funnel, offering A/B testing inspiration for campaign managers and curious marketers alike.

Before I get into the how, let me give you a quick recap of the results of the presidential post:

  • 7,536 unique page views, 4,513 new users and 99 new subscribers in first 30 days
  • 6,000+ social shares
  • Ranking first in Google for “presidential marketing campaigns” and “presidential marketing”

Not only that, but the post was trending on Inbound.org and was mentioned in this Inc. and this Huffington Post piece.

So how’d we do it?

Well, it all started with a casual Slack convo:

Slack conversation

Once we got a completed pitch from Aaron, it was clear to us that this post had potential to go, well, viral. But not if we didn’t do a little strategy to go along with it, starting with a detailed pitch…

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If you’re not sure if your post is a good candidate for a content campaign, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Is it timely? Does it have newsjacking potential? Are people already talking about the topic?
  • Is it unique? Does it offer a fresh perspective on a familiar subject?
  • Does it have potential to rank in search engines? (This should require a little keyword research, but we’ll get to the how later.)
  • Are there other people invested in its success? Does it contain original quotes from industry experts? Does the author have a sizeable network?

All clear? Word. Now it’s time to strategize.

Phase I: Determine the goal of the post

Campaign posts require a lot more effort than a standard “3 Easy Ways to X” post does, so it’s important to determine a goal for the post, so that you can measure whether or not it was worth the added effort.

We’ll usually go with one of three options: leads (four-field form), subscribers (email only) or new users (traffic).

In the case of the Clinton vs. Trump post, our primary goal was new users. Because we were leveraging a trending topic, our suspicion was that the post would have great reach, but that the people reading it may be cold to Unbounce and therefore hesitant to hand over their lead info. Thus, this was a true TOFU post, focused on driving new eyes — and ideally prospects — to the blog.

As a baseline, we usually get between 500 and 800 new users on any given post. However, as I mentioned in the bullet points above, this post brought us over 4,500 new users in its first 30 days. Not too shabby, amirite?

hillary-gif
Our completely non-partisan happy dance. Image via Giphy.

Now, if you checked out the post, you may have noticed a few CTAs throughout, and even an exit overlay — all with separate goals!

While it’s not always viable or even smart to have a multiple goals, we decided on a secondary subscriber goal for two reasons: (1) the post was long (6,000 words), so we offered a PDF of the post in exchange for an email address and (2) we wanted to give new users who loved our content an opportunity to sign up for blog updates.

In total, we received 175 CTA submissions, 99 of which were brand new subscribers. If subscribers had been our primary goal, this number would have been disappointing, but since new users and, really, brand awareness was our goal, these 99 subscribers were the cherries on top.

Phase II: Keyword research and implementation

Content Marketer Helen Arceyut-Frixione took on the challenge of finding the juiciest keywords to rank for.

Taking into consideration searcher intent, Helen worked backwards to figure out (a) what might someone learn from the post and (b) what might someone search to find a post like this. Helen explains:

Although the post talks about sales funnels, that’s not what it’s really about. And I would be surprised if Google showed me this post after searching for “sales funnel.” However, if I search presidential marketing (and its variations), landing on this post makes total sense.

Once she had “presidential marketing” and a few other new keywords in mind, she was ready to verify their relevancy.

First Helen used Google Adwords Keyword Planner to get a pulse on monthly search volume. However, because the Keyword Planner only takes into account paid search, she then moved onto MOZ, which allows her to see where the organic opportunities are. She narrowed it down to a few potential keywords, which were then reviewed by our resident SEO expert Cody Campbell.

In the end, we focused our efforts primarily on “presidential marketing campaign.” As you can see below, our efforts paid off.

presidential marketing campaigns google search
You know you’re doing something right when you’re ranking higher than Forbes.

Phase III: Loop in influencers

A key part of this post’s success can be credited to the people involved: firstly, Unbounce Official Contributor Aaron Orendorff and secondly, the 18 influential experts who contributed analyses on each step of the candidate’s online donation funnel.

As a successful freelance content strategist and producer, Aaron is no stranger to writing high-performing pieces. Several of his highest performing posts have also leveraged trending topics, like this Entrepreneur piece, titled “The Mindy Kaling Guide to Entrepreneurial Domination”.

So with the right writer (right righter? write righter?) assigned to the piece, Aaron set out on a seemingly impossible mission: to wrangle 18 professional CROs, copywriters and content producers into submitting their critique on a tight deadline. I asked Aaron how he did it:

Wrangling 18 of the best conversion-rate optimizers wasn’t easy. But a few tricks helped get their contributions.

First, I had buy in from Kyle Rush from the jump — Clinton’s Deputy CTO — so attaching his name gave the piece immediate authority.

Second, the topic itself was killer; having something original for them to write about piqued their interest.

Third, I got granular. Instead of asking for “general” teardowns on each candidate’s site, I gave each contributor a specific section of one site to critique: (1) pop-up, (2) homepage or (3) donation page. Once they agreed, I created separate Google Docs for each section and gave them direct access to write up their notes.

Despite its challenges, getting 18 influential marketers to weigh in on this post was hugely impactful, because they too were invested in the success of the piece and thus shared it on their own social networks.

Andy Crestodina tweet
Neil Patel tweet
Both Andy Crestodina and Neil Patel have sizeable Twitter followings: ~18,000 and a staggering ~214,000, respectively.

Phase IV: Create custom blog assets

At Unbounce, we use Shutterstock for the majority of our feature blog images. Actually, until quite recently we didn’t even use Shutterstock — instead we used free images from various sources (if you use free images, check out this bomb-ass resource).

However, in this case we looped in our designers to give it the ol’ blowout treatment. Not only did they produce a striking feature image, they also made an exit overlay with the same design.

Exit overlay on presidential post

Exit overlays and popups in general are a touchy subject, because they can be abrupt. So when we use them, we try to do it in a way that is both value-added and delightful. In this case, we’ve added value by giving time-constrained readers an opportunity to read the post at their leisure. As for delight, well, did you see the button copy?

exit overlay tweet

Phase V: Distribution (social and otherwise)

The final key piece in your blog post campaign is distribution. I mean, why put all that work into the post if people aren’t going to read it?

Aaron took a lot off our hands by contacting each contributor to let them know the post was live; step one, leverage influencers: check!

I also met with Community Strategist Hayley Mullin to ensure we were were covered on the social front.

Of course, #election2016, #Trump and #Clinton were trending; however, Hayley opted to use those hashtags sparingly, since most people searching them out wouldn’t be looking for a post about conversion rate optimization. Again — as in the case with keyword selection — we took searcher’s intent into consideration.

Instead, she split her efforts between presidential-esque hashtags and marketing-type hashtags, including #CRO and, well, #Marketing. I asked Hayley about her strategy:

We had to strike a balance between taking advantage of the election hype — without making a statement — and staying relevant. So I targeted broad, uncontroversial audiences in both politics and marketing to case a wide net on both sides. As tempting as it was to dive into the more fervorous political communities, it would have been a gimmicky move that wasn’t true to the nature of the post.

One last thing we did, in an effort to get as much juice as possible out of this post, was to share it with our team and ask them to share it in their networks.

Internal email Unbounce
Please excuse the overused subject line.

So if you were wondering: No, we are not above just asking people to share something. Because sometimes a little nudge is what we all need.

Takeaways, tips and learnings

So, that’s it, folks. That’s how we approach our blog post mini-campaigns. If you’d like to give it a go yourself (and I highly suggest you do!) here’s the advice I can offer:

  1. Be in “the know.” Keep an eye out and and ear to the ground for trending topics you can put your own unique spin on.
  2. Establish a goal for your post. Is it leads? Is it traffic? Whatever the case, figure that out early so you can measure whether post was a success or not.
  3. Think about searcher’s intent — and do it in both the keyword research and distribution phase. You want people to find your post, but you want the people who find the post to also stay on it, maybe even share it, because it’s relevant to them.
  4. Involve influencers. Okay, so getting 18 well-known experts in your field might not be doable every time, but asking a few notable peeps for original quotes can go a long way. This gives them buy-in to share when the post is live, and you’re doing them a solid by boosting their professional clout.
  5. Consider custom images. Stock photos have gotten so much better over the years, but they don’t always cut the mustard when you’re championing a piece with viral potential. If you have access to a designer — or have some design chops of your own — consider creating a memorable custom image that you’d like to see in your own social media feeds.

Have any of your own tips for making your content work harder for you? I’d love to hear them, so drop me a line in the comments.

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Why We Started Treating Blog Posts Like Campaigns (and You Can Too!)

How to Master SEO for Ecommerce Product Pages

Regardless of your industry/niche, reaching the upper echelons of the search rankings is vital in our search-centric consumer world. According to Optify, “websites ranked number one received an average click-through-rate (CTR) of 35.4 percent; number two had a CTR of 12.5 percent; and number three had a CTR of 9.5 percent.” When you break it all down, having the number one spot will essentially bring you the same amount of traffic as spots two through five combined. That’s pretty incredible! To prove the importance of SEO for Ecommerce even further, just consider the fact that 44 percent of people begin…

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How to Master SEO for Ecommerce Product Pages

Is 1:1 Marketing Personalization a Realistic Possibility?

Hi [FIRSTNAME], Thanks for ordering your free copy of the [LEADMAGNET] eBook, we really hope the tips provided help [ORGANIZATION] grow its customer base and take its revenue to the next level. Before you go [FIRSTNAME], I’d love to know what specific problems both you and [ORGANIZATION] are facing so I can better tailor future materials to your needs. You’ve seen the likes of the above before. It’s one of the many cookie cutter email openings you’re probably sick of receiving. Sure, it adheres to the basic rules of personalization. It mentions both the user’s name, organization and even goes…

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Is 1:1 Marketing Personalization a Realistic Possibility?

How Sport Chek is getting more value out of its value proposition

Reading Time: 2 minutes

TL;DR Canada’s largest sporting goods retailer has a multi-faceted optimization program, but two recent tests revealed impactful insights about the company’s ‘Free Shipping’ value proposition. Read the full case study here.

The Company

Sport Chek is Canada’s largest national retailer of sporting goods, footwear and apparel. We partnered with Sport Chek just over a year ago and have been working together to optimize their e-­commerce experiences, with the goal of increasing conversions in the form of transactions.

While Sport Chek’s conversion optimization program is multi-faceted, two different tests recently revealed impactful insights about one of the company’s value propositions.

What is a value proposition?

Value proposition can be thought of as a cost versus benefits equation that shows your prospects’ motivation. But it’s all about perception: if your perceived benefits outweigh the perceived costs, your prospects will be motivated to act.

Motivation = Perceived Benefits - Perceived Costs

Michael St Laurent

All value propositions have varying degrees of value depending on how they’re interpreted and how they’re communicated. Your benefits hold different weight for different people―it’s all about finding out which of your benefits are perceived to be most important to your prospects.

Michael St Laurent, Optimization Strategist, WiderFunnel

The value of ‘Free Shipping’

Sport Chek offers free shipping on online orders over a certain dollar amount. Of course, offering some degree of free shipping is basically par for the course in today’s e-commerce world. It’s a Point of Parity―these are the features that are important to your prospects that you also share with your competitors (the basic entry requirements to the game).

The question in this case was: How can Sport Chek communicate this offer in a way that provides more value to their customers? How can they make this Point of Parity look like a Point of Difference​―a feature that’s important to the prospect and unique to your business.

Related: For more on Points of Parity, Points of Difference and Points of Irrelevance, check out Chris Goward’s post “U​se these 3 points to create an awesome value proposition​“.

In this case study, you’ll read about:

  • Two experiments, one on the cart page and one on the product page, that led to substantial lift for Sport Chek
  • An unexpected variable that revealed an insight about the company’s ideal ‘Free Shipping’ threshold

The results of these experiments showed that ‘Free Shipping’ is an extremely elastic value proposition point for Sport Chek. At varying “you-qualify-for-free-shipping” price points, there are major swings in user behavior.

In the past, their ‘Free Shipping’ offer was an under-utilized value proposition because it wasn’t being emphasized in the right way. Now, this value proposition point is more visible and being communicated with more clarity.

Read the full case study here

Learn more about how Sport Chek extracted more value from their value proposition. Read the full case study here.

The post How Sport Chek is getting more value out of its value proposition appeared first on WiderFunnel Conversion Optimization.

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How Sport Chek is getting more value out of its value proposition

How Sport Chek is getting more value out of their value proposition

Reading Time: 2 minutes

TL;DR Canada’s largest sporting goods retailer has a multi-faceted optimization program, but two recent tests revealed impactful insights about the company’s ‘Free Shipping’ value proposition. Read the full case study here.

The Company

Sport Chek is Canada’s largest national retailer of sporting goods, footwear and apparel. We partnered with Sport Chek just over a year ago and have been working together to optimize their e-­commerce experiences, with the goal of increasing conversions in the form of transactions.

While Sport Chek’s conversion optimization program is multi-faceted, two different tests recently revealed impactful insights about one of the company’s value propositions.

What is a value proposition?

Value proposition can be thought of as a cost versus benefits equation that shows your prospects’ motivation. But it’s all about perception: if your perceived benefits outweigh the perceived costs, your prospects will be motivated to act.

Motivation = Perceived Benefits - Perceived Costs

Michael St Laurent

All value propositions have varying degrees of value depending on how they’re interpreted and how they’re communicated. Your benefits hold different weight for different people―it’s all about finding out which of your benefits are perceived to be most important to your prospects.

Michael St Laurent, Optimization Strategist, WiderFunnel

The value of ‘Free Shipping’

Sport Chek offers free shipping on online orders over a certain dollar amount. Of course, offering some degree of free shipping is basically par for the course in today’s e-commerce world. It’s a Point of Parity―these are the features that are important to your prospects that you also share with your competitors (the basic entry requirements to the game).

The question in this case was: How can Sport Chek communicate this offer in a way that provides more value to their customers? How can they make this Point of Parity look like a Point of Difference​―a feature that’s important to the prospect and unique to your business.

Related: For more on Points of Parity, Points of Difference and Points of Irrelevance, check out Chris Goward’s post “U​se these 3 points to create an awesome value proposition​“.

In this case study, you’ll read about:

  • Two experiments, one on the cart page and one on the product page, that led to substantial lift for Sport Chek
  • An unexpected variable that revealed an insight about the company’s ideal ‘Free Shipping’ threshold

The results of these experiments showed that ‘Free Shipping’ is an extremely elastic value proposition point for Sport Chek. At varying “you-qualify-for-free-shipping” price points, there are major swings in user behavior.

In the past, their ‘Free Shipping’ offer was an under-utilized value proposition because it wasn’t being emphasized in the right way. Now, this value proposition point is more visible and being communicated with more clarity.

Read the full case study here

Learn more about how Sport Chek extracted more value from their value proposition. Read the full case study here.

The post How Sport Chek is getting more value out of their value proposition appeared first on WiderFunnel Conversion Optimization.

This article – 

How Sport Chek is getting more value out of their value proposition

Building Social: A Case Study On Progressive Enhancement

We talk a lot about progressive enhancement and how it improves backwards compatibility. But how straightforward is it to apply progressive enhancement concepts to a real-life project? When designing a rich interactive experience, it can be difficult to determine what can be implemented purely using HTML and CSS and what absolutely requires JavaScript.

Building Social: A Case Study On Progressive Enhancement

Through this case study on redesigning the Building Social website, we’ll share some simple yet often overlooked front-end techniques that defer the use of JavaScript as much as possible, while providing some neat JavaScript enhancements, too.

The post Building Social: A Case Study On Progressive Enhancement appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Building Social: A Case Study On Progressive Enhancement

How “Your Tea” Boosted Revenue by 28% Through Structured Conversion Optimization

An increasing number of companies and agencies are following a structured approach to Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO). Presently, we will be looking at how a tea eCommerce website increased revenue using conversion optimization.

About the Company

Your Tea is an online tea eCommerce site serving health and lifestyle-focused consumers. Tiny Tea Teatox is one of their largest sellers in their diversifying everyday tea product ranges.

Your Tea signed on We Are Visionists (WAV), a digital agency that partners with eCommerce agencies and startups, to help solve their clients’ digital problems ranging from paid advertising to conversion rate optimization.

We got in touch with Joel Hauer, founder at WAV, to know all about their successful optimization exercise that resulted in a 28% improvement in revenue.

Onboarding Your Tea

WAV pitched CRO as part of a raft of complementary services, including SEO and PPC, to improve Your Tea’s online presence.

Joel says, “It made business sense and so it was a straightforward decision for Your Tea. If you can create an uplift in your revenue by improving your product page, why wouldn’t you? We were able to make projections based on anticipated improvements to the site, and those projections were what got us over the line. We are lucky to have such a pragmatic client!

Process of Optimization

What WAV wanted to do was to insulate Your Tea’s revenue stream against any potential declines in traffic and maximize revenues in the periods of high traffic.

While doing so, they decided to follow a formalized approach to CRO, that is, researching their website data and visitors’ behavior intently to create hypothesis and running A/B tests that would impact revenues the most.

The Research Phase

To begin with, they analyzed their website data using Google Analytics (GA) to understand the journey of the visitors. They detected a large number of drop-offs on the product pages of the website, that is, a lot of people were landing on the product pages but not adding anything to the cart. They discovered that the Tiny Tea Teatox product page in particular was attracting the largest amount of traffic, and decided to optimize it first.

On further research on that page, they found that more than 50% of visitors were browsing through mobile. This information compelled WAV to closely analyze the mobile version of Tiny Tea Teatox. They found multiple optimization opportunities. For instance, the CTA was not prominent, there was no detailed description of the products, and more.

Here’s how the original page looked:

A/B test Control

Hypothesis Creation

Since a majority of traffic was coming from mobile in particular, WAV decided to optimize both the desktop and mobile versions of the Your Tea website. They hypothesized that adding a more prominent CTA, along with a detailed description of the product and user reviews would increase add-to-cart from the product page.

Using Visitor Behavior Analysis, they were able to develop their hypotheses further. For instance, by looking into heatmap analysis, they realized that visitors mostly browsed the product description and its benefits.

A large number of visitors also visited the reviews section, thereby making it clear that they were looking for trust elements. WAV decided to add more product information and benefits, along with credible “before and after” images and testimonials to the page. WAV also conducted website surveys and user testing sessions, which confirmed their hypothesis of adding more “credibility proofs” to the page.

The Test

WAV concluded that a full redesign of the product pages could yield better results than a series of incremental improvements from smaller tests. Such a massive redesign required heavy technical work, and WAV used VWO’s Ideact service to create a variation. Below is the screenshot of the control and variation:

Your Tea Control Variation Here’s how the Before And After section in the variation looked like:

Here’s the Why Buy From Us section in the variation that aimed to improve the website’s credibility :

Credibility Proof in the VariationResults

With the tests, they tracked two goals, that is, the add to cart conversion rate and the revenue.

The improvement in add-to-cart actions led to an impressive 28% increase in the revenue. In terms of add-to-cart conversions, control of the test was yielding a conversion rate of 11.3% in contrast to the variation which emerged to be the winner with a conversion rate of 14.5%.

Road Ahead

To capitalize on these higher conversions, an optimized checkout experience is required.

The agency could identify that the checkout pages were receiving multiple views from the same visitors. Users were getting stuck in loops around the checkout page. After they identified what to look for, the data from analytics supported it. Currently, they are testing to optimize the mobile experience on parameters such as anxiety and trust signals.

When asked about his biggest learning of the test, Joel responded: “One thing that came out of this test was learning more about the checkout experience—particularly on mobile.”

Experience Using VWO

Joel remarks, “The work of VWO’s Ideact team in setting up the tests on the technical front to help us record users through the checkout experience was invaluable.”

“We loved working with Rauhan and Harinder from VWO. The willingness to go the extra mile and help us get the maximum insight from our tests was fantastic. Having spoken about the features in the pipeline, we’re excited to see what’s to come.”

What Do You Think?

Do you have any similar experiments to share? Tell us in the comments below.

cta

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How “Your Tea” Boosted Revenue by 28% Through Structured Conversion Optimization