All posts by Johnathan Dane

How Your PPC Strategy Should Differ on the AdWords Search VS Display Network

As we ramp up for Unbounce’s upcoming PPC week, we thought we’d revisit some of our favorite PPC posts from the archives. This post was originally published in June 2015 but still rings true. Enjoy!

Have you ever been kicking so much AdWords Search Network butt that it made you raise your chest and gave you instant super powers?

You know, the type of confidence that makes you walk with a pep in your step and hair bouncing around?

Confidence
Kinda like this mini-horse. Image source.

Feels AMAZING.

But sometimes you hit a ceiling with the keywords you’re bidding on, and there’s literally no more Search Network traffic out there (since your impression shares are all around 98%).

You immediately think of using the AdWords Display Network, simply because you know there’s more traffic, cheaper clicks and much more potential ROI just waiting to be grabbed.

dog-pee-to-claim-land-FACE-Low-Cost-SpayNeuter-Clinic-FB
Actually, don’t do that. It won’t get you conversions. Image source.

As you may already know, the AdWords Display Network (also known as the Google Display Network/GDN) is the biggest digital ad network in the world. It allows you to advertise on publisher properties like websites, mobile apps, Gmail, YouTube and more.

Compared to the AdWords Search Network, the Display Network also houses the largest viewership of any online platform. YouTube itself has a monthly viewership equivalent to 10 Super Bowls – so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that display advertising is said to capture 34% of all online ad spend and about 10% of all marketing budgets.

But with new channels come different strategies.

What you’re doing on the AdWords Search Network will not perform the same way on the Display Network.

If the Display Network is uncharted territory for you, here’s how you need to adjust your current PPC strategy to get the results you want.

Different user behavior calls for a different strategy

The biggest difference between the AdWords Search Network and Display Network can be seen in the sweet visual I had my designer custom-make below.

unbounce-_chuck_norris

In the “Chuck Norris” action cycle above, you can see how the power of keyword intent in the Search Network can put people really close to taking action (AKA converting), but the Display Network typically has visitors who are a few steps behind.

This is because people who are on the Display Network aren’t actively searching for what you offer. As Erin Sagin puts it, they’re rarely in “shopping mode.”

Instead, Display Network visitors are most likely in the research phase when your display ads are hitting them. They’re on forums, blog posts, or watching that YouTube vid trying to gather enough information to make a decision. They don’t know what they need yet, so your job is create awareness.

If you’re selling more of an “emergency” service like being a locksmith or roadside assistance, then you’ll have a hard time using the Display Network to your advantage.

This is simply because ads on the Display Network are not triggered from a search engine like text ads on the Search Network are. The Search Network works as a demand harvester (your ads are grabbing the intent), while the Display Network works as a demand generator (your ads are creating awareness).

So how do you change your strategy from the Search Network to also make the AdWords Display Network a money making machine?

Create trust and deliver value

As I mentioned, your Display Network ads could be interrupting someone who’s reading the news, reading a blog or watching a video.

Because of that, the level of commitment it takes for someone to stop what they’re doing, click your ad, then call you or fill out your landing page form is high and much more unlikely compared to the Search Network. In other words, you can’t expect to have the same campaign conversion rates on the Display Network as you do on the Search Network.

If you’re offering “Free Quotes” on the search network because people are actively searching for someone who can relieve their problem, it might actually be better for you to lead with valuable educational material (i.e. your content) on the Display Network.

A perfect example of this is my crush of an email marketing company, Emma.

Emma uses the AdWords Search Network to drive sign ups, but they use the Display Network to give you great, fun and actionable value. Here’s what some of their Display Ads look like (click on them to go to the accompanying landing page):

emma-gif-1

emma-gif-2

emma-gif-3

I reached out to Cynthia Price (the Director of Marketing at Emma) and she gave me this golden nugget about how they use the AdWords Display Network:

We get that someone seeing a display ad isn’t necessarily interested in learning more about our product just yet. It’s all about brand awareness, and more importantly for us, trust-building.

So we offer content that we think will be valuable and helpful to our audience’s marketing efforts. It starts our brand relationship off on the right foot, helps them understand the strength of our expertise and paves the way for us to nurture or retarget them in the future.

You already know that content marketing’s core foundation is about adding true value.

Your display ads should be no different.

On the Display Network, your first goal is to establish trust by giving value, and then nurture the visitors down the road to become paying customers.

Revisit your targeting options

Once you have a great piece of content that delivers value and educates your audience, it’s time to figure out how to target it to people who actually want it.

Let’s have a look at the five targeting options that’ve been found to drive the biggest impact on the Display Network.

To illustrate how each one works, let’s pretend you’re a dog walker. Your name is Lori and you live in Huntington Beach, CA. You’ve been advertising on the AdWords search network and this is your landing page:

lori-the-dog-walker

What are your best targeting options?

Placement targeting

Placement targeting allows you to advertise directly on certain publisher sites. This means you could have your ad show up on Forbes or CNN if you’d like.

Best practice advice: Make sure the website or page’s audience is relevant to what you’re offering. Don’t shotgun approach all of CNN – sniper shot individual placements within CNN if you can.

Contextual/Keyword targeting

Contextual/Keyword targeting allows you to give Google your keywords and have it automatically find relevant placements for your ads.

Best practice advice: Mix this with placement targeting to be even more laser focused with your targeting.

Topic targeting

Topic targeting allows you to go more broad than regular placement targeting.

For this, you could target the topic of Pets & Animals directly and cast a wider net, with the possibility of your ads showing up on FerretLovers.com (yes, that’s a real site).

Best practice advice: See what Topic targeting gives you, then exclude unwanted placements from your campaign once things are running and data is coming in.

Interest targeting

Interest targeting is kind of similar to topic targeting, but instead of judging the context of websites, interest targeting tracks behaviors of web users. This targeting method can be even more vague than topic targeting.

Best practice advice: Every industry is different, so always test things out and see the performance. Be quick to pause and exclude irrelevant placements once data comes in.

Combining targeting methods

This is where you’ll have a lot of fun and potentially get better results.

You’re not locked into using just one targeting method with the AdWords Display Network. In fact, Alistair Dent over at Search Engine Watch and many others highly recommend never going with just one targeting option, but combining multiple together.

You can target certain placements with the addition of contextual/keyword targeting to tell Google that you only want your ads to show when a visitor is on CNN and reading an article about dog walking.

Or you can target different interests with contextual/keyword targeting as well.

Create multiple ad groups, each with their own targeting specifications, and see how they perform against each other. Once you’ve hit your stride and conversions are coming in, pause the other ad groups that aren’t working, and make variations of the ad group targetings that are working for you, so that you can squeeze more out of your PPC dollars.

Wrapping up

Wow! Quite a bit of info huh?

Now that you clearly know why your Display Network strategy has to be different from your Search Network strategy, what do you have to lose? Get started now. Try different targeting combinations, and never forget to offer true value.

What have you found to be the best driver of conversions on the AdWords Display Network? How different are your strategies compared to the ones we talked about?

Read More: 

How Your PPC Strategy Should Differ on the AdWords Search VS Display Network

[Gifographic] Better Website Testing – A Simple Guide to Knowing What to Test

Note: This marketing infographic is part of KlientBoost’s 25-part series. You can subscribe here to access the entire series of gifographics.


If you’ve ever tested your website, you’ve probably been in the unfortunate situation of running out of ideas on what to test.

But don’t worry – it happens to everybody.

That’s of course, unless you have a website testing plan.

That’s why KlientBoost has teamed up with VWO to bring to you a gifographic that provides a simple guide on knowing the what, how, and why when it comes to testing your website.

21-vwo-website-testing2

Setting Your Testing Goals

Like a New Year’s resolution around getting fitter, if you don’t have any goals tied to your website testing plan, then you may be doing plenty of work, with little results to show.

With your goals in place, you can focus on the website tests that will help you achieve those goals –the fastest.

Testing a button color on your home page when you should be testing your checkout process, is a sure sign that you are heading to testing fatigue or the disappointment of never wanting to run a test again.

But let’s take it one step further.

While it’s easy to improve click-through rates, or CTRs, and conversion rates, the true measure of a great website testing plan comes from its ability to increase revenue.

No optimization efforts matter if they don’t connect to increased revenue in some shape or form.

Whether you improve the site user experience, your website’s onboarding process, or get more conversions from your upsell thank you page, all those improvements compound into incremental revenue gains.

Lesson to be learned?

Don’t pop the cork on the champagne until you know that an improvement in the CTRs or conversion rates would also lead to increased revenue.

Start closest to the money when it comes to your A/B tests.

Knowing What to Test

When you know your goals, the next step is to figure out what to test.

You have two options here:

  1. Look at quantitative data like Google Analytics that show where your conversion bottlenecks may be.
  2. Or gather qualitative data with visitor behavior analysis where your visitors can tell you the reasons for why they’re not converting.

Both types of data should fall under your conversion research umbrella. In addition to this gifographic, we created another one, all around the topic of CRO research.

When you’ve done your research, you may find certain aspects of a page that you’d like to test. For inspiration, VWO has created The Complete Guide To A/B Testing – and in it, you’ll find some ideas to test once you’ve identified which page to test:

  • Headlines
  • Subheads
  • Paragraph Text
  • Testimonials
  • Call-to-Action text
  • Call-to-Action button
  • Links
  • Images
  • Content near the fold
  • Social proof
  • Media mentions
  • Awards and badges

As you can see, there are tons of opportunities and endless ideas to test when you decide what to test and in what order.

website-testing
A quick visual for what’s possible

So now that you know your testing goals and what to test, the last step is forming a hypothesis.

With your hypothesis, you’re able to figure out what you think will have the biggest performance lift with the thought of effort in mind as well (easier to get quicker wins that don’t need heaps of development help).

Running an A/B Test

Alright, so you have your goals, list of things to test, and hypotheses to back these up, the next task now is to start testing.

With A/B testing, you’ll always have at least one variant running against your control.

In this case, your control is your actual website as it is now and your variant is the thing you’re testing.

With proper analytics and conversion tracking along with the goal in place, you can start seeing how each of these two variants (hence the name A/B) is doing.

a_b-testing
Consider this a mock-up of your conversion rate variations

When A/B testing, there are two things you may want to consider before you call winners or losers of a test.

One is statistical significance. Statistical significance gives you the thumbs up or thumbs down around whether your test results can be tied to a random chance. If a test is statistically significant, then the chances of the results are ruled out.

And VWO has created its own calculator so that you can see how your test is doing.

The second one is confidence level. It helps you decide whether you can replicate the results of your test again and again.

A confidence level of 95% tells you that your test will achieve the same results 95% of the time if you run it repeatedly. So, as you can tell, the higher your confidence level, the surer you can be that your test truly won or lost.

You can see the A/B test that increased revenue for Server Density by 114%.

Multivariate Testing for Combination of Variations

Let’s say you have multiple ideas to test, and your testing list is looking way too long.

Wouldn’t it be cool if you could test multiple aspects of your page at once to get faster results?

That’s exactly what multivariate testing is.

Multivariate testing allows you to test which combinations of different page elements affect each other when it comes to CTRs, conversion rates, or revenue gains.
Look at the multivariate pizza example below:

multivariate-testing-example
Different headlines, CTAs, and colors are used

The recipe for multivariate testing is simple and delicious.

multivariate-testing-formula
Different elements increase the combination size

And the best part is that VWO can automatically run through all the different combinations you set so that your multivariate test can be done without the heavy lifting.

If you’re curious about whether you should A/B test or run multivariate tests, then look at this chart that VWO created:

multivariate-testing-software-visual-website-optimizer
Which one makes the most sense for you?

Split URL Testing for Heavier Variations

If you find that your A/B or multivariate tests lead you to the end of the rainbow that shows bigger initiatives in backend development or major design changes are needed, then you’re going to love split URL testing.

As VWO states:

“If your variation is on a different address or has major design changes compared to control, we’d recommend that you create a Split URL Test.”

what-is-split-testing-explained-by-vwo

Split URL testing allows you to host different variations of your website test without changing the actual URL.

As the visual shows above, you can see that the two different variations are set up in a way that the URL is different as well.

URL testing is great when you want to test some major redesigns such as your entire website built from scratch.

By not changing your current website code, you can host the redesign on a different URL and have VWO split the traffic between the control and the variant—giving you clear insight whether your redesign will perform better.

Over to You

Now that you have a clear understanding on different types of website tests to run, the only thing left is to, well, run some tests.

Armored with quantitative and qualitative knowledge of your visitors, focus on the areas that have the biggest and quickest impact to strengthen your business.

And I promise, when you finish your first successful website test, you’ll get hooked on.

I know I was.

0

0 ratings

How will you rate this content?

Please choose a rating

The post [Gifographic] Better Website Testing – A Simple Guide to Knowing What to Test appeared first on VWO Blog.

Continue reading: 

[Gifographic] Better Website Testing – A Simple Guide to Knowing What to Test

PPC Landing Page Magic: Secrets Revealed [GIFOGRAPHIC]

This marketing infographic is part of KlientBoost’s 25-part Marketing Advent Calendar. Sign up here to receive a new gifographic once a day in your inbox.

As a kid who was fascinated with the magic store, it’s kind of surprising that I still don’t know how magicians do certain tricks. But it’s probably because as an adult, I’ve spent most of my time trying to master one magic trick:

Making more money appear — both for my PPC agency and for our clients.

How do we do it?

A large part of the magic comes from the landing pages our CRO team designs and tests. And today I want to reveal all the tricks that go into a high-converting landing page to make you the David Copperfield of PPC landing page testing.

(Keep reading below the gifographic for more explanation.)

ezgif-com-878a1ae317

Geographic specificity: Get more local love

When your PPC campaigns and landing page work together on a geographic level, you unleash serious conversion potential.

To help illustrate, imagine these two scenarios:

  1. A nationwide PPC campaign that goes to a nationwide landing page
  2. A city-specific PPC campaign that goes to a city-specific landing page

Which one do you think will perform better?

I think the second would — and we have 100+ clients that would agree. By becoming more granular with your PPC campaigns, you’re able to make the visitor believe that you’re local (even if you’re not).

Take this example of using geographic-specific area code phone numbers on landing pages versus a generic 800 number:

conversion-rate-for-generic-vs-local-numbers
This table shows conversion rates for landing pages displaying generic 800 phone number versus landing pages with a local number. Image source.

And phone numbers are only a start. Test geographically-specific PPC ad copy, landing page headlines and even visuals.

We use Unbounce’s Dynamic Text Replacement (DTR) to help us easily launch dynamic landing pages and prevent traffic dilution that slows down statistical significance.

Which brings us to our next trick…

Dynamic text replacement: Less work, more fun

Dynamic text replacement allows you to swap out the text on your landing page with keywords from your PPC campaigns.

By making small adjustments to your PPC campaign URLs, you can make one landing page specific to hundreds of keywords you’re bidding on, resulting in a landing page that show exactly what visitors searched for:

dynamic-text-replacement-example-url
With DTR, you can turn one landing page into 100 landing pages.

Here’s an example of an outdoors company using DTR to “magically” create super-relevant landing pages.

If the user searched for “hiking backpack,” this is the landing page they’ll see:

dtr-examlpe-hiking-backpack

And if they searched for “trekking backpack”?

dtr-example-trekking-backpack

Boom.

Notice how nothing changed but the text on those two pages?

Read a full explanation of this “magic trick” here.

Multi-step landing pages

You’ve heard how reducing the amount of form fields will help improve your conversion rates, right?

few-form-fields-quotes

But what if I told you that there’s a way to add more fields (thereby better qualifying prospects) while still improving conversion rates?

That’s some true David Copperfield s*** right there.

giphy
I know that’s not David Copperfield. Just trying to see if you’re awake. GIF source.

Multi-step landing pages can help you achieve just this by asking for a little information upfront, then progressively asking for more and more. Dr. Robert Cialdini, author of Influence: The Power of Persuasasion, explains that this technique works because of a principle he calls Commitment and Consistency:

ciadini-quote-commitment-consistency

On our own landing pages, we start by asking questions that are easy to answer, and then progressively get more personal.

We’ve found that these “micro conversions” make it more likely for the prospect to then later fill out more personal details such as their name and contact information:

multi-step-landing-page-threat
We’ve built all our lead gen efforts around multi-step landing pages. Image source.

Call to action temperature testing

A common mistake a lot of our clients make prior to working with us is that they use the same call to action for all their PPC traffic: search, social, video and display.

This is problematic because different types of PPC traffic have different levels of intent.

For example, people seeing your ads through the Search Network can be people really close to converting (depending on keyword intent), but the Display Network typically has visitors who are a few steps behind. (I wrote about this on the Unbounce blog before.)

klientboost-ppc-thermometer
We have found that display leads are typically colder than leads acquired through the search network.

If a certain PPC channel isn’t converting for you, sometimes switching up the offer — and the call to action — can make all the difference.

We’ve found that the offers on the left work well for cold leads, whereas the offers on the right work better for warm leads:

klientboost-match-ppc-channel-temperature
We made this to use internally at KlientBoost.

As with most PPC tactics, this requires a bit of testing. And don’t forget to have a means of nurturing cold leads down the funnel.

Local visuals: Make ‘em feel at home

Remember how you can improve conversion rates by changing phone numbers and headlines to appear more local to the visitor’s location?

You can also do that with your hero shot and other visuals you’re using on your landing page.

We ran a test for a roofing company who advertised in several states. Because we were able to split up the PPC traffic based on geography, we were able to funnel all visitors to a dedicated landing with visuals that matched the local feel:

local-visuals-a-b-test

The result?

Conversion rates increased by 22%.

It seems so simple, yet it’s a bit of work to set up.

But the payoff is immense.

Hidden fields sales tracking

This very moment, you’re likely bidding on multi intent keywords that may bring you conversions (leads, demos, or trials), but will never turn into sales.

But with hidden fields sales tracking like Google’s ValueTrack parameters, you’re able to create hidden fields on your landing page to capture lead information, along with other nifty data, like:

  • The keyword they typed in
  • The device they were using
  • The landing page URL they converted on
  • The geographic location they were in

With your CRM lead entry that now has all that additional bulleted info, you’re able to go back to your PPC accounts and learn not just what keyword gave you the lead, but what keyword gave you the sale in other words, which of your keywords have the highest closing rate.

With that information, you’ll find that you’re able to afford higher CPAs for certain conversions compared to others, and this will ultimately help you get higher volumes of the right type of conversions.

How’d you do that?

PPC landing page testing can be complex, but these few tricks above are what help us double the performance for our clients.

These tips will help you customize your landing pages, resulting in better marketing experiences that convert better.

So you can pull more rabbits conversions out of your hat PPC campaigns.

Embed this gifographic on your site (copy and paste the code).

See original: 

PPC Landing Page Magic: Secrets Revealed [GIFOGRAPHIC]

Why Your AdWords Competitors Are Making More Money Than You

frog
Don’t go green with envy over the success of your competitors’ Adwords campaigns. Photo via Kaboompics.

I know, that’s a pretty harsh headline. But it’s true.

Some of your AdWords competitors are making more money than you.

Whether you’re trying to generate leads, get new SaaS users or make ecommerce sales, there’s an AdWords competitor out there who’s able to spend more than you to acquire new business while also making more money at the same time.

But here’s the good news: You can get much more from your modestly sized budget if you’re willing to look at things a little differently.

Let’s take a look at the four biggest things you need to change:

  1. You complain about lead quality, but haven’t adapted your offerings
  2. You’re obsessed with your conversion rates, but not your sales rates
  3. You’re getting conversions, but your sales game is weak
  4. You’re getting sales, but you’ve never tried increasing your prices or upselling

Let’s dig in.

1. You complain about lead quality, but haven’t adapted your offerings

If you have an AdWords campaign that’s serving you well, you may be tempted to pump more money into it.

But don’t assume that more traffic = more conversions.

Your AdWords traffic is composed of a colorful bunch of people with a different set of needs and dramatically different budgets.

There’s nothing you can do to change that.

All you can do is adapt your offerings.

Consider how Google has three different products to choose from when it comes to PPC:

adwords options
Which one are you using?
  • Small mom-and-pop shops may get by with Google AdWords Express where not a lot of customization is needed.
  • Smaller to medium sized businesses might have all their needs met with regular Google AdWords with ad scheduling and keyword targeting.
  • Enterprise level companies might only want to use DoubleClick because of the additional abilities like bidding separately for tablets or access to other ad networks beyond regular Google Search and Display.

With our PPC and landing page agency, KlientBoost, we know we don’t want to work with every single lead that comes through our door. We only want to work with companies that fit our requirements (like a certain amount of ad spend per month).

And in the beginning of our agency journey, we were throwing a ton of leads away since all we cared about was signing up people for our month-to-month services, our biggest bread winner.

I felt like Captain Ahab chasing around a bunch of Moby Dicks.

Captain Ahab
Costa Mesa, CA — that’s where our boat is docked, and our office.

But we all know that whale hunting is ridiculously tough on the shoulders (and illegal). Plus there are way more sardines than whales in the ocean.

So how could we profit off those sardines smaller fish?

Since our lead volume kept growing from our marketing efforts, I had to do something different to take advantage of those fish.

So I started experimenting.

What if the people who can’t afford to work with us on a monthly basis could still get help from us?

With that “Aha!” moment, we introduced one-time growth packages where we helped clients set up their AdWords account and landing pages, and then handed them the keys to run it.

We didn’t create new ads, landing pages or change anything in our PPC accounts. Because someone searching “PPC agency” could have a budget of a $1 million a month or just $100 a month.

Fast forward two months and we’ve made $32,500 from that one decision change. Money we’d otherwise have missed out on.

And these new packages then give us the opportunity to potentially work with those customers on a larger scale when they can afford our month-to-month services.

stripe
Here’s a quick look at our Stripe history with some of those recent charges. Not bad if you ask me!

So even if you get conversions from people who are ready to buy, but can’t afford your solution, what are you doing to get their foot in the door?

Have you considered offering them something of complementary value to your core offering?

2. You’re obsessed with your conversion rates, but not your sales rates

If you are doing a good enough job getting AdWords traffic, then trust me, it’s not the quantity of the conversion you should be worried about, it’s the quality of those conversions.

You’ll want to make sure you track and qualify your conversions fast enough to understand if they’re worth spending time on (especially if you’re trying to generate leads).

Let’s use LeBron James as an example. On the surface, some AdWords keywords and display placements could be looking like a superfly LeBron James in a golden leotard with fancy dance moves (getting a ton of leads), but on the back-end, they’re not getting you enough championships (a.k.a. sales).

LaBron James
Don’t be fooled by the pants and fancy dance moves. Image via Giphy.

What your competitors already know is to track the entire process from click to close (first AdWords click to you actually making money) and optimize off of sales, not leads.

If you’re trying to generate leads, your competitors might already know which keywords have the highest sales rates (from paying over the phone), not just conversion rates (from converting on the landing page).

And that’s where your competitors are laughing all the way to the bank.

The flashiness of leads (and golden leotards) inside your AdWords account has you focused on getting more, without realizing that you could cut your budget in half and still get the same amount of sales.

But how do you do that?

The secret is called ValueTrack parameters, and it’s a URL parameter string you can append to your final URLs inside the tracking template field of your AdWords account.

ad builder
The “Ad URL options” field is where you want to add those parameters.

You can custom create your own URL parameter string or adopt what I recommend below:

lpurl?GA_network=network&GA_device=device&GA_campaign=campaignid&GA_adgroup=adgroupid&GA_target=target&GA_placement=placement&GA_creative=creative&GA_extension=feeditemid&GA_keyword=keyword&GA_loc_physical_ms=loc_physical_ms&GA_landingpage=lpurl

Next, you’ll want to make sure your landing page form has the hidden fields (like GA_network, GA_device, etc.) to capture that info along with the form fields the visitor is filling out.

This URL parameter string that you add to your AdWords ads will help you see which networks, devices, keywords, campaigns, etc. that your conversion came from and how much money that conversion meant for you.

hidden field data
Here’s what that hidden field data looks like inside Unbounce.

In the world of lead generation, let’s break this down with a hypothetical example:

Keyword #1 = 20% lead conversion rate and a 10% sales rate

Keyword #2 = 10% lead conversion rate and a 50% sales rate

If you were only tracking lead conversion rates, then you’d think keyword #1 is performing better because of the higher conversion rates and lower cost per conversion.

But if you do the math, it’s keyword #2 that’s making you more money.

Keyword #1 = 1 lead for every 5 clicks (20% conversion rate), 1 sale for every 10 conversions (10% sales rate). 50 clicks = 1 sale.

Keyword #2 = 1 lead for every 10 clicks (10% conversion rate), 1 sale for every 2 conversions (50% close rate). 20 clicks = 1 sale.

As you can see, not tracking the quality of your conversions can be detrimental.

Even without a fancy CRM, you can quickly backtrack and see which areas in your AdWords account are bleeding money. Better yet, increase bids on the keywords and placements that are giving you high quality conversions to get more of them.

3. You’re getting conversions, but your sales game is weak

Did you know that it takes on average between five and 12 touches of following up with a prospect before you close them?

But I’m not talking about manually spending more time emailing or calling prospects.

Because how many times have you complained about not being able to get a hold of your form leads?

Let me guess — quite a bit.

What you do after they convert matters just as much as what you did before they converted.

If your AdWords competitors are smart (and I know some of them are), then they already have an email nurturing program in place to drip value on their leads.

baby chimp
You know, to keep their prospects engaged, fed and happy.

And while some of your competitors may be bigger than you and have more money, there’s absolutely no reason why you can’t do the same.

For our PPC agency, here’s what our workflow looks like when we’re trying to give someone a custom proposal:

Email 1 What our proposal looks like
Email 2 AdWords screenshots of ongoing monthly improvements
Email 3 Monthly service or one-time package
Email 4 Custom goal setting ideas (scale or get lean)
Email 5 Links to our partner webinars
Email 6 Podcast/interview links (showing thought leadership)
Email 7 Case studies from current clients
Email 8 Call to action of getting a proposal
Email 9 New AdWords screenshots of improvements

The goal of each email is to showcase our skills and the features and benefits we can bring to prospects and their business.

We were super impressed with the continuous open rates (50% average throughout the entire sequence), but even more blown away to see that leads we’ve never heard from initially didn’t reply to us until they got the sixth email (out of nine total).

Which, funny enough, is a link to the podcast I did with the peeps here at Unbounce

email campaign
Here’s a snapshot of our first four drip emails.

So if you’re spending precious dollars on AdWords, how are you making sure that none of your conversions are going to waste?

If you think you can afford to have a “lead nurturing program” that’s made up of only two phone calls and one email, then you’re wasting your time and money.

Because it takes much more effort these days to to turn a conversion into a sale, you need to equip yourself with the tools that sales professionals use on a daily basis.

Here are a few to help you out:

MailChimp

MailChimp is one of the easiest email automation tools out there.

If you can map out five emails that would bring value to your prospects, then turn them into a MailChimp automation workflow.

The goal of MailChimp will be to get your prospects to take a specific action. In our case, it’s a simple response that they want a proposal from us. When that happens, we move them over to Yesware.

Yesware

Yesware is a Gmail tool that helps you track email opens and gives you the ability to automatically remind yourself to follow up with leads after a certain period of time.

Once someone has replied to us via MailChimp, we put them in Yesware as they’ve now moved into our sales funnel.

Yesware helps us track who opens our emails and reminds us to follow up with prospects too.

Autopilot for LinkedIn

Autopilot is a cool tool that allows you to “autovisit” the LinkedIn profiles of your prospects. You set the criteria and the tool will notify your prospects that you visited their profile.

For us, this acts as great touch points without having to manually visit profiles every day and helps us look like we’re everywhere when someone is considering working with us.

IFTTT

IFTTT stands for “if this, then that,” and it allows you to automate some of your lead nurturing touch points.

Let’s say someone comes through as a lead on your landing page. You can then use IFTTT to connect with them on Twitter and LinkedIn (if the emails match) with a certain amount of time delay.

This will make you look like you’re going the extra mile compared to some of your competitors (who your lead could be talking to) to really want to work with the lead.

But don’t take my word for it.

I spoke with Sujan Patel from ContentMarketer.io who gave me a new perspective on the focus of nurturing:

When someone decides to become a lead it means they’ve decided to “explore” or find out more, not purchase (you made a good first impression). Lead nurturing keeps you top of mind (or close to it), builds credibility, trust and helps you passively demonstrate your value.

The same thing applies to AdWords traffic.

If someone finds you via PPC, then they also know they have 10 other options (the 10 others search ads on Google) that they need to explore and will most likely compare all the options.

If you’re fortunate enough to get a conversion, then you must strongly consider the nurturing part as well. Because sometimes, there’s a big gap between getting a conversion and actually making money.

4. You’re getting sales, but you’ve never tried increasing your prices or upselling

I remember my first PPC client.

I just got back from a pitch at a local crossfit gym in Newport Beach and I recall how nervous I was that I nearly sputtered out my price when they asked.

“Uhmm… That would be uhh… $250 a month for everything we talked about, which includes keyword bidding, ad testing uhmmm… negative keywords…”

I felt like I had to defend myself, even though they were clearly interested.

Right after the meeting, I went straight home to my bed and fell asleep because I was so emotionally drained.

Then — to my surprise — when I woke up, I had a PayPal notification showing that they’d paid.

Since then, we’ve increased our average price to be almost twenty times what it was back then.

And it isn’t because we’re trying to keep up with the rate of inflation.

It’s because we know, just like your competitors know, that if our profit margins are high enough, then

  • we can spend more money to acquire a client,
  • we can be okay saying no to more of the smaller fish
  • and we’ll have more time to work on the results for our Moby Dick clients so that we can retain them longer and make more money.

Now I know that raising prices can be a scary thing, especially when you might alienate people who aren’t willing to pay what you ask.

But consider the obvious negotiation tactic of starting high and then going low.

You’ll be surprised how many people are okay to pay what you charge, even if you double your pricing on your next sales call.

And when you do, don’t stop there. Be a greedy pig goat.

baby goat

Because as soon as you have a customer that’s already paying, they’re 50% more likely to buy again compared to brand new prospects.

Another tactic to consider is the upsell. GoDaddy gets aggressive with its upsell, even before you’ve bought anything:

godaddy upsell
Sure, I’ll take .net, .org and .info.

So when it comes to paying a decent amount of money for all your AdWords clicks, strongly consider what you can do increase your prices without increasing your resources.

So what’s next?

Now that you’ve been spending the last couple months improving your AdWords metrics and landing page conversion rates, I hope you have a stronger incentive to learn about the other improvements you could be making (both during and after conversions).

In the long run, the changes above will improve your bottom line from other marketing efforts. It won’t be long until you can’t even see your AdWords competition in the rearview mirror.


Read the article: 

Why Your AdWords Competitors Are Making More Money Than You

Adwords Optimization Made Easy With These 3 Adwords Workouts [GIFOGRAPHICS]

Adwords optimization workouts
Ready, set, grow. Image by Ryan McGuire via The Stocks.

Have you ever heard about the 10,000 hour rule?

It’s a rule that Malcolm Gladwell coined that says in order to be really good at something, you have to put in 10,000 hours of deliberate practice.

I don’t know about you, but as a lifelong student of PPC marketing, I feel exhausted just thinking about that.

Good thing the 10,000 rule is a myth. You don’t have to spend more time to be really good at something.

You just need to know your goals and what gets you there the fastest. Think of it in terms of fitness: If you’re looking to drop a few pounds, you’re not going to stock up on gainers and up your chicken breast intake to eight a day, Thor-style — you’re going to research the fastest way to slim down.

So when it comes to AdWords and the power of landing pages, wouldn’t it be great to know exactly what to do on a weekly basis to get closer to your goals?

Whether you’re looking to lower costs, increase volume or just maintain, KlientBoost and Unbounce have created three 10-minute AdWords optimization workouts that help you do just that.

Just don’t try to print these posters to hang on your wall ;)

The Slimmer

Is your AdWords account eating up your ad budget?

Put it on a diet and kick it into high-gear with this wallet-friendly AdWords workout.

KlientBoost

Embed this gifographic on your site (copy and paste the code).

The Maintainer

They say the hardest part of weight loss is keeping it off. Same goes for maintaining a healthy AdWords account.

Steer clear of the temptation to slack off. Stick to this low-maintenance AdWords regimen — just 10 minutes a week keeps your campaigns running smoothly!

KlientBoost

Embed this gifographic on your site (copy and paste the code).

The Bulker

So your AdWords are performing well, are they? Awesome news!

But now’s not the time get lazy. Instead, pump up your efforts with this butt-kicking AdWords management workout.

KlientBoost

Embed this gifographic on your site (copy and paste the code).

These gifographics were originally posted on KlientBoost and were republished with permission.

Excerpt from – 

Adwords Optimization Made Easy With These 3 Adwords Workouts [GIFOGRAPHICS]

The 10-Minute AdWords Management Workout

adwords-workout-650

As a busy marketer, you don’t have a ton of time to manage your AdWords account.

It’s not that you don’t care, you just have other things to work on. Like actually running a business.

Besides, why should you spend time in your dashboard when your efforts to date haven’t shown much success?

tom-and-jerry
You’re doing work, but are you getting anywhere? GIF source.

Improving your AdWords account is much like building your muscles at the gym. It isn’t about working longer or harder. It’s about working smarter.

Just like your frequency of squats, there’s a point of diminishing returns where your muscles won’t continue to grow bigger or stronger.

But there are certain workouts that will bring you gains, you just have to know how to effectively use your time and how to make the biggest and most positive impacts on your AdWords performance.

Let me introduce you to the weekly 10-minute AdWords management workout.

1. Speed-add negative keywords (3 minutes)

Expected results? Your gluteus maximus of a click-through rate will increase and wasted ad dollars will be spared.

You already know that adding negative keywords on a regular basis helps you reduce wasteful spend (if not, read this super quick post by AdStage).

But did you know you can add negative keywords in just a snap?

You’ll want to look for search terms that don’t have your most common root keyword in them.

For example, let’s say you sell ice cream online and you want to quickly scan if some of your search terms don’t include the word “ice cream.”

To do so, go to your search term report inside your AdWords account, and quickly use the on-page search function of Command + F if you’re on a Mac, or Control + F if you’re on a PC. Then type in “ice cream” in the search bar.

You’ll want to sort your impressions column in descending order so you tackle the biggest performance killers first.

Screen Shot 2015-06-09 at 6.09.09 PM
If something isn’t highlighted yellow, then take a closer look.

Then scan your entire search term report, while paying extra close attention to the non-highlighted search terms. These are usually the ones you will be adding as negative keywords since they fall outside of your root keywords.

As you’re scanning your search term report, add negative keywords to a spreadsheet and keep it on hand for our next workout.

Over time, you’ll start seeing less and less negative keywords that need to be added because you’re continually pruning and trimming.

Have multiple root keywords? Then use this approach on the different keywords you’re bidding on.

But be careful.

As you do this once a week, you may neglect what I call “search term creepers.”

These are search terms that get such few impressions and clicks week by week that they may go unnoticed as you scan through your search term report, but add up in the long run.

Screen Shot 2015-06-10 at 6.42.12 PM
Search term creepers are usually pretty good at hiding. Image source.

To combat them, change your AdWords date range once in a while to the last 30 days instead of just the last seven days. See if they’re adding up impressions and clicks that you don’t want to pay for.


Quickly add #AdWords negative keywords with this 3-minute campaign management workout.
Click To Tweet


2. Negative keyword list adding (10 seconds)

Expected results? You’ll be saving time on the AdWords treadmill and saving money on clicks that are wasteful.

If you have multiple AdWords campaigns that share common negative keywords, then a negative keyword list will be your best friend.

Negative keyword lists help you save time by not having to copy and paste your new negative keywords across all your campaigns. Instead, you can keep them all in one hub and apply that negative keyword list to all or just a few of your campaigns.

If you followed my advice from the previous workout and have your spreadsheet filled with new negative keywords, you can now take that list and add it to your negative keyword list.

To find your negative keyword lists, simply go to the “Shared library” on the left hand side of your AdWords interface and then to “Campaign negative keywords.”

all-online-campaigns

Your negative keyword lists are found through here. Specifically right here:

negative-keyword-list-specific

3. Bad ad pausing (1 minute)

Expected results? Better overall account well-being and improved average ad positions, average conversion rates and average cost per conversions. In short, you’ll sleep better at night.

Just like a horrible tasting protein shake, horrible ads have to be dealt with in order to make your workout more enjoyable and your AdWords performance stronger.

The idea here is to pause under-performing ads in the ad groups that have the most clicks and highest costs.

The reason why we want to make changes in the ad groups with the most clicks and highest costs is because it’ll have the biggest positive impact on your account, compared to just randomly making changes in different ad groups.

Think of it as doing bench presses (that can strengthen your entire upper body), compared to just regular dumbbell curls that just strengthen your biceps.

For this workout, you’ll want to go to “All online campaigns” and be on the “Ad groups” tab.

all-online-campaigns2
This is where you’ll find it.

Then, make sure you’ve clicked on the “Clicks” column for descending order (highest to lowest) and that your date range is around two to three months back.

Once you’re there, you’ll want to right-click on the top 10 ad groups with the most clicks and open each of them in new browser tabs.

all-campaigns-new-tab

This also prevents slow browser loading of going back and forth between ad groups.

Now to the fun part.

Go to each of the new browser tabs and pause the ads in each ad group that are performing worse when comparing cost per conversion, conversion rate, and click-through-rate (in that order) between the ads.

competing-ads
Here’s a look at two competing ads in which one got the axe. Can you guess which?

Make sure you have at least two ads running in each ad group for continuous A/B testing purposes. This will help take us to the next AdWords management workout.

4. New champion ad creations (1.5 minutes)

Expected results? You’re taking what’s already working and making it better. Building off your past success only makes you stronger.

Now that you’ve paused lower performing ads in the top 10 ad groups based on click volume and costs, it’s time to make new variations of the champion ads (the better performing ads you left running).

If you don’t, then you’re missing an opportunity to be constantly improving.

If your champion ads have similar ad copy in the top 10 ad groups (or even if they’re wildly different), then I’d recommend isolating one section of the ads (like description line 1) as the part that you’re testing.

isolated-ad-section
Pick an ad section to isolate and test.

When you create multiple ads that share similar ad sections, then it’ll be easier and faster to see if ad performance has improved since you’re now gathering data faster than you would with just one ad test in one ad group.

Once you’ve decided which part of the ad you want to isolate and test, use AdWords labels so you can filter to see those ads later on after they’ve gotten enough data and clicks and compare them to the rest of your campaign or account.

You can highlight the new ads you’ve created and create a new AdWords label called “New Ad Test,” or whatever makes it easier for you to keep things organized.

Depending on your traffic volumes, you can quickly get an ad data snapshot like the one below (the yellow line is from your filtered ads from your AdWords label).

sweet-sweet-numbers
Those are some sweet, sweet numbers :)

To see if your ad testing has statistically significant results, you can jump over to KISSmetrics’ A/B calculator here and type in your clicks and conversions to see your confidence levels.


Run similar #AdWords ad tests across multiple ad groups for faster results.
Click To Tweet


5. Bad keyword bid lowering (1.5 Minutes)

Expected results? Just as there are 17 different ways you can perform a squat, all keywords perform differently when it comes to CTR, CPC and conversion rates. This’ll help you ditch expensive ones that increase costs and keep you out of shape.

If you have AdWords conversion tracking set up (I sincerely hope you do but if not, read this), then there’s a really good chance you know your average conversion rate and average cost per conversion across your entire AdWords account.

Think of these as your AdWords Body Mass Index (BMI) scores that you’re trying to improve so that you can finally get in that 80s aerobics video you always dreamed about.

80s-workout
Colors and fashion were so on point. Image source.

You have some keywords that are performing great, and then you have some that are, ehh, not so great (maybe the CTR is low, Quality Scores suck or the costs per conversion are higher than your account average).

One of the fastest levers you can pull on lowering your cost per conversion is by lowering your max CPC keyword bid amounts.

Let’s say your average cost per click is $5 and your conversion rate is 10%. This gives you a $50 cost per conversion.

If you lower your bids to be $4 and you’re able to maintain the same click-through and conversion rate, then technically your new cost per conversion should be $40.

But don’t do this on all your keywords. Identify which keywords are the most expensive by their cost per conversion metrics.

To do so, make sure you’re viewing “All online campaigns” and then go to the “Keywords” tab and sort your “Cost / converted click” in descending order.

high-costing-keyword-conversions
Here’s a look at high-costing keyword conversions with at least 30 clicks.

This will show you the highest costing conversions and which keywords are responsible for them.

In the example above, you’ll notice that some keywords are much more expensive than your account average, and as long as you have enough clicks (at least 30), you can start slowly lowering their bids.

Quick workout note: If you lower bids too much, then you may also be lowering your average positions and damaging your CTR. You may find that lowering your bids puts them below “first page bid estimates” or doesn’t allow you to enter in the AdWords auction.

If that happens, then be quick to increase bids back to normal.

Make sure you have enough clicks (at least 30) for a keyword you’re about to lower the bid on. Anything less than that would be premature since the averages might not have had enough time to pan out yet.

With an understanding on how bid adjustments affect average ad positions and click-through-rates, you’ll want to slowly lower bids (5-10% of current bid amount) so that your average cost per conversions go down more smoothly.

6. High performing keyword bid increasing (1.5 minutes)

Expected results? Think of your keyword conversions as the number of leg extension reps you can do each set. Increasing bids is like eating more protein so you can start performing more reps.

Feeling a little winded? Good!

We’re eight minutes and 40 seconds into our 10-minute AdWords campaign management workout.

You’re making quick progress and your AdWords account is starting to look pretty dang sexy.

Screen Shot 2015-06-10 at 7.19.20 PM
That’s a definitive yes Ryan. Thanks for noticing.

Just like we lowered bids on keywords that were too expensive, we’re going to do the exact opposite on keywords that are performing well, to get them to perform even better.

This time, you’ll want to reverse the “Cost / converted click” column in ascending order.

Now you’ll start to see which keywords are your best performers and their associated average ad positions.

sweet-improvements-to-be-made
Some sweet improvements are about to be made here.

If a good performing keyword has an ad position of 1.2 for example, then raising the bid won’t do much to improve CTR or give you more conversion volume.

But…

If it’s 1.7 or worse (your keywords are triggering ads that mostly show in spot #2, but sometimes in spot #1), then increasing bids will help you get more of those type of conversions since an increase in bid can improve the average ad position and therefore increase the click-through rate.

Here you can be a little more aggressive with keyword bids and increase them 10-20% at a time since there’s no fear of having them disappear in the ad auctions.

You may quickly notice that your lowest-conversion-costing keywords are keywords with zero clicks and therefore technically have the lowest cost per conversion of zero dollars.

To prevent this and to make sure you’re changing bids on keywords that actually have traffic, we’re going to save some time and create some custom filters you can use every week moving forward.

Which takes us to our next AdWords management workout…

7. Creating and saving custom filters (35 seconds)

Expected results? AdWords filters are like listening to your favorite songs while working out. They help you get in and out, and on with your life. Creating an AdWords filter will help you move through workouts 3, 4, 5 and 6 even quicker.

You’ll want to use filters to quickly showcase the worst or best performing keywords/ads based on the criteria you choose.

adwords-custom-filters
Think of filters as your personal spotters. Ready and excited to help out.

For the example above, let’s say you only want to decrease bids on keywords that have more than 20 clicks (because anything less than that would be premature) and a cost per conversion greater than $40 (this amount will obviously vary for your AdWords account).

The filter will then only show you those keywords that fit your criteria so you can make your bid adjustments on them.

You can then save the filter for next week’s workout with the goal of having the filtered “bad keywords” and “bad ads” become less and less frequent over time.

8. Checking for alerts (45 seconds)

Expected results? Sometimes it’s easy to forget the small things, like how certain workouts are actually supposed to be done. Think of the AdWords alerts as your own personal trainer that can prevent you from looking silly.

youre-going-places
You’re going places. GIF source.

You’ve hustled through your workout so fast that you’re not even sweating – you’re raining like Shaquille O’Neal. Now it’s time to cool down from the intense AdWords management workout you just went through.

As you sit down to start stretching, thinking about that delicious post-workout chocolate milk, you remember there’s just one thing you forgot: checking for AdWords alerts.

Are there any conflicting negative keywords, disapproved ads or budgets that are hitting a ceiling?

If so, your little right-hand corner bell inside your AdWords interface will tell you.

59-ads-disapproved

No need to change everything it recommends though.

Click on any of the alerts to make the quick adjustment – if they make sense.

I say this because almost everything that Google recommends comes with the idea of having you spend more money, so take it all with a grain of salt.

If nothing strikes your eye, then it’s time to pat yourself on the back and drink that milk. You deserve it.

Good work!

Your workout is now over and you feel amazing. Instead of just running mindlessly on that elliptical, you actually came in and did what needed to be done to bring you closer to your AdWords goals: more conversions, lower costs per conversion and higher conversion rates.

All in record time.

Over to you. When it comes to effective AdWords management, what have you found to make the biggest impacts in the shortest time?

Read original article:

The 10-Minute AdWords Management Workout

How PPC Strategy Differs on the Search Network VS the Display Network

Have you ever been kicking so much AdWords Search Network butt that it made you raise your chest and gave you instant super powers?

You know, the type of confidence that makes you walk with a pep in your step and hair bouncing around?

Confidence
Kinda like this mini-horse. Image source.

Feels AMAZING.

But sometimes you hit a ceiling with the keywords you’re bidding on, and there’s literally no more Search Network traffic out there (since your impression shares are all around 98%).

You immediately think of using the AdWords Display Network, simply because you know there’s more traffic, cheaper clicks and much more potential ROI just waiting to be grabbed.

dog-pee-to-claim-land-FACE-Low-Cost-SpayNeuter-Clinic-FB
Actually, don’t do that. It won’t get you conversions. Image source.

As you may already know, the AdWords Display Network (also known as the Google Display Network/GDN) is the biggest digital ad network in the world. It allows you to advertise on publisher properties like websites, mobile apps, Gmail, YouTube and more.

Compared to the AdWords Search Network, the Display Network also houses the largest viewership of any online platform. YouTube itself has a monthly viewership equivalent to 10 Super Bowls – so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that display advertising is said to capture 34% of all online ad spend and about 10% of all marketing budgets.

But with new channels come different strategies.

What you’re doing on the AdWords Search Network will not perform the same way on the Display Network.

If the Display Network is uncharted territory for you, here’s how you need to adjust your current PPC strategy to get the results you want.

Different user behavior calls for a different strategy

The biggest difference between the AdWords Search Network and Display Network can be seen in the sweet visual I had my designer custom-make below.

unbounce-_chuck_norris

In the “Chuck Norris” action cycle above, you can see how the power of keyword intent in the Search Network can put people really close to taking action (AKA converting), but the Display Network typically has visitors who are a few steps behind.

This is because people who are on the Display Network aren’t actively searching for what you offer. As Erin Sagin puts it, they’re rarely in “shopping mode.”

Instead, Display Network visitors are most likely in the research phase when your display ads are hitting them. They’re on forums, blog posts, or watching that YouTube vid trying to gather enough information to make a decision. They don’t know what they need yet, so your job is create awareness.

If you’re selling more of an “emergency” service like being a locksmith or roadside assistance, then you’ll have a hard time using the Display Network to your advantage.

This is simply because ads on the Display Network are not triggered from a search engine like text ads on the Search Network are. The Search Network works as a demand harvester (your ads are grabbing the intent), while the Display Network works as a demand generator (your ads are creating awareness).

So how do you change your strategy from the Search Network to also make the AdWords Display Network a money making machine?

Create trust and deliver value

As I mentioned, your Display Network ads could be interrupting someone who’s reading the news, reading a blog or watching a video.

Because of that, the level of commitment it takes for someone to stop what they’re doing, click your ad, then call you or fill out your landing page form is high and much more unlikely compared to the Search Network. In other words, you can’t expect to have the same campaign conversion rates on the Display Network as you do on the Search Network.

If you’re offering “Free Quotes” on the search network because people are actively searching for someone who can relieve their problem, it might actually be better for you to lead with valuable educational material (i.e. your content) on the Display Network.

A perfect example of this is my crush of an email marketing company, Emma.

Emma uses the AdWords Search Network to drive sign ups, but they use the Display Network to give you great, fun and actionable value. Here’s what some of their Display Ads look like (click on them to go to the accompanying landing page):

emma-gif-1

emma-gif-2

emma-gif-3

I reached out to Cynthia Price (the Director of Marketing at Emma) and she gave me this golden nugget about how they use the AdWords Display Network:

We get that someone seeing a display ad isn’t necessarily interested in learning more about our product just yet. It’s all about brand awareness, and more importantly for us, trust-building.

So we offer content that we think will be valuable and helpful to our audience’s marketing efforts. It starts our brand relationship off on the right foot, helps them understand the strength of our expertise and paves the way for us to nurture or retarget them in the future.

You already know that content marketing’s core foundation is about adding true value.

Your display ads should be no different.

On the Display Network, your first goal is to establish trust by giving value, and then nurture the visitors down the road to become paying customers.

Revisit your targeting options

Once you have a great piece of content that delivers value and educates your audience, it’s time to figure out how to target it to people who actually want it.

Let’s have a look at the five targeting options that’ve been found to drive the biggest impact on the Display Network.

To illustrate how each one works, let’s pretend you’re a dog walker. Your name is Lori and you live in Huntington Beach, CA. You’ve been advertising on the AdWords search network and this is your landing page:

lori-the-dog-walker

What are your best targeting options?

Placement targeting

Placement targeting allows you to advertise directly on certain publisher sites. This means you could have your ad show up on Forbes or CNN if you’d like.

Best practice advice: Make sure the website or page’s audience is relevant to what you’re offering. Don’t shotgun approach all of CNN – sniper shot individual placements within CNN if you can.

Contextual/Keyword targeting

Contextual/Keyword targeting allows you to give Google your keywords and have it automatically find relevant placements for your ads.

Best practice advice: Mix this with placement targeting to be even more laser focused with your targeting.

Topic targeting

Topic targeting allows you to go more broad than regular placement targeting.

For this, you could target the topic of Pets & Animals directly and cast a wider net, with the possibility of your ads showing up on FerretLovers.com (yes, that’s a real site).

Best practice advice: See what Topic targeting gives you, then exclude unwanted placements from your campaign once things are running and data is coming in.

Interest targeting

Interest targeting is kind of similar to topic targeting, but instead of judging the context of websites, interest targeting tracks behaviors of web users. This targeting method can be even more vague than topic targeting.

Best practice advice: Every industry is different, so always test things out and see the performance. Be quick to pause and exclude irrelevant placements once data comes in.

Combining targeting methods

This is where you’ll have a lot of fun and potentially get better results.

You’re not locked into using just one targeting method with the AdWords Display Network. In fact, Alistair Dent over at Search Engine Watch and many others highly recommend never going with just one targeting option, but combining multiple together.

You can target certain placements with the addition of contextual/keyword targeting to tell Google that you only want your ads to show when a visitor is on CNN and reading an article about dog walking.

Or you can target different interests with contextual/keyword targeting as well.

Create multiple ad groups, each with their own targeting specifications, and see how they perform against each other. Once you’ve hit your stride and conversions are coming in, pause the other ad groups that aren’t working, and make variations of the ad group targetings that are working for you, so that you can squeeze more out of your PPC dollars.

Wrapping up

Wow! Quite a bit of info huh?

Now that you clearly know why your Display Network strategy has to be different from your Search Network strategy, what do you have to lose? Get started now. Try different targeting combinations, and never forget to offer true value.

What have you found to be the best driver of conversions on the AdWords Display Network? How different are your strategies compared to the ones we talked about?

Read original article: 

How PPC Strategy Differs on the Search Network VS the Display Network

Thumbnail

How to Write the Highest-Performing AdWords Ads, Ever

Writing AdWords ads can be extremely frustrating because you need to fit all your ad copy into such a tiny space.

“Only 25 characters for the headline?!”
“I can’t use the word ‘click’? But that’s what I want them to do!”
“I can’t fit all my benefits and features here…”

justin-timberlake
Seriously Google? Image source.

You have to get creative to stand out from the nine other advertisers you’re sharing real estate space with (or as few as four competitors if you’re on mobile).

So how do you do it?

I’m here to give you some proven tactics you can use to write AdWords ads that will bring you higher click-through rates, higher Quality Scores and higher conversion rates.

Ready to have some fun? Let’s go!

Mirror the visitor’s end goal

Because many of your competitors are using dynamic keyword insertion and bidding on similar keywords, you’ll notice that a lot of their ads say the same thing.

It’s easy to get lost in the mix and hurt your chances of getting that click – so how can you stand out?

Advertisers sometimes lose sight of what their customers are truly looking for. I call this “The End Goal:” what people ultimately want to accomplish with the help of your product or service.

Understanding this can be the secret to writing an ad that stands out from the sea of DKI keywords.

A hypothetical example

Let’s say you sell acne products and your visitors search for keywords like, “Help get rid of acne.”

Your headline shouldn’t ask prospects if they’re “Dealing with Acne?” – as the advertiser, you already know that they are.

adwords-copy-get-rid-of-acne

Instead, you should speak to their End Goal – what they’re looking to achieve – with a headline like this:

Kill Acne Once & For All

Don’t give up very precious headline space for something you and the visitor already know. Instead, give visitors that end solution they’re looking for.

A real-world example

What if you’re a car buyer who purchases cars from the general public?

Interested prospects might search for something like this:

adwords-copy-sell-your-car
WeBuyCars.com tells the visitor they’ll buy the car – which mirrors the prospect’s end goal.

To make it easy for people to convert and remove ambiguity, all these ads should focus on telling prospects what they want to hear: “We’ll Buy Your Car Today.”

Why? Because the goal of the searcher is to have someone buy their car. How they go about selling it isn’t as important as actually getting it sold.

With a headline like “Sell Your Car Today,” the searcher might wonder if they have to list their car themselves on an AutoTrader-like platform and field calls from a ton of tire-kickers who aren’t really serious about buying a car. Or even worse, will they get a call back from seven interested companies who will spam them until they die?

I’ve run this test, specifically for a car buyer, pitting “Need To Sell Your Car?” (control) versus “We’ll Buy Your Car Today” (variation).

This simple headline tweak resulted in a 30% increase in conversions.

Use countdown timers to trigger loss aversion

Did you know that we’re more readily motivated by the idea of losing out than the idea of gaining something?

This commonly-known psychological force is called loss aversion and it can be a powerful way of boosting your AdWords click-through and conversion rates.

Luckily, injecting a little FOMO into your ads isn’t very hard.

Google has recently come out with a simple countdown timer you can set within your text ads. All you have to do is add this little snippet inside your headline or description:

{=

Pretty simple right? After you set the end date, your ad will include a countdown in real time.

google-countdown
This is what the countdown dashboard looks like.

Visitors seeing your ads will be motivated by their fear of loss, giving you the edge over your competitors who aren’t using this tactic.

A real-world example

Ad agency Merkle | IMPAQT did this for some of their clients pre-Black Friday to have their AdWords text ads countdown to when the actual sale started. Here’s what they found:

We used the countdown feature to countdown the days until Thanksgiving and holiday deals began. We discovered the click and impression assisted conversions for this ad copy performed at a significantly higher rate than other copy. We also saw higher conversions associated with this copy on Thanksgiving and for about a week after as a result.

They’re not the only ones to have seen success with this new feature – Clarks America saw a 32% increase in CTR and a 3% increase on conversion rates from using the countdown timers.


Having a sale? To add urgency, test adding countdown timers to your #PPC ads.
Click To Tweet


Keep your ads current

Now that we’re on the subject of time, have you ever felt that certain things are more relevant or exciting when they just happened?

The concept of being current and timely is pretty intuitive; what happened recently will get more eyeballs and interest than what happened three months ago.

The same is true with your AdWords ads.

Have you tried testing copy that states how many customers you serviced last month or this year?

I put this to the test for a tax accounting firm. Here were the two ads we pitted against each other:

adwords-local-tax-prep
The control ad (top) and the variation (bottom)

The result? The more timely, current ad saw a whopping 217% increase in CTR and 23% improvement in conversion rates.

And I’m willing to bet that the specificity of the number also added some conversion power…

Get super specific

Numbers are easy to digest and understand, and studies show that incorporating them into your copy can make it appear more accurate and credible.

Here’s a great example from MECLABS in which Amy Hebdon created a new numbers-driven ad to compete against her control ad:

adwords-marketing-strategies
The control ad (top) and the variation (bottom)

Which one do you think performed the best?

The control ad did.

Just kidding, the new ad did! It actually received an 88% higher click-through rate at a confidence level of 99%.

Why did this happen? The specificity of the new ad could have made it just a tad more credible than the control ad.


Writing #PPC ads about how great you are? Use real numbers to be more convincing.
Click To Tweet


How could we make the ad perform even better?

By getting even more specific.

It’s been shown that specific numbers like 1,542 can improve performance over round numbers like 1,500+. If you’re including a number, write out the exact number!

The more specific you are, the more believable you become.

And the more believable you become, the bigger your chances are of becoming the next David Blaine, or just really good at giving people a pleasant experience.

david-blaine

Make things personal

When it comes to writing ads, do you sometimes fall into the trap of being a little egocentric? Do you use words like “we,” “us,” “me,” “myself” and “I”?

Words like that fail to focus on the customer’s needs and can hurt your chances of getting a click – not to mention they’ve been shown to hurt conversions on landing pages, too.

When it comes to writing copy that resonates, I couldn’t agree more with this nugget from John Kuraoka:

The second-best word is “you.” The best word is the customer’s name.

Since we’re still in the stone age of advertising and can’t add the visitor’s first name to our AdWords ads automatically, we’ll have to settle for second best.

So how do you craft AdWords ads that use the power of “you” to enhance ad performance? Take these ads for example:

adwords-copy-personal-you

Which one stands out and gets you most excited to click?

One could argue both Shopify and Volusion do a great job, but we all know that AmeriCommerce struggles.

“Awarded “Best eCommerce Solution”? Ptssshh. Enough about yourself. What can you do for me?!

Find opportunities where you can include the word “you” in your headline or first description line. And as always, lead with benefits.

Make your ads hyper-local

A lot of advertisers target more than just one city when creating their AdWords campaigns. Many even advertise nationally.

Even if you offer services world-wide, you want to be welcoming to your potential customers and show them that help is right around the corner.

You may already have a 800 number that you use for all your AdWords call extensions and landing pages, or maybe even a pool of 800 numbers. But did you know that having phone numbers with geographic proximity to the visitor can double your conversion rates?

Yea, believe it or not, your 800 numbers could be working against you.

adwords-copy-local-numbers

So how can you put this to the test in your AdWords ads?

By creating geographic-specific AdWords campaigns and have your ad copy and call extensions specific to that geographic area as well.

The goal here is to let your prospective customers know that you’re right around the corner, with a helping hand.

a3dGDg8_460sa_v1

If you’re still using the regular Google call forwarding in your AdWords call extensions, stop it immediately. Go to a call tracking provider like CallRail or Call Tracking Metrics and start buying all their local phone numbers.

Seriously.

Test your heart out

With so many of your competitors worrying about 1,000 things other than writing better ads, you now have the ammunition to make your AdWords ads the most glorious ads in the world (read: the best-performing ones).

That is, if you start testing today.

So go!

And if you’ve got any other ideas for writing killer AdWords ads, let me know in the comments!

– Johnathan Dane


google-countdown

See original article here – 

How to Write the Highest-Performing AdWords Ads, Ever

Thumbnail

5 Unknown Tips To Hack Your Retargeting

retargeting-cookies
Image via imgflip.

We’ve all experienced our fair share of retargeting and there are good reasons for why marketers do it.

Retargeting ads have a 10x higher click-through rate than display ads – and visitors subject to retargeting are 70% more likely to complete a conversion compared to non-retargeted visitors.

All great stuff, but as you and I both know, retargeting ads can as annoying as people who play music from their phone in public places (ugh).

If you’re not using your retargeting opportunities strategically to provide value to your visitors or solutions to their problems, then you’re no good. You’re just noise.

Here are five tactics you can start using today to get the most out of your retargeting efforts while still delivering value to your prospects.

Retargeting tactic #1: Unique segmentation

Again and again, I’ve seen companies serving the same retargeting ads to everyone, regardless of which page they visited, keyword they searched or device they’re coming from.

This is sloppy at best. Different people behave in different ways and that should call for different ads, different messaging and different creative.

Did someone find you from a non-branded search on Google or are they already on your email list? Each will be at a different stage of their relationship with you, and you should only hold hands when you need to and french kiss with the others.

I’m talking about segmentation.

An example of unique segmentation in action

Noah Kagan, former employee of Facebook and Mint and current CEO of AppSumo, has written extensively about his retargeting campaigns.

While some of his retargeting ads are a softer sell (asking people to opt in to a leads list in exchange for a freebie), people who visit his product page but don’t convert are given a harder sell: Noah runs his retargeting ads to bring them back to a product purchase landing page.

1-Retargeting-Facebook-Newsfeed
Note how Noah tells his own personal success story (to appeal to his target market of entrepreneurs who are chasing the dream) rather than throwing them generic ads about his product. Image source.

What kind of results does he see from his retargeting efforts?

In the example he writes about in this article, he spent $4,168.19 to make $9,365 through his Facebook retargeting – a 200% ROI.

Not too shabby.

Use unique segmentation in your retargeting campaigns

To get you started with segmentation, take a look at your Google Analytics and determine if there are more visitors on certain pages compared to others. Ask yourself why that is and then craft retargeting ads that speak directly to them.

Some of these audience segments may be small portions of your overall traffic, but they will have a higher chance of converting since you’re being more specific with your messaging.

Here’s some inspiration to get you started:

  • Do your visitors spend a lot of time on your “About Us” page? Why not show them a retargeting ad that offers a 15-minute, one-on-one consultation from your CEO or another prominent employee from your organization? The visitor wanted to get to know you better – here’s your chance to start that relationship.
  • Do you have different categories on your blog? Why not create a guide on your most popular subject and retarget it to frequent visitors to that category?

Bonus tip:
When users convert, be sure to use burn pixels to remove them from your retargeting audience so you don’t continue to show the same ad over and over again.

Retargeting tactic #2: Use old school marketing tactics

People were on your landing page for a reason, and hopefully, it was because they’re interested in what you have to offer.

But with your competitors just a click away, there’s no reason people shouldn’t take their time in making a decision.

This is when good ol’ urgency, scarcity and social proof can be used to supercharge your retargeting.

An example of old school marketing tactics in action

Here’s an example of how Birchbox uses social proof in their retargeting campaigns:

birtchbox-remarketing

Don’t ask me what I was doing on Birchbox.com.

Birchbox’s ad is effective is because it teases you.

Maybe you visited the site, left and forgot all about it. But when you see this ad a week later, you may be more intrigued because “other people” are beaming about it.

So many people are focused on new and fancy ways of running successful retargeting ads, but sometimes it’s the easy-to-overlook old school methods that can make the biggest difference.

Use old school marketing tactics in your retargeting campaigns

  • Give people specific numbers: Only have a few left in stock? Tell people that! Or tell ‘em that hundreds (if not thousands) of people are already using your service.
  • Show people countdowns: Why not add countdown timers to your retargeting ads? Creating urgency by telling people that there are only X days left in your sale is a surprisingly motivating force that can drive conversions.

Retargeting tactic #3: Reach your audience on a variety of retargeting channels

Retargeting on only one channel unnecessarily limits your reach.

Your retargeting ads might be following visitors around on the Google Display Network, but are they being shown on other channels where your audience hangs out?

Social media retargeting is a powerful tool that allows you to show your ads either directly in the newsfeed (Facebook or Twitter) or in the right-hand sidebar (Facebook).

Social media retargeting in action

If you’ve ever been on AdRoll’s site and then checked your Facebook, you’ve probably been the victim of a lot of pointing people.

adroll-retargeting-3

Or maybe you went to Perfect Audience’s homepage and then were stalked on Twitter later with something like this:

5-Retargeting-Twitter-Feed-Ads

Note that to be able to advertise on Facebook, you have need to use a platform that is certified by Facebook’s Ad Exchange network (FBX). AdRoll or Perfect Audience (now part of Marin) are both safe bets.

Each social media network also has pretty specific creative guidelines that you should be aware of. For example:

  • On Facebook, only up to 20% of your ad image can be used for text. You can use this Facebook tool to make sure your ads comply with this policy.
  • Unlike the animated capabilities of ads on the Google Display Network, Facebook retargeting ads have to be static.
  • There is now only one Facebook ad size (1200 x 628 pixels) and one Twitter ad size (800 x 320 pixels) – Facebook will automatically adjust your ads to fit the newsfeed and right hand sidebar.

Retargeting tactic #4: Upselling and cross-selling

You got them to convert! That’s awesome. But what if you could sell more?

When a person has just converted, it’s because they like what you do. You now have a perfect chance to give them more value, and in return, get more money from them.

tom-fishburne-masterbrand
Image by Tom Fishburne.

Whether it’s a complementary offer or something to move them down another funnel, retargeting is the perfect tool for making that happen.

In fact, upselling through retargeting has been found to increase conversion rates by an additional 3-5%.

Upselling in your retargeting campaigns

Are you a SaaS company with a freemium user base? Why not use retargeting to explain your premium features (and hopefully score some upsells)?

Or you could create new audience segments for people who have converted through different offers and use regular display, email or social media retargeting to upsell relevant packages to them.

The possibilities are endless!

Retargeting tactic #5: Testing your ads

Retargeting ads are extremely effective, but only if you’re dedicated to constantly improving them. As with all things conversion rate optimization, you’ve got to work out a testing plan.

You’ve probably got tons of ideas around how you can test your ad creatives: your headline, CTA, hero shot and copy.

But consider going deeper and testing other things such as a completely differently offer and the frequency of your ads.

Maybe your first offer wasn’t the hook the visitor was looking for. Or maybe you’ve been bombarding your prospects with so many ads that you’re causing banner blindness.

A/B testing can help you find that “sweet spot.”

Testing as research

The beauty of A/B testing your retargeting ads is they give you insight into the preferences of each particular audience.

Once you see what works well through your retargeting, you’ll have more insight into what could be effective on your landing pages as well.

Think of retargeting as a way of bringing back lost sales, but also as a research tool.


Retargeting is an effective way to capture lost sales, but it’s also a great research tool.
Click To Tweet


A final word of warning

With so many different ideas and options for you, how do you even decide on where to begin?

Your best bet is to pick a tactic and start testing today.

No matter what you do, make sure you only use one retargeting vendor per retargeting channel so that you don’t compete against yourself and artificially drive up your costs.

What have you found works best for your retargeting? Let’s school each other in the comments!

– Johnathan Dane


Source:  

5 Unknown Tips To Hack Your Retargeting

Thumbnail

You’re Doing AdWords Wrong (Here’s How to Make It Right)

Growing up, I wasn’t the type of kid who knew how to fix things. I wasn’t into cars or building tree houses and I couldn’t for the life of me figure out why my Discman kept skipping (yes, it was because I was moving). But there was one thing I was amazingly good at: making Nutella sandwiches.

Now that I’m older, I’ve realized that I do my best when I play to my strengths. Google AdWords is fortunately one of them. The other is making the occasional grocery store run in a highly effective manner. Let’s just say I still know how to get the essentials.

nutella-johnathan-dane

And although I know you’re not a beginner when it comes to AdWords, I can’t tell you how many high-budget AdWords accounts I’ve seen ($100k – $500k/month) that are set up in a way that just makes me super sad.

You can optimize your landing page all you want, but if you want to get the highest ROI from your PPC campaigns, you should also be optimizing the setup of your AdWords account.

Not only will the ideas I’m about to share improve your CTRs, Quality Scores, ad positions, impression shares, chances of dating and lower your cost per click, it will also help you improve your conversion rates.

Get ready to have your mind blown.

54zhb1

Here are three AdWords mistakes that are hurting your conversion rates… and how to fix them.

1. You’re not using single keyword ad groups

One major obstruction to AdWords performance is when people decide to bundle 10 – 20 keywords in a single ad group. Many people do this because all those keywords fit a common theme.

Sadly, it’s actually recommended by Google to do it this way within the AdWords dashboard:

adwords-keywords

What Google fails to mention is that having that many keywords per ad group can make search-to-ad message match hard to achieve.

Message match is when the search term matches with the ad, and it’s ideal because achieving it means that Google bolds your ad copy to stand out. In the split second it takes someone to decide which ad to click, yours becomes instantly more relevant.

But when you have that many keywords per ad group, you can never have a 100% message match between the keyword you’re bidding on and the ad that is being triggered to show.


Having too many keywords in an ad group makes search-to-ad message match virtually impossible.
Click To TweetPowered By CoSchedule


If you have 10 – 20 keywords per ad group like Google suggests, you’ll end up with a situation like this:

50-to-1-Ad-Group
Can’t believe I actually found a Nutella ad.

The keywords that are pointing to this one ad could be:

  • Nutella cookies recipe
  • Nutella recipes
  • Nutella brownies recipe
  • Nutella cake recipe
  • Nutella hot chocolate recipe
  • Nutella frosting recipe
  • Nutella cupcakes recipe
  • Nutella ice cream recipe
  • Nutella crepe recipe
  • Nutella cheesecake recipe
  • Nutella recipe book
  • Nutella recipe book urban outfitters
  • Nutella recipe brownie

As you can quickly see, not all these keywords that you’re bidding on would be relevant to that one ad. In an ideal world, when someone types in “Nutella cookies recipe,” you’d want an ad that has the following headline: “Nutella Cookies Recipe.”

So how do you go about perfecting your message match? The answer is SKAGs.

What are SKAGs?

Single keyword ad groups (aka SKAGs) allow you to control the message match between the keyword and the text ad because only one keyword will trigger that specific ad.

When you only have one keyword per ad group, your best bet will be to make your ad super specific to that keyword. This means that your ad for the keyword “Nutella crepe recipes” could and should look like this:

New-Ad

The reason why this ad is better and more relevant is because you have the keyword you’re bidding on in the ad itself. Perfect message match.

Higher relevancy = higher click-through rate = higher Quality Score = lower cost per click = lower cost per conversion.

I’d recommend having at least two drastically different ads in each ad group that you test against each other that follow the format below:

Headline: Include keyword in headline
Description line 1: Talk about benefits and features.
Description line 2: Talk about benefits. Call to action!
Display URL: YourDomain.com/Keyword

When you create single keyword ad groups, your layout of targeting should start looking like this:

Keyword-Ad-variant

And when it comes to keywords and match types, try setting them up like this in each ad group:

Keyword:
+nutella +cookies +recipe
[nutella cookies recipe]
“nutella cookies recipe”

How SKAGs impact your click-through rates

Here’s an example of what happens to your click-through rates when you continually create single keyword ad groups (screenshot pulled from one of my clients’ accounts):

improved-ctr

Your click-through rate slowly starts to grow as your relevancy between keyword and ad increase.

Here’s what happens to your click-through rates when you don’t:

worsened-ctr

The multiple keywords in your ad group ultimately hurt your performance and relevancy, bringing down your click-through rates and Quality Scores (and adding more just makes it worse).

Here’s another example of a complete single keyword ad group overhaul for the entire account. Notice the spike in click-through rate and the ongoing improvement of it as well.

skag-overhaul

You may be thinking, “Well crap Johnathan! I have like, a bazillion keywords, and I use dynamic keyword insertion for almost all of my ads! I can’t do this!

200

And all I’ll say is, “Can you afford not to?”


Here’s why you can’t afford NOT to use single keyword ad groups in your AdWords campaigns.
Click To TweetPowered By CoSchedule


2. You’re not focusing on ad group level negative keywords

With PPC, there’s nothing worse than not knowing what you don’t know.

Inside your AdWords account, you most likely have short tail and long tail versions of different keywords. What you may not know is that your shorter tail keywords could be stealing away impressions from your longer-more-specific-tail keywords. Usually, this happens because AdWords doesn’t know how to correlate the search term to your long-tail keyword because of the match types you’ve chosen.

This is a problem. You don’t want your newly-created SKAGs to go to waste, right?

To avoid this scenario, we’ll need to take a very close look within your search term reports and make sure that each search term corresponds with the exact same keyword.

Using ad group level negative keywords

One of the things I always strive to do is to get all AdWords accounts to have at least 25 search terms (from highest impressions and down) in a row that are pulling from the exact same keyword. When that happens, your search term report starts looking like this:

Search-Term-Report
Notice how the search terms correspond perfectly with the exact same keywords?

To make this (almost ludicrous) level of granularity happen, you’ll need to start adding ad group level negative keywords (not campaign or account level negative keywords) when there’s a discrepancy between keyword and search term. This will then prevent your short tail keywords stealing away impressions from the longer tail ones.

When you look at your search term report and see search terms that you want to show for but don’t match up exactly with the keyword that you’re bidding on, you’ll want to add that search term as an ad group level negative keyword (from the current ad group) and then create a new ad group for it.

Ensuring the right ads are being triggered to show

To make sure your keywords are triggering the right ads to show, you should frequently perform keyword diagnoses. To do this, you’ll want to be at the keyword level view within your AdWords account and click on the “Details” button and then “Keyword diagnosis.”

keyword-diagnosis

Sometimes you’ll find that negative keywords, bids that are too low or internal competition are preventing certain keywords from triggering corresponding ads. No matter the source of the problem, identifying the issue gives you the information you need to optimize your ads and make them hyper-relevant.

As you continue to do this over time, your Quality Scores, click-through rates and average ad positions will start going up because you’re granulating and improving relevancy.


Ad group level negative keywords are one of the key ingredients to a successful AdWords campaign.
Click To TweetPowered By CoSchedule


3. You’re not using dynamic keyword insertion

Now that you’ve done your part on the AdWords side, it’s time to start capturing the traffic on your landing pages. Remember the day you created landing pages for every single keyword? No? I sure do.

Well, luckily, you may never have to go through that.

With dynamic keyword insertion, you can essentially take any text on the landing page and change it out with what you specify in the URL parameters. This allows you to create one landing page around a service or product theme and then change the headlines and calls-to-action to fit the keyword that the visitor searched for.

This will also have a positive impact on your landing page Quality Scores as Google sees that your page is very relevant to the keyword you’re bidding on.

With dynamic keyword insertion in place, your PPC funnel could essentially look like this:

Keyword-Ad-LP
By the way, that’s a horrible landing page. No call to action at all. What is that? A parchment?

A PPC funnel structured like this results in ads and landing pages that are extremely relevant to what people are searching for. Here’s that magic equation again:


Higher relevancy = higher CTR = higher Quality Score = lower CPC = lower cost per conversion.
Click To TweetPowered By CoSchedule


Higher relevancy leads to more conversions

This trifecta of strategies will make ads more relevant to your leads and will result in increased conversions. It’s a win-win.

SKAGs, ad group level negative keywords and dynamic keyword insertion work together to improve the relevancy of the ads seen by your visitors and give visitors a consistent experience.

Combined, these three steps will make your AdWords campaign optimization efforts more accurate than a Stormtrooper trying to do its own laundry.

stormtrooper-laundry

So there you have it: a brand new way to structure your AdWords account. I’d love to hear how your initial tests go.

Do you think this will help with your PPC performance? Why or why not? Please comment below!

– Johnathan Dane


nutella-johnathan-dane

Originally posted here: 

You’re Doing AdWords Wrong (Here’s How to Make It Right)