All posts by Jennifer Pepper

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7 Page Speed Stats Every Marketer Should Know

If we asked you to describe an effective digital marketing campaign, you might tout the value of strong design, ad targeting, or the benefits of conversion optimization. But even if your web and landing pages are aesthetically on point, it can mean nothing if you haven’t considered page speed. For context, if it takes more than three seconds for a page to load, just over half of visitors will leave it. Put another way, for every second of impatient agony you’re causing visitors with slow load times, you’re losing conversions and profit.

Beyond your bottom line, page speed also influences how your content ranks with Google. In July of this year, the search engine announced that speed will have a more prominent effect on the ranking of mobile searches. So if you want your landing pages and web pages to appear in the SERP (paid or search), you need them to be lightning-fast.

To paint a picture of why load time is so essential, we’ve collected seven stats about page speed. We’re currently doing some original research of our own on this, but for now, read on to learn why slow and steady doesn’t win the digital marketing race and use these fast facts to make the case for speeding up your landing pages.

1. 46% of people say waiting for pages to load is what they dislike most about browsing the web on mobile

When creating a landing page, you consider several factors (layout, content hierarchy, visuals, CTA, and more). But as Google encourages, page speed needs to be a priority too. Your visitors don’t like waiting—and their frustration has only grown since the 2015 survey linked above—so always consider load time (regardless of device) just as much as traditional design elements. Watch your image sizes and compress any that are borderline too heavy. Anything above 800kb is pushing your luck in the speed department.

2. On average, it takes 15.3 seconds to load a mobile landing page

(And that’s on simulated 4G and everything!) But that’s also just accounting for mobile—in general, pages can load much faster on desktop. According to the latest from Pingdom, for example, most web pages load in just 3.21 seconds. At a minimum, you should aim for a load time of three seconds or less—especially if you want to boost conversions.

When Akamai studied how mobile load times affected a client’s conversions, they discovered that 2.4 seconds was the sweet spot, averaging a peak mobile conversion rate of 1.9% during a 30-day span. On the flipside, when their client’s site loaded in 4.2 seconds, the average conversion rate dropped below 1%.

Ultimately, aiming for anywhere between 2.4 to 3 seconds on mobile and desktop is a smart move.

3. Sites that load in five seconds (compared to those that load in 19) see 70% longer average sessions

While you can definitely aim for quicker than five seconds, the point here is that the longer people spend on your pages, the more time they have to consume your content and actually convert. You work hard to build persuasive offers—so keep visitors on your landing pages by ensuring that they load quickly enough for them to actually see (and understand!) your key messaging.

4. A 100-millisecond delay in load time can cause conversion rates to drop by 7%

Similar to Google’s stat about conversions dropping by 12% for every second of load time, Akamai comes to the table with another time-is-money figure. According to their research in 2017, one full second can decrease conversion rates by 70%! So, in addition to losing visitors, page speed is directly tied to losing a lot of potential revenue—something Mobify discovered when they decided to examine the effects of homepage load time. In its 2016 Q2 Mobile Insights Report, the online shopping platform revealed that every 100-millisecond decrease in load time worked out to a 1.11% increase in session-based conversion.

But remember, page speed doesn’t just affect organizations that sell products and/or services, as evidenced by Pinterest’s decision to rebuild their pages for performance. By reducing wait times by 40%,the sharing platform increased both search engine traffic and sign-ups by 15%.

5. 73% of mobile users have encountered websites that take too long to load

Hey, we’ve all been there. Even though faster speeds are constantly being offered to visitors (via telecom ads, internet providers, etc.), many websites still aren’t loading fast enough. That’s bad news for visitors, but great news for you in that there’s an opportunity to stand out if you speed up. SEMrush reports that “if your site loads in 1.7 seconds, it’s faster than approximately 75% of the web.” Use this as an opportunity for your brand to make a competitive move with websites and landing pages that load faster than most. It’s time to make speed a priority.

6. 79% of web shoppers who have trouble with web site performance say they won’t return to the site to buy again

The online shopping experience isn’t just about website aesthetics or customer service; it’s about overall performance, which includes page speed and responsivity. This stat shows that something like a slow loading site can easily turn visitors away—sometimes for good.

7. Pages that load within two seconds have an average bounce rate of 9%, while pages that take five seconds to load have a bounce rate of 38%

A high bounce rate indicates visitors aren’t staying on your website for very long—I mean, sure they’re landing there, but they’re not consuming more content than the page they’re on right at that moment. And who knows how much of it?! This can mean they’re not clicking your CTA to a next step, nevermind learning about your key value prop.

It can be difficult to determine why, exactly, someone has left your landing page—poor audience targeting? Uninteresting content? Not enough multimedia? And if page speed is affecting bounce rate, you might begin to second guess your content. Save yourself some time (and confusion) by prioritizing page speed via solutions like Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP).

Are slow loading pages affecting your digital marketing campaigns? Join our AMP beta and be one of the first to give your visitors a near-instant mobile experience.

Now, returning to our question about the most important thing to consider when designing a digital marketing campaign? Hopefully, with all of these stats in mind, you have a new perspective. Page speed is one of the first things visitors experience when they arrive on your site or landing page, and as load time continues to become a priority (for both mobile and desktop environments) it will only be more integral to the success of your online strategy—so you gotta hurry up!

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7 Page Speed Stats Every Marketer Should Know

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Converting with Extra Copy: 5 Long-Form Landing Page Examples

We all know how effective a short, concise landing page can be. It’s quick to read and, depending on the offer up for grabs, can convince visitors to purchase or opt-in fast.

But there are benefits to building long-form pages too. For starters, longer pages can provide in-depth info visitors need to make informed decisions, helping you attract more qualified leads from the start. Moreover, your company may have offers better suited to a longer page with more convincing to do.

According to our Conversion Benchmark Report, which analyzed the behavior of more than 74 million lead-gen landing page visitors, pages with 125 words or less typically had a 15% higher conversion rate (I mean, concise converts!) But for pages between 250 and 750 words, we found conversion rates really only varied slightly in this range.

Such remains the question facing every copywriter:

“How long should my landing page be?”

Well, the answer is nuanced and comes down to the offer at hand. There are several cases where long-form landing pages can actually be better than shorter ones. For instance, if you’re:

  • describing technical product details and in-depth benefits,
  • showcasing your company’s achievements to establish credibility, or
  • persuading customers to invest in especially expensive software, services, or high-commitment offers.

Page length is less about preference, and has more to do with the complexity of the offer at hand and the stage of the buying process someone’s in. You need to cover all your bases, anticipate objections, and show that your offer is legit. A heckuva task for a limited amount of copy.

So, to inspire your next not-so-short page, we analyzed five long-form landing page examples below. Here’s our take on why each of these built-in-Unbounce pages work so well.

Example 1: American Executive Centers

A long-form landing page example from American Executive Centers
Click the image above to see the full page.

Why this works: No questions are left unanswered.

This long-form landing page immediately highlights American Executive Centers’ distinct offering in the headline, and above the fold (i.e. they’re offering virtual office services like mail handling, virtual assistants, and meeting rooms). Given the decision potential customers face here, it’s important that the brand’s presented a bulleted, quick-to-read list of what’s up for grabs at the beginning of the page.

By listing all the key features above the fold like this—readers can quickly get a sense of whether AEC will meet their core requirements. This is especially important for busy decision makers who are comparing their options. If AEC’s landing page is just one of many someone has open in their browser, for instance, it makes a strong case against competing pages where core offerings may be harder to spot.

The landing page doesn’t stop there, either. Their contact form appears above the fold in an orange rectangle that bridges between the two sections. This contrast encourages the eye to move down the page.

AEC Orange Rectangle

Below the fold, AEC shares detailed information about where they operate and emphasizes the benefits over the competition. They also list packages and pricing so customers can independently decide whether the service fits their budget.

The lesson here? Extra copy may not be required to convert a consumer on a personal purchase, but when their decision impacts an entire team or workplace, it clearly helps. For a B2B company like American Executive Centers, using a long-form landing page makes sense because it allows this brand to cater to a more intense consideration phase in the buyer’s journey.

Example 2: Mr. Rooter Plumbing

Click the image above to see the full page.

Why this works: Simple, straightforward design—and an incentive for customers.

Mr. Rooter’s landing page (developed to promote their South San Gabriel service region) is not necessarily long in terms of the number of page sections, but it’s got a lot of copy and details. Right off the bat, readers can see what Mr. Rooter offers. Adding a phone number to the header also gives customers who are urgently seeking a plumber an immediate point of contact. Hey—when the water’s gathering around your ankles, you don’t have time to read an entire landing page. Additionally, all of the cities within the South San Gabriel region are listed—so customers don’t have to do further research.

And people like a deal. By offering a $20 discount, the page gives customers an extra incentive to use Mr. Rooter over a competitor. The placement of the offer is on the left-hand side of the page, which is ideal considering that online readers’ tend to scan pages from left to right in a Z- or F-shaped pattern. The offer is also an example of basic but effective skeuomorphism, with a dotted line that immediately calls to mind coupons in printed media.

Mr. Router Coupon

The page goes on to describe the company’s areas of expertise in detail—something condensed landing pages don’t offer—and highlights why customers choose Mr. Rooter by including some benefits of their service (24/7 availability, reliable specialists, local area knowledge) as well as testimonials.

This example proves that in many industries, substance matters more than stunning design—and you don’t need a technical background to build a landing page that does the trick (shameless plug: especially not with our landing page templates).

Example 3: Chronotek

Click the image above to see the full page.

Why this works: Expert insight and in-depth product details.

We’re startin’ to see some patterns here. Just like the above long-form landing page examples, Chronotek showcases its primary features above the fold—along with a direct heading that describes their product in clear, uncomplicated terms. Having both these elements above the fold grabs the target audience’s attention as soon as they land and encourages them to keep reading.

But they don’t stop there. Since Chronotek is B2B software—and likely requires a significant investment of time and money—it’s essential their landing page paints a full picture. By listing six key ways customers benefit (e.g. simplified payroll, live reporting, in-app messaging), Chronotek outlines the value of investing IT dollars in their time-tracking software.

Though their primary messaging is relatively straightforward, farther down the page Chronotek uses short copy with videos and illustrations to connect on a more emotional level. In this case, these elements instill a sense of urgency (“Chronotek sends the alert before it’s too late.”) mingled with the assurance that they have you covered (“Rest assured and know it all!”). The copy in this section is also more ‘you’ oriented. “You” or “your” occur six times—and the copy’s peppered with emotional words, like “stress.”

Chronotek's emotion
An example of the copy paired with videos Chronotek uses throughout the page.

Though many prospects might be convinced by the features and benefits of this product alone, using a long-form landing page lets Chronotek make a more emotional appeal to anyone who has remaining objections or needs to hear certain key phrases before they’ll sign up for a free trial.

Example 4: Throne & Hauser

Click the image above to see the full page.

Why this works: Transparency and convenience builds trust.

Again, not a ton of page sections length wise on this one, but this law firm’s page does contain a fair amount of copy. That said, it also doesn’t waste any of their visitors’ time. The company’s services and location appear immediately—plus a short description of why a client should work with Throne & Hauser. They also feature the credentials visitors expect from a reputable law firm upfront. And, finally, we see two simple methods of contacting the company (via phone or form).

By including personal bios about the firm’s lawyers (photos included), the page creates a connection, which is critical in a largely relationship-driven industry. Testimonials further boost prospects’ trust in the firm by showcasing examples of happy clients.

This long-form landing page also subtly tells a story with a happy ending in its choice of photos:

Throne Hauser CTA image

The hero shot features a sad child divided between parents, while the image underlying the call-to-action at the bottom shows a parent and child happily united. Using their page this way allows Throne & Hauser to tell a story and evoke emotions.

Example 5: Schar School at George Mason University

Click the image above to see the full page.

Why this works: Credit where it’s due.

To impress prospective students, the Schar School at George Mason University has included tons of information on its long-form landing page. Readers quickly learn that the school operates in Washington, D.C. (location’s a major factor when it comes to selecting a university) and that programs combine technical skills and theory. If a student’s interested, they can easily request more information and start their application using the form. There are also opportunities to enroll in sample classes or attend an open house.

The Schar School also features achievements to separate themselves in a competitive category, where options can feel endless. The testimonials come from recent graduates who now occupy high-demand jobs in fields associated with the school’s programs:

Schar Testimonials

The page also includes degree program descriptions. For these (lengthy!) blurbs, short-form pages wouldn’t cut it, but this is the kind of specific info prospective students need to determine if a given option is right for them.

The page leads with the school’s Master’s programs, which makes up the bulk of its enrollment. And although it might make sense to create separate landing pages for each degree program, using a longer format for this landing page helps provide an overview for students who might be considering multiple programs.

And there you have it: five effective long-form landing page examples…

…across five industries no less! These companies all needed a few more words to get their point across, with detailed descriptions, testimonials, and achievements that short pages just don’t have room for. The extra copy helps the brands be empathetic to the often significant personal or financial impacts of the offers at hand.

Ultimately, the nature of your industry and product or service will help dictate landing page length. What’s important to remember is that there’s no hard and fast rule. We’re often taught that shorter is sweeter, but landing pages—like naps, daylight hours, and vacations—can sometimes stand to last a little bit longer.

Original source: 

Converting with Extra Copy: 5 Long-Form Landing Page Examples

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6 Examples of the Best B2B Landing Pages (and the Secrets to Steal From Them)

Best B2B Landing Pages

B2B products and services can be difficult to fully capture on a landing page—we know from experience.

Whether it’s defining your conversion goal, ordering your page sections, or writing copy that resonates, it’s not always a walk in the park. Not to mention B2B can involve so many more decision makers you may need to appeal to. Showcasing the value of something like software at scale can be trickier than explaining how your cutting-edge hoverboard might benefit just one person.

But, in our view, building a successful B2B page boils down to a few key things:

  • Creating an engaging experience that makes prospects acutely aware of the problem you solve
  • Promoting your offer clearly and simply, and
  • Cleverly leading visitors through consideration, towards conversion.

Persuasion sounds great in theory, hey, but what does this actually involve?

To help you better understand what makes an effective B2B landing page, we’ve analyzed six Unbounce-built pages doing a great job. Scroll through the examples to see what they do especially well, and how you can take their techniques to the next level.

1. PIM on Cloud

PIM on Cloud Landing Page
Image courtesy of PIM on Cloud. (Click image to see the full page.)

Best practice to steal: Where appropriate, bring prospects through several stages of the customer journey.

Sales cycles vary per industry, sure, but the process always starts with building interest and (ideally) ends with a purchase decision. Designed properly, some landing pages can take readers through each of these stages as they scroll from top to bottom. We found PIM on Cloud’s long-form landing page does this really well.

PIM on Cloud Landing Page Features

This brand builds awareness by offering a description of their service (in the first two page sections), they guide prospects through consideration with a list of features and benefits, and then drive conversions by detailing available plans alongside their calls to action (i.e. “Choose plan” or “Ask for pricing”, respectively).

Though some landing pages are designed to increase conversions at the bottom of the funnel, providing a more holistic journey—like PIM on Cloud does—allows a wider net for prospects to learn more. This page could even be a destination URL for many of PIM’s branded Google Ads because it’s so high-level.

PIM on Cloud Anchor

Of course, some visitors will also know exactly what they’re looking for from the start, so PIM on Cloud includes anchor navigation on this page for a choose-your-adventure experience. Thanks to this, more qualified prospects can jump straight to the details most relevant to them. While landing pages shouldn’t have tons of links on them (your main site navigation would be a real no-no, for example), anchor navigation is recommended if you’re trying to cover a lot of info at once. They can make longer pages like this more digestible.

Bonus: PIM on Cloud’s landing page provides readers with an FAQ section and a contact form, further opportunity for prospects to evaluate their decision—and for the brand to collect valuable leads. When you make landing pages that cover a broad offer, be sure to consider whether you might use an FAQ to ease any potential friction, and leave a way people can get in touch with you directly just in case.

2. Resource Guru

Resource Guru Landing Page
Image courtesy of Resource Guru. (Click image to see the full page.)

Best practice to steal: Help prospects visualize a complex idea.

Many B2B products and services solve complex problems. As a result, landing pages need to be designed in such a way that they make it easy for potential customers to understand features and benefits. One way to do this is to incorporate visual elements like videos, images, and even animations—all of which can help drive conversions. According to Eyeview, using a video on your landing page can increase conversions by up to 80%.

Resource Guru’s landing page is effective because it greets viewers with a large play button as soon as they land. Pressing play is intuitive and launches a high-quality explainer video. They let this video do the talking, then quickly request an action from visitors.

Taking it to the next level:

Instead of a simple play button, this landing page could have benefitted from including a video thumbnail featuring people’s faces. Visually compelling thumbnails that align with your video’s content can actually increase play rate.

Additionally, it’s always a good idea to reiterate all the core points from your video script on your landing page in text. This ensures that even in the event you have a low play rate, prospects can still learn about your offer without having to click play. Whether they left their headphones at home that day or prefer text, it’s good to have a backup plan.

3. Blink

Blink Landing Page
Image courtesy of Blink. (Click image to see the full page.)

Best practice to steal: Include the right kind of proof to build trust and credibility.

Blink’s landing page above relies heavily on testimonials and a list of select, high-profile clients, which are presented immediately below their contact form. Also, rather than diving into product features, Blink backs up their expertise by showcasing industry awards.

Taking it to the next level:

Although testimonials, logos, and other social proof are effective, it’s worth noting that Blink misses the opportunity to (immediately) explain what they actually do for customers at the start of this page.

According to Nielsen Norman Group, 57% of visitors’ time spent on a page occurs above the fold (and 74% is spent on the first two screenfuls). If your company’s offerings are at the very bottom, as they are on Blink’s landing page, visitors may click away without context. Overall, make sure your pages get into the details of what you do before explaining why you’re the best at doing it.

4. MediaValet

MediaValet Landing Page
Image courtesy of MediaValet. (Click image to see full page.)

Best practice to steal: The rule of three works great for layouts and benefit copy.

The rule of three is one of the most successful methods for memorizing content—we’ve seen it used in film, advertising, and beyond—and MediaValet’s landing page is no exception.

The digital asset management company applies the rule of three when presenting their key benefits and testimonials. This clear, concise, and easy-to-consume structure is also key to the landing page’s successful layout: it introduces the product, backs up their claims with stats, and provides an easy way for prospects to request a demo. The easier visitors can consume and retain the content on your landing page, the better equipped they are to make a decision to purchase. They’re also more likely to keep scrolling instead of being overwhelmed by too much info.

MediaValet Form

Taking it to the next level:

Headline clarity is key, and you only have the first few words of anything to convince people to keep reading. In my opinion, MediaValet could have benefited from using a variation of their sub-headline (“Organize your assets, marketing content and media in one central location with digital asset management.”) as their primary headline to make their product offer that much more obvious.

5. Vivonet Kiosk

Vivonet Kiosk Landing Page
Image courtesy of Vivonet Kiosk. (Click image to see full page.)

Best practice to steal: A floating CTA button gives you a greater chance to convert.

A landing page has one goal—to convince visitors to take action. Whatever the intended next step, it’s your job to create a clear, strategically placed call to action that lets visitors know what to do next. Using multiple CTAs can be distracting to your audience, but a consistent CTA that follows visitors throughout their experience? That’s crystal clear.

Vivonet Kiosk uses a floating CTA button that follows visitors as they scroll down the page. No matter where they’re at, the “Talk to Us About Kiosks” button remains in the bottom right-hand corner of their screen.

6. Unbounce

PPC Page

Best practice to steal: Have a conversation with your prospects.

Alright, y’got me. I’m using an Unbounce example here, but I think you’ll agree it’s pretty good. This is a landing page we created to speak about a problem we solve, and drive signups.

In the screenshot you may notice that this page actually breaks one of the rules we established above: it includes the main site navigation. Think of this as a hybrid, as well as a great example of how flexible you can be. Our page is structured with the persuasive force of a landing page (and built using our builder)—but incorporates neatly into the rest of our site, living on our domain and sharing the site’s nav. We do this fairly often when we want to build a web page especially quickly for the site that would otherwise require a ton of dev work.

Since Unbounce markets to marketers, we also wanted to overcome the hardened shell of skepticism that so many of us develop when it comes to other people’s campaigns. So this landing page uses a conversational framework to build trust. It offers a straightforward rundown of both the problem—running ads has become increasingly pricey—and the solution before it ever pitches our platform. And the inclusion of a chatbot invites you to ask questions we don’t cover, keeping the conversation going.

Of course, a landing page with an educational tone risks losing the reader’s attention—the same way a boring teacher might. In addition to a friendlier tone, we use interactive elements, animations, and social proof in the form of quotes from digital marketers. All of these elements keep things lively and provide added detail.

PPC Detail

Like the example from PIM on Cloud, we also anticipated less qualified prospects might visit the page, so we include tabs and collapsible page sections that provide more info or answer questions. If a reader happens to hit the page without a strong understanding of what we mean by “landing page,” for instance, they can click to learn the answer, without leaving. Like any good conversationalist, we listen as well as talk.

Feeling inspired? Learn how to design and build a B2B landing page in just seven simple steps.

Follow this link – 

6 Examples of the Best B2B Landing Pages (and the Secrets to Steal From Them)

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See The Landing Pages These Shopify Merchants Used to Scale Ad Revenue 33X

Year round Liz and Bill Farrell, a husband and wife team, work the dirt at Fat Stone Farm in Lyme, Connecticut with their two kids.

After making the move from cubicles to the great outdoors, the Farrells realized they loved growing fresh food, and creating healthy, farm-grown products ranging from elderberry apple shots to their own maple syrup.

Now—when you think of a typical farmer’s marketing strategy—you might picture a hand-painted sign at a local market, but Liz and Bill run a digital elderberry empire.

The couple started as Shopify merchants and then partnered with digital agency Webistry to take their business to new heights. They wanted to see better return on ad spend, and prepare for winter (their best sales season of the year).

It was a perfect partnership from the start, but nobody could predict that a combo of Unbounce landing pages, popups, a Shopify integration, and near obsessive audience building and retargeting on Facebook would:

  • Lower cost-per-acquisition from $145 (at its highest) to just $1.55(!) for the company’s Elderberry Apple Shots and DIY Gummy kits.
  • Increase return on ad spend for their Elderberry Apple Shot campaigns from 1.66X to an incredible 33.12X.
  • Deliver a cost-per-lead for a sweepstakes campaign of just $0.51.
  • See sweepstakes conversion rates from ad click to entry of up to 79.55%.
  • And garner Facebook relevance scores of 8s and 9s.

Overall, with Webistry’s help, Fat Stone Farm tripled ROAS in just five months (December ‘16–April ‘17), and—via continued optimizations—reached returns of 33X over a year and three months.

Here’s their epic ecommerce story, and the paid media tactics that could work for you too.

Winter is Coming

Historically, sales of Fat Stone Farm’s Elderberry Apple Shots go up in winter to help fight off flu season. So in early winter 2016, Bill and Liz approached Jonathan Naccache, Co-Founder at Webistry to prep some advertising.

The agency discovered that they couldn’t look to AdWords for a huge win. The search volume for elderberries or related products wasn’t super high, and this approach simply wasn’t scalable. Instead, they needed to generate extremely targeted custom audiences on Facebook (which can be difficult because prospects on Facebook aren’t necessarily screaming about their love of elderberry – these prospects need to be uncovered).

In Webistry’s approach, each ad campaign would target a group of interests that could coincide with elderberry products. They’d target Facebook users who’s interests included: alternative medicine, natural remedies, homesteading, or those engaging with popular health blogs like Mother Earth News and Wellness Mama.

It took a lot of research, and as Jonathan says this is where the agency advantage comes into play: “having access to several strategic minds, resources and thorough research gets you a significant edge right off the start.”

The First Ad to Shopify Landing Page Combo

From December 2016 to January 2017, Webistry ran campaigns on Facebook targeting each of the audience segments they’d identified might be interested in the elderberry shots.

Here’s an example of some of the ads (corresponding to fall and winter seasons):

Pictured above: the ads Webistry ran to the associated landing page.

All elderberry apple shots ads led to this Unbounce-built PPC landing page, which converts at 4.7% (lifetime average conversion rate). A conversion in this case was a purchase via the ‘add to cart’ button):

Notice the benefit copy from the ad headlines is carried through to the Unbounce landing page. Click to see a larger version.

And while the orange ‘add to cart’ button on the page looks deceptively simple, it’s actually where the magic happens. Instead of redirecting prospects to the brand’s Shopify store, Webistry fashioned custom javascript to make the button integrate seamlessly with Shopify and offer a slick, on-page checkout experience:

Interested in adding a Shopify cart to your Unbounce landing pages? Webistry shared the custom Javascript in our community. Head over, grab the script, and drive purchases on your own pages.

Two months into this campaign, return on ad spend was 1.66X, and cost-per-purchase was fluctuating between $19 and $145. Jonathan knew they could improve upon these early results and began targeting audiences of vegetarians, vegans, healthy eating affectionados, and homesteaders.

And so, in April 2017 the agency launched a new landing page campaign for smoothie lovers.

The idea was to position the elderberry product as the ideal ingredient to add to a smoothie. Here’s a sample ad used to launch this campaign:

And of course, the landing page this ad pointed to:

This beautiful landing page converts traffic to purchase at 9.44%

Beyond driving sales, the agency realized there was potential for lead capture here too (as a means of remarketing to especially interested prospects later), so they added an on-exit popup to this page. It offered up a free smoothie recipe book and integrated with a Mailchimp autoresponder.

With an 18% conversion rate, here’s the popup built in Unbounce:

The smoothie campaign helped drop cost-per-purchase down to ~$9.65, and Bill and Liz saw a return on ad spend of 3X from their initial investment after just five months of executing this strategy.

This was great, but Webistry wanted to help Fat Stone Farm stay present in their potential buyer’s world year round. They could lie low waiting for winter again all summer, or they could start developing highly refined retargeting and lookalike audiences to reach all year long.

The Sweepstakes That Raised the Stakes

In May 2017, continuing in the off-season, it was time to start preparing for their next winter. Fat Stone Farm was seeing major benefits from refined Facebook audience targeting, so Jonathan and the team extended this strategy with sweepstakes.

They used weekly sweepstakes as a means to gauge and track prospect’s interest in the products, then later in the winter, they created Facebook lookalike and retargeting audiences to get in front of similar groups of interested people regularly.

As Jonathan shares, this allowed the team to generate even better target audiences:

“Our goal was to create campaigns that helped us measure different levels of interest, and to identify these audiences by tracking every event with a pixel. We had a drip campaign setup, and non-winners of the first sweepstakes were given access to a second sweepstakes.”

That is – those who didn’t win each week were offered access to another sweepstakes prize (either the breakfast pack or gummy pack product). This helped introduce prospects to other Fat Stone Farm products and gauge interest for these versus a complementary offering like smoothies.

Here’s a sample ad for the sweepstakes:

And here’s the first landing page touchpoint:

Click the image above for a closer look.

If you didn’t win, you might be sent a second offer in the sweepstakes, with a chance to win an Elderberry Gummy Kit via the landing page below:

Click the image above to see the full landing page.

Of the people who clicked through on the Facebook ad and reached the first landing page above, 18.79% converted. Moreover, of the people who did not win the first sweepstakes, but clicked through the email announcing the second sweepstakes, 79.55% converted via the landing page.

Hot tip: Webistry embedded a third party tool called ViralSweep on these pages. It’s a sweepstakes application to help manage entries, select a winner at random, and allows people to win bonus entries by referring friends via social.

Not only did this campaign collect over 15,000 relevant leads that Fat Stone Farm could remarket to year long with terrific offers, but it reduced cost-per-lead down to a mere $0.51.

Which brings us to…

Winter Season, 2018

After all the ad testing, landing page alterations, and lessons along the way, Webistry re-launched the sales campaigns using six months of audience-segmented data.

They launched the gummy kits as a standalone product landing page (vs. the sweepstakes page) and continued to sell the Elderberry Apple Shots. The best part? From January to March 2018 Webistry achieved the highest return on ad spend for Bill and Liz since starting to work with them: a whopping 33.12X.

Additionally, this season they saw the lowest cost-per-acquisition of just $1.55.

As Bill Ferrell says of the partnership with Webistry:

“These guys are worth every penny. Excellent results (very high CTRs, good CPA, [and] lots of new customers!). The Webistry co-founders are hands-on, creative, and keep tweaking throughout. Their attentiveness to the campaigns and my crazy ideas have exceeded my expectations month after month.”

Berry good results indeed.

Continue at source – 

See The Landing Pages These Shopify Merchants Used to Scale Ad Revenue 33X

See How Dynamic Text on a Landing Page Helped Increase Conversions by 31.4% [A/B Test Reveal]

a/b testing with ConversionLab

Pictured above: Rolf Inge Holden (Finge), founder of ConversionLab.

Whether your best ideas come to you in the shower, at the gym, or have you bolting awake in the middle of the night, sometimes you want to quickly A/B test to see if a given idea will help you hit your marketing targets.

This want to split test is real for many Unbounce customers, including Norway-based digital agency ConversionLab, who works with client Campaign Monitor.

Typically this agency’s founder, Rolf Inge Holden (Finge), delivers awesome results with high-performing landing pages and popups for major brands. But recently his agency tried an experiment we wanted to share because of the potential it could have for your paid search campaigns, too.

The Test Hypothesis

If you haven’t already heard of San-Francisco based Campaign Monitor, they make it easy to create, send, and optimize email marketing campaigns. Tasked with running especially effective PPC landing pages for the brand, Finge had a hypothesis:

If we match copy on a landing page dynamically with the exact verb used as a keyword in someone’s original search query, we imagine we’ll achieve higher perceived relevance for a visitor and (thereby) a greater chance of conversion.

In other words, the agency wondered whether the precise verb someone uses in their Google search has an effect on how they perceive doing something with a product, and—if they were to see this exact same verb on the landing page— whether this would increase conversions.

In the case of email marketing, for example, if a prospect typed: “design on-brand emails” into Google, ‘design’ is the exact verb they’d see in the headline and CTAs on the resulting landing page (vs. ‘build’ or ‘create’, or another alternative). The agency wanted to carry through the exact verb no matter what the prospect typed into the search bar for relevance, but outside the verb the rest of the headline would stay the same.

The question is, would a dynamic copy swap actually increase conversions?

Setting up a valid test

To run this test properly, ConversionLab had to consider a few table-stakes factors. Namely, the required sample size and duration (to understand if the results they’d achieve were significant).

In terms of sample size, the agency confirmed the brand could get the traffic needed to the landing page variations to ensure a meaningful test. Combined traffic to variant A and B was 1,274 visitors total and—in terms of duration—they would run the variants for a full 77 days for the data to properly cook.

To determine the amount of traffic and duration you need for your own tests to be statistically significant, check out this A/B test duration calculator.

Next, it was time to determine how the experiment would play out on the landing page. To accomplish the dynamic aspect of the idea, the agency used Unbounce’s Dynamic Text Replacement feature on Campaign Monitor’s landing page. DTR helps you swap out the text on your landing page with whatever keyword a prospect actually used in their search.

Below you can see a few samples of what the variants could have looked like once the keywords from search were pulled in (“create” was the default verb if a parameter wasn’t able to be pulled in):

A/B test variation 1
A/B test sample variation

What were the results?

When the test concluded at 77 days (Oct 31, 2017 —Jan 16, 2018), Campaign Monitor saw a 31.4% lift in conversions using the variant in which the verb changed dynamically. In this case, a conversion was a signup for a trial of their software, and the test achieved 100% statistical significance with more than 100 conversions per variant.

The variant that made use of DTR to send prospects through to signup helped lift conversions to trial by 31.4%

What these A/B test results mean

In the case of this campaign, the landing page variations (samples shown above) prompt visitors to click through to a second page where someone starts their trial of Campaign Monitor. The tracked conversion goal in this case (measured outside of Unbounce reporting) was increases to signups on this page after clicking through from the landing page prior.

This experiment ultimately helped Campaign Monitor understand the verb someone uses in search can indeed help increase signups.

The result of this test tell us that when a brand mirrors an initial search query as precisely as possible from ad to landing page, we can infer the visitor understands the page is relevant to their needs and are thereby more primed to click through onto the next phase of the journey and ultimately, convert.

Message match for the win!

Here’s Finge on the impact the test had on the future of their agency’s approach:

“Our hypothesis was that a verb defines HOW you solve a challenge; i.e. do you design an email campaign or do you create it? And if we could meet the visitor’s definition of solving their problem we would have a greater chance of converting a visit to a signup. The uplift was higher than we had anticipated! When you consider that this relevance also improves Quality Score in AdWords due to closer message match, it’s fair to say that we will be using DTR in every possible way forwards.”

Interested in A/B testing your own campaigns?

Whether you work in a SaaS company like Campaign Monitor, or have a product for which there are multiple verbs someone could use to make queries about your business, swapping out copy in your headlines could be an A/B test you want to try for yourself.

Using the same type of hypothesis format we shared above, and the help of the A/B testing calculator (for determining your duration and sample size), you can set up some variants of your landing pages to pair with your ads to see whether you can convert more.

ConversionLab’s test isn’t a catch all or best practice to be applied blindly to your campaigns across the board, but it could inspire you to try out Dynamic Text Replacement on your landing pages to see if carrying through search terms and intent could make a difference for you.

View this article: 

See How Dynamic Text on a Landing Page Helped Increase Conversions by 31.4% [A/B Test Reveal]

Hanapin’s PPC Experts Share How to Boost Your AdWords Quality Score with Landing Pages

It’s happened to the best of us. You return from lunch, pull up your AdWords account, and hover over a keyword only to realize you have a Quality Score of just three (ooof). You scan a few more keywords, and realize some others are sitting at fours, and you’ve even got a few sad twos.

Low Quality Scores like this are a huge red flag because they mean you’re likely paying through the nose for a given keyword without the guarantee of a great ad position. Moreover, you can’t necessarily bid your way into the top spot by increasing your budget.

You ultimately want to see healthy Quality Scores of around seven or above, because a good Quality Score can boost your Ad Rank, your resulting Search Impression Share, and will help your ads get served up more often.

To ensure your ads appear in top positions whenever relevant queries come up, today we’re sharing sage advice from PPC experts Jeff Baum and Diane Anselmo from Hanapin Marketing. During Marketing Optimization Week, they spoke to three things you can do with your landing pages today to increase your Quality Score, improve your Ad Rank, and pay less to advertise overall.

But first…

What is Quality Score (and why is it such a big deal?)

Direct from Google, Quality Score is an estimate of the quality of your ads, keywords, and landing pages. Higher quality ad experiences can lead to lower prices and better ad positions.

You may remember a time when Quality Score didn’t even exist, but it was introduced as a way for you to understand if you were serving up the best experiences possible. Upping your score per keyword (especially your most important ones) is important because it determines your Ad Rank in a major way:

Cost Per Click x Quality Score = Ad Rank

To achieve Quality Scores of seven and above you’ll need to consider three factors. We’re talkin’: relevancy, load time, and ease of navigation, which are consequently the very things Diane and Jeff say to focus on with your landing pages.

Below are the three actions Hanapin’s dynamic duo suggest you take to get the Ad Rank you deserve.

Where can you see AdWords Quality Score regularly?
If you’re not already keeping a close eye on this, simply navigate to Keywords and modify by adding the Quality Score column. Alternatively, you can hover over individual keywords to view case-by-case.

Tip 1) Convey the Exact Same Message From Ad to Landing Page

One of the perks of building custom landing pages fast, is the ability to carry through the exact same details from your ads to your landing pages. A consistent message between the two is key because it helps visitors recognize they’ve landed in the right place, and assures someone they’re on the right path to the outcome they searched for.

Here’s an ad to landing page combo Diane shared with us as an example:

Cool, 500 business cards for $8.50—got it. But when we click through to the landing page (which happens to be the brand’s homepage…)

  • The phone number from the ad doesn’t match the top of the page where we’ve landed.
  • The price in the ad headline doesn’t match the website’s headline exactly ($8.50 appears further down on the page, but could cause confusion).
  • While the ad’s CTA is to “order now”, the page we land on has tons to click on and offers up “Free Sample Kit” vs. an easy “Order Now’ option to match the ad. Someone may bounce quickly because of the amount of options presented.

As Jeff told us, the lesson here is that congruence builds trust. If you do everything to make sure your ads and landing pages are in sync, you’ll really benefit and likely see your Quality Score rise over time.

In a second example, we see strong message match play out really well for Vistaprint, wherein this is the ad:

And all of the ad’s details make it through to the subsequent landing page:

Improve your AdWords Quality Score with landing pages like Vistaprint's here.

In this case:

  • The price matches in the prominent sub-headline
  • The phone number matches the ad
  • Stocks, shapes and finishes are mentioned prominently on the landing page after they’re seen in the ad
  • The landing page conveys the steps involved in “getting started” (the CTA that appears most prominently).

Overall, the expectations are set up in the ad and fulfilled in the landing page, which is often a sign this advertiser is ideally paying less in the long run.

Remember: Google doesn’t tell you precisely what to fix.
As Jeff mentioned in Hanapin’s MOW talk, Google gives you a score, but doesn’t tell you exactly what to do to improve it. Luckily, we can help with reco’s around page speed, CTAs and more. Run your landing page through our Landing Page Analyzer to get solid recommendations for improving your landing pages.

Tip 2) Speed up your landing page’s load time

If you’re hit with a slow-loading page, you bounce quickly, and the same goes for prospects clicking through on your ads.

In fact, in an account Jeff was working on at Hanapin over the summer, in just one month they saw performance tank dramatically because of site speed. Noticing that most of the conversion drop off came from mobile, they quickly learned desktop visitors had a higher tolerance for slower load times, but they lost a ton of mobile prospects (from both form and phone) because of the lag.

Jeff recalls:

“we saw our ad click costs were going up, because our Quality Score was dropping due to the deficiency in site speed”.

Your landing page size (impacted by the images on your page) tends to slow load time, and—as we’ve seen with the Unbounce Landing Page Analyzer—82.2% of marketers have at least one image on their landing page that requires compression to speed things up.

As Jeff and Diane shared, you can check your page’s speed via Google’s free tool, Page Speed Insights and get their tips to improve. Furthermore, if you want to instantly get compressed versions of your images to swap out for a quick speed fix, you can also run your page through the Unbounce Landing Page Analyzer.

Pictured above: the downloadable images you can get via the Analyzer to improve your page speed and performance.

Tip 3) Ensure your landing page is easy to navigate

Using Diane’s analogy, you can think of a visit to your landing page like it’s a brick and mortar store. In other words, it’s the difference between arriving in a Nike store during Black Friday, and the same store any other time of the year. The former is a complete mess, and the latter is super organized.

Similarly, if your landing page experience is cluttered and visitors have to be patient to find what they’re looking for, you’ll see a higher bounce rate, which Google takes as a signal your landing page experience isn’t meeting needs.

Instead, you’ll want a clear information hierarchy. Meaning you cover need-to-know information quickly in a logical order, and your visitor can simply reach out and grab what they need as a next step. The difference is the visitor being able to get in and check out in a matter of minutes with what they wanted.

This seems easy, but as Diane says,

“Sometimes when thinking about designing sites, there’s so much we want people to do that we don’t realize that people need to be given information in steps. Do this first, then do that…”

As Jeff suggested, with landing pages, less can be more. So consider where you may need multiple landing pages for communicating different aspects of your offer or business. For example, if you own a bowling alley that contains a trampoline park and laser tag arena, you may want separate ads and landing pages for communicating the party packages for each versus cramming all the details on one page that doesn’t quite meet the needs of the person looking explicitly for a laser tag birthday party.

The better you signpost a clear path to conversion on your landing pages, the better chance you’ll have at a healthy Quality Score.

The job doesn’t really end

On a whole, Diane and Jeff help their clients at Hanapin achieve terrific Ad Rank by making their ad to landing pages combos as relevant as possible, optimizing load time, and ensuring content and options are well organized.

Quality Score is something you’ll need to monitor over time, and there’s no exact science to it. Google checks frequently, but it may be a few weeks until you see your landing page changes influence scores.

Despite no definitive date range, Diane encourages everyone to stay the course, and you will indeed see your Quality Score increase over time with these landing page fixes.

Original source:  

Hanapin’s PPC Experts Share How to Boost Your AdWords Quality Score with Landing Pages

Get a Glimpse into the Future of PPC From Microsoft’s Senior Manager of Global Engagement

Purna Virji on AI and PPC
As I learned at the start of February, if you’re a lucky enough to get one-on-one time with Purna Virji, Senior Manager of Global Engagement at Microsoft, you ask her about the future of search, AI, and pay per click (because she makes everything sound pretty exciting).

Purna—named the #1 most influential PPC expert in the world by PPC Hero in 2016—is on the forefront of what’s coming down the pipeline in our industry. She’s joining us February 21st as a speaker for Marketing Optimization Week to share her insight into AI, and today we’re sharing a sneak peek of what to expect in that session.

Watch our chat below, or read on for the condensed Q&A.

Jen: What do you imagine the day-to-day life of a marketer will be like with access to exciting AI? You grab your morning coffee, log on to your computer, then what?

Purna: [Then] you’ll be getting all kinds of wonderful notifications about performance, new insights, and ideas for engaging with your audience. AI solves some of our biggest problems—including [how to] engage with people in this world full of distractions.

AI is super helpful because it can analyze all of the different data and touchpoints to see what’s working (or not), and it can help us get really good at personalization and engaging with people in the way they’d like to be engaged with.

It also gives us new interfaces. Things like chatbots or digital assistants, as well as virtual reality. So if I interest somebody through a chatbot to look at the latest collection of shoes, I can just put on my HoloLens and take a look at a 3D hologram in front of me of all the latest styles.

It’s really about cool ways to engage with brands and people in a very seamless manner.

Jen: You’re speaking at Unbounce’s Marketing Optimization Week February 21st on how to prepare for AI’s emerging role in marketing. As a preview, can you share one of those things we can all prep for?

Purna: Yes! I think one of the things marketers can prepare for is to understand what AI can do for us and try to touch the waters a bit more with a chatbot. [In my talk] I’ll be giving people some tips for how to incorporate a chatbot within search. For example, Bing offers a conversational bot right in the SERPs, so I’ll give some tips on how you can set this up and a strategy you can use for your bot.

Jen: Chatbots are very hot right now.

Purna: It’s because they’re so easy and convenient. You’re already using a platform you’re familiar with—whether it’s Skype or Facebook Messenger or Kik—or whatever platform you use to talk to your friends. In that same platform, I can order a pizza or check on a status of my order, or do anything I need to do with a brand in that same place. There’s no multiple hops that have to happen.

Jen: It seems like, for customers, chat is very natural. It’s how we already go about our world.

Purna: yes—conversation is the first thing we learn. From babies to now arguing about who’s going to take the trash out. Conversation is [still] at the forefront of all of our lives.

Jen: Here at Unbounce we’re a Conversion Platform for marketers, and many of our customers pair landing pages with PPC in social or search. How do you see AI impacting pay per click the most in the next few years?

Purna: I think AI will have a couple of different roles…

For one —it’s going to make it easier to hone into the right person. We’re already seeing some signs of this with our much more advanced audience targeting, such as in-market audiences—which lets you slice and dice audiences based on people who are more likely to buy —so it’s going to [enhance] reaching the right person at the right time.

It’s also going to help us take a lot of the effort and pain out of the administrative side. We saw this with bit automations…it’ll make things like reporting a lot easier, keyword research a lot easier. Anything that’s really a repetitive task can get automated and can be improved by AI. Time savings and more effective ads – it’s a win win for all.

Jen: Y’know, we hear some marketers kind of demonize AI, or see it in a sort of detrimental way. But you don’t see it this way.

Purna: No, I don’t think so. I think the way AI has been designed and actually, the way companies like Microsoft, Google or IBM, who are at the forefront of creating AI…I think the responsibility is on people like us to infuse the technology to respect humans. And, I mean, that’s one of the pillars we’re building our AI on, that it is respectful to the human. It’s there to augment what we can do. It’s not there to replace us or destroy us or anything like that.

All AI is doing is taking what we’re good at and giving us a little super power. It’s like wearing a little jet pack so we can run faster or slide faster. When you think of it that way it’s giving us gifts we didn’t have access to before.

Jen: You’re no stranger to setting up an AdWords or Bing campaign. So, what’s a little known technique that anyone managing paid spend can do today for more impact with their PPC ads?

Purna: I’d say there are two things. The first is to make sure you’re implementing in-market audiences. If someone was to ask me, “what’s one tip for success for 2018?”, I’m a big believer of the power of in-market audiences, it’s still in pilot in open beta so anyone can sign up an be a part of it and test it.

Throughout the testing period we’ve seen such amazing results from many people. It allows you to reach an audience that’s in the market or looking to buy specific products or services you’re selling. We have over 120 different categories, so if you just layer them onto your existing ad groups or campaigns and just adjust the bids accordingly, you have a better chance of reaching people who are interested in what you sell but may not know who you are…you’re just reaching this very qualified audience.

If you can do [this] and combine it with the wonderful landing page learnings you get with Unbounce, I think that’s a really win win solution.

Jen: We know voice search is going to have a much bigger role to play. What should PPC’ers be thinking about to prepare for this?

Purna: We are seeing voice being adopted more and more. We’ve seen Mary Meeker’s internet study…and Google [has shared] that 20% of their mobile traffic is voice now, because voice is easy.

I would say PPC marketers should think about the differences or what’s unique to voice. First, it tends to be much more local. If you’re running local campaigns, you’ll want to think about the queries relating to your business that people may ask if they’re in a hurry or on the go.

And second, all marketers (including SEOs too) should consider: are we providing the right information? I.e. do we have some sort of structured data or schema markup that can give the search engine much more insights into understanding what the page or information is about.

Lastly, [we can] look at the keywords. Voice is of course more conversational and with conversational queries, we tend to have longer phrases, [so] we’re much more clear on the intent. If you can, look at testing some of the most common, broader questions or phrases that get asked and actually test adding them in keywords. Ask yourself what could be the right way to answer [the query].

In the old days (ha, just last year!) we would look for shoes, like mens sandals. We’d go to the website, select colours, size and width. But now with voice, you self-select in the query itself. You say “show me blue strappy summer sandals in size 8”. If I then [have] to go to the website and do the selections again I’m quite annoyed, but if I got to a page that showed just what I was looking for? It’s about making it very seamless for the customer.

Jen: so prepare for more granularity…
Purna: exactly, [it’s] on page as well, which is why it’s important to look at some of the landing page options you have, [and ask] —“are we answering the right questions” in the right way.

Jen: You’ve seen dozens of landing pages for PPC. What do you think is the biggest mistake people make when creating landing pages to pair with their search ads?

Purna: It’s not being specific enough. If [someone’s] looking for something and your ad promises something, does your page deliver on that promise?

For example, if I’m doing a search for waterproof digital cameras and see an ad that talks about waterproof digital cameras on sale, and I go on your landing page and its all of your digital cameras —again you’re giving the searcher more work to do.

You want to make life as easy as possible, answer the right questions, and don’t go too broad. Yes – there’s the temptation, especially with newbie PPC marketers— Let’s just send people to the homepage. As you know that’s just not going to work and they’ll realize that soon.

Also, as you say, the call to action—even sales people fail at this sometimes—you don’t or forget to ask exactly what you want [visitors] to do. So making sure you do that is a huge advantage.

Don’t miss Purna’s session February 21st as part of Marketing Optimization Week. She’ll be joining other experts from Drift, Hanapin, and Emma delivering the latest tactics you can use to see better results. See the agenda here.

Original source:

Get a Glimpse into the Future of PPC From Microsoft’s Senior Manager of Global Engagement

Sharp Suits & Scrappy Marketing: How Indochino Crafted a Tailor-made Digital Strategy with Unbounce

Similar to how Indochino is revolutionizing menswear with made-to-measure suits, it turns out a custom fit applies to their digital marketing too.

In the past year, the fast-growing apparel brand saw over 50% growth in retail, and opened nine new showrooms across North America. The brand’s marketing team of just 12 people are used to acting fast, but until about a year ago, the team faced a bottleneck threatening their nimbleness and the effectiveness of their PPC ad spend.

As Lisa Craveiro, Director of Acquisition told us, the company’s blog and website CMS templates couldn’t be easily customized to suit their pay-per-click needs. When Lisa’s team needed to publish relevant content (for pointing paid ad traffic to), changes to the site couldn’t be published fast enough.

To ensure return on their ad spend, Lisa and the team rolled out two key tactics:

  • First, they experimented with mock editorial pieces created in Unbounce to better convert Facebook ad traffic.
  • And second, the team built several location-specific landing pages for marketing different showrooms and educating prospects on their unique customer experience.

Over just nine months, Lisa’s team secured 800+ showroom bookings via their new Unbounce landing pages, 40 online transactions of purchased suits, and 750 newsletter signups.

Having over 340,000 visitors directed to a landing page as part of their paid media strategy is just one aspect of how Indochino’s scrappy marketers have been able to grow the brand’s selling appointments 77% year over year. Read on for a peek into their playbook.

A Custom-Fit Ad Approach

Similar to most marketers using Facebook ads, Indochino knew they needed hyper relevant content to point to from ads like these:

Indochino's example Facebook ads

But sending paid traffic to the brand’s blog or site-specific web pages wasn’t a good option as recent as a year ago because the marketing team had little control over the experience.

Lisa Craveiro, Director of Acquisition at Indochino

“Before Unbounce, we didn’t have an informative landing page on the website with a simple, easy navigation path that focused a user’s attention toward our conversion goals. Often existing pages weren’t the most relevant option to land on from a specific ad, or didn’t contain a clear call to action. We needed to quickly build better, high-converting options and Unbounce was perfect for an on-brand look, fast.”

And so Indochino began using Unbounce in a fairly unconventional way. Alongside a designer, the team created mock editorial articles for their Facebook ads to point to. These articles — fashioned to look like blog posts — contained calls to action to “schedule an appointment” in a showroom, but also to “see the suits” for those preferring to browse.

Here’s an example of one of the editorial pieces created with the builder:

Example Mock Article from Indochino

With over 64,000 visitors via their ads, this ‘mock’ article converts at 17.40% with thousands of people clicking through to see showroom locations, go to the website, or see sample suits.

These articles (built in just a few hours) not only provide an especially relevant destination for anyone arriving from a Facebook ad, but they also allow Indochino’s marketers to communicate different value props quickly based on different ad messages.

For example, the brand knows the showroom experience is very valuable and that many men become lifelong customers based on their unique experience being fitted.
Here’s an article Indochino’s marketers whipped up for communicating exactly what to expect in your showroom experience:

Indochino example 2

This listicle style piece converts at 29.63%. The CTA prompts visitors to book an appointment.

The team continues to create mock editorial like this and is always looking to optimize as they go. As Lisa tells us:

“We’re often trying out several value props with these types of mock articles, testing different variations of copy and trying to understand via data which article or angle resonates best with different audiences. They’re a quick way to tell if you’re on the right track with your ad’s messaging.”

Seamless online and offline

On the topic of nine new showrooms launched in North America this year, as Indochino found, once you introduce a new product line, or— in this case—a new retail location, you can’t always update your website right away with location-specific content.

So instead of relying on developers to help update their site with pages specific to each new showroom launch, Indochino turned to landing pages. They created several location-specific pages to explain their fitting process and speak directly to potential customers in a given area.

Here’s an example featuring details on DC’s showroom:

Indochino's DC showroom landing page example

This page, where you can book an appointment or ‘see the suits’, converts at 19.38%.

The team also has a dedicated page for Chicago:

Chicago landing page example

These location-specific pages allow Indochino to get really granular with the targeting of their ads, and the message prospects see upon click through. There’s strong message match from ad to landing page, and visitors see specifics to their location which helps fulfil the promise of the ads.

Want to run location-specific ad to landing page combos like Indochino? Try Dynamic Text Replacement. This Unbounce feature swaps out select keywords or text on your landing page with the exact terms someone has searched, like their location. See a preview of how this works here.

Extending the made-to-measure experience

Beyond highly relevant Facebook ads and location-specific content, Indochino also uses landing pages for lead generation; often for contests and partnering with wedding vendors like The Knot and others.

Here’s a lead gen page Indochino created for a Postmedia National contest:

lead gen landing page example from Indochino

Converting at 15.14%, Lisa said campaigns like this contest allow their marketers to be especially nimble:

“Often marketers can land a great partnership, like we’ve been lucky to do with The Knot and Postmedia, but if you can’t generate relevant landing pages specific to the campaign quickly, you limit the momentum of the partnership along with creative opportunities. With contest pages like this, we can be up and running in a couple of days and immediately see from ad to landing page how we’re performing. It’s helpful for understanding which partnerships we should run again.”

The PPC landing page advantage

On a whole, taking control of the experience after someone clicks an Indochino ad has proven very valuable for this fast-growing menswear brand. By serving up especially relevant content, they’ve seen their paid Facebook posts perform especially well.

You could say, Unbounce was a perfect fit ;)

Read article here:

Sharp Suits & Scrappy Marketing: How Indochino Crafted a Tailor-made Digital Strategy with Unbounce

Marketing Optimization Week is coming! 4 Free Days of Advice From Experts in PPC, Automation, AI, and Strategy

Starting to feel like you’ve been working in overdrive to (maybe) bring in only half the leads you used to? Not to mention your paid budget seems to be climbing way outta hand?

Well, it’s definitely not just you. Marketing’s changing and it’s getting tougher to see strong results.

Two weeks ago Facebook tweaked it’s publisher settings, fewer advertisers can justify current CPCs in AdWords, and—while there’s a lot of talk about artificial intelligence—how the heck can you make use of it today, exactly?

Fortunately you’re not alone, and we’ve got your back.

Learn new tactics at Marketing Optimization Week


Dedicated to helping you optimize your marketing, we’re hosting four days of FREE, tactical advice you can implement now to guarantee success in the future and get more results from your existing channels.

From February 20-23, you and your team can tune in to learn from major players in the marketing space with four daily sessions covering PPC, marketing automation, AI and marketing strategy tracks.

We don’t kid around with online events, and this is sure to be one of our best yet. Find the full agenda here, or read on for some highlights.

Learn how (and why) to kiss gated content goodbye with Drift’s David Gerhardt

February 22, 2018. Time: 3:00pm PST | 6:00pm EST | 5:00pm CST

David Gerhrdt – Director of Marketing at Drift

Breaking expectations can help your marketing thrive, and nobody knows this better than David Gerhardt – Director of Marketing at Drift. Having spent the last 6+ years working in SaaS companies including HubSpot and Constant Contact, he’ll reveal insight into Drift’s 2016 decision to do away with gated content and rely on conversations instead.

In this session, get a behind-the-scenes look at the impact the decision to remove forms has had on this leading SaaS business, and what it could mean for yours.

Improve Your AdWords Quality Score with Hanapin’s Jeff Baum and Diane Anselmo

February 22, 2018. Time: 9:00am PST | 12:00pm EST | 11:00am CST

Associate Director of Services, Diane AnselmoJeff Baum, Director of Services at Hanapin Marketing

You already know the importance of your quality score, but making significant improvements to it can be a challenge if you’re not sure where to start.

In this absolutely-don’t-miss session, Hanapin PPC experts Jeff Baum and Diane Anselmo walk you through some changes you can make to your landing pages today to positively impact your quality score.

Get clear on how to prep for AI with Microsoft’s Purna Virji

February 21, 2018. Time: 11:00am PST | 2:00pm EST | 1:00pm CST

Microsoft’s Senior Manager of Global Engagement, Purna Virji

At best, you know AI is already all around us, and at worst you think of it as something to fear. Hear from Microsoft’s Senior Manager of Global Engagement on how AI is going to shake up the industry (for the better) and how you can be ready.

Bringing over 15 years in search experience to the table, Purna’s an expert in SEO, everything Bing, and voice search. You’ll walk away with three critical steps you can take today to set yourself up for AI success.

Secure 10X Results Across Channels with Larry Kim of Mobile Monkey

February 23, 2018. Time: 9:00am PST | 12:00pm EST | 11:00am CST

founder of Mobile Monkey, Larry Kim

Self-professed unicorn obsessor Larry Kim is ready to show us all the magic of a unicorn campaign (campaigns so effective they perform in the top 1–3%).

In this session, learn the WordStream founder’s unusual tips and processes for getting 10-100x more value from paid ad campaigns on Facebook, Twitter, Taboola and other networks, including how to drive exponentially more traffic to your content and convert more of those clicks into sales.

There’s something for everyone on your team

Above are just four of the sessions you can look forward to – there are four days(!) of carefully curated content to enjoy. Registration gets you access to:

  • The Google Ventures Sprint process via your host, Unbounce’s own Alexa Hubley
  • How to have your best year of email ever by Karen Gragg of Emma
  • How to get more out of your marketing tools via integrations by Sean Kennedy of Zapier
  • And much, much more.

Bonus: There’ll be a massive giveaway

During MOW we’re giving away the Ultimate Marketing Optimization kit. The package retails at over $4,000 and includes 2 tickets to Unbounce’s Call to Action Conference in August, a free year of Unbounce Premium, tons of swag, a printed copy of the Conversion Benchmark Report and more.

Here’s how you can gain more entries:

  1. Hop on over to the Unbounce Landing Page Analyzer and get a comprehensive analysis of your landing page based on nine specific performance categories.
  2. Scroll down to the bottom of your customized report and share on Twitter. Make sure to include the #marketingoptweek hashtag.

Best of luck, and we’ll see you February 20th to kick things off.

This article is from:

Marketing Optimization Week is coming! 4 Free Days of Advice From Experts in PPC, Automation, AI, and Strategy

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How Just One Ecommerce Popup Offer Helped Canvas Factory Generate 1.1 Million in Revenue

Canvas Factory's Popup Success

When you hear ‘website popup’ in a marketing context, my bet is—as a discerning marketer—you all but cringe. Surely these boxes that jump up in the middle of a screen are for low-level marketers. They’re scammy, make you lose your train of thought, nobody likes them,…you’d never use ‘em.

But can you really hate popups if they’re found to drive results?

As heated as the debate can get, Richard Lazazzera, an ecommerce entrepreneur and Content Strategist at Shopify has a fair point in this reply to a comment on his blog post:

Image via the Shopify blog.

And drive sales they can.

By experimenting with popup overlays, Auckland-based Canvas Factory (an ecommerce shop providing high-quality canvas prints) has found a ton of success engaging prospects at exactly the right time.

Using just one popup that appears across several of their domains, Canvas Factory discovered the targeting that worked best for them, and—most importantly—brought in 1.1 million USD in revenue(!) via their offer.

In today’s post, we’ll share Canvas Factory’s story, along with some lessons learned, so that—if you’re tempted—you too can convert more site visitors.

Canvas Factory’s approach to ecommerce popups

Similar to many ecommerce brands, Canvas Factory wanted to convert more of the visitors leaving their site empty handed. They’d realized some prospects only needed a moderate incentive to get over any purchase anxiety, so they had started offering a small discount via a coupon.

Eventually they wondered if the coupon would perform even better if delivered via a popup at the right moment.

Experimenting, they created this popup overlay in Unbounce for their site:

One of Canvas Factory’s domains outfitted with their popup.

They duplicated this one design eight times for running across different domains on certain URLs. The copy was the same for each, offering $10 off someone’s first order in exchange for an email, and only appeared as someone was actively trying to leave the site, once per visitor.

The main difference was location. The brand ran four of these overlays across their product pages on their Australian and New Zealand domains, while another four appeared on the Canvas Factory blog across the same domains.

How’d the experiment go?

The Unbounce popup overlay has now been running from November 2016 to present and in comparing the period before using the popups to promote this same coupon code to now:

  • Canvas Factory has seen a 6% to 9% increase in use of the coupon, and
  • Subscription to their mailing list has grown by over 14.3%.

Now the brand’s marketers can do a better job actively nurturing prospects claiming the coupon, and re-marketing to successful first-time customers.

But in terms of the bottom line? Managing Director Tim Daley says it best:
Tim from Canvas Factory

“Unbounce played a key part in Canvas Factory’s conversion rate optimization activity for our subscriber campaign. This has contributed to over $1.1 million dollars in purchases.”

$1.1 million the brand may not have otherwise seen had they not tried the overlay? If that’s not making you reconsider whether or not your personal distaste for popups should stop you from trying one out, I’m not sure what will.

That said…

How’d the brand track success?

Tim tells us the coupon use was measured by integrating Unbounce popup overlays with their mail platform and their payment gateway CS-Cart:

“This [integration] allows us, per country level, to collect new subscribers, partition [them] to relevant country and then track their individual and group purchase application of the coupon acquired through the popup.”

Ultimately the integration lets Canvas Factory see:

  • How many customers are using coupons + how many discounts are being used total
  • Total revenue before and after coupons are applied
  • Average order value before and after coupons are applied
  • What kind of customers the brand’s attracting with coupons

All very useful factors in understanding how long a campaign like this is feasible for, and experimenting with different discounts.

Want to push your lead data collected via landing pages, sticky bars, and popup overlays through to your mail platforms and other tools? See our Integrations Powered by Zapier and all the connections available right in Unbounce.

It’s all about location: A lesson on why popups in the wrong place are a big mistake

Your gut feeling that popups can be scammy? It’s not far off. If used incorrectly at the wrong time or on the wrong URL of your site, they certainly can be. We’ve all seen these types of popups and they’re maddening.

In Canvas Factory’s case, it wasn’t as simple as create the popup, set it and forget it. In running their Unbounce popup overlay in several locations, they’ve learned placement and timing is critical.

In Tim’s case, he discovered that the blog wasn’t the proper placement for this particular offer, it was simply too soon in the buyer journey to be offering someone a discount. With posts on the brand’s blog aimed to help you take better photos of your kids and other photography tips, this level of awareness doesn’t really align with wanting to purchase right away.

Overall, Canvas Factory’s blog popup conversion rate was 0.18% versus the up to 11% conversion rate they’d seen on product pages where the purchase intent was likely higher.

As outlined above, aim to align your offers with buyer intent.

The lesson:

If you choose the right place for your offer (pricing pages and high commitment URLs in Canvas Factory’s case), you’ll see results because you offered a timely and relevant incentive. In the wrong place, however, you simply won’t see the results you want, and worse, you’ll irritate and annoy your visitors.

Get actionable tips on where to place your popups, and which types of messages perform best in our Best Practice Guide.

So you shouldn’t use popups on your blog?

No—Canvas Factory’s unique experience isn’t to say that popups on your blog won’t work, because they definitely can. You just have to choose the right kind of offer and perfect targeting. Because your blog readers may not be product aware yet, you need to align your offer with the level of awareness readers do have about your company (i.e. they might be open to a free in-depth ebook about the exact topic they’re already reading about).

You might also try directing your blog traffic to an even higher-converting area of your site.

Here’s a super relevant clickthrough popup Seer’s Wil Reynolds uses to offer up more relevant content on his site:

By proactively serving up what prospects might want next, Seer becomes more trustworthy and keeps people engaged on their site longer (which is a great sign in Google’s eyes). You can make traffic shaping like this the goal of some of your popups in locations where a higher-commitment ask doesn’t make sense.

Try an Experiment Yourself

Overall, popups can definitely be annoying when used aggressively or poorly (there’s no arguing that) but, as we’ve seen with Canvas Factory, proper targeting and relevant offers can make all the difference to both marketers and site visitors who can be receptive to proper incentives at the right time.

If you’ve got a great campaign or offer running, a well-timed and targeted popup could ensure all the right people see it and that you don’t leave opportunities on the table.

Try an Ecommerce popup from Unbounce today

Link: 

How Just One Ecommerce Popup Offer Helped Canvas Factory Generate 1.1 Million in Revenue