All posts by Ryan Engley

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It’s Time to Retest Your Page Speed [Google’s latest update]

Back in October, we were the first to claim that 2019 will be the year of page speed. We’ve got our eyes on the market and lemme tell you: Google is sending serious signals that it’s crunch time to deal with your slow pages.

Faster pages are a strategic marketing priority.

And sure enough, Google has made yet another change to uphold that prediction. In early November, they quietly rolled out the most significant update to a core performance tool we’ve seen to date, announcing the latest version of PageSpeed Insights.

So what does this update mean for marketers and their bottom line?

If you’ve used PageSpeed Insights to test page performance, it’s time to retest! Because your old speed scores don’t matter anymore. The good news is that you’ll have new data at your fingertips to help you speed up in ways that actually matter to your prospects and potential conversions.

Let’s take a closer look at this update and explore why it should play a role in your page speed strategy in 2019.

“You can’t improve what you don’t measure.”

PageSpeed Insights is easily Google’s most popular tool for measuring web performance.

When you look at the screenshot below, you can see why. It provides an easy-to-interpret color-coded scoring system that you don’t need an engineering degree to understand—red is bad, green is good. Your page is either fast, average, or slow. The closer to a perfect 100 you can get, the better. The scores also come with recommendations of what you can do to improve. It’s almost too easy to understand.

PageSpeed Insights
PageSpeed Insights v.4 (October 2019)

Earlier versions of PageSpeed Insights had some issues with how they reported performance. Simple results could be misleading, and experts soon discovered that implementing Google’s suggested optimizations didn’t necessarily line up with a better user experience. You might’ve gotten great scores, sure, but your pages weren’t always any faster or your visitors more engaged. Don’t even get me started on your conversion rates.

As Benjamin Estes over at Moz explains, “there are smarter ways to assess and improve site speed. A perfect score doesn’t guarantee a fast site.” Many experts like Estes began turning to more reliable tools—like GTMetrix, Pingdom, or Google’s own Lighthouse—to run more accurate performance audits. And who would blame them?

The latest version of PageSpeed Insights (v.5) fixes these issues by putting the focus where it should be: on user experience. This is a huge leap forward for marketers because it means that the tool is directly relevant to conversion optimization. It can help you get faster in ways that translate into higher engagement and conversion rates.

For the full scoop, check out Google’s release notes here, but there are really two changes you should note:

1. PageSpeed Insights Now Uses Lighthouse

Lighthouse is excellent because it gives you a more accurate picture of how your landing pages perform with lab and field data. The lab data means you get results ASAP, whether you’ve seen traffic yet or not. This gives you a way to test and improve your pages before you point your ads at them.

An important note is that Lighthouse simulates a page load on a mid-tier device (Moto G4) on a mobile network—roughly equivalent to the fastest 25% of 3G and slowest 25% of 4G. So it’s a pretty solid estimate of what you’re likely to see in the wild. Here’s what it looks like:

New lab data from Lighthouse provides a much better picture of what a user experiences.

The Lighthouse engine behind PageSpeed Insights also brings more user-centric performance metrics with it, two of which are very important to your landing pages:

  • First Meaningful Paint (FMP) is the time it takes for the first valuable piece of content to load—usually a hero shot or video above the fold. It’s the “is this useful?” moment when you catch—or lose—a visitor’s attention. Even if the rest of your page loads later, it’s paramount that the first page elements appear as quickly as possible.
  • Time to Interactive (TTI) is the first moment a visitor can interact with your page. It’s the best measure of speed to determine if a visitor will happily engage with your content, or whether they’ll get annoyed and bounce because your landing page keeps choking on clunky JavaScript or poorly prioritized code.

2. PageSpeed Insights Gives You Better Opportunities and Diagnostics

You can bid adieu to the short checklist of optimizations that experts like Ben Estes called out. Google has replaced the (moderately useful) feature with new opportunities and audits that will actually help you improve your visitor experience. These include new suggestions and estimated savings for each.

Your priorities should be much clearer:

PageSpeed Insights Opportunities
Opportunities and Diagnostics in PageSpeed Insights

How your Unbounce Pages Stack Up

Faster pages earn you more traffic and better engagement. As a result, page speed has a major impact on your conversion rates and can even help you win more ad impressions for less. That’s why we’ve made page speed our priority into 2019.

To show how Unbounce stacks up in the real world, we chose to test an actual page created by one of our customers, Webistry, a digital marketing agency. Their “Tiny Homes of Maine” page is a real-world example.

Click here to expand.

It has tons of custom functionality, so it’s fairly representative of what many customers do with the Unbounce builder. (The ability to customize is often why customers choose Unbounce in the first place!) This page includes custom Javascript for smooth scrolling, a sticky header, fading header, some custom CSS, and a bunch of images of various file types.

We tested two versions of “Tiny Homes of Maine” using Google PageSpeed Insights v.5, running a minimum of three tests using the median results. The results below focus on the mobile scores:

Speed Boost

First, we tested the original Tiny Homes of Maine landing page using Unbounce’s Speed Boost, which optimizes landing page delivery to do things like leverage browser caching, prioritize visible content to load first, bundle Javascript, and so on. Speed Boost handles the technical recommendations from PageSpeed Insights that developers usually tackle behind the scenes. You can see the overall results of the test here:

Tiny Homes of Maine with Speed Boost

Speed Boost + Auto Image Optimizer

Next, we retested the Tiny Homes of Maine adding our upcoming Auto Image Optimizer into the mix. This new tool automatically optimizes your images as your page is published. You can fine-tune your settings, but we used the defaults here. Check out the mobile results:

Tiny Homes of Maine with Speed Boost + Auto Image Optimizer

The score jumped from a respectable 88 to an incredible 96 and, more meaningfully, we saw time to interactive improve from 4.4 sec to 2.7 sec. That’s 12.3 seconds faster than the average mobile web page, and 0.3 seconds faster than Google’s ideal 3 second load time.

Here we’ve shared the time to interactive speeds from both tests, for desktop and mobile, measured against the average web page:

Time to Interactive is the best measure for whether a visitor will engage or bounce. Our average mobile speed is based on Google’s mobile benchmarks, while the desktop average comes from a study by SEO Chat.

Overall, when we tested, we saw Speed Boost and Auto Image Optimizer create a dramatic difference in performance without sacrificing visual appeal or complexity. We took a compelling page that converts well and upped the ante by serving it at blazing speeds. Whether on a mobile or desktop, the page loads in a way that significantly improves the visitor’s experience.

Speed Boost is already available to all our customers, and the Auto Image Optimizer is coming very soon. This means your own landing pages can start achieving speeds like the ones above right now. Read more about our page speed initiatives.

But hold up. What about AMP? You might already know about AMP (accelerated mobile) pages, which load almost instantly—like, less than half a second instantly. Not only do they lead to crazy engagement, but they eliminate waiting on even slow network connections. This makes your content accessible to everyone, including the 70% of global users still on 3G connections—or 70% of pedestrians on their phones while they wait at a crosswalk.

While AMP can be complicated to build, Unbounce’s drag-and-drop builder lets you create AMP in the same way you create all your landing pages. If you’d like to try it out for yourself, you can sign up for AMP beta which opens in January 2019.

For the speed test above, we decided to leave AMP out of it since AMP restricts some custom functionality and the page we used would’ve required a few design changes. It wouldn’t be apples to apples. But we’re pretty pumped to show you more of it in the next while.

Page Speed & Your Bottom Line

Seconds are one thing, but dollars are another. Google recognizes the direct impact that fast load times have on your bottom line, which is why they released the Impact Calculator in February 2018. This tool sheds more light on why providing accurate measurements is so important.

Let’s revisit our Tiny Homes landing page above as an example. Imagine this landing page gets 1,000 visitors a month, at a conversion rate of 3.5% (which is just slightly higher than the average Real Estate industry landing page in our Conversion Benchmark Report). If the conversion rate from lead to sale is 5%, and each conversion is worth an average of $54,000 (which is the mid-priced home on their landing page), then their average lead value is $2700.

Tiny Homes of Maine in the Impact Calculator

When we input those numbers into the Impact Calculator and improve their mobile page speed from 4.4 seconds to 2.8 seconds, as shown in the test above, the impact to revenue for this one page could be $52,580.

Heck yes, speed matters.

And if we forecast the near-instant speeds promised by Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP), that page could see a potential annual revenue impact of more than $179,202 USD if it were to load in 1 second.

And that’s one landing page!

If you’ve been struggling with how to improve your page loading times, this latest version of PageSpeed Insights now gives you a much more meaningful picture of how you’re doing—and how to get faster.

You may not have considered speed a strategic priority, but when seconds can equate to tens of thousands of dollars, you need to. Try the Impact Calculator yourself or contact our sales team if you’d like to see what kind of revenue impact Unbounce landing pages can get you.

Read this article: 

It’s Time to Retest Your Page Speed [Google’s latest update]

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How to Make Your Unbounce Landing Pages GDPR Compliant

You might not wake up each morning thinking about data privacy and security but, like it or not, Facebook’s recent move makes it an issue you can’t dismiss. Long before Mark Zuckerberg sat before congress in the face of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, explaining how Facebook uses personal data, the European Union started getting especially serious about data protection and privacy.

And so, on May 25 2018, the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) goes into effect.

In a nutshell, the GDPR legislation gives everyone in the EU greater privacy rights, and introduces new rules for marketers and software providers to follow when it comes to collecting, tracking, or handling EU-based prospects’ and customers’ personal data.

Moreover, the GDPR applies to anyone who processes or stores data of those in the EU (i.e. you don’t need to be physically located in Europe for this to apply to your business and can incur fines up to 4% of your annual global turnover or €20 million [whichever is greater] for non-compliance).

But Beyond Potential Fines, Here’s Why You Need to Care

On Tuesday April 3rd, Zuckerberg said that Facebook had no plans to extend the GDPR regulations globally to all Facebook users. But, fast-forward a few weeks later and Facebook completely changed its tune, now planning to extend Europe’s GDPR standards worldwide.

This move sets a precedent, showing all of us that no matter where we are in the world, personal data and privacy laws aren’t optional. Compliance is table stakes.

If you’re located in Europe, process lead and customer data from Europe — or just happen to believe in high standards for data privacy and security, this post will help you navigate:

  • What Unbounce has done to become GDPR compliant, and
  • Some of what you need to do to make sure your landing pages, sticky bars, and popups adhere to the new rules.
Note: This post isn’t the be-all-and-end-all on EU data privacy, nor is it legal advice. It’s meant to provide background information and help you better understand how you can use Unbounce in a GDPR compliant way.

Data Protection by Default for You and Your Customers

For several months now, Unbounce has been investing heavily in the necessary changes to be GDPR compliant as a conversion platform. We believe that to build trust and confidence with your customers, you need to make their privacy your priority.

As of the day of GDPR enforcement, you can be sure we’ve got your back when it comes to processing and storing your data within Unbounce, and giving you the tools you need to run compliant campaigns.

To see exactly what Unbounce has been doing, why it matters and where we’re at in development, check out our GDPR FAQ page.

But while we’re a GDPR compliant platform with privacy and security safeguards built into our business practices and throughout our platform, this is only part of the equation. There are still a few things you are responsible for to use Unbounce in a compliant way, including:

  • Obtaining consent from your visitors (lawful basis of processing)
  • Linking to your privacy policy (informing visitors of your data protection policies)
  • Deleting personal data if requested (right to erasure)
  • Encrypting lead data at transit and in rest (using SSL) and
  • Signing a data processing addendum (DPA) with Unbounce

Here’s what you’re gonna want to watch for as you build landing pages, popups, and sticky bars.

Obtaining Consent From Your Visitors

Before collecting someone’s data the GDPR states you must first have a legal basis to do so. There are six lawful bases of processing under the GDPR, but if you’re a digital marketer, your use case will most likely fall into one of the following three:

  1. Consent (i.e. opt-in)
  2. Performance of a contract (eg. sending an invoice to a customer)
  3. “Legitimate interest” (eg. Someone is an existing customer and you want to send them information related to a product or service they already have.)

If you are using Unbounce for lead gen, then you must gather consent via opt-in to collect, use, or store someone’s data. When building your landing pages in Unbounce, you can easily add an opt-in field to your forms with the Unbounce form builder:

Keep in mind: Your visitors must actively check your opt-in box to give consent. Pre-checked checkboxes are not a valid form of consent.

Related But Different: Cookies And The ePrivacy Regulation

In many posts you’ll see Europe’s ePrivacy regulations tied in with GDPR, but they are, in fact, two separate things. While the GDPR regulates the general use and management of personal data, cookie use is core to the ePrivacy regulation (which is why you’ll sometimes see it called the “cookie law”). ePrivacy regulations are still in the works, but it’s certain they will be about visitor consent to cookies on your site.

We know the ePrivacy directive requires “prior informed consent” to store or access information on your visitors’ device. In other words, you must ask visitors if they consent to the use of cookies before you start to use them.

Last year Unbounce launched sticky bars (a discreet, mobile-friendly way to get more conversions), but they do double duty as a cookie bar, notifying your visitors about cookies.

You can design and publish a cookie bar using Unbounce’s built-in template, as shown below, embed the code across all of your landing pages using script manager, then promptly publish to every landing page you build in Unbounce. You can even have it appear all across your website.

Informing Visitors of Your Data Protection Policies

It’s not enough to just obtain consent, the GDPR also requires you to inform your customers and prospects what they are consenting to. This means that you need to provide easy access to your privacy and data protection policies (something Google AdWords has required for ages).

Sharing your privacy and data protection policies easily and transparently can help you earn the trust and confidence of your web visitors. Every visitor may not read through it with a fine tooth comb, but in a web littered with sketchy marketing practices, sharing your policies shows that you’re legit and that you have nothing to hide.

In the Unbounce landing page builder you can have any image, button or text link on your page open in a popup lightbox window. This means that you can link to the privacy policy already hosted on your website in a popup window on-click, and still keep visitors on your page to boost engagement and conversion rates.

This is a great example of how doing right by your customers can also help you achieve your business goals.

Here you can see a button being added to an Unbounce page linking through to a privacy policy. Something you need to do going forward to be compliant.

The Right To Be Forgotten

At any point in time a customer or lead whose data you have collected can request that you erase any of their personal data you have stored. There are several grounds under which someone can make this request and the GDPR requires that you do so without “undue delay”.

As an Unbounce customer, simply submit an email request to our support team who will ensure that all information for a specific lead or a group of leads are deleted from our database.

As part of our ongoing commitment to supporting data privacy and security, we are inspecting alternate solutions to deletion requests, but you can rest assured that even as of today, we will fulfill deletion requests within the time limit enforced by the GDPR.

Preventing Unauthorized Access to Data

Unbounce has supported SSL encryption on landing pages for years, and we’re proud that we made this a priority for our customers before Google started calling out non-https pages as not secure and giving preferential treatment to secure pages.

Presently Unbounce customers can already adhere to the GDPR requirement to process all data securely.

When you build and publish your landing pages with Unbounce, you can force your web visitors to the secure (https) version of your pages, even if they accidentally navigate to the unsecure (http) version.

In the upper right corner you can toggle to force visitors to the secure HTTPS version of your page.

This forced redirect will ensure proper encryption of your visitor lead data in transit and at rest. And as an added bonus, it’ll keep you in Google’s good books and prevent ‘not secure’ warnings in Google Chrome.

Signing a Data Protection Addendum (DPA) With Unbounce

According to the GDPR, when you collect lead information with Unbounce, you are the data controller while Unbounce serves as your data processor. To comply with GDPR regulation when using a tool like a landing page builder or conversion platform, you need a signed DPA between you (the data controller) and the service provider (your data processor).

Without getting too deep into the weeds on this one, let me just say that if you’re using Unbounce, we’ve got you covered and that you can complete a form on our GDPR overview page to get your DPA by email.

Privacy = Trust = Great Marketing

At Unbounce we view data privacy and security as two cornerstones of great marketing. At their core they are about a positive user experience and can help make the internet a better place.

The GDPR puts more control in the hands of users to determine how their information is used. No one wants their personal data falling into the wrong hands or being used in malicious or intrusive ways. Confidence and trust in your brand is at stake when it comes to privacy, so we aren’t taking any chances. Using Unbounce as your conversion platform, you can assure your customers that you take their privacy and data security seriously.

Increased regulation around data privacy may provide short term challenges for marketers as we establish new norms, but long term they can provide a more positive experience for users — something we should always strive for as marketers.

Continued: 

How to Make Your Unbounce Landing Pages GDPR Compliant

Why Geo-targeting Your Website Content Is a No-brainer (and 3 Ways to Try It This Afternoon)

We all know marketing campaigns convert best when we segment and personalize them – which is where geo-targeting can come into play. In fact, a whopping 74% of consumers get frustrated on sites where the content has nothing to do with their interests, and 86% of customers say personalization impacts their purchase decisions.

The good news is, today you can tailor almost every marketing experience to a visitor’s location and other identifiers to make offers feel more personal. So why do even the best of us continue to use blanket-style, default messaging for every visitor?

More than half of marketers struggle to execute personalized campaigns, and reasons range from not having enough data about TOFU prospects to know what to personalize—to having trouble securing the resources to execute.

But making sure everyone sees relevant, location-based offers on your website doesn’t actually need to be a huge production. In our experience, it’s way easier (and could do more for your conversion rates) than you might think.

Why geo-target website content — and the fastest way to try this

Like all forms of personalization, geo-targeting is about relevance. And I should clarify off the bat, I’m not talking about using “y’all” in your headline if you’re targeting Texans, or splitting hairs on “sneakers” vs. “tennis shoes” based on regional preference.

What I am talking about is getting way more creative and specific with your offers. If visitors see offers that feel like they’re just for them, they’re more likely to click through, and convert.

For example, imagine targeting only locals in Chicago, Philadelphia, and Seattle respectively with their own coupon codes and special hotel offers for your in-person event instead of blanketing your entire site with a generic message.

Now imagine if you didn’t need to rely on your web team to get those three offers up on the site and could do it yourself really fast?

One of the quickest ways to experiment with this type of personalization is website popups and sticky bars. The real key with these is understanding your options (and there are plenty of them!). Here are a few of my favourite examples to get you started:

Practical geo-targeting examples to try today

1. Experiment with seasonal offers by region

According to Steve Olenski of Forbes, “acknowledging [your] potential buyer’s location increases relevance, and the result is higher engagement that can translate into additional revenue.” It’s a quick win! And, with ecommerce in particular, there’s tons of opportunity to run promotions suited to specific locations.

As an example, if you sell sports equipment or apparel, you could run two or more different “winter sales” suited to the context of winter in different locations. Your ‘classic’ winter sale would appear in states like Colorado—and could feature an offer for 15% off ski gear, whereas your ‘Californian winter sale’ could showcase 15% off hiking gear.

An example of the two different “winter sale” popup offers by location.

Not only do you earn points by acknowledging your visitor’s location like this, but you also ensure each region sees an offer that makes the most sense for them. Running offers like this is wayyyy better than a single offer that’s less relevant to everyone and later wondering why it didn’t convert.

Recommended settings for this example:
Frequency: Show once per visitor
Trigger: On exit

2. Increase foot traffic with in-store promos by region

We’ve all seen the most common ecommerce discount popup on entry. You know the one — “signup for our newsletter for 15% off your first purchase”. And there’s a reason we’ve all seen it: it works. But, we can do better.

To take things a step further, you can target this type of offer by location. If you have physical stores in specific cities, you can offer an in-store discount in exchange for the newsletter sign up. Like this:

Example of a popup driving in-store visits, and potential for remarketing later

This can help you build foot traffic in different cities, and help you create location-specific mailing lists to promote more relevant in-store events, products, and sales to local shoppers.

Recommended settings for this example:
Frequency: Show once per visitor
Trigger: When a visitor scrolls 40% of the way down your page.

3. Target your event marketing to precise regions

If you’ve ever planned a party, you know how easy it is to fixate on details. Are three kinds of cheese enough? Is my Spotify Discover Weekly cool or do I need a new playlist?! None of this matters if nobody shows up. Marketing events are no different.

A well timed, geo-targeted popup or sticky bar can get your message in front of the people who will care most about your event. When you tailor event messages to your visitor’s location, you can include a more precise value prop. Targeting locals? Remind them how cost effective it is since they don’t have to travel. Targeting neighbors in a nearby state? Remind them that your conference can be a mini-vacation complete with conference-exclusive hotel discounts.

Pictured above: examples of local vs. neighbor city popup offers. *These CTAConf offers are just to help us demo. You can check out our real conference details for CTAConf 2018 here.

Recommended settings for this example:
Frequency: Show on the first visit
Trigger: Show after a 15-25 second delay on relevant URLs (you can use Google Analytics to determine the right delay for your site).

Tip: After triggering this popup on the first visit or two, set up a more subtle sticky bar for subsequent visits to keep the event top of mind, without overdoing it. You could even run the “maybe later” popup Oli Gardner’s a huge proponent of.

Hyper-personalize text on your popups

As a bonus: just as you can do with your Unbounce landing pages, you can also swap out text on your popups and sticky bars with Dynamic Text Replacement to match a prospect’s exact search terms.

This gives you a way to maintain perfect relevance between your ads and website popups in this case.

For example, you could choose to switch out the name of a product for a more relevant one in a popup. If someone searched for “House Prices in Portland”, you could automatically swap out the text in your popup to match exactly and maintain hyper relevance. You can read about a real Unbounce customer experimenting with DTR here.

Want to see how DTR helps you be extra relevant? (even on your popups?) See a preview of how it works here

How to create your own geo-targeted popups

On premium plans and above you can target Unbounce popups by country, region, and even city (which is wicked granular!). The possibilities for what you show, or how you show it, are nearly endless:

  • You can trigger: on exit, arrival, after a delay, on scroll, or on click.
  • And you can target: by location (geo-targeting), URL, referring URL, and cookie targeting.

The options you choose will come down to a few factors including your site, your buyers, ad standards you uphold for a great website experience, and testing.

Here’s how to setup popups and sticky bars on your site:

To get started:

  1. Hop into your Unbounce account , and on the All Pages Screen, click “Popups & Sticky Bars” in the left menu.
  2. In the top left, Select “+ Popup or Sticky Bar”.
  3. Then, click “Create a Popup.”
  4. Choose a Template (or start with a blank popup if you prefer), name your popup, and select “Start with this Template”.

Once you’ve created your popup, set your targeting, triggering and frequency. On your popup or sticky bar overview page:

  1. Set the domain and URL paths where you want your popup or sticky bar to appear.

  2. Choose your triggering option based on your engagement goals.
  3. Set your frequency to choose how often your visitors will see your popup or sticky bar.
  4. In the advanced triggers section, toggle location targeting on and choose which country, region or city you want to show (or not show) your popup or sticky bar.

For best results, personalize

As I hope I’ve illustrated, in the golden age of martech, it’s time to stop squandering valuable website visits on impersonal, generic experiences. You can now leverage useful information about where your visitors are coming from and, by extension, come up with creative offers that will be relevant for them. Small details significantly enhance customer experience, and I hope you can use the above three examples as a springboard for some experiments of your own.

Taken from: 

Why Geo-targeting Your Website Content Is a No-brainer (and 3 Ways to Try It This Afternoon)