Desktop Wallpaper Calendars: July 2012

We always try our best to challenge your artistic abilities and produce some interesting, beautiful and creative artwork. And as designers we usually turn to different sources of inspiration. As a matter of fact, we’ve discovered the best one—desktop wallpapers that are a little more distinctive than the usual crowd. This creativity mission has been going on for over four years now, and we are very thankful to all designers who have contributed and are still diligently contributing each month.

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Desktop Wallpaper Calendars: July 2012

Why Account Managers Shouldn’t Prevent Designers From Speaking To Clients

Working as a web designer can suck sometimes. This is especially true when you don’t get to work alongside the client. Unfortunately this scenario is more common than you would think. Many organizations have been carefully structured to keep the web designer and the client apart. But is that really sensible? Would projects run much smoother without your account manager or boss acting as the middleman?
This issue came to my attention following the release of my latest book “Client Centric Web Design.

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Why Account Managers Shouldn’t Prevent Designers From Speaking To Clients

How Content Creators Benefit From The New SEO

Due to big changes in the SEO landscape, designers, photographers, videographers and writers have new opportunities to build their reputation, expand brand awareness and generate more leads. This post describes five important developments that content creators should be aware of, and then we’ll outline several ways to capitalize on them.
Five SEO Developments That Favor Content Producers Thanks to self-publishing and social networks, the world is drowning in content. Google’s response: make it easy for searchers to drill down to exactly what they are looking for.

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How Content Creators Benefit From The New SEO

Responsive Menus: Enhancing Navigation On Mobile Websites

Most of us are pretty familiar with responsive Web design by now. Basically, it uses a combination of a fluid layout and media queries to alter the design and layout of a website to fit different screen sizes. There are other considerations, too. For example, a lot of work has been done on responsive images, ensuring not only that images fit in a small-screen layout, but that the files downloaded to mobile devices are smaller, too.

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Responsive Menus: Enhancing Navigation On Mobile Websites

Create A Responsive, Mobile-First WordPress Theme

Let’s assess the situation. WordPress is an extremely popular, flexible, easy to use and open-source blogging and CMS system. More and more mobile devices are flooding the market every day, changing the way people use the Internet. And the need is growing for more beautifully designed and coded WordPress themes that work well across all of these devices. So, what are we waiting for? Let’s get to work!

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Create A Responsive, Mobile-First WordPress Theme

Form-Field Validation: The Errors-Only Approach

Error pages for form-field validation are dreadful. You’ve just filled out 20 form fields, yet you get the same bloated page thrown back in your face because a single field failed to validate.
I clearly recall the often loud sighs of despair during our last usability study each time a test subject encountered a validation error page.
Further Reading on SmashingMag: Web Form Validation: Best Practices and Tutorials Useful Ideas And Guidelines For Good Web Form Design Web Form Design: Showcases And Solutions We also noticed that test subjects who had been exposed to validation errors began to take preventive actions to avoid them in subsequent steps, by writing things such as “N/A” in the “Company name” field if in doubt about whether the field was optional.

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Form-Field Validation: The Errors-Only Approach

Introduction To JavaScript Unit Testing

You probably know that testing is good, but the first hurdle to overcome when trying to write unit tests for client-side code is the lack of any actual units; JavaScript code is written for each page of a website or each module of an application and is closely intermixed with back-end logic and related HTML. In the worst case, the code is completely mixed with HTML, as inline events handlers.

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Introduction To JavaScript Unit Testing

Do-It-Yourself Caching Methods With WordPress

There are different ways to make your website faster: specialized plugins to cache entire rendered HTML pages, plugins to cache all SQL queries and data objects, plugins to minimize JavaScript and CSS files and even some server-side solutions.

But even if you use such plugins, using internal caching methods for objects and database results is a good development practice, so that your plugin doesn’t depend on which cache plugins the end user has.

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Do-It-Yourself Caching Methods With WordPress

Let’s Play With Hardware-Accelerated CSS

If you’re a developer of mobile Web apps, then you’ve heard this before: Native apps perform better than Web apps.
But what does “perform better” mean? In the context above, performance is usually about measurable aspects such as loading time and responsiveness to user interaction. But more often than not, statements about performance lie within the realm of animations and transitions and how smooth they are. [Links checked February/21/2017]

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Let’s Play With Hardware-Accelerated CSS

Do’s And Don’ts For WordPress Startups

WordPress businesses are springing up all of the time. Some of them succeed, some of them fail, and some of them go global. Last month, I wrote a post on Smashing Magazine about the thriving WordPress economy. Later this year, the PressNomics conference will bring together some influential people and companies to discuss WordPress and business. But what if you’re just starting out? What if you’re taking your first steps with a WordPress business?

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Do’s And Don’ts For WordPress Startups