Typeplate: A Starter Kit For Beautiful Web Type

As of today we’re pleased to announce Typeplate, a free-range and open-source typographic starter kit that will hopefully help you build beautiful, text-rich websites. The word on the street is that the Web Is 95% Typography, so as we hurtle towards the future, we think there’s still a lot we can learn from five centuries of history. Typeplate is the result of this exploration of our typographic heritage.

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Typeplate: A Starter Kit For Beautiful Web Type

The Problem Of CSS Form Elements

Before 1998, the birth year of CSS Level 2, form elements were already widely implemented in all major browsers. The CSS 2 specification did not address the problem of how form elements should be presented to users. Because these elements are part of the UI of every Web document, the specification’s authors preferred to leave the visual layout of such elements to the default style sheet of Web browsers.

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The Problem Of CSS Form Elements

Creating Exciting And Unusual Visual Hierarchies

Layout, for both print and screen, is one of the most important aspects of graphic design. Designs that extend across multiple pages or screens, whether containing large or small amounts of type, must be carefully controlled in a way that is enticing and is easy for all to access. Careful control of visual hierarchy is a key aspect of the design decisions we have to consider.
In this article, we will look at how frequently type needs to be broken down into different levels, such as topic, importance and tone of voice.

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Creating Exciting And Unusual Visual Hierarchies

There Is No Mobile Internet!

It’s time to stop thinking about the Internet and online communication in the context of a device, be it desktop, tablet or mobile. Advances by Google and Apple have heightened consumer expectations, which now require stricter focus from us to create seamless online communications — communications that work everywhere and that get their point across.
We need to embrace a device-agnostic approach to communicating with connected consumers and forget the idea of a “mobile Internet”.

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There Is No Mobile Internet!

Bringing Angry Birds To Facebook

There’s no avoiding those Angry Birds. They are, quite literally, everywhere: toys, snacks, cartoons, plush toys and that wildly addictive game that seemingly everyone has downloaded at some point — 1 billion of us last year alone.
2012 was another landmark year at the Angry Birds aviary, otherwise known as Rovio. The Finnish-based developer not only released a slew of tie-ins — from Green Day to Star Wars — but also went social.

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Bringing Angry Birds To Facebook

The Evolution Of The BEM Methodology

This article is a case study about the evolution of BEM, a methodology that enables team members to collaborate and communicate ideas using a unified language that consists of simple yet powerful terms: blocks, elements, modifiers. Learn about the challenges that a big company faces when gradually building an entire ecosystem of services with an ever-growing team of developers.
Once upon a time, in a distant country far far away, an IT company named Yandex started developing Web search and related services.

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The Evolution Of The BEM Methodology

How To Improve And Refine Your WordPress Theme Development Process

There is so much to learn about WordPress theme development. The Internet is home to hundreds of articles about building WordPress themes, to countless theme frameworks that will help you get started, and to endless WordPress themes, some of which are beautiful and professional but not a few of which are (to be honest) a bit crappy.
Rather than write another article on building a WordPress theme (which would be silly, really, since any theme I build would fall into the “crappy” category), I’ve asked some of the top theme designers and developers to share some tips and techniques to help you improve and refine your theme development and design process.

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How To Improve And Refine Your WordPress Theme Development Process

How To Sell Your UX Design Solution To Clients

How do you convince clients to trust you with their valuable and much-loved product? In my experience, the best way to sell work to clients is to apply user-centered design not only to the work we produce, but also to the clients who commission that work.
We have to understand who our clients are, what is important to them and what their goals are. And then we have to deliver work that not only meets the needs of end users, but also satisfies the personalities within the company itself.

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How To Sell Your UX Design Solution To Clients

Using White Space For Readability In HTML And CSS

Right up front, I’ll offer some simple advice: In production, your code should be as performance-friendly as possible. This means, Gzip’ing, concatenating and minifying as many assets as possible, thus serving the smallest possible files and the least number of files. I don’t think anyone would argue that these suggestions aren’t best practices (even if we don’t implement them in every project).
Well-written, readable code doesn’t create mind games and labyrinths when other developers read it.

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Using White Space For Readability In HTML And CSS

Designing For The Reading Experience

With the rise of web fonts as well as affordable hosted web font services and ready-made kits, typography is reclaiming its title as design queen, ruler of all graphic and web design. [Links checked March/06/2017]
At the same time, for far too many designers, the primary concern about typography today seems to be aesthetic in nature. The problem is, we tend to use typography and lettering as two interchangeable terms, which they are not.

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Designing For The Reading Experience