How To Get Started With jQuery Mobile

There is no longer any debate about whether we need to address the design needs of mobile website users. While mobile browsers and platforms are creating new challenges for us, jQuery Mobile, an open-source multiplatform UI framework, can help us succeed with our mobile apps.
jQuery Mobile can help in the following circumstances:
Different screen sizes, pixel densities (DPI) and orientations; Different compatibility in terms of HTML5 and CSS3; New platforms appearing every couple of months (if you don’t believe me, Windows 8, Firefox OS and BlackBerry 10 will reach the market in the next couple of months); Dozens of hacks that we need to implement for each platform and to update almost every couple of months when a new browser appears.

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How To Get Started With jQuery Mobile

Mastering Real-World Constraints (A Case Study)

As UI designers, we’re always interested in learning, reading user research, understanding best practices and keeping up to date on all the latest approaches and tactics for building websites and applications.
One of the most exciting concepts we’ve started to apply to our thinking is the mobile-first approach, famously pioneered by designer Luke Wroblewski on his blog and then in his subsequent book. Generally, this approach provides a healthy way to gain focus, cut the fat and get to the heart of what’s important — for both content and interaction.

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Mastering Real-World Constraints (A Case Study)

Navigation For Mega-Sites

For most websites, navigation is not particularly challenging. A primary navigation bar, supported by sub-navigation, is often enough.
Typically, sub-navigation displays the parent, siblings and children of the current page. A persistent primary navigation bar shows top-level pages, allowing users to move between sections.
Further Reading on SmashingMag: Responsive Navigation On Complex Websites Breadcrumbs In Web Design: Examples And Best Practices Responsive Upscaling: Large-Screen E-Commerce Design Responsive Web Design: What It Is And How To Use It However, there is one class of website for which this traditional form of navigation falls short.

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Navigation For Mega-Sites

Goodbye, Zen Coding. Hello, Emmet!

Back in 2009, Sergey Chikuyonok wrote an article to present a new way of writing HTML and CSS code. This revolutionary plugin, called Zen Coding, has helped many developers through the years and has now reached a new level.
Emmet, previously known as Zen Coding, is the most productive and time-saving text-editor plugin you will ever see. By instantly expanding simple abbreviations into complex code snippets, Emmet can turn you into a more productive developer.

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Goodbye, Zen Coding. Hello, Emmet!

C-Swipe: An Ergonomic Solution To Navigation Fragmentation On Android

There are 3,997 different Android devices. Your navigation should work with all of them. C-Swipe can help: It is an alternative navigation pattern for tablets and mobile devices that is novel, ergonomic and localized.
This article provides a detailed walk-through of the design and code and provides a downloadable mini-app so that you can try out C-Swipe to see whether it’s right for your app.
Further Reading on SmashingMag: What Every App Developer Should Know About Android How To Design For Android Designing For A Maturing Android How To Design For Android Tablets Size, Complexity Increasing The number of touch devices is increasing, with new devices and features being introduced daily.

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C-Swipe: An Ergonomic Solution To Navigation Fragmentation On Android

Responsive Web Design With Physical Units

This post should be titled “Getting Ahead of Yourself.” “…By a Few Years,” actually. Here’s the deal: at the time I’m writing this, early 2013, there’s no way to accurately design for the Web using physical units, nor will there be for a very long time. But there is a way to design while knowing the physical characteristics of the device — or, at least, there will be in the very near future.

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Responsive Web Design With Physical Units

Practical Tips From Top WordPress Pros

Recently I shared with you some advice from the WordPress community to beginners. But what if starting out is already a dim memory? What if you’re already so immersed in the world of WordPress that you dream of Trac and you bore your partner with talk of your latest achievement with custom post types?
Below are some tips from WordPress pros from across the community. Many of the tips cover development, but there’s also advice on business, running your website and, of course, getting involved with the community.

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Practical Tips From Top WordPress Pros

The Art Of Storytelling Around An App

Every app tells a story. Apps like Pandora tell the story of music; apps like Tip N Split tell a story of a calculator; and apps like Temperature tell the story of weather. Then we have storybook apps like Alice for the iPad, which literally tell stories!
The story of the cluttered app market is well known! Biz Report recently reported that the number of app downloads is estimated to reach 56 billion in 2013.

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The Art Of Storytelling Around An App

Responsively Retrofitting An Existing Site With RWD Retrofit

Since the introduction of the iPhone in 2007, touchscreen mobile devices have exploded in popularity. They have introduced new problems, new solutions, new interactions, new ways of thinking and, of course, new costs to our clients.
The most important question on everyone’s mind — clients and developers alike — is, “How can we provide a great Web experience to our users on mobile?”
Further Reading on SmashingMag: Responsive Web Design: What It Is And How To Use It Responsive Web Design Techniques, Tools and Strategies The State Of Responsive Web Design Design Process In The Responsive Age It All Started With iPhone The mobile Web was rarely considered before the iPhone (mostly because mobile browsers were so bad).

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Responsively Retrofitting An Existing Site With RWD Retrofit

How To Design A Better Mobile Checkout Process

A record number of shoppers are turning to their smartphones to research potential purchases. Meanwhile, the bigger question — are those same users willing to complete the purchases on their mobile device? — is quickly being answered. The US, for example, saw an 81% spike in mobile e-commerce (m-commerce) sales in 2012, comprising a $25 billion market.
And it’s not just apps. By a landslide, users prefer mobile websites to apps for shopping.

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How To Design A Better Mobile Checkout Process