Tips And Tricks For Testing WordPress Themes

Whether you offer free or premium themes, testing should be a major part of your development process. By planning in advance, you can foster a development environment that deters some bugs by design and that helps you prevent others. The aim of this article is to share some of the tricks I use personally during and after development to achieve a bug-free product.
This article is split into three distinct sections:

View original article – 

Tips And Tricks For Testing WordPress Themes

The State Of Responsive Web Design

Responsive Web design has been around for some years now, and it was a hot topic in 2012. Many well-known people such as Brad Frost and Luke Wroblewski have a lot of experience with it and have helped us make huge improvements in the field. But there’s still a whole lot to do. [Links checked February/09/2017]
In this article, we will look at what is currently possible, what will be possible in the future using what are not yet standardized properties (such as CSS Level 4 and HTML5 APIS), and what still needs to be improved.

Jump to original: 

The State Of Responsive Web Design

Open Device Labs: Why Should We Care?

With all of the different smartphones, tablets and other devices that sport various operating systems and versions thereof, a Web developer’s job — testing (sometimes virtually) on multiple devices to resolve errors — hasn’t become any simpler. This article suggests how we can manage these tasks without pouring a truck-load of money into actually buying all of these different devices.
Further Reading on SmashingMag: Where Are The World’s Best Open Device Labs?

See original article here:

Open Device Labs: Why Should We Care?

50 Design Problems In 50 Days: Real Empathy For Innovation (Part 1)

I recently travelled 2517 miles to try to solve 50 problems in 50 days using design — a journey that would challenge me to fundamentally rethink my understanding of the user-experience design process.
I set myself a challenge. I wanted to test the limits of design’s ability to solve problems — big and small. To do this, I left the comfort of my computer chair and set out into the unknown.

Originally posted here: 

50 Design Problems In 50 Days: Real Empathy For Innovation (Part 1)

Beyond The Button: Embracing The Gesture-Driven Interface

As a mobile UI or UX designer, you probably remember the launch of Apple’s first iPhone as if it was yesterday. Among other things, it introduced a completely touchscreen-centered interaction to a individual’s most private and personal device. It was a game-changer.
Today, kids grow up with touchscreen experiences like it’s the most natural thing. Parents are amazed by how fast their children understand how a tablet or smartphone works.

Original link:

Beyond The Button: Embracing The Gesture-Driven Interface

Building The New Financial Times Web App (A Case Study)

Update (10.10.2013): Good news: according to recent tests, Flexbox layout isn’t slow any longer. Author’s comments about the performance of Flexbox refer to the original (legacy) flexbox that used display: box;. A head-to-head comparison of old vs. new syntax is available as well. — Ed.
When the mockups for the new Financial Times application hit our desks in mid-2012, we knew we had a real challenge on our hands. Many of us on the team (including me) swore that parts of interface would not be possible in HTML5.

Link – 

Building The New Financial Times Web App (A Case Study)

Flexbox Is As Easy As Pie: Designing CSS Layouts

Flexbox (or flexible box layout) is a new box model optimized for UI layout. As one of the first CSS modules designed for actual layout (floats were really meant mostly for things such as wrapping text around images), it makes a lot of tasks much easier, or even possible at all. Flexbox’s repertoire includes the simple centering of elements (both horizontally and vertically), the expansion and contraction of elements to fill available space, and source-code independent layout, among others abilities.

Continue reading here – 

Flexbox Is As Easy As Pie: Designing CSS Layouts

Exploring 10 Fundamental Aspects Of M-Commerce Usability

Everyone is talking about mobile. Some e-commerce websites are venturing into it. Mobile commerce (also known as “m-commerce”) has immense potential, exhibiting a 86% growth rate and hitting $25 billion in 2012 (set to reach $86 billion by 2016, according to eMarketer).
It’s also a whole new platform, with new interaction methods and usage contexts that introduce a host of limitations and pitfalls to watch out for when designing and running an m-commerce website.

Visit site:  

Exploring 10 Fundamental Aspects Of M-Commerce Usability

Typographic Design Patterns And Current Practices (2013 Edition)

Good typography has always been a defining aspect of effective Web design, and this holds true especially for websites in which the emphasis is on presenting a large amount of content — specifically, articles, news and stories. Whether for a magazine or international newspaper, the designer of any website that distributes a lot of content has always had to consider typographic details as seriously and thoroughly as a print designer would.

From:  

Typographic Design Patterns And Current Practices (2013 Edition)

Migrating A Website To WordPress Is Easier Than You Think

Now powering over 17% of the Web, WordPress is increasingly becoming the content management system (CMS) of choice for the average user. But what about websites built with an outdated CMS or without a CMS at all? Does moving to WordPress mean starting over and losing all the time, energy and money put into the current website? Nope!
Migrating a website (including the design) over to WordPress is actually easier than you might think.

Excerpt from – 

Migrating A Website To WordPress Is Easier Than You Think