How to Avoid Web Analytics “Analysis Paralysis” and Spend More Time Making Optimization Wins

It’s much easier to start your website optimization journey from a visual perspective than a strictly numerical one. When you can immediately see where visitors and users are clicking and where they’re not, you’re instantly clued into obvious bottlenecks, blockers, and regions that are completely ignored. Take this Google Analytics data for example… When you start digging through your typical analytics package, you’ll end up several pages deep, looking at listed data such as that shown above. Not always helpful, right? Visualizations are the best place to start What happens when I look at visual website analytics? This is a…

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How to Avoid Web Analytics “Analysis Paralysis” and Spend More Time Making Optimization Wins

How To Avoid Web Analytics ‘Analysis Paralysis’ & Spend More Time Making Optimization Wins

Visualizations are the best place to start It’s much easier to start your website optimization journey from a visual perspective than a strictly numerical one. When you can immediately see where visitors and users are clicking and where they’re not, you’re instantly clued into obvious bottlenecks, blockers, and regions that are completely ignored. Take this Google Analytics data for example… When you start digging through your typical analytics packages, you’ll end up several pages deep, looking at listed data like what is shown above. Not always helpful, right? What happens when I look at visual website analytics? This is a…

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How To Avoid Web Analytics ‘Analysis Paralysis’ & Spend More Time Making Optimization Wins

Product Designer (REMOTE)

Looking for a well-rounded Product designer [REMOTE]
We’re growing our design team and looking for a person who understands product design, business perspective and why we do stuff that we do, but who’s also very good at visual design.
What will you be working on? Semaphore is a continuous delivery service, focused on speed and simplicity. A tool that helps developers write better code. More on semaphoreci.com.
Who you’ll be working with?

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Product Designer (REMOTE)

From Cats With Love: Welcome The New Smashing Membership

We can’t believe it’s actually happening. After 18 months of hard work on the big bang relaunch of this little website, today is the day when everything changes. New design and new technical stack. New personality and new ambitious goals. But most importantly, a new focus on our wonderful web community, with the brand new Smashing Membership.
Rewarding Great People Doing Great Work In times when we fight all the craziness and narrow-mindedness around us, we need to remind ourselves how wonderful a vast majority of the web community actually is.

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From Cats With Love: Welcome The New Smashing Membership

10 Ways To Build An Actionable Content Marketing Strategy To Boost Conversion Rates

Content marketing is an essential technique that’s considered to bring in a huge return with a potentially low-tier budget.

What’s so special about it?

For one, content marketing can act as a backbone of all your marketing strategies, from paid campaigns to outbound strategies. Every marketing tactic is augmented to an audience with the help of content marketing.

Thanks to content marketing, businesses have been able to increase their website reach, conversion rates, lead generation, and more.

Even then, there have been common misconceptions that content marketing isn’t the best way to improve your conversions. We can see that 38 percent of organizations are yet to give content marketing a serious chance. This leads to a lower emphasis on content marketing as a growth and conversion-driving method.

B2B Content Marketing

Source

Here are 10 reasons that contribute to a poor content marketing strategy and its effect on your low conversion rates.

1. Aggregate Resources to Run Content Marketing

One of the challenges marketers face is the shortage of resources.  

This may be true for an organization that reaches a certain level of maturity, but content marketing still gets you results even with minimal resources.

There are 2 crucial parts of content marketing which are discussed as follows:

  • Team: A significant problem stated by CxO’s and marketers in various organizations is about building a team. Content marketing requires dedication and a clear strategy, but building a team is not a necessity. All you need is a clear content promotion and distribution strategy. And this has been validated by growing startups time and again.B2C marketing team size
  • Marketing Tools: Scarcity of marketing tools can also stall the progress of your marketing efforts. Generally, one can do most of the stuff manually, but the downside to the manual approach is a lot of time gets wasted. Here are a mix of free and premium tools that one can use as tools to streamline their content marketing efforts –
    • Keyword Research: Google Keyword Suggest, Google Trends, SEMRush, and Ahrefs.
    • Writing tools: Microsoft Word, Hemingway Writer, and Dropbox Paper.
    • Content Ideation and research tool: Buzzsumo, Alltop, Uber Suggest, and Google Search Suggestions.
    • Content Distribution (Social and Organic): Buffer, Meet Edgar, Contently, Stumbleupon, Feedly, and LinkedIn Pulse.
    • User Engagement tracking: VWO, Kissmetrics, Mention, Google Analytics, and more.

It’s a myth that content marketing requires a lot of resources that come at a premium. As a result, it is considered out of reach for most of us. However, if you put a little effort in finding the right set of tools, you’ll have these just with little spending.

2. Figure Out the KPIs for Your Content Strategy

Figuring out the critical KPIs, or key performance indicators, will tell you if you are achieving your target and if not, how much effort has to be put in. The KPIs you choose should indicate your progress toward your goal.

For content marketing, here are a few KPIs that you should always document:

  • Time spent on a blog or other content pieces
  • Forms filled for gated content like eBooks, Whitepapers, and so on
  • Bounce rate of your blog and averages views
  • Subscribers gained for a newsletter/email list
  • Social media shares
  • Conversion rate/Desired action was taken
  • Inbound links generated
  • Comments posted on your blog

For example, if you want to increase conversions and sign up customers for a trial, you would be measuring conversion rate as one of your KPIs.

3. Map Your Content Strategy to Your Marketing Funnel

Whilst creating a content marketing strategy, it is important that the creation procedure relates to various stages of your marketing funnel.

If a standard marketing funnel is divided into 4 stages, it is imperative that the content strategy is in line with it.

Content Marketing and Funnel Journey

A guideline, like the one above, can you give a clear picture about creating an effective content strategy. This strategy can guide your audience or customers at every stage of their journey.

4. Streamline Your Content Strategy

It’s a nightmare for marketers to streamline their content strategy. And it’s a task that a content marketer has to overcome, as the smoother the process to churn out quality content, the smoother it is to engage with your target audience.

Here is a quick strategy flow that you can follow to streamline your process:

Build a Content Calendar

  • Build a content calendar even when you are planning to publish a couple of articles over a month or so.
  • Strategize your content marketing around content bundles. Target no more than 2 keywords for a month.
  • Using the 2 keywords, share multiple content collaterals on your website as well as on guest blogs and web pages for a month.
  • Depending on your team size, you can scale from just 2 keywords to more.
  • In the next month, move to the next set of keywords from the pool of your target keywords.
  • For each month, repeat Steps b and c.

Automate your social media distribution

  • The most common reason that discourages marketers to use social media to market their content is the distribution part. Posting on social media becomes tedious when you publish over 10–12 social updates daily.
  • To solve this problem, use social media automation.
  • Use tools like Buffer and Hootsuite to automate content distribute among social websites like Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.
  • To monitor social media activity, you can either use the analytical dashboard provided by different social media websites or a tool like Mention or Brand24.

Build and follow an outreach program

  • Outreaching is crucial if you want to promote your brand and build links. It also puts you in the spotlight with influencers and provides the much-needed exposure.
  • Email and social media are the two best channels for an outreach program.
  • If you’re starting out, you can use various templates available on the Internet. We like these ideas shared by HubSpot and Mailshake.
  • Automate your outreach campaigns by using tools like Gmass or Ninja Outreach. Set up automatic follow-ups so that you can focus on what really matters.

With these 3 elements of content marketing in place, you will realize how effective content marketing is. Most importantly, you and your team will become a content-generating factory in no time.

5. Solve the Dilemma – Long vs. Short Content Pieces

It’s a common belief that long-form content works better if it were to rank for any given keyword.

While this is true in most cases, yet writing short-form content does not batter your business. The reason behind it is the purpose of your content.

There are various factors that you need to consider before concluding that “My blog post has to be a long one.” Don’t compromise on the quality of your post because it needs to have a certain length.

Instead, pay attention to these factors:

  • Target Audience: When you are ideating your content strategy, it is important to figure out your audience. See who you are targeting, what problems you are trying to alleviate for your audience, and where you fit in. Now, devise the purpose of your post.
  • Writing Style: Some content writers and marketers have the habit of writing unnecessarily lengthy content. Some want to keep their content short and to the point. If you’re changing your writing style, be steady.
  • Type of Content: Not all content can be words. As a business, you need to have diverse content creation and distribution strategy. Most successful business owners and individuals invest in a variety of content verticals like blogging, infographics, eBooks, Whitepapers, video walkthroughs, and more.
  • Content Posting-Frequency: The length of your blog posts also matters on your posting frequency. To post articles or other content pieces every few days, you would have to write brief and small pieces of content. However, people who tend to post once in a week or two tend to write longer content. Avoid being stringent to a strict deadline if you or your team feel that you are compromising on the quality of your content.
  • Post Format: The format of your post has a lot of impact on the readability. If you lean toward writing short paragraphs with a good amount of whitespace and images, you can produce a short form or long form content and both can be equally engaging.

6. Don’t expect to get fast results without a proper structure

While marketers may agree that content marketing is a lengthy process and does not get immediate results, at times, it may be the only way to build authority for your business.

To elaborate we are going to discuss the CRM Industry. CRM stands for Customer Relation Management systems.

What is a CRM?

A CRM system gives other teams, such as sales, customer service, business development, or marketing, a better way to manage the external interactions and relationships that drive success. A CRM tool lets you store customer and prospect contact information, identify sales opportunities, record service issues, and manage marketing campaigns, all at a central location. The purpose is to make information about every customer interaction available to anyone in your company who might need it. [Source]

The CRM industry is a crowded and competitive space. CRM is the backbone of any brand’s sales and marketing process.

Giants like Salesforce and SAP are battling it out in the open; and brands like Hubspot, Pipedrive, FreshWorks, and others are being billed as the up and coming CRM platforms.

Yet, the industry is still blooming. How do you then outrank the competition?

Paid advertising and outbound marketing are a costly affair.

We will share a small story about a fairly new SaaS company named Pipedrive that tapped content marketing to not only get noticed but also get lot of conversions.

Pipedrive is a young CRM platform that has been targeting small- to mid-level businesses. It focuses on content marketing efforts to improve its conversion rates.

Pipedrive devised a content strategy around sales management (a highly competitive keyword on Google and in the CRM universe). It took 3 months for it to rank from nothing to the first position on Google.

“Sales management” has a monthly search volume of approximately 10k with a high competitive score.

After a lot of brainstorming and coming out with a well-laid strategy, Pipedrive’s content marketing team could deliver in under 3 months.

So, before you play down content marketing as a strategy, think about Pipedrive—a nascent CRM platform that is now present in 140 countries with 4 offices across the globe.

You can read the complete case study here.

Content marketing might not bring you fast results, but planned execution can bring in massive results in 6 months.

7. Focus on Social Media

Marketers disregard social media as a viable, alternative method to build traffic and drive user engagement.

We were able to identify 2 major reasons for it:

  • Marketers believe that social media is meant only for businesses, which are targeting millennials and tech-savvy consumers.
  • Social media efforts result in wastage of valuable time. Marketers believe that if they can create quality content, search results will automatically bring in customers, en masse.

There are additional points other than the above reasoning.

  1. Almost 2 billion people are using social in one form or another. If you are not leveraging social media, you are losing a huge chunk of the audience.
  2. I’m sure, you’ve heard the phrase, “Putting all your eggs in one basket.” This phrase means banking excessively on just one method for achieving success. In content marketing, while search results bring in a major chunk of your audience, a simple change in the Google algorithm can completely block your traffic. So, there is a need to explore other channels as well to maintain a consistent traffic flow.
  3. You can’t build a relation without interacting with your customers and clients. Social media is one of the best ways to start building one.

8. Don’t Write Content Just around Your Brand

A common habit among marketers is of focusing their content only on their own product or service. To your target audience, this comes off as too promotional, so at times, the audience complains that it’s hard to trust such brands.

This can become a major problem for marketers who are trying to cultivate a meaningful relationship with their audience that benefits both parties.

Then what should you do?

The key purpose of content marketing is to develop a worthwhile relationship with the target audience. The readers should relate to you as a brand that genuinely treats a customer’s problem as its own problem.

Start looking for challenges your audience is facing. Create content that offers effective countermeasures to help overcome those challenges.

When your audience notices that your content is consistently relevant, they will keep coming back for more.

9. Invest in Content Marketing

Many organizations start delving into content marketing because they think the investment is zero or next to zero.

While this concern is true to an extent. You should understand that quality content creation has no importance if it’s not promoted on the right channel at the right time.

Promotion depends on your audience type.

For example, for targeting B2B audience, you may use professional networks like LinkedIn and GrowthHackers as well as public platforms like Twitter by using retargeting and online behavior.

Investing a small amount (a few hundred dollars a month) can help you promote your post to not just a few hundreds, but many thousands.

10. Write for the Web

Writing on the web is different from other forms of writing. Choose a topic and run a search query on Google, and you’ll find a sea of similar articles.

Therefore, it’s important to stand out.

Here is a popular framework that can help you improve the usability of your blog post and allow it to be more in sync with your audience.

Starting Afresh

Even if you have failed with content marketing at some point in your professional lives, that’s not the end you can try again.

To get results from your content marketing efforts, you need to give it a lot of time.

Look for small wins to gain the initial momentum. For example, set a target of building 5 inbound links to your website in the first month, or get 500 shares about your blog in 2 weeks’ time. When you start achieving your subgoals while going for the bigger goal, it becomes more quantifiable and attainable.

If you’re serious about content marketing, I’m looking forward to learning what sort of problems you faced or are facing during your journey in this field. Did you solve it, or are you working toward it? We would love to hear from you in our Comments section.

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10 Ways To Build An Actionable Content Marketing Strategy To Boost Conversion Rates

Get Better Landing Pages for AdWords with 3 Techniques to Try Today

If you’re a PPC strategist, your client’s campaigns live and die by the strength of the landing pages. If you drop the perfect paid audience on a page with no offer (or an unclear one), you’ll get a 0% conversion rate no matter how your ads perform.

The problem is that as AdWords account managers, we can be pretty limited in our ability to change landing pages. In this role, we typically lack the budget, resources, and expertise needed to affect what’s often the root cause of failing campaigns.

So how do you rescue your AdWords campaigns from bad landing pages without also becoming a landing page designer or a conversion rate optimization expert?

Below are three techniques you can use to reveal some insight, change performance yourself, or influence more relevant, better converting landing pages for AdWords.

1. Cut spend & uncover priority content with the ugly duckling search term method

Many AdWords accounts have rules that look something like this:

If the keyword spends more than $100 and doesn’t result in a sale, remove keyword.

Whether it’s automated or a manual check, the process is the same: “optimize” by getting rid of what doesn’t convert.

But this assumes that the landing page your ad points to is perfectly optimized and relevant to every keyword that might be important to your audience — a pretty tall order. But what if your target audience is searching for your offer with your seemingly “dud” keyword, and you’re driving them to an incorrect or incomplete landing page that doesn’t reflect the keyword or the search intent behind it?

The “Ugly Duckling” is a check you can do when your keyword isn’t hitting the performance metrics you want. It will help you figure out if your keyword is a swan, or a wet rat you need to purge from your aquatic friends.
Ugly duckling adwords landing page trick

As an example, let’s say your client is a fruit vendor, with an AdWords campaign driving coupon downloads. Here’s the ad group for concord grapes:

Concord Grape Ad Group

The Ad Group for Concord Grapes

The keyword phrase ‘organic concord grapes’ has a lot of search volume, but it’s performing horribly at $695 per coupon download!

An AdWord’s “rule” pausing or deleting what doesn’t work would wipe out this keyword in no time. But, before assuming a wet rat, this is where you’d take look at the (hypothetical) landing page:

the corresponding landing page

The hypothetical landing page for the fruit vendor’s Ad campaign.

The landing page never mentions your grapes are organic! No wonder your visitors aren’t converting. This is poor message match from your ad.

In this case, simply adding the high-volume, highly relevant term “organic” to your landing page is much smarter than negative matching the term your audience is using to find your product. There could be several keywords you’re bidding on that could use this swan/wet rat treatment.

Applying swan or wet rat to your AdWords landing pages

Instant wet rat: If your poor performing keyword doesn’t reflect your offer at all (ie: your grapes aren’t organic), then the keyword is a wet rat. Don’t bid on it, and consider negative matching to avoid further traffic.

Further investigation needed: Assuming your grapes are organic (or more broadly, the keyword is indeed relevant to your offer), there are several things you can try, such as:

  • Altering your ad headline: If it’s not already in there, test adding your keyword to your ad’s headline. This should drive a better quality score and cost per click, and you can see whether it affects CTR for the keyword. Because making changes to your landing page could require more rigorous review than changing ad copy, this can be a good first step.
  • Ad group break-out: If your keyword phrase is particularly long or is unrelated to the other keywords in your ad group, break it into a new ad group before including it in your headline.
  • Data-based landing page recommendation: If your keyword performance improves with the ad-specific steps above, you should now have the data you need to get your client or designer/team to feature the keyword prominently on the landing page. In the case of our example, “organic” can be easily added to the headline on the landing page.
    • In other cases, building out a separate, more specific landing page to address individual keywords could be more appropriate.
    • Depending on relevancy and search volume, you can incorporate the theme of the keyword throughout the landing page and offer.
  • Search term deep dive: Go a step further and examine the search terms, not just the keywords, following the same process. Looking at the actual search terms that do drive spend and traffic can reveal potential exclusions, match type tightening, and keywords to add.

Hypothetically, here’s what performance could look like for our keyword once we’ve optimized the ad and resulting landing page to better reflect the product:

hypothetical before and after

This keyword we were about to pause is now driving 1400+ downloads with a cost per download of the coupon. That’s below our target. Swan after all!

2. Learn about your audience with “mini-quiz” ad copy

A strong AdWords landing page isn’t just about following best practices or using slick templates. It should encompass user research, sales data, persuasive messaging, and a compelling offer, but you’ve got a trick up your sleeve: your ad copy.

Think of your ad copy as a quiz where you get to ask your audience what unique selling point is most important to them. With each ad click, you’re collecting votes for the best messaging, which can fuel key messages on your landing page.

To do this right, you have to have distinct messages and value propositions in your copy. For example, it makes no sense to run a test of these ad descriptions:

  • (Version A) Say goodbye to breakouts. #1 solution for clear skin. Try for free today!
  • (Version B) Say Goodbye to Breakouts. #1 Solution for Clear Skin. Try for Free Today!
  • (Version C) #1 solution for clear skin. Say goodbye to breakouts. Try for free today!

One of these ads will get a better click through rate than the others, but you’ve learned nothing.

A good ad copy quiz has distinct choices and results.
You’ll want to challenge assumptions about your audience. Consider this other, better version of the quiz from the text ad example above:

  • (Version A) Say goodbye to breakouts. #1 solution for clear skin. Try for free today!
  • (Version B) Get clear skin in just 3 days. Get your 1st shipment free. Order now!

Whether the winner is “#1 solution” or “Results in 3 days,” we’ve learned something about the priorities of our audience, and the learnings can be applied to improve the landing page’s headline and copy throughout. Rinse & repeat.

Turning your ads into mini-quizzes

See what your audience truly values by letting them vote with their click. Here are some ideas for value propositions to get you started with your ad copy quiz:

Note: I normally don’t suggest including messaging in your ad that isn’t reflected on the landing page (i.e. if your landing page doesn’t mention price, neither should your ad). However, if you don’t control the landing page as the paid media manager, the CTR of an ad copy test can point you in the right direction for what to add to your page, so it’s fair game in this instance.

3. “Tip the scales” with exactly enough information

There’s a widely-spread idea that landing pages for AdWords should be stripped of any features, links, or functionality other than a form. This is just not true, and blindly following this advice could be killing your conversion rates.

Unbounce co-founder Oli Gardner, frequently talks about the importance of landing page Attention Ratio:

Basically, your page should have one purpose, and you should avoid distractions.

This is great advice, especially for people who are tempted to drive AdWords traffic to a home page with no real CTA. But I find it has been misinterpreted and misapplied all over the internet by people who’ve twisted it into an incorrect “formula”, i.e.:

  • He who has the fewest links and options on the landing page wins.

That’s not how it works. People need links, content, choice, and context to make a decision. Not all links are bad; I’ve doubled conversion rates just by diverting PPC traffic from dedicated LPs to the website itself.

The question is, how much information does a visitor need in order to take action?

Ultimately you want to “tip the scales” of the decision-making process for your visitor – getting rid of unnecessary distractions, but keeping those essential ingredients that will help them go from “no” to “yes” or even “absolutely.”

Here are 2 very common mistakes that are killing conversion rates on landing pages across the internet:

Mistake #1: Single-option landing pages

You’ve heard all about the paradox of choice and analysis paralysis. You know that when people have too many options, they’re more likely to choose none at all. But what happens when you have too few?

If you don’t see what you want, you’re also going to say “no.”

As an example (that you probably won’t see in the wild but it’s nice and easy to illustrate), someone’s Googled a pizza delivery service. But the landing page allows someone to order pepperoni and pepperoni only, and our vegetarian searcher leaves to order elsewhere.

At first glance, this might look like our “organic grapes” problem from earlier, but something different is at play.

Many AdWords ads today are driving to single-option landing pages, where the only choice is to take the offer exactly as-is. This can be fine when only one variation exists, or your visitors have a chance to narrow their choices later in the process.

But if your visitors’ search is more broad, don’t take away their options in an effort to simplify the page. You’ll miss out on potential sales, which is kind of the whole point of running a campaign.

Instead, driving to a category page, or one that gives your visitors (gasp) – choice! – will keep them engaged. You may also consider creating several different types of landing pages for each specific option you offer to get specific after someone’s narrowed down their options via a broader landing page.

Mistake #2: The not-enough-info landing page

Another case of “When good landing page principles go bad” is the stripped-down, bare-bones dedicated landing page that has no useful information.

A disturbing and growing trend is for AdWords landing pages to feature no navigation, links, details, or information. There’s not even a way to visit the company domain from the landing page. This is a problem, because as the saying goes: A confused mind says no.

What’s going through your site visitors’ minds when they get to a landing page and can’t find what they need?

A landing page without enough information can be just as bad (or worse) than a landing page with too much.

Whether your traffic is warm or cold, coming from an email campaign or paid ads, arriving at your home page or a dedicated landing page, your visitors need to trust that you can solve their problems before they’ll convert on your offer.

Overall, just because someone’s clicked on an AdWords ad doesn’t mean they have fewer questions or less of a need for product details than if they came in from another channel. Remember to cover all your details of your offer in a logical information hierarchy, and don’t be afraid to give your visitors options to explore important info via lightboxes, or links where appropriate.

Getting control over your landing pages for AdWords

As a PPC manager, you may not directly control the landing page, but you can remind your team to avoid conversion killers like:

  • Key questions from the top keywords that aren’t answered on the landing page
  • No clear reason to take action
  • Landing pages where choice is limited unnecessarily, leaving more questions than answers
  • Landing pages that don’t explain what will happen after a visitor takes action on the offer
  • No way for visitors to have their questions answered

Give your visitors a reason to say yes, remove their reasons to say no, and watch your conversion rates improve.

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Get Better Landing Pages for AdWords with 3 Techniques to Try Today

What is a Vanity Metric?

what is a vanity metric

A metric that makes you feel good without telling you anything about your business. Or as Tim Ferris puts it: ‘Vanity metrics: good for feeling awesome, bad for action.’ Vanity metrics are things you can measure that don’t matter. They’re easily changed or manipulated, and they don’t bear a direct correlation with numbers that speak to business success. People use vanity metrics because they don’t know that these numbers don’t really count, or because vanity metrics can make you feel like you’re getting results – even though they don’t really tell you anything about your business health or growth. What’s…

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What is a Vanity Metric?

Product Manager – Mobile Applications – Heni Publishing – (London) – FullTime

The Company:
Heni Publishing is a boutique, fast-growing, arts business based in the heart of Soho. We work with leading artists and estates across publishing, art reproductions, photography, website development, events and art research. For further information, please visit our website www.henipublishing.com.
The Role:
You will be a confident Product Manager with broad experience of working in Agile environments across Web and Mobile Products. Working primarily with external developers, in this role you will be a key part of technical and design events including planning, refinement, review, retrospective, the sprint and daily scrum.

Originally posted here – 

Product Manager – Mobile Applications – Heni Publishing – (London) – FullTime

A Comprehensive Guide To Web Design

(This is a sponsored post). Web design is tricky. Designers and developers have to take a lot of things into account when designing a website, from visual appearance (how the website looks) to functional design (how the website works). To simplify the task, we’ve prepared this little guide.
In this article, I’ll focus on the main principles, heuristics, and approaches that will help you to create a great user experience for your website.

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A Comprehensive Guide To Web Design

How To Do Content Marketing Without Writing Blog Posts

Content marketing is all the rage right now. And for good reason. It’s the best way to bring in new organic traffic to your site. If you want a piece of the organic, SEO traffic pie, you need to be creating new content on a daily basis. Otherwise, you risk falling behind. There are currently millions of blog posts published daily. Meaning you are competing with potentially thousands of other businesses for the same traffic. But what if you don’t have to, want to, or need to blog? What if your business doesn’t make sense for blogging? It’s becoming a…

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How To Do Content Marketing Without Writing Blog Posts