Static Site Generators Reviewed: Jekyll, Middleman, Roots, Hugo

Static site generators are quickly becoming a big part of the professional website builder’s toolbox. A new static website generator seems to pop up every week. Figuring out which one to use can be like a walk in the jungle.
In the last article, I looked at why static website generation is growing in popularity, and I gave a high-level overview of all of the components of a modern generator.

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Static Site Generators Reviewed: Jekyll, Middleman, Roots, Hugo

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Static Website Generators Reviewed: Jekyll, Middleman, Roots, Hugo


Static website generation is quickly becoming a big part of the professional website builder’s toolbox. A new static website generator seems to pop up every week. Figuring out which one to use can be like a walk in the jungle.

Static Website Generators: An Overview

In the last article, I looked at why static website generation is growing in popularity, and I gave a high-level overview of all of the components of a modern generator. In this article, we’ll look at four popular static website generators — Jekyll, Middleman, Roots, Hugo — in far more detail. This should give you a great starting point for finding the right one for your project.

The post Static Website Generators Reviewed: Jekyll, Middleman, Roots, Hugo appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Static Website Generators Reviewed: Jekyll, Middleman, Roots, Hugo

Web Development Reading List #112: Edge Update and Performance Monitoring

What’s going on in the industry? What new techniques have emerged recently? What insights, tools, tips and tricks is the web design community talking about? Anselm Hannemann is collecting everything that popped up over the last week in his web development reading list so that you don’t miss out on anything. The result is a carefully curated list of articles and resources that are worth taking a closer look at.

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Web Development Reading List #112: Edge Update and Performance Monitoring

The 3-Step Conversion Funnel That Will Revolutionize Your Conversion Optimization

Sometimes, all your conversion optimization needs is a swift kick in the pants. CRO can easily devolve into a bean-counting, test-running, data-crunching road to nowhere. What it needs is a strong dose of strategy, structure, alignment, and revenue-focused goals. Consider this article your swift kick in the pants — in the gentlest way possible, of […]

The post The 3-Step Conversion Funnel That Will Revolutionize Your Conversion Optimization appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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The 3-Step Conversion Funnel That Will Revolutionize Your Conversion Optimization

WDRL #112: Edge Update and Performance Monitoring


What’s going on in the industry? What new techniques have emerged recently? What insights, tools, tips and tricks is the web design community talking about? Anselm Hannemann is collecting everything that popped up over the last week in his web development reading list so that you don’t miss out on anything. The result is a carefully curated list of articles and resources that are worth taking a closer look at. — Ed.

Microsoft Edge

Last week I was talking about avoiding working all day and night. But Erik actually added a valid point to it: For you as an employee, it’s not always easy to turn off devices and just not respond to requests of your manager. And many companies still have the thinking of “we pay you salary, so we pretty much own you”. This is not true and we all need to educate people, including our managers, to respect that. Because work without joy is not efficient work. And we need some downtime to deliver good work and enjoy our work.

The post WDRL #112: Edge Update and Performance Monitoring appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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WDRL #112: Edge Update and Performance Monitoring

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Web Development Reading List #112: Updated Edge, Performance Monitoring, and How to Stay Relevant


What’s going on in the industry? What new techniques have emerged recently? What insights, tools, tips and tricks is the web design community talking about? Anselm Hannemann is collecting everything that popped up over the last week in his web development reading list so that you don’t miss out on anything. The result is a carefully curated list of articles and resources that are worth taking a closer look at. — Ed.

Microsoft Edge

Last week I was talking about avoiding working all day and night. But Erik actually added a valid point to it: For you as an employee, it’s not always easy to turn off devices and just not respond to requests of your manager. And many companies still have the thinking of “we pay you salary, so we pretty much own you”. This is not true and we all need to educate people, including our managers, to respect that. Because work without joy is not efficient work. And we need some downtime to deliver good work and enjoy our work.

The post Web Development Reading List #112: Updated Edge, Performance Monitoring, and How to Stay Relevant appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Web Development Reading List #112: Updated Edge, Performance Monitoring, and How to Stay Relevant

Using UI System Fonts In Web Design: A Quick Practical Guide

For perhaps the first time since the original Macintosh, we can get excited about using system UI fonts. They’re an interesting, fresh alternative to web typography — and one that doesn’t require a web-font delivery service or font files stored on your server. How do we use system UI fonts on a website, and what are the caveats?
System UI fonts being amazing kind of snuck up on us. Google has been toiling away at Roboto with great success (including regular updates), Apple made a splash with San Francisco, and Mozilla asked renowned type designer Erik Spiekermann to create Fira Sans.

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Using UI System Fonts In Web Design: A Quick Practical Guide

40 Travel Icons To Spruce Up Your Designs [Freebie]

Have you been looking for nice icons to spice up your travel agency or the airline website? Today, we’re happy to release the Voyage Icon Set, a set of 40 free icons available in AI, EPS, PDF, SVG and PNG formats. This icon set was brought to you by Print Express and is free to use in private as well as commercial projects.
You may modify the size, color or shape of the icons.

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40 Travel Icons To Spruce Up Your Designs [Freebie]

Learn CRO Visually: 13 Infographics on Conversion Optimization

We’re visual creatures – that’s one of the reasons that infographics are so appealing. For many of us, it’s also about the stats. There’s something appealing about good research clearly illustrated. That’s the reason for this roundup of conversion rate optimization (CRO) tips from infographics, drawn from the length and breadth of the interwebs. Check […]

The post Learn CRO Visually: 13 Infographics on Conversion Optimization appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Learn CRO Visually: 13 Infographics on Conversion Optimization

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How to Charge Your Clients for Landing Page Services

Pricing any service at an agency is tough because of all the variables — unexpected delays, crazy review cycles and borderline-silly-and-sometimes-seemingly-impossible client requests.

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“It needs to pop more! Give it some pizzazz!” Image source.

And when it comes to adding landing pages to your list of services, things can get especially tricky. (Still working on convincing your clients of the value of landing pages? Here’s some help.)

Is landing page design a staple service of yours? Will you offer follow up, maintenance and optimization services? Or are landing pages simply an add-on that you’ll teach clients to maintain themselves?

No matter which pricing model you go with, you want to present landing page services to clients in a way that shows their potential for exponential ROI, while leaving the client feeling like they’re getting a good deal… all while turning a profit.

Let’s take a look at a couple of ways that agencies are charging their clients for landing page services, while keeping both their clients and accountants happy.

1. Include landing pages in your retainer fee

A lot of agencies work on a retainer fee model. They get paid upfront to provide specific services over a period of time. For these agencies, a good practice is to build the fees for landing pages into that initial retainer.

Jacob Baadsgaard, the founder and CEO over at Disruptive Advertising in Provo, Utah, uses this pricing model. Says Jacob:

jacob-baadsgaard copyIt’s included in the pricing. That’s just one of the perks that we give them… We just say ‘this is a simple, inexpensive solution that’s included in our pricing anyway, whether you use it or not.’ I’d say 95% of our clients use it.

Clients are often receptive to an agency charging for a third-party marketing tool like Unbounce, as long as it’s clearly outlined in a retainer fee breakdown and they’re aware of the positive impact it will have on their business.

Guidelines for using this pricing structure:

  • Make sure you account for all variables before calculating the fee. Will you offer analytics and optimization services? What level of service is reasonable for your flat rate?
  • Set expectations about the revision process and whether you’ll provide ongoing support. Is your client expecting more advanced functionality, mock-ups, or other things that will be resource-intensive for you? If clients want to go over the bar that you’ve set, work together on additional pricing.

2. Charge your client for landing pages directly

For other agencies, it makes more sense to charge landing pages as a separate line item.

Maybe your campaign requires particularly sophistical landing pages with custom coding and custom design. Or, as Liesl Barrell, CEO at Montreal boutique digital marketing agency Third Wunder has found, different campaigns might require more landing pages than others. Liesl asks:

liesl-barrell-200How many landing pages will they need? Will they require updates to copy or creative? Do they need ongoing support? These are the questions we need to ask to establish pricing and manage expectations.

Based on the answer to this question, Third Wunder establishes a flat fee and then makes additions based on the client’s needs.

Vancouver agency Titan PPC, charges a flat fee of around $500-$700 for a custom landing page. That may sound like a lot, but included in that price are as many variations as the client desires for the lifetime of that page.

Guidelines for using this pricing structure:

  • Start by identifying the scope of your project. How many pages does the campaign call for? Which additional resources (custom functionality, custom design) will be required?
  • Make sure that the client understands what they’re getting and at what price from the very beginning. This will help you manage expectations and keep them happy in the long term.

The best landing page pricing model

It’s worth sitting down with your team and establishing how landing pages fit into your offering. Are they a critical part of the service you provide or are they add-ons? How can you offer continued support without undervaluing any custom work your clients might ask of you?

The best pricing model is the one that works best for your clients and for you — it’s all about finding that sweet spot where clients feel that they’re getting a great deal, and you feel that your expertise is being properly valued. 

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How to Charge Your Clients for Landing Page Services

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