Category Archives: Conversion Rate Optimization

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How To Design Search For Your Mobile App




How To Design Search For Your Mobile App

Suzanne Scacca



Why is Google the search behemoth it is today? Part of the reason is because of how it’s transformed our ability to search for answers.

Think about something as simple as looking up the definition of a word. 20 years ago, you would’ve had to pull your dictionary off the shelf to find an answer to your query. Now, you open your phone or turn on your computer, type or speak the word, and get an answer in no time at all and with little effort on your part.

This form of digital shortcutting doesn’t just exist on search engines like Google. Mobile apps now have self-contained search functions as well.

Is a search bar even necessary in a mobile app interface or is it overkill? Let’s take a look at why the search bar element is important for the mobile app experience. Then, we’ll look at a number of ways to design search based on the context of the query and the function of the app.

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Mobile App Search Is Non-Negotiable

The search bar has been a standard part of websites for years, but statistics show that it isn’t always viewed as a necessity by users. This data from Neil Patel and Kissmetrics focuses on the perception and usage of the search bar on e-commerce websites:


Kissmetrics site search infographic


Data from a Kissmetrics infographic about site search. (Source: Kissmetrics) (Large preview)

As you can see, 60% of surveyed users prefer using navigation instead of search while 47% opt for filterable “search” over regular search functionality.

On a desktop website, this makes sense. When a menu is well-designed and well-labeled — no matter how extensive it may be — it’s quite easy to use. Add to that advanced filtering options, and I can see why website visitors would prefer that to search.

But mobile app users are a different breed. They go to mobile apps for different reasons than they do websites. In sum, they want a faster, concentrated, and more convenient experience. However, since smartphone screens have limited space, it’s not really feasible to include an expansive menu or set of filters to aid in the navigation of an app.

This is why mobile apps need a search bar.

You’re going to find a lot of use for search in mobile apps:

  • Content-driven apps like newspapers, publishing platforms, and blogs;
  • e-Commerce shops with large inventories and categorization of those inventories;
  • Productivity apps that contain documents, calendars, and other searchable records;
  • Listing sites that connect users to the right hotel, restaurant, itinerary, item for sale, apartment for rent, and so on;
  • Dating and networking apps that connect users with vast quantities of “matches”.

There are plenty more reasons why you’d need to use a search bar on your mobile app, but I’m going to let the examples below speak for themselves.

Ways To Design Search For Your Mobile App

I’m going to break down this next section into two categories:

  1. How to design the physical search element in your mobile app,
  2. How to design the search bar and its results within the context of the app.

1. Designing The Physical Search Element

There are a number of points to consider when it comes to the physical presence of your app search element:

Top Or Bottom?

Shashank Sahay explains why there are two places where the search element appears on a mobile app:

  • 1. Full-width bar at the top of the app.
    This is for apps that are driven by search. Most of the time, users open the app with the express purpose of conducting a search.

Facebook app search


Facebook prioritizes app search by placing it at the top. (Source: Facebook) (Large preview)

Facebook is a good example. Although Facebook users most likely do engage with the news feed in the app, I have a sneaking suspicion that Facebook’s data indicates that the search function is more commonly engaged with — at least in terms of first steps. Hence, why it’s placed at the top of the app.

  • 2. A tab in the bottom-aligned navigation bar.
    This is for apps that utilize search as an enhancement to the primary experience of using the app’s main features.

Let’s contrast Facebook against one of its sister properties: Instagram. Unlike Facebook, Instagram is a very simple social media app. Users follow other accounts and get glimpses into the content they share through full-screen story updates as well as from inside their endless-scroll news feed.


Instagram app search


Instagram places its search function in the bottom navigation bar. (Source: Instagram) (Large preview)

With that said, the search function does exist in the navigation bar so that users can look up other accounts to peruse through or follow.

As far as this basic breakdown goes, Sahay is right about how placement of search correlates with intention. But the designing of the search element goes beyond just where it’s placed on the app.

Shallow Or Deep?

There will be times when a mobile app would benefit from a search function deep within the app experience.

You’ll see this sort of thing quite often in e-commerce apps like Bed Bath & Beyond:


Bed Bath & Beyond app search


Bed Bath & Beyond uses deep search to help users find nearby stores (Source: Bed Bath & Beyond) (Large preview)

In this example, this search function exists outside of the standard product search on the main landing page. Results for this kind of search are also displayed in a unique way which is reflective of the purpose of the search:


Bed Bath & Beyond map search results


Bed Bath & Beyond displays search results on a map. (Source: Bed Bath & Beyond) (Large preview)

There are other ways you use might need to use “deep” search functions on e-commerce apps.

Think about stores that have loads of comments attached to each product. If your users want to zero in on what other consumers had to say about a product (for example, if a camping tent is waterproof), the search function would help them quickly get to reviews containing specific keywords.

You’ll also see deep searches planted within travel and entertainment apps like Hotels.com:


Hotels.com app search


Hotels.com includes a deep search to narrow down results by property name. (Source: Hotels.com) (Large preview)

You’re all probably familiar with the basic search function that goes with any travel-related app. You enter the details of your trip and it pulls up the most relevant results in a list or map format. That’s what this screenshot is of.

However, see where it says “Property Name” next to the magnifying glass? This is a search function within a search function. And the only things users can search for here are actual hotel property names.

Bar, Tab, Or Magnifying Glass?

This brings me to my next design point: how to know which design element to represent the search function with.

You’ve already seen clear reasons to use a full search bar over placing a tab in the navigation bar. But how about a miniaturized magnifying glass?

Here’s an example of how this is used in the YouTube mobile app:


YouTube app search icon


YouTube uses a magnifying glass to represent its search function. (Source: YouTube) (Large preview)

The way I see it, the magnifying glass is the search design element you’d use when:

  • One of the primary reasons users come to the app is to do a search,
  • And it competes against another primary use case.

In this case, YouTube needs the mini-magnifying glass because it serves two types of users:

  1. Users that come to the app to search for videos.
  2. Users that come to the app to upload their own videos.

To conserve space, links to both exist within the header of the YouTube app. If you have competing priorities within your app, consider doing the same.

“Search” Or Give A Hint?

One other thing to think about when designing search for mobile apps is the text inside the search box. To decide this, you have to ask yourself:

“Will my users know what sort of stuff they can look up with this search function?”

In most cases they will, but it might be best to include hint text inside the search bar just to make sure you’re not adding unnecessary friction. Here’s what I mean by that:

This is the app for Airbnb:


Airbnb app search text


Airbnb offers hint text to guide users to more accurate search results. (Source: Airbnb) (Large preview)

The search bar tells me to “Try ‘Costa de Valencia’”. It’s not necessarily an explicit suggestion. It’s more helping me figure out how I can use this search bar to research places to stay on an upcoming trip.

For users that are new to Airbnb, this would be a helpful tip. They might come to the site thinking it’s like Hotels.com that enables users to look up things like flights and car rentals. Airbnb, instead, is all about providing lodging and experiences, so this search text is a good way to guide users in the right direction and keep them from receiving a “Sorry, there are no results that match your query” response.

2. Designing The Search Bar And Results In Context

Figuring out where to place the search element is one point to consider. Now, you have to think about how to present the results to your mobile app users:

Simple Search

This is the most basic of the search functions you can offer. Users type their query into the search bar. Relevant results appear below. In other words, you leave it up to your users to know what they’re searching for and to enter it correctly.

When a relevant query is entered, you can provide results in a number of ways.

For an app like Flipboard, results are displayed as trending hashtags:


Flipboard app search results


Flipboard displays search results as a list of hashtags. (Source: Flipboard) (Large preview)

It’s not the most common way you’d see search results displayed, but it makes sense in this particular context. What users are searching for are categories of content they want to see in their feed. These hashtagged categories allow users to choose high-level topics that are the most relevant to them.

ESPN has a more traditional basic search function:


ESPN app search results


ESPN has designed its search results in a traditional list. (Source: ESPN) (Large preview)

As you can see, ESPN provides a list of results that contain the keyword. There’s nothing more to it than that though. As you’ll see in the following examples, you can program your app search to more closely guide users to the results they want to see.

Filtered Search

According to the aforementioned Kissmetrics survey, advanced filtering is a popular search method among website users. If your mobile app has a lot of content or a vast inventory of products, consider adding filters to the end of your search function to improve the experience further. Your users are already familiar with the search technique. Plus, it’ll save you the trouble of having to add advancements to the search functionality itself.

Yelp has a nice example of this:


Yelp app search filters


Yelp users have filter options available after doing a search. (Source: Yelp) (Large preview)

In the search above, I originally looked for restaurants in my “Current Location”. Among the various filters displayed, I decided to add “Order Delivery” to my query. My search query then became:

Restaurants > Current Location > Delivery

This is really no different than using breadcrumbs on a website. In this case, you let users do the initial work by entering a search query. Then, you give them filters that allow them to narrow down their search further.

Again, this is another way to reduce the chances that users will encounter the “No results” response to their query. Because filters correlate to actual categories and segmentations that exist within the app, you can ensure they end up with valid search results every time.

e-Commerce websites are another good use case for filters. Here is how Wayfair does this:


Wayfair app search filters


Wayfair includes filters in search to help users narrow down results. (Source: Wayfair) (Large preview)

Wayfair’s list of search results is fairly standard for an e-commerce marketplace. The number of items are displayed, followed by a grid of matching product images and summary details.

Here’s the thing though: Wayfair has a massive inventory. It’s the same with other online marketplaces like Amazon and Zappos. So, when you tell users that their search query produced 2,975 items, you need a way to mitigate some of the overwhelm that may come with that.

By placing the Sort and Filter buttons directly beside the search result total, you’re encouraging users to do a little more work on their search query to ensure they get the best and most relevant results.

Predictive Search

Autocomplete is something your users are already familiar with. For apps that contain lots of content, utilizing this type of search functionality could be majorly helpful to your users.

For one, they already know how it works and so they won’t be surprised when related query suggestions appear before them. In addition, autocomplete offers a sort of personalization. As you gather more data on a user as well as the kinds of searches they conduct, autocomplete anticipates their needs and provides a shortcut to the desired content.

Pinterest is a social media app that people use to aggregate content they’re interested in and to seek out inspiration for pretty much anything they’re doing in life:


Pinterest app search autocomplete


Pinterest anticipates users’ search queries and provides autocomplete shortcuts. (Source: Pinterest) (Large preview)

Take a look at the search results above. Can you tell what I’ve been thinking about lately? The first is how I’m going to decorate my new apartment. The second is my next tattoo. And despite only typing out the word “Small”, Pinterest immediately knew what’s been top-of-mind with me as of recent. That doesn’t necessarily mean I as a user came to the app with that specific intention today… but it’s nice to see that personalized touch as I engage with the search bar.

Another app I engage with a lot is the Apple Photos app:


Apple Photos app search


Apple Photos uses autocomplete to help users find the most relevant photos. (Source: Apple) (Large preview)

In addition to using it to store all of my personal photos, I use this on a regular basis to take screenshots for work (as I did in this article). As you can imagine, I have a lot of content saved to this app and it can be difficult finding what I need just by scrolling through my folders.

In the example above, I was trying to find a photo I had taken at Niagara Falls, but I couldn’t remember if I had labeled it as such. So, I typed in “water” and received some helpful autocomplete suggestions on “water”-related words as well as photos that fit the description.

I would also put “Recent Search” results into this bucket. Here’s an example from Uber:


Uber app recent search results


Uber’s recent search results provide one-click shortcuts to repeat users. (Source: Uber) (Large preview)

Before I even had a chance to type my search query in the Uber app, it displays my most recent search queries for me.

I think this would be especially useful for people who use ride-sharing services on a regular basis. Think about professionals who work in a city. Rather than own a car, they use Uber to transport to and from their office as well as client appointments. By providing a shortcut to recent trips in search results, the Uber app cuts down the time they spend booking a trip.

If you have enough data on your users and you have a way to anticipate their needs, autocomplete is a fantastic way to personalize search and improve the overall experience.

Limited Search

I think this time savings point is an important one to remember when designing search for mobile apps.

Unlike websites where longer times-on-page matter, that’s not always the case with mobile apps. Unless you’ve built a gaming or news app where users should spend lots of time engaging with the app on a daily basis, it’s not usually the amount of time spent inside the app that matters.

Your goal in building a mobile app is to retain users over longer periods, which means providing a meaningful experience while they’re inside it. A well-thought-out search function will greatly contribute to this as it gets users immediately to what they want to see, even if it means they leave the app just a few seconds later.

If you have an app that needs to get users in and out of it quickly, think about limiting search results as Ibotta has done:


Ibotta app search categories


Ibotta displays categories that users can search in. (Source: Ibotta) (Large preview)

While users certainly can enter any query they’d like, Ibotta makes it clear that the categories below are the only ones available to search from. This serves as both a reminder of what the app is capable of as well as a means for circumventing the search results that don’t matter to users.

Hotels.com also places limits on its search function:


Hotels.com limiting search results


Hotels.com forces users to make a choice so they don’t end up with too many results. (Source: Hotels.com) (Large preview)

As you can see here, users can’t just look for hotels throughout the country of Croatia. It’s just too broad of a search and one that Hotels.com shouldn’t have to provide. For one, it’s probably too taxing on the Hotels.com server to execute a query of that nature. Plus, it would provide a terrible experience for users. Imagine how many hotels would show up in that list of results.

By reining in what your users can search for and the results they can see, you can improve the overall experience while shortening the time it takes them to convert.

Wrapping Up

As you can see here, a search bar isn’t some throwaway design element. When your app promises a speedy and convenient experience to its users, a search bar can cut down on the time they have to spend inside it. It can also make the app a more valuable resource as it doesn’t require much work or effort to get to the desired content.

Smashing Editorial
(ra, yk, il)


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How To Design Search For Your Mobile App

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CRO Hero: Christopher Nolan, Conversion Optimization and Growth Manager at BigCommerce

CRO Heroes

Often, marketers simply don’t focus on conversion rate optimization. Why? Some say they don’t have time, it’s too expensive, or their priorities are just driving traffic. But if you’re focusing on driving traffic without optimizing your website to convert it, you’re going to miss the mark on your ultimate business goals. And increased revenue aside, […]

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CRO Hero: Christopher Nolan, Conversion Optimization and Growth Manager at BigCommerce

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How to Create the Best Heatmap Online: Your Complete Step-by-Step Guide

Creating a heatmap online isn’t as difficult as it sounds. In fact, if you have the right software, you can get your first heat maps going in as few as five minutes. Crazy Egg allows you to create several different user behavior reports from the same database. You get access to all the tools that […]

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10 Effective FOMO Marketing Techniques to Increase Online Results

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In case you’re allergic to social media and haven’t ever before heard the term, FOMO means “the fear of missing out.” But what is FOMO marketing? We’re all familiar with the fear of missing an amazing opportunity. We don’t want to look back on our lives and wonder, “What if?” Savvy marketers have tapped into […]

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User Experience Design: 6 Simple Steps for Developing Your UX Design Process

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User Experience Design or UX design is the process for improving the satisfaction of your website visitors by making your site more usable, accessible, and pleasurable to interact with. When you consider that nearly 80% of buyers will quickly bounce from a site if they don’t like what they find, and will quickly choose another […]

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User Experience Design: 6 Simple Steps for Developing Your UX Design Process

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What is a Landing Page: A Beginner’s Guide to Generate Conversions

what-is-a-landing-page-introduction

What is a landing page? And why should you create one? Landing pages are essential elements of any online marketing campaign. They’re designed to funnel traffic toward a specific action, such as buying a product or signing up for your email list. Some businesses have dozens of landing pages. Others have just a handful. However, […]

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What is a Landing Page: A Beginner’s Guide to Generate Conversions

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Quick Ways to Make Your Google Ads Stand Out from the Competition

Google Ads amounts to billions of dollars in revenue for the search engine giant, but what about your revenue?

Standing out in this competitive—and, let’s face it, cluttered—environment can be a huge challenge for advertisers, especially if they’re just starting out. There’s only so much space on a search results page to go around, after all.

As we enter the 2018 holiday season, it’s the right time to take a good, hard look at your stale ads. It’s time to breathe some new life into them.

With that in mind, here are the features the pros use to stand out from the competition:

The Latest Expanded Text Ads

Google made their standard text ads larger by introducing expanded text ads (ETAs) in 2016. The increased character count was a boon for advertisers because it enabled messaging to reflect more of the advertiser’s key incentives.

Experts jumped on this new format immediately, even though Google didn’t require they switch until January 2017. Even then, advertisers could continue to run standard (shorter) ads, but they couldn’t edit them or launch new ones.

Some people hesitated, but advertisers who were slow to switch were at a disadvantage compared to those who immediately moved to the new format. The go-getters ended up with a huge head start since ETAs proved to have higher clickthrough rates (CTRs) than standard ads.

(And good CTRs = good quality scores = lower CPCs = better ad positioning.)

Now you have this opportunity again!

In August, Google further expanded their text ad format—expanded expanded text ads?—but taking advantage of these new character limits is still optional (hint: you should use them).

The latest iteration of expanded text ads introduces a second headline and more characters to all text fields, making text ads even more prominent. Here’s what’s new:

  • An additional, optional headline of up to 30 characters
  • An additional, optional description line
  • Both description lines can now be up to 90 characters (increased from 80)

And here’s a comparison of the three ad formats:

Google’s expanded text ads give you more space to connect with prospects.

These longer character counts may not sound like much—oh boy, ten more characters!—but they add up and can have a significant impact on how your ads look (and how they convert). See for yourself how the three types of ads look in a side-by-side comparison:

An example of how these ads appear in the search results.

The new ETAs feature up to 218% more text than the original “standard” format. As expected, search experts are already updating their ads to capitalize on the latest change—and this time you should too!

Even though the extra headline and description won’t show up all the time, they’ll help you stand out when they do by making the ad itself bigger. The third headline also gives you an extra thirty characters of highlighted blue text at the top of your ad.


Ad Extensions

Ad extensions are optional snippets of text that users can append to their ads. Google introduced the first extension—sitelinks—way back in 2009. These short links appear beneath the ad and direct searchers to different pages of the advertiser’s website.

But why stop there? There are now ten different types of manual extensions and six automated extensions that advertisers can use to compel more clicks:

Google ad exensions are free to implement and often improve your ad’s CTR.

On average, an ad’s CTR has the potential to improve by 10-15% per extension. Aside from adding functionality, extensions increase the surface area of your placement and are free to implement, so they’re a no-brainer.

Though every ad extension is potentially useful, there are four (highlighted in yellow above) that you must use (if you’re not already). This is because they’re easy to implement and they allow you to feature critical incentives and information about your business that would otherwise take up valuable ad copy.

1. Sitelinks

Sitelinks are valuable because they allow you to link deeply into your site. The number of sitelinks associated with your ad varies from 2 to 8. A great tip is to create specialty landing pages for each sitelink which are goal oriented and customized to the link. You can customize sitelinks at the ad group level too, making them even more relevant to specific searches.

Expert Tip: The Unbounce Builder is an excellent tool for quickly creating landing pages that match your ads’ sitelinks.

2. Callouts

Callout extensions can be up to 25 characters each and are not clickable. They promote features, benefits, and selling points of your business. They’re also a great way to highlight specific qualities of your business that you don’t have room to showcase in your primary ad copy. For instance, 250 5 star reviews, 5 convenient locations, all credit cards accepted, etc.

3. Call Extensions

Call extensions add a phone number without wasting any of the primary copy. On mobile devices, a callout extension lets people tap a button to call your business directly. Implementing call extensions is quick and easy, so you should include them in all applicable ads.

4. Structured Snippets

This extension gives users the option to include a list of products or services beneath their ad. Structured snippets contain a category header (e.g., services) followed by a list of items (e.g., pet grooming, pet sitting, dog training, de-shedding).

Using all of these snippets is a great way to differentiate your ad from competitors’ ads. You can get creative too. For example, if you’re a B2B database host, you could list the features included in your service (e.g., Cloud Automation, Advanced Security, Easy-To-Use Data Browser).

It’s worth noting, though, that when it comes to the categories you can choose, you’re restricted to Google’s preset list. The full list of snippet categories (headers) is available here. Here are some other structured snippet examples based on different ones:

  • Amenities: Free WiFi, Sauna, Early Check-In, Concierge Service, Continental Breakfast
  • Brands: Urban Decay, bareMinerals, Nyx, Tarte, Too Faced
  • Courses: Financial Training, Investment Banking, Business Economics, Fundraising

Using a few of the available extensions creates more opportunities to capture your prospects’ attention. It can even push your competition further down the page!

Here’s an example of how an ad would appear if all the above extensions showed at once:

An ad with structured snippets, call, callout, and sitelink extensions enabled.
Expert Tip: Not all ad extensions show up all the time, and they appear differently on mobile devices versus desktops. Google’s system tries to match the most appropriate extensions to the most relevant searches.

Geotargeting and other important settings

Implementing ad extensions along with the latest ETA format is sure to get advertisers more clicks. Yet this can be a double-edged sword because (sadly) most of us don’t have an unlimited budget.

Fortunately, there are some settings and features that you can (and should) use to minimize clicks from unqualified traffic. The settings we’re going to focus on are bid modifiers, geotargeting, remarketing for search ads (RSLA), ad scheduling, and negative keyword lists.

Bid Modifiers

Bid modifiers, or adjustments as Google calls them, enable you to increase or decrease bids based on when and how people search. Bid modifiers can apply to devices, locations, ad scheduling, and more. Advertisers bid up or down by percentages.

For example, if you want to bid more aggressively on mobile searches, you can adjust your bids to +30% for mobile devices. Likewise, if you want to appear for desktop searches, but would rather pay less for these types of clicks, you can adjust your bids to -30% for desktop devices.

Expert tip: Use Google’s reporting tools to test how your modified segments are performing and adjust bids regularly. You can review performance by location, audience, device, time of day, and more right from the Google Ads main interface.

An example of locations segment (via Google Ads)

Geotargeting

There’s more to geotargeting than just showing your ads in your desired locations. You can also refine where your ads appear by excluding certain locations and regions. You can get granular with this too by increasing or decreasing bids to your targeted areas using bid modifiers.

Geotargeting improves your ROI by minimizing clicks from unqualified prospects (e.g., people outside of your service area, neighborhoods below a certain income threshold, etc.). So it’s well worth the time it takes to set up and refine.

Ad Scheduling

Maybe you’re not open on weekends. Maybe no one is operating the phones after 8 pm every night. Maybe your strongest return on ad spend occurs between the hours of 10 am and 1 pm every day. Once you figure out the best time of day for your ads to appear, you can use scheduling to choose exactly when they show. This is an especially great feature when you have a limited budget.

Remarketing for Search Ads (RSLA)

Remarketing isn’t just for display ads anymore! This feature allows you to target search ads to people who have already visited your site. Your ads then appear when they search on Google for the keywords you’re bidding on. You can either append RSLA lists to existing ad groups or create groups that only show ads if a searcher is on your remarketing list. Google provides detailed instructions for setting up RSLA campaigns. It’s definitely worth investing the time to read.

Negative Keyword Lists

You can ensure your ad isn’t triggered for undesirable keywords by creating negative keyword lists and applying them at the account, campaign, or ad group level. The new Google Ads interface makes creating and assigning negative keyword lists simple. Create themed lists (e.g., competitors, locations, common terms) and assign them based on account performance or structure.

Expert tip: Check out Google’s search terms report to see exactly what people are searching for when they look at your ads, and then use this info to build your negative lists.

We’ve only scratched the surface…

The good news is that there are things you can (and must) do to make your brand stand out and to ensure it’s reaching the most qualified prospects.

Google gives you some powerful tools to help improve the clickthrough rate of your ads, which contributes to a higher quality score. And, in turn, higher scores help drive down your cost per click, give you a higher impression share, and make your ad more likely to show up than your competitors’. They can even help your ad appear at the top of the search results.

But blindly implementing these tips can only help you so far.

It should go without saying (but we’re saying it anyway) that you should test all ads with different ad copy (and extensions) and then refine them based on actual performance.

Effective ads—even those loaded with ad extensions—are also only part of a good PPC strategy. Landing page optimization, tracking, A/B testing are critical practices for a successful campaign. Setting clear goals is also very important.

It’s also helpful to see what the competition is doing by reviewing competitor ads, landing pages, and incentives. Google’s Auction Insights report allows you to see who is bidding against you and their impression share compared with yours. Make sure you’re reviewing your competitive data monthly or quarterly. It can help you plan and revise your keyword and ad copy strategy.

An example of an auction insights report (via Google Ads)

Industry tools like SEMRush, KeywordSpy, and SpyFu also provide competitive information and enable you to automate monitoring. They’re worth checking out—you can be sure that most experts use them!

Even if you don’t dig deeper into the competitive data, however, implementing the above settings and ad extensions—as well as taking advantage of the latest expanded text specifications—will put you ahead of the competition. So get started today!

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Quick Ways to Make Your Google Ads Stand Out from the Competition

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What is Hypothesis Testing and How It’s Done – A Complete Guide with Examples!

hypotesis-testing-introduction

When attempting to optimize your web presence for maximum leads and conversions, you may come across terms like hypothesis testing. While the term sounds like something from a science test, marketers intent on boosting their digital results are increasingly turning to scientific methods to squeeze a little more juice from their online campaigns. If you […]

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What is Hypothesis Testing and How It’s Done – A Complete Guide with Examples!

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Year in review: Our top 9 experimentation articles and news of 2018

That’s because experimentation is becoming an essential business practice. Over the course of the year, we witnessed organizations go from…Read blog postabout:Year in review: Our top 9 experimentation articles and news of 2018

The post Year in review: Our top 9 experimentation articles and news of 2018 appeared first on WiderFunnel Conversion Optimization.

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Year in review: Our top 9 experimentation articles and news of 2018

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What is Lean UX? A Beginner’s Guide with Principles, Methods & Tips to Start

lean-ux

Lean UX or lean user experience is the method for creating web offerings that are streamlined and visitor-centric, the very elements visitors today demand. Lean UX design best practices help website visitors enjoy a more streamlined and memorable web experience. Similar to lean manufacturing, which is used by top brands to eliminate waste in production, […]

The post What is Lean UX? A Beginner’s Guide with Principles, Methods & Tips to Start appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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What is Lean UX? A Beginner’s Guide with Principles, Methods & Tips to Start