How To Provide The Greatest Mobile User Experience Possible

Now and again, I hit the swimming pool. It’s a good way to exercise, but also to relax after a long day in front of my PC. I can do quite a few laps in my front crawl, but only because I don’t use my legs much. I kick steadily to ensure that my legs stay lifted and don’t slow me down. I don’t use my legs much for forward propulsion.

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How To Provide The Greatest Mobile User Experience Possible

Converting Our Stories Into Multi-Screen Experiences

Storytelling takes many forms. In the past, stories were told orally, with people telling and retelling myths, fables and even histories. As writing technology became more prevalent, we began to record our stories, and we told them in the pages of books. Now, our society is awash in different devices and technologies, and those traditions of spoken stories and printed stories are blurring.
Multi-screen narratives are being told across all kinds of platforms, pages and devices, making for truly immersive experiences.

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Converting Our Stories Into Multi-Screen Experiences

How To Avoid Duplicate Downloads In Responsive Images

The <picture> element is a new addition to HTML5 that’s being championed by the W3C’s Responsive Images Community Group (RICG). It is intended to provide a declarative, markup-based solution to enable responsive images without the need of JavaScript libraries or complicated server-side detection.
The <picture> element supports a number of different types of fallback content, but the current implementation of these fallbacks is problematic. In this article, we’ll explore how the fallbacks work, how they fail and what can be done about it.

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How To Avoid Duplicate Downloads In Responsive Images

How To Contribute To WordPress

WordPress is built by volunteers. People from all over the world collaborate to create the core software, write the documentation, provide support, translate WordPress, organize events and generally keep the project running. Individuals work on WordPress in their free time, and companies ask their employees to get involved.
Part of WordPress’ success is that the community consists not only of developers, but of designers, user experience experts, support volunteers, writers, users, accessibility experts and enthusiasts.

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How To Contribute To WordPress

How To Design For A Maturing Android

Android is huge: 480 million people currently use Android devices, and 1 million new devices are activated daily. This means that every three weeks, the number of people who activate new Android devices is equal to the entire population of Australia. (Recent studies by Nielsen show that more Android devices are on the market than iOS devices.)
Popular apps that become available on Android experience huge growth. For example, Instagram grew by 10 million users with the launch of its Android app — in just 10 days.

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How To Design For A Maturing Android

The Smashing Editor’s Choice: A Free eBook

Nearly half a year ago, we introduced our eBook subscription model, also known as the Smashing Library. We knew we were onto something good, realizing that the Smashing Library was the next step in offering quality content — at a price you’ll still be able to afford all of the coffee you need to stay up long enough to read the entire library and, of course, the free eBooks.

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The Smashing Editor’s Choice: A Free eBook

Whiteboards, Visions And Banned Words

This article is about design consultancy. It’s about wrangling that client who uses empty sentences like, “We want a snappy, simple experience,” or, “It should be on brand and should really pop.” It’s about commanding the room and setting a vision before moving on to wireframes and pixels.

Any whiteboard is a weapon if you hold it right.
While I’ll talk in terms of consultation, these ideas can be applied to the design phase of any new project.

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Whiteboards, Visions And Banned Words

How Much Has The Web Really Changed?

Responsive design is about more than just layout; it’s about designing for the Web, which means, mostly, for people with browsers. And that’s just about everything we know about the people who visit our websites: they are probably using a browser. All the rest we just don’t know.
Up until not so long ago, we used to base our designs on some rather general assumptions about screen size and input type.

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How Much Has The Web Really Changed?

How I Work: IDEO’s Duane Bray On Creating Great Digital Experiences

Welcome to another interview in the series called “How I Work.” These interviews revolve around how leading thinkers and creators in the Web world design, code and create. The goal is not to get into the specific nuances of their craft (as that information already exists online), but rather step back and learn a bit about their habits, philosophies and workflow for producing great work.
You might want to have a look at the first interview as well, which features Doug Crockford, Yahoo’s JavaScript evangelist.

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How I Work: IDEO’s Duane Bray On Creating Great Digital Experiences

Infinite Scroll: Let’s Get To The Bottom Of This

Infinite scroll promises a better experience for users. However, the good is often accompanied by the bad and the ugly. Once we understand the strengths and weaknesses of infinite scrolling, we can begin to use it to enhance our interfaces. [Links checked February/21/2017]
Human nature demands hierarchy and structures that are easy to navigate. But infinite scrolling sometimes leaves users feeling disoriented as they travel down a page that never ends.

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Infinite Scroll: Let’s Get To The Bottom Of This