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The Nomadic Designer: Tips And Tricks To Work On The Road

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to travel the world while working as a designer? It might sound like a dream, but all that glitters is not gold, and it might not be the right choice for you. In this article, I’ll share some insights from my four years of travel and work that hopefully will be useful for anyone willing to try a nomadic lifestyle, too.

When I wrote the first draft of this article, I was in London, after a long trip to Asia. Now, I’m making changes to it in Mexico, before going to Argentina to visit my family. Changing countries often has become an important part of my life as a designer; and, curiously, it all happened by accident.

I once heard that, while at the office, you should stand up from your desk, stretch your legs, leave the building and never come back. That’s exactly what I did when I was living in Barcelona in March 2014. At the time, I was working for a big company on a project that I didn’t enjoy, and was participating in meetings with people I didn’t know. Sounds like fun, doesn’t it?

Looking back, I see that quitting a stable job to jump into the void of a traveling life was one of the scariest moments of my life. I was going to start a trip to South America, doing design workshops and lectures that would provide me with income to sustain my journey — but in reality, I had no idea what I was doing. Without knowing it, I was becoming a nomadic designer.


doing a lecture


Doing lectures and workshops around the world — and meeting new people because of it — is one of the things I’ve liked most about moving so much. Location: Barcelona.

When that six-month trip ended and I went back to Barcelona, I was never able to settle again. So, what did I do? Of course, I kept traveling! Four years and 60 countries later, I’m still on it.

And I am not alone. I’d like to quote Vitaly Friedman (founder and long-time editor in chief of Smashing Magazine), who once said:

“There is nothing more liberating and sentimental than the sound of a closing door that you will never open again. As memories are flowing by, you turn your back from that door, you hold your breath for just a second and you walk away. At that point you almost sense the change in the wind flowing by. You let go; and knowing and feeling this change is an incredibly empowering, intoxicating experience.”

If this sounds appealing, and you would like to try it for yourself, I hope my article will help you get started. Please note, however, that I’m not going to give you a “how to” guide, with step-by-step instructions that will work for everyone. Instead, I’ll share some insights from my personal experience.

Whatever People Think It Is, It Is Not That

When I tell someone that I’m constantly traveling, usually the person looks amazed. Most of the time, their first question is, “How can you afford to live like that?” I sometimes joke, saying I’m a millionaire with plenty of free time, but it’s not only because of this that I suspect they get the wrong idea about “working and traveling.” Perhaps, some of them imagine plenty of beaches and a lot of comfort and freedom.

Well, guess what? Working from a beach is not that fun or convenient. Or, as Preston Lee puts it, “Freelancing is not sitting on the beach, sipping margaritas, and reading books by Tim Ferriss.”


places to work


I’ve worked in all kind of places: public libraries, hostels, friends’ houses (and, of course, some of them had cats). Can you spot a beach in any of these photos?

But the part about having a lot of freedom is true. I do have a lot of freedom and flexibility — like any other freelancer — with the bonus that I get to know different places, people, cultures and cuisines. The perks of such a lifestyle outweigh the difficulties, but at the same time, not everyone would be willing to handle it.

Today, the “digital nomad” hype is all around, with a lot of people publishing e-books, videos and blog posts selling an ideal lifestyle that’s apparently perfect. Of course, some things are often left out — things like getting tired of packing again and again, being away from family and friends, and starting over often. That’s why people might have a unrealistic idea of what all this is about.

In case you are considering trying something similar, it might help to be aware of some personal characteristics that would be helpful to have.

Comfort With Being Alone

Being a solo traveler allows me to make my own decisions and be wherever I want, whenever I want. I spend a lot of time by myself (luckily, I get along well with myself). Even though it’s fine for me, I know it’s not for everybody. Loneliness is easy to solve, though. Coworking spaces, hostels, couchsurfing hangouts and Meetup are great places when you feel like you need some company and want to meet new friends.

Being Able To Adapt To New Contexts Easily

On a rough average, I move from one place to another every four days. This is very tiring, because every time I switch cities, I have to repeat the same process: book transportation and accommodation, pack my stuff, figure out how to get around, check the weather and find out about the cost of living. Ideally, you won’t be moving that often, but you should be able to grab your things quickly and move to a new place that better meets your expectations.


airport


In my travels, I’ve taken more flights than I would like to admit. That’s a problem when moving so much from one place to another. Location: São Paulo, Brazil.

In some cases, you could plan to stay three or four months in the same spot, but the reality is that you will never know how you’ll feel until you get there. So, my advice is: Go little by little, especially at the beginning.

Flexible But Organized

I think I’ve never been as organized as I’ve been since I started traveling. Apart from the tools that I normally use to generate invoices, track payments and manage projects as a freelance designer, I also have several spreadsheets to organize my flights, accommodation and daily expenses.

The spreadsheet for expenses is divided into different categories and organized by day. I put in there all the money that goes out, so that I know exactly what’s happening, and how close I am to reaching my daily budget. I know there are some apps for this, but so far I haven’t felt comfortable with any of them. The key here is not to cheat (just write down everything) and to be consistent (do it every day) — this will give you good insight into how you are spending your money on the road. Then, it will be easier for you to make decisions based on the data gathered — for example, you could stop buying expensive cocktails so much.

Before Packing: Find A Remote-Friendly Job

If you’ve decided to give it a try, then, as a minimum, plan your start, and don’t leave home without at least one or two months of contracted work. This will keep you busy for the first part of your trip, so you’ll only have to worry about settling in a new place.

When I went to South America at the very beginning of my new life, I contacted several design organizations, schools and agencies that could help me organize design workshops and lectures in different countries. I did this because, a few months before leaving, I, along with a friend (¡hola José!) self-published a book that gained some popularity among designers in Latin America, and I was willing to teach its contents and show how to put them into practice. Doing things like that provided me with at least some idea of dates and an approximate income, while leaving other things to improvisation.

In my case, I’ve always liked being a freelancer, so I give myself a bit more flexibility in managing my schedule. One of the last projects I worked on was for a team in Barcelona and in which the words “remote” and “freelance” were clear in our agreement from the very beginning. This is what allowed me to keep going from country to country, splitting my time between work and getting to know new places and people.

Just so you know how “glamorous” this way of working is, at the beginning of this project I tried to hide my background during video calls or said that I couldn’t turn video on, because I was a bit embarrassed. By the end, though, my teammates didn’t care about that, and so later on, usually the first question of a video call was to ask me for a tour of the place I was staying at, to everyone’s amusement.

Of course, freelancing is not the only way. Working at a remote-friendly company could also be a good option for you. While you’ll lose some of the freedom to move around, if you plan to stay longer in places, then this could be the way to go: Hubspot, Basecamp, Bohemian Coding (of Sketch fame) and Automattic are some examples of companies that successfully work with designers and developers remotely, and there are many more.

A few websites list remote positions for design, so be sure to check them often: We Work Remotely, Remote OK, Working Nomads and Designer News — to name just some of them.

Regardless of whether you are freelancing or working for someone else, I have to say that face to face contact with members of your team is necessary from time to time to time, especially when planning meetings at the beginning of a project, when things are not all that clear. This will partly determine the location you choose, so best to pick a place that allows you to conveniently go where your team is based when needed.

Choosing Your Next Destination

After finding work that allows you to be on the move, the next big thing is to decide where to base yourself. The good thing is that you can work from any place with a decent Internet connection and easy access to coffee (which is essential).


wi-fi sign


I always say that, to work, I need only an Internet connection and a laptop. So, this place at almost 5,000 meters up is a good place to get stuff done. Location: somewhere near Uyuni, Bolivia.

So far, I’ve been in 60 countries, more or less. Many of them were in Europe, where it is easy to move from one place to another and where you can sometimes cross countries without even noticing. (True story: I once missed a whole country because I fell asleep on the train.)

When choosing where to go next, keep in mind the following.

Reliable Access To Internet

You’ll never know how good the Internet connection is until you get there, but at least you can research which countries have the best and worst. This is important. Even if you’re tempted to spend a few days in the middle of a forest, if there is no access to Internet, it will probably be a no-go.

Time Zones

Choose a place where you’ll be in the same time zone with the rest of your team, or maybe a couple of hours ahead or behind. You’ll thank me when you have to schedule your first online meeting and it’s not 4:00 am.

Work Facilities

I’ve said that I can work from almost anywhere, but I have to make sure that my next destination at least has some good coffee shops, libraries or coworking spaces. You could also work from your hostel, hotel or rented flat, but then you’d have to make sure it’s a proper environment to work in.

Design Ecosystem

It’s always good to be surrounded by like-minded people, so many times before going somewhere, I’ll check whether there’s a designer, a design studio or a meetup where I could visit and get in touch with others. Luckily, some people are always willing to meet new pals, and they’ll give you good insight into how the local design community works. You can exchange and share tools of the trade, and you can make new friends as well.


camel


Sometimes I don’t choose my destinations right… at least for getting some work done. Being in the middle of snowy places forced me to take unplanned vacations. Location: Mongolia.

In my case, sending some emails in advance enabled me to meet such talented people as Michael Flarup in Copenhagen and Sacha Greif in Osaka. Just don’t be afraid to ask if you can drop by for a short visit!

Besides that, other factors are at play when you’re deciding where to go: affordability, transportation, safety, weather, etc. Fortunately, Nomad List rounds up the “best” cities,, which you can use as a reference when choosing where to head to next.

Of course, sooner or later, you’ll make some mistake. I’ve learned the hard way that planning where to work is indeed important. I once had to take a few unintended days off when I took the Trans-Siberian train to go from St. Petersburg to Beijing via Mongolia. At some point, the temperatures in the middle of Siberia were so low — the worst day was -50º Celsius — that my phones’ batteries suddenly drained — and being lost in the middle of a snowy small town is anything but fun. (The Russians there thought I was crazy for traveling during winter, and I now know they were right. But if you are like me and go there during wintertime anyway, always keep a paper copy of directions and important information, and bring warm boots and a pocket-sized bottle of vodka.)

Packing And Gear

If you already have a job and know where you are heading to, then you are ready to pack! Someone once said that before starting a trip, you should take half the things you plan to carry and double the money you have budgeted. While the last thing is not always an option, packing light is doable! You’ll thank me when you find your accommodation is uphill.

I started traveling with a 50-liter backpack for my personal things, and a smaller one for work-related items that I carry separately. After some time, I switched the smaller one for a daypack that I can roll up and put into the big one when I don’t need it. Everything (including the laptop) weighs 10 kilograms or so, but I keep assessing what else can I take off in order to have fewer things to carry. Similarly to when working on a design, try to get rid of the unnecessary.

For my work, I chose a MacBook Air because I knew I was going to travel a lot, and I wanted something lightweight and compact. Even though it’s a bit old now, it’s been enough for my requirements so far. I also carry two phones (iPhone and Android, with their corresponding chargers) because I do a lot of UX design for mobile and I often need to test on different devices.

I do have more gadgets and stuff, of course. I carry a remote to control my slides (for conferences and workshops), all kinds of adaptors, and noise-cancelling headphones (very useful for when you travel by train or plane.) But, in general, it is a good idea not to over-buy in advance, and pick up items only when you need them.

Where To Work

I have worked in all kinds of places: buses, trains, coffee shops, airport lounges, libraries, shared rooms in hostels, private rooms in hotels — sometimes anywhere I can set my laptop horizontally… or kind of. I’ve even gotten used to not using a mouse at all, because there is not always a place to put it next to my laptop.

Chances are the room where you stay is also going to be where you will work, so choose carefully. Airbnb is now pretty much widespread, so renting your own room with a desk should be enough — but be sure to mark “laptop friendly” in the search filters.

I try to keep a low budget, so most of the time I stay in a hostel. After a bit of training, I’ve learned to identify places that look better for work — like ones with spacious common areas — just by looking at the pictures. Of course, “party hostels” are not an option if you want to get work done, so if you see a lot of people having fun on the property’s website, that’s a red flag.


hostel room


I sleep in shared dorms in hostels most of the time, to keep my budget low and meet new people, but there’s not much privacy. Location: Sofia, Bulgaria.

One of the main problems is that you never know how good the Internet connection will be. So, if you have difficulty with the Wi-Fi at your hostel, go to a coffee shop, coworking space or even a public library. (Interestingly, public libraries are where I’m most productive, perhaps because of the silence and the fact that I cannot make calls or participate in online meetings.)

Tip: More than once, I’ve visited a coworking space and offered to give a free design lecture to members in exchange of a few days’ worth of using a desk. It’s also nice because afterwards people will know who you are and will approach you openly to share ideas! Feel free to try it yourself.

Finally, a couple of websites could be useful when you’re looking for a place to work — namely, Workfrom and Places to Work.

Things To Keep In Mind When Living On The Road

A few things are important for any traveling designer but are too complex to address completely in one article, so I’ll just briefly mention a few of them, in the hope that it will still be useful.

Please keep in mind that everybody’s situation is different. There’s no one-size-fits-all answer, so you might have to adapt the following to your case.

Taxes

What is convenient for you will depend on your case, and it’s difficult to advise on what’s best, so be aware of the legislation of your home country and of the country where you plan to work. I’ve also been exploring the possibilities that Estonia is offering with its e-citizenship. I’m already an Estonian e-resident, but I haven’t done anything practical with this as of yet.

Managing Your Finances

Besides keeping spreadsheets for expenses, one thing that I discovered (perhaps too late) is that it is normally far more convenient to create an account in an app such as Monzo or Revolut (and there are plenty of others, like N26), so that, when making withdrawals, you pay fewer fees and get better exchange rates. This is especially useful in places where credit or debit cards are not normal; this way, you can also avoid the excessive fees that traditional banks often charge.

Also, check the exchange rate of your home currency before arriving at your next destination. In some cases, I’ve arrived in a new country and bought a very expensive coffee because I didn’t do my homework beforehand. One app I use to avoid situations like this is Currency, an elegant and simple currency converter.

Visas

The situation will depend on where you’re from and where you’re going, so check well in advance regarding the requirements for the passport you are holding.

Something useful I learned when applying for a visa that requires a tentative itinerary is to book hostels and planes that you can later on cancel for free, and print out and bring those booking confirmations.

Health And Insurance

Plenty of companies offer health insurance for travel, so I cannot recommend any one of them. The only thing I can advise is not to leave home without it. An accident in a foreign country, besides being annoying, could also be very expensive. So, prepare in advance.


car in a desert


You never know where you’ll be when there’s a problem at work, so try to find ways to stay connected on the go. Location: somewhere near Jericoacoara, Brazil.

Getting Connected

What I normally do is buy a prepaid SIM card in each country I stay, with a data plan that will be enough for my stay there. I do a bit of research beforehand to see which carrier has the most widespread coverage, and I check if there’s any information in English on their website to make recharges when necessary.

A SIM card is more necessary in some countries than in others. For example, in Russia, most open Wi-Fi networks require you to fill in a phone number, to which a validation code will be sent, before you are able to use the network. Japan, on the other hand, is full of convenience stores with free internet (such as 7-Eleven), so a SIM card is not so necessary. Meanwhile, Europe now has a more convenient way to handling roaming, called “Roam like at home”, and getting a new SIM card in every country is not so necessary anymore.

In any case, before buying a SIM card, make sure it will work across the country, especially if the country is large with many different regions.
Another important thing to check beforehand: Will your current phone number work in the new country? Luckily, there’s a website where you can check that information.

Preparing To Be Offline

Moving from one place to another involves a lot of time spent on the road, and in some cases you won’t have the chance to find Wi-Fi or good data network coverage. At these times, Spotify and Netflix are my best friends, because both allow me to download music and TV shows, respectively, so I can use them without an Internet connection. This was especially useful when I had to take several connecting trains to cross Siberia, spending in some cases around 30 hours straight in a railroad car before my next stop.


Seven Rila Lakes


I still had an Internet connection in these mountains in Bulgaria! However, being offline from time to time and enjoying the natural surroundings is really advisable. Location: Seven Rila Lakes region, Bulgaria.

For the same reason, I always download a map of my next destination, using Google Maps (Maps.me has the same functionality).

If you want more information of this kind, check out another article I wrote, with more travel hacks and tips from my years of traveling.

Final Thoughts

Before I board my next train, let me tell you that becoming a nomadic freelance designer is by far one of my best decisions of my life so far. I have the flexibility that any freelancer has, but I also meet new people and see new places all the time. And it’s not as expensive as you might think. If you control your budget, traveling could be cheaper than living in a big city. So, I can afford to work four to five hours every day, and I use the rest of the time to get to know the place I’m visiting, to work on personal projects and to write articles for Smashing Magazine.

Traveling also makes it a bit hard to separate pleasure from work, because everything seems more enjoyable when you’re moving around. I’ve had to remind myself sometimes that I’m not on a vacation and to focus on getting things done. After a while, though, I’ve found a good balance. Now, I allow myself some moments to just move around, travel and enjoy the ride, doing nothing. It’s not all about work, after all!


on a train


Taking a train in Siberia. It’s not all about work. You also have to let yourself go and enjoy your ride. Location: somewhere in Russia.

Living like this is sometimes challenging and tiring, but I find it much richer than being in an office Monday to Friday, 9:00 to 5:00. And with all of the current technology, it’s easy for any designer to embrace this lifestyle. The most difficult part is finding a job to sustain your travel, but once you’ve found it, the next part is just to let it flow.

The nomadic lifestyle is not right for everyone, but the only way to know for sure is to try. Neale Donald Walsch once said that life starts where your comfort zone ends, and I completely agree. If you can afford to take the risk, go for it and enjoy a part of life that might not last long but will give you a life-changing experience, teach you new things and change the way you see the world forever.

If, for some reason, it doesn’t work, you can always go back to your previous life, right? Whether you are ready to give it a try or still have some questions about it, feel free to let me know. I’ll do my best to help you out. See you on the road!

Further Reading

Smashing Editorial
(mb, ra, al, yk, il)

Read more – 

The Nomadic Designer: Tips And Tricks To Work On The Road

The Current State Of Email Marketing Programming: What Can And Can’t Be Used

Many people want to create the best email campaigns possible, and this goal can be realized by following best practices for email design and coding and by implementing advanced techniques correctly. This comprehensive guide, for novices and pros alike, delves deep into the nitty gritty of email marketing.

Here’s what you’ll learn:

  • best practices for email design, from creating a theme to designing the footer;
  • how to add images and incorporate rich media (GIFs, cinemagraphs, video) in your emails;
  • how to design responsive emails for a better user experience;
  • email client support for responsive mobile emails;
  • finally, advanced techniques in email design.

Introduction

Emails have transformed from being an ordinary text-based personal communication tool into a future-proof marketing channel. We have moved into a world of visually attractive HTML emails that have the feel of microsites in the inbox.

Getting acquainted with the best practices of email coding is, therefore, imperative if you want to avoid a broken user experience and instead improve user engagement. Moreover, as the digital world becomes more mobile, creating responsive emails is the need of the hour.

In this article, we shall delve deeper into best practices to follow for all email clients, as well as advanced techniques you can include for email clients that support interactive elements.

Let’s start with the basic structure of an email.

Basic Email Structure

As Leonardo da Vinci said, ”Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” Accordingly, keep the design of your email simple.

Check out the email design below by Charity: Water. Simple yet engaging.

A simple yet engaging email design by Charity: Water.


View large version

Developers have been coding emails using <table> layouts for a long time now. So, it is recommended that you place your email elements in a grid-based layout, rather than arbitrarily placed. Moreover, any element that might overlap needs to be added to a different layer.

The email shown above by Charity: Water looks like this when exported to a tabular layout:

Email design by Charity: Water divided into a grid.


View large version

Email design is made up of different subelements. Let’s explore them now.

1. Email Theme

The logo is not the only element that reflects your brand’s personality. The overall theme of your email, including the fonts, color scheme and imagery, should be in sync with branding guidelines.

2. Width And Height Of Email Template

Because your subscribers use diverse email clients and devices, your email should be appropriately visible in the preview pane of all email clients. Keep in mind that the email will be displayed according to the display pane of the email service provider or client. Only certain email clients, such as Thunderbird, Apple Mail and native mobile email clients, will display email at full width.

For other email clients, the display boxes have variable sizes. Many service providers, such as MailChimp, go over the basics of HTML email, by recommending, for example, 600 to 800 pixels as a width, so that the full email gets displayed. Remember, that most subscribers never use the horizontal scroll bar in an email.

The height of your email template should usually be long enough to accommodate your copy within two scroll lengths. You can certainly have a longer email template if you have to convey a huge amount of information. However, if your email template gets too long, it might become boring for subscribers, who will be less likely to scroll to the end to check out all of the offers and promotions included.

The height of the preview pane of most email clients (which contains content commonly referred to as “above the fold”) is generally between 300 and 500 pixels. Make the best use of this space, so that the content included above the fold entices the subscriber to scroll down.

Every email developer knows that if an email’s file size exceeds 102 KB, Gmail’s app will clip the email, and they will not be able to track metrics.

Check out the screenshot below to see what an email looks like in Gmail when it is clipped:

Email message, the weight of which exceeds 102 KB, as seen in Gmail, with ‘View entire message’ at the end.


View large version

To avoid Gmail’s clip, make sure your email does not have unnecessary code and is not over-formatted. Go for a minimalist email design, without any shortened URLs. Note that images will not be embedded in the email and, so, will not increase the file’s size. That being said, removing unnecessary images will help to reduce the email size.

For marketers who use predesigned templates, the height and width will already be taken care of. If you want to use your own design, consider the ideal width and height of an email template.

3. Body Of Email

Emails usually begin with a hero image at the top, followed by the main copy, a call to action and then the footer.

Because most people read on screens positioned about 2 to 3 feet away, your h1 title should be around 16 pixels; if your title is short, it could even go up to 20 pixels. A good idea would be to render the h1 title as text, along with an attractive hero image.

Your descriptive text should not be smaller than 12 pixels. It should be easily readable across all email clients and devices. Moreover, the alignment of paragraphs and paragraph size also play an important role.

4. Call To Action

The primary objective of email marketing is to persuade customers to take action. To do that, your call to action (CTA) should have engaging, actionable verbs. Use convincing and actionable text, like “Start the free trial,” rather than drab phrases like “Click here.”

An interesting study by ContentVerve, “10 Call-to-Action Case Studies With Takeaways and Examples From Real Button Tests”,” shows that use of the first-person perspective in CTAs increase clicks by 90%, regardless of the product. For example, “Get my free copy” converts better than “Get your free copy.”

Create a sense of urgency in CTAs and get higher click-through rates by adding the word “now.”

This email from 'Alice and Olivia' has a CTA in bright pink, contrasting with the white background.


View large version

Campaign Monitor, in one of its guides, “10 Tips to Optimize Your Calls to Action,” emphasizes that a CTA button should always contrast strongly with the background color, so that it doesn’t blend in and that it grabs the subscriber’s attention. Based on your target audience, your industry and the message to be conveyed, including CTAs at regular intervals can increase email conversions and the desired subscriber action. Its height should be at least 30 pixels, and it should be easily tappable with a thumb on mobile devices.

Check out the email below from Asana. It places a CTA strategically above the first fold and also follows the CTA best practices discussed above.

Email by Asana strategically places CTA above the first fold.
Email by Asana strategically places CTA above the first fold. (View large version)

5. Images And Interactive Elements

If you are putting images or rich media in your email, add relevant alternative (alt) text, so that the purpose of the email is preserved even when the visuals are blocked by the email client. This is also greatly helpful with accessibility, because screen readers will be able to read the alternative text and convey your message.

Most email marketers tend to send emails consisting of a single image, which is first of many common HTML mistakes compiled by MailChimp. It recommends a text-to-image ratio of 80 to 20, to make sure that emails do not get trapped in spam filters. According to a recent study by MailChimp, 200 words per image yield a good click-through rate.

Using linked images in your email ensures an optimum file size. Load images from an external server using <img> tags.

The main advantage of this technique is that you can change images even after sending the email. It makes the email light and reduces the time taken to send the email. The disadvantage is that subscribers will have to download the images from the external server, which will incur download costs for those on metered connections, and the images might also get blocked by some email services.

Rich media elements, such as GIFs, cinemagraphs and video, are becoming popular in email these days.

You can add a GIF or cinemagraph in an email simply by uploading the file to the server that stores your images. Then, copy the URL and use the following HTML:

<pre class="lang:default decode:true" title="Code for adding GIFs or Cinemagraphs in Email"><img src="/wp-content/uploads/thefiletobeinserted.gif">
</pre>

Test the email to make sure that the GIF works properly.

Embedding video is a very adaptable technique of web development, but unfortunately, it’s not supported in email. Therefore, opt for HTML5 video.

To add a video in email, use the code below:

<pre class="lang:default decode:true" title="Code for including video in email"><video width="400" height="200" controls poster="http://www.art.com/images/blog_images/Imagefiles/2017/html5_video/valentinesday.jpg"><br/><source src="http://www.videofile.com/htmlfiles/movie-14thfeb.mp4" type="video/mp4"><br/><!-- fallback 1 --><br/><a href="http://www.xyz.com" ><br/><img height="200" src=" http://www.art.com/pictures/important/Imagefiles/2017/html5_video/valentinesday.jpg " width="400" /><br/></a><br/></video><br/><br/><br/>
</pre>

HTML5 primarily supports the MP4, OGG and WebM video formats.

Pro tip: Apple supports the MP4 video format in its email clients and browsers.

Some points to remember:

  • Make sure that the server configuration you use can output the right MIME type, so that the email client identifies the correct video format when retrieving the video.

  • If you are using an Apache web server, add this entry to the .htaccess file: Add Type video/mp4.mp4 m4v.

6. Number Of Email Folds

Your email should have just two folds, as mentioned earlier. The first fold should capture your brand and include the h1 title with a relevant CTA. If your email template exceeds two scrolls, then the third scroll should cross-sell your products. The idea is to change up the content and keep subscribers hooked by providing interesting information.

The footer is the most overlooked part of any email. However, it probably has information that subscribers are looking for, such as the company address, social sharing buttons and contact details. In order for your email to be CAN-SPAM compliant, the footer should have some additional elements.

An “Unsubscribe” link should allow subscribers to opt out of your mailing list easily and will reduce spam complaints.

Your contact details should link back to your company website and should include your postal and email address.

Additionally, you can have ancillary links, such as “Forward to a friend” and “View in Browser.”

As stated in “The Best Practices of Footer Design” by Bee, the fine print of your email should have the following sections:

  • Explanation of why the recipient got this email
    Your subscribers have probably subscribed to numerous mailing lists. Subtly remind recipients of the reason they received the email, to maintain your reputation as an emailer and to minimize spam complaints.
  • Copyright
    Include the copyright mark, along with the current year and your business name.
  • Privacy policy
    Link to your privacy policy, because subscribers should know where that information is stored. This is critical for e-commerce retailers.
  • Terms of use
    If you are sending out a promotional email highlighting discount offers, share the terms of use that govern the deals.

Cramming information into the footer sounds tempting, but you should determine the most important information for your business and restrict the footer to the minimum. Stuffing it with too much information could lead readers to dismiss it entirely because they will not be able to figure out which links to click.

Check out the footer below by Cotton on Body. Although it is well organized, it could be overwhelming for the subscriber who is scanning the email.

The Cotton on Body email footer, which is too lengthy.


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Have a look at the footer below by Alice and Olivia. It is simple, and it maintains a visual hierarchy according to the actions they want subscribers to take.

Alice and Olivia's email footer is concise and designed with all good practices in mind.


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The footer by HSN below is clean and makes good use of padding and white space. It is not overwhelming, yet it conveys important information that readers might be looking for.

HSN's footer is clean; padding and white space are used appropriately.


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Mobile Responsive Emails

Most subscribers will check email on their phone. Owing to this trend, your emails ought to be responsive. Responsive design includes several elements, such as media queries, fluid grids and fluid images, so that users can view the email as intended, regardless of screen size or device. The basics of responsive email design include the table element, easily stackable sections and full-width CTAs.

If your subscriber list consists of many mobile users, then avoid overlapping layouts. Hide non-primary sections, such as navigation and email advertisements, to cater to mobile subscribers. Mobile-specific email elements such as a navigation menu and image sliders can also be used.

Responsive email design is supported in these email clients:

  • iOS Mail app
  • Windows Phone 7.5
  • Android 4.x Email (OEM) app
  • BlackBerry Z10
  • BlackBerry OS7
  • iPhone Gmail app

The following email clients do not support responsive email:

  • Android Yahoo Mail app
  • iPhone Yahoo Mail app
  • BlackBerry OS 5
  • Windows Phone 7
  • iPhone Mailbox app
  • Windows Phone 8
  • Android Gmail app
  • Windows Mobile 6.1

Responsive design enables you to do the following:

  • change hierarchy,
  • modify navigation,
  • enlarge fonts,
  • change layout,
  • scale images,
  • add padding,
  • change or hide content.

Designing Responsive Email

To make their emails responsive, developers use a media query that is commonly referred to as @media. It is a special set of CSS styles, included in the header, that work as conditional statements or dynamic rules.

The point of media queries is to identify the screen size of the device being used and to execute various rules according to that screen size. The challenge is that media queries do not work in all email clients and might need detailed planning and testing compared to other design techniques.

Have a look at the media query below:

<pre class="lang:default decode:true" title="Structure of Media Query">@media only screen and (min-width:479px) and (max-width:701px) 
.em_main_table 
     width: 100% !important;


.em_hide 
     display: none !important;

}
</pre>

When this email is accessed on a device whose screen is between 479 and 701 pixels wide, the email’s width will be 100%, according to the width: 100% !important; attribute. The !important function forces this attribute in email clients such as Gmail, where it might be ignored.

The styles in the CSS rule block should specify the container or element type that the styles will dictate. Assign these rules in the HTML if you want them to work.

Here is the CSS:

<pre class="lang:default decode:true" title="Code for CSS"> td[class="body-header"] font-size: 18px !important; 

And here is the HTML:

<pre class="lang:default decode:true" title="Code for HTML"><td align="left" class="body-header">
</pre>

It is important that the element (td) and the class (body-header) added in the CSS and HTML match each other.

Advanced Techniques

With the advent of advanced email clients, such as Apple Mail, which is based on Webkit, email developers can even play around with keyframe animation, interactive elements such as carousels, and live feeds.

Conditional coding for different email clients (such as for Outlook and for Samsung and Apple devices) has also become possible.

Conditional coding for Outlook and for Samsung and Apple devices


View large version

Wrapping Up

If you follow these simple tips, you will surely be able to create awesome email marketing campaigns that convert, whether you are a novice or pro at email programming. In the end, aim to create a good user experience and make subscribers look forward to your emails. Happy emailing!

Smashing Editorial
(da, ra, yk, al, il)

More:  

The Current State Of Email Marketing Programming: What Can And Can’t Be Used

The Future Of Mobile Web Design: Video Game Design And Storytelling

As technologies change and design techniques evolve, it’s inevitable that we’d experience massive growth in terms of design quality. There are similar parallels we can see within video game design as well. For instance:

This was CERN, the very first website back in 1991. Just some basic HTML and ample white space:

CERN was the first website created just with plain text and hyperlinks.


The very first website to appear online back in 1991. (Large preview)

This example from Smashing Magazine is how we design websites and share information online in 2018:

Smashing Magazine demonstrates how much we can do with web design in 2018.


A much more complicated and yet beautiful web design… 27 years after the advent of websites. (Large preview)

Now, if you look at the history of video game design, you’ll note a similar track; one in which early games like Pong were incredibly simplistic and devoid of any real story:

But now there are games like Grand Theft Auto that put players in the actual driver’s seat, allowing them to control the pace, direction, and outcomes of their experience:

As technologies improve and design techniques evolve, improvements in digital design are inevitable. What is truly impressive, however, is how we are now able to use design to tell a story. In other words, we no longer need to use long scrolls to set up plots or describe what a company does. This is especially great when designing for the mobile experience, which already sets pretty strict limits on how much we can “tell” versus “show.”

In this article, I want to look at three ways in which video game designers get the storytelling aspect of design right, and how web designers can use these techniques to provide users with an immersive experience and drive them more quickly and effectively to conversion.

Three Video Game Storytelling Techniques We Need More Of In Web Design

Video games have come a long way since they were introduced in the late ‘70s in terms of graphics, user controls and, of course, story development. With video game design evolving around the same time as web design, there are similar features and trends that can be found between the two. The only thing is, I don’t know if many web designers think to look to video games for design tips.

Granted, the overwhelming use of shocking colors and cheesy dialogue won’t work that well when you’re developing a professional website. However, it’s the way in which video game designers tell a story with design elements — and effectively guide players to the end by using those elements — that we need to pay attention to.

As your visitors’ attention spans shorten and demand grows for more engaging experiences, web designers can greatly benefit from using these storytelling techniques on the web and, more importantly, for mobile.

1. Make Your Visitor the Hero

Ever since the early days of video games, the goal was to put the player in the front seat and to let them be the hero of the story.

Take PAC-MAN, for instance:

The player was always the hero (i.e., PAC-MAN), and his or her mission was to work through the situation (i.e., to fight the ghosts) and get to the end.

The same holds true for modern gaming as well, though many games go the route of giving players the impression they have control over their heroic journey. A good example of this are the Telltale games.

Basically, each of their games is crafted around a well-known story. In the example above, the game is based on the events that unfold in the T.V. show Game of Thrones. Throughout the game, players are called upon to step into the world and make active choices about what happens next. Sometimes this is through dialogue (at 6:00), and sometimes it happens through action (at 11:55).

In the end, every player of the game ends up at the same place regardless of which way they turn or what line they utter. This doesn’t make the experience any less enthralling for the player as they are actively engaged throughout, and there is a reward in the end — even if it’s one they share with every other person who has played this game.

That’s exactly what websites should do for their visitors, right? They allow visitors to take full control over the experience so that they want to get to the end. For the web, this translates to conversion. And the best way to do this, as evidenced by video games, is to give visitors the ability to pick and choose how they traverse through the story.

Here are some ways in which you can do this with web design:

Create User Personas

Develop user personas before you do anything else when strategizing and planning for a website. Your personas should have a key “problem” they face. It’s then your job to establish the user’s journey in a way that helps them discover solutions to that problem.

Enable Avatar Setup

For those of you with websites that allow for users to create profiles, this is a great opportunity to enable them to define their own unique identity. Allow them to upload a photo of themselves and to personalize their profile. You can also give them different access settings which directs what kinds of content they see, what types of offers they receive, and so on.

WordPress membership websites like WPMU DEV are a good example of websites that do this. Users can create their own profiles and earn points and special statuses based on how much work they put into the community.

WPMU DEV enables users to create their own profiles.


A fun community where web design and development professionals can set up individual profiles. (Large preview)

Use Relatable Content

In video game design, there is something known as “ludonarrative dissonance.” Basically, it “is the unpleasant situation where we’re asking players to do something they don’t want to do… or prevent them from doing what they want.”

You’ve likely encountered this sort of resistance as you’ve designed websites in the past.

You review the analytics and discover high bounce rates on certain pages or even right from within the home page. You discover that there’s a visual element or a line of copy that just doesn’t sit right with your audience. That’s because it’s a disruption in what should be an otherwise immersive experience. By using content that resonates with the visitor, that makes them feel like you’re telling their story, they won’t feel disconnected and want to stray from the goal.

Spin a Fantasy

Here’s an interesting fact: people are 22 times more likely to remember data when it’s presented in a narrative form.

Let’s face it; if you’re building a website on behalf of a business or other professional entity, you don’t have some dramatic tale to spin like a video game does. And that’s fine.

Consumers aren’t visiting websites in order to get caught up in hours of epic storytelling. That said, they do still expect to be engaged by what you’re sharing with them.

So, why not depict a fantastic scenario through visual storytelling? The brain digests visual content 60% more quickly than written content, so your web designs and other visuals (like video, animation, and so on) are the keys to doing this.

The Airbnb blog always does a great job of this type of visual storytelling.

Airbnb’s blog uses images that tell a story within themselves.


The Airbnb blog is a master of visual storytelling. (Large preview)

While every story is probably told through 800 to 1,000 words, it’s also accompanied by highly attractive visuals that tell you something about what you’d experience at this specific destination.

2. Minimize Distractions by Using Symbols

Let’s talk specifically about websites viewed from mobile devices for a second, shall we? As of August 2017, 52.64% of all visits to websites were done via a smartphone. And, starting in 2017, the most popular size for a smartphone was between five and six inches and will only continue to grow in popularity as the years go on.

That’s not a lot of space to fill with content for the majority of site visitors, is it? So, how do you effectively tell a story if you have limited real estate? If we’re to take a page out of the video game design handbook, then we should turn to symbols.

Kontra makes a good point about this:

“[O]ne, often overlooked, strong point of game UX is the preference towards symbolism. The ability to transform meaning into symbols was a huge step towards visual decluttering.”

Functional minimalism is already something you’re doing in your own web design efforts, but have you thought about how it can tie into the storytelling aspect as well? When it comes to video games, symbols help clear the way so that players can focus on the story before them. You’ll see this most often in two-dimensional, side-scroller games:

Street Fighter and other fighting games place the health bar at the top:

Sonic the Hedgehog places the life counter at the bottom:

There are even ones like Virtua Racing and other geographic-dependent games that put their navigation off to the side for players to reference:

As you can see, the use of symbols keeps the gamespace clear and easy to follow along with.

Whether you’re designing mostly for desktop or mobile users, your aim is to design a space that encourages users to follow along and not get caught up in distractions. So, while you might think that full-screen, overlay navigation is a creative choice for your website or the ever-present live chat pop-up will get more engagements, you may be doing yourself a great disservice.

By employing the use of easily recognized symbols throughout your site, you can keep the design clean and clear and distraction-free. The story you’re weaving throughout is the most important thing, and you don’t want to stand in the way of visitors being able to get to it.

MSR is a beautiful example of this done well:

MSR minimizes distractions from the main content area by using symbols.


A good example of how to minimize navigation and directional cues so visitors can focus on the main content and story. (Large preview)

The website is for their architecture design firm. Rather than write volumes of text about what they’ve done and how they do it, they allow the images to speak for themselves. They’ve then employed a number of symbols to help visitors continue on to other points of interest in their journey.

Here are some ways in which you might use symbols to declutter your site:

  • Hamburger icon (for the navigation)
  • Profile photo icon (for account details)
  • Pencil icon (for an editing interface)
  • Gear icon (for settings)
  • Shopping cart icon (to checkout)
  • Magnifying glass (to expand the search bar)
  • Connector icon (to open social sharing and RSS feed options)
  • Question mark (to expand live chat, search, or help options)
  • And so on.

One thing to note here is that you don’t want to overdo it with icons. As you can see from the video game examples above, the entire interface isn’t strewn with icons. They’re simply there to hold the place of elements players are already familiar with and will refer to often. That’s the way you should handle icons for your own site. Think about how easy your icons will be to decipher as well as which ones are absolutely necessary. Decluttering doesn’t mean hiding every element under an icon; you simply want to tidy up a bit.

If you’re concerned with the potential for confusion over what your icons mean to users, then use labels, alt text, or tooltips to provide further elaboration to those who need it.

3. Be Smart About How You Use Space

One of the nice things about video games is how they use actual walls and roadblocks to prevent players from navigating into territory where they shouldn’t be. One of my favorite games that does this right now is called LittleBigPlanet. While it is similar to side-scrolling adventures like Super Mario, its design expands beyond the basic two dimensions usually experienced in these kinds of games.

As you can see, the player encounters a number of hard surfaces which then prompt him or her to move back and forth between layers, to climb up various elements, and to find a more ideal route towards the end of the game.

First-person shooter games like Halo also use physical elements to keep players confined to the main gamespace and on track to completing the mission and story.

As a web designer, you don’t have the luxury of crafting walls around the user’s journey on your site. That said, you don’t have to design a website and leave it all to chance. There are ways to steer visitors through a direct path to conversion.

Kill Screen did an interesting write-up about the art of spatial storytelling in video games. In it, writer Sharang Biswas explained the idea that “Spaces can be designed. They can be made to promote certain pathways, encourage specific behaviors, even elicit emotional reactions.”

There are a number of ways in which you can do this with design:

Use a Spotlight

In video games, you can use light and darkness to draw attention to important pathways. On websites, it’s not always easy to employ the use of lightness or darkness as too-dark of a design or too-light of text could lead to a bad user experience. What you want to do instead is create a “spotlight” of sorts. You can do this by infusing a key area of your design with a dramatic color or a boldly stylized font.

In a site that’s otherwise pretty light in color usage, Kappow does a nice job using it to highlight two key areas of the site where it’s clear visitors should visit: its case studies.

Kappow uses bright swatches of color to draw attention.


It’s more than obvious where Kappow wants visitors to focus their attention as they scroll through the home page. (Large preview)

Add Clues

If you’ve ever played a horror video game before, you know how critical the element of sound can be for it. Here’s an example of how Until Dawn uses sound (as well as visual footprints) to try to steer the player in the right direction:

In all honesty, I’m not a big fan of music on websites, even if they’re from auto-play videos that I visited the website for in the first place. I’m sure I’m not the only one who feels this way as there aren’t many websites that employ the use of background music or auto-play audio anymore.

That said, while you might not be able to direct visitors down the page with the sound of something playing down below, you can use other elements to lead them. For one, you can use interactive elements like animation to draw their attention to where it needs to go. Let’s take a game like Angry Birds, for example.

See how the little red birds are hopping up and down while they wait their turn? It’s a subtle gesture, but one that is sure to draw first-time players’ attention to the area of the screen in which they should directly interact if they want to move on to the next level. Animation on a website would work just as effectively if you’re trying to lure visitors’ eyes down to a key element like a contact form or a clickable button.

But it doesn’t just have to be animation. Other video game designers simply plant clues around the landscape to steer players through the journey. I’m not suggesting that your site start hiding Easter eggs all over the place. Instead, you may want to think about using subtle arrows or lines that define the space in which visitors should “play” and then move down through.

Employ a Mascot

For some brands, it might make sense to employ the use of an actual mascot to guide visitors through the story. If it’s an already established mascot and it won’t intrude too heavily on the experience, then why not bring it on the journey to ensure that visitors are checking in at all the right spots?

Or you can do like BarkBox and use a series of related mascots to guide visitors through different parts of the site (especially the signup and subscription process).

Black-and-white illustrated mascots on BarkBox website.


BarkBox uses a series of illustrated black-and-white mascots to guide visitors through the conversion processes. (Large preview)

Summary

As attention spans shorten and visitors just want to get to the good stuff on a website, designers have to get more creative in how they communicate their website’s “story.” Ideally, your web design will do more showing of that story instead of telling, which is how video game design tends to succeed in this matter.

Remember: Storytelling isn’t just relegated to big brands that can weave bright and shiny tales about how consumers’ lives were changed with their products. Nor is it just for video game designers that have hours of gameplay to develop for their audiences. A story simply needs to convey to the end-user how their problem can be fixed by your site’s solution. Through subtle design strategies inspired by video game storytelling techniques, you can effectively share and shape your own story.

Smashing Editorial
(da, ra, yk, il)

Continue reading here: 

The Future Of Mobile Web Design: Video Game Design And Storytelling

A Simple Guide to Understanding and Creating a Website Conversion Funnel

How many articles have you read recently about the “conversion funnel”? Probably a lot. If you regularly read marketing blogs, it can sometimes feel like you’re hearing, seeing, and having the term “conversion funnel” shoved in front of your eyeballs constantly. I personally come across conversion funnel information multiple times per day when I’m focused on research and reading. It seems like every marketer in existence wants to be sure I don’t forget about this part of my strategy. So why is this? The short is answer is that an optimized conversion funnel is critical to your online marketing success. You might be…

The post A Simple Guide to Understanding and Creating a Website Conversion Funnel appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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A Simple Guide to Understanding and Creating a Website Conversion Funnel

How GDPR Will Change The Way You Develop

Europe’s imminent privacy overhaul means that we all have to become more diligent about what data we collect, how we collect it, and what we do with it. In our turbulent times, these privacy obligations are about ethics as well as law.
Web developers have a major role to play here. After all, healthy data protection practice is as much about the development side — code, data, and security — as it is about the business side of process, information, and strategy.

Original link:

How GDPR Will Change The Way You Develop

How Quora Can Help You Drive Massive Traffic and Conversions to Your Website

Many of you are probably familiar with Quora. But not everyone knows that Quora can be turned into a perfect marketing tool that will drive high quality targeted traffic and conversions to your website. I made the most out of Quora and continue to use it as one of my major marketing tools for increasing conversions. How, you ask? I’m one of the most viewed writers on many popular topics including videos, online videos, video production, and explainer videos. My answers gained 1.2 million+ views during the last 10 months. Want to know how to make a go of Quora…

The post How Quora Can Help You Drive Massive Traffic and Conversions to Your Website appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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How Quora Can Help You Drive Massive Traffic and Conversions to Your Website

Are Security Concerns Holding You Back From Marketing Innovation?

Incredibly, 32% of companies were victims of cybercrime in 2016. And 87% of CIOs believe their security controls are failing to keep their business protected. When you’ve marketed your business effectively, you can enjoy numerous benefits such as increased brand awareness, high SERP visibility and abundant traffic. Unfortunately, the more you grow your online presence, the more you are a target for cyber-criminals, hackers and other disreputable individuals. 2017 was a year when a number of high profile cyber-security disasters hit the news. In this current climate of fear, it’s understandable you might feel inclined to hold back on your…

The post Are Security Concerns Holding You Back From Marketing Innovation? appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Are Security Concerns Holding You Back From Marketing Innovation?

Now You See Me: How To Defer, Lazy-Load And Act With IntersectionObserver

Once upon a time, there lived a web developer who successfully convinced his customers that sites should not look the same in all browsers, cared about accessibility, and was an early adopter of CSS grids. But deep down in his heart it was performance that was his true passion: He constantly optimized, minified, monitored, and even employed psychological tricks in his projects.
Then, one day, he learned about lazy-loading images and other assets that are not immediately visible to users and are not essential for rendering meaningful content on the screen.

Source – 

Now You See Me: How To Defer, Lazy-Load And Act With IntersectionObserver

9 Creative Sticky Bar Examples – Plus 21 New Unbounce Templates

alt : https://unbounce.com/photos/sticky-bar-condoms.mp4https://unbounce.com/photos/sticky-bar-condoms.mp4

Sticky Bars are the less intrusive cousin of the noble Popup. They appear at the top or bottom of the page (and sometimes the sides) when a visitor arrives, leaves, scrolls down or up, stays on the page for a certain time period or clicks a link or button. They have a million useful use cases, some of which you may not have considered.

In today’s Product Awareness Month post, I’ll be sharing:

  • 9 Sticky Bar Examples From Out in the Wild: These are examples the team has found on other folks websites, and a couple of our own.
  • 21 New Unbounce Sticky Bar Templates: Check out our latest designs that you can use today.

To get things started, here’s an example that I’ll talk about later in the new templates section. Click to show a Sticky Bar with a countdown timer.

I’d love to see your Sticky Bars too, so drop me a link in the comments, please.

9 Creative Sticky Bar Examples to Inspire Your Next Campaign

Discounts and newsletter subscriptions are valid, common and effective use cases, but I want to explore different types of interaction design, or campaign concepts that can compliment what you’re already using them for.

#1 Maybe Later

If you’ve been following along with Product Awareness Month (PAM), you’ll have seen the “Maybe Later” concept. This is where an entrance popup morphs into a persistent Sticky Bar when your visitors click the middle “Maybe Later” button instead of yes or no.

You can see a live demo of how it works here. A popup will appear when you arrive. Click “Maybe Later”, then refresh the page and a Sticky Bar will appear, and can be configured to show up site-wide until you convert or say “No Thanks”.


#2 Sticky Bar to Popup

This concept is the exact opposite of “Maybe Later”, and it uses a concept known as a two-step opt-in. Instead of showing a form on the Sticky Bar, it just shows a button to express interest.

Click-Through Sticky Bar

When you click the Sticky Bar CTA it launches a popup to collect the email address. This two-stage concept can increase conversions because the first click establishes intent and a level of commitment to continue – while not showing a scary form right away. I’ll be discussing the two-step opt-in in a future post.

Lead Gen Popup


#3 Sticky Video Widget

You’ve seen these on many blogs I’m sure. It’s really cool functionality for increasing engagement in your videos. You can see a demo here. And instructions on how to implement it can be found in the Unbounce community here.


#4 E-commerce Product Reminder

This example is really cool. As you scroll down a product page on an e-commerce site, an “Add to Cart” Sticky Bar appears when you scroll past the main hero image.


#5 E-commerce Checkout Discount Nudge

This Sticky Bar sticks with you for every step in the photo creation and checkout process. Clearly, they are comfortable with the coupon being applied to the sale because it’s an incredibly competitive business niche and let’s face it when you see a coupon code field you go searching for one. So why not just offer it straight up.

For the record, trying to buy canvas prints to deliver to family in the UK is a freakin’ nightmare. I had to try 8 different sites before one of them would allow me to put a Canadian address in the billing info fields. They are losing a TON of money by not realizing that customers can be in other places.


#6 On-Click Side Slide

On-click Sticky Bars and Popups are the best kind when it comes to a permission-based interaction. You make something interesting and ask people to click on it. In this example, there is an element on the left side of the page which slides in from the side when clicked.

Unbouncer Noah Matsell created a similar thing in Unbounce (see demo here). It doesn’t actually use a Sticky Bar. Instead it’s just a box with text in it. I love how it works. Try it out, and think about all the cool stuff you could stick in a sidebar.


#7 EU Cookie Policy

European Union laws around privacy are some of the toughest in the world, and for the last few years, the EU Cookie Privacy Law required that all EU businesses, as well as international businesses serving EU customers, show a privacy statement with a clickable acknowledgment interaction. I’m not a lawyer so I don’t know all the ins and outs, but needless to say, it’s a great use case that you may not even know that your web team or legal team actually needs.

Coming up in May is the new GDPR legislation which will usurp this law, but offer its own needs and requirements, so stay tuned for more on that, and how you should be dealing with it. In fact, I did a quick poll on Twitter to see what people thought about the cookie law and got an interesting mix of responses. Don’t be in the “Haven’t dealt with it yet” camp when it comes to GDPR. That could get you dinged.

We released a new Cookie Bar template below that you can use until you deal with the new legislation.

#8 Microsite Navigation

Another example from earlier in Product Awareness Month. You can use a Sticky Bar as the connective global navigation that turns a group of landing pages into a microsite.

A really simple way to create a multi-page marketing campaign experience.

#9 Net Promoter Score (NPS)

Net Promoter Score surveys are a method of measuring how your customers feel about your product or service. Based on a scale from 0-10 and the question “How likely are you to recommend company name to a friend?”

Co-founder Carter Gilchrist made this NPS demo to show how it works:


Follow our Product Awareness Month journey >> click here to launch a popup with a subscribe form (it uses our on-click trigger feature).


21 New Unbounce Sticky Bar Templates You Can Use Today

We just released a whole bunch of new Sticky Bar and Popup templates which you can see inside the Unbounce app screenshot below. I chose a few of them to showcase below based on some of the examples I discussed above.


Sticky Bar Template #1: Countdown Timer

Countdown timers are great for creating a sense of urgency, and can have a positive influence on conversions as a result.


Click to show this Sticky Bar at the bottom | at the top.


Sticky Bar Template #2: Location Redirect

If you have multiple websites or online stores, you can use Location Targeting (Unbounce supports city, region, country, and continent) to let people know there is a local version they might want to switch to.


Sticky Bar Template #3: Product Release

Announce product releases on your website to drive people to the features page of the new product.


Sticky Bar Template #4: Cookie Privacy Law

As I mentioned earlier, this is big for companies in Europe, and also businesses who have European customers. On May 25, 2018 this law will be usurped by the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).


Sticky Bar Template #5: Product Beta Access

Build an email list for an upcoming beta release.


Sticky Bar Template #6: Product Hunt Launch

Product Hunt can be a great place to launch new products. To be successful you need to get upvotes and you can use a Sticky Bar to send people there from your website.

Check Out Our Sticky Bar Live Demo

We built a cool tool that shows what Sticky Bars and Popups look like on your site. Simply enter your URL here to preview. It even grabs your brand colors and in this case, Amanda from Orbit Media makes a cameo appearance.

Cheers
Oli Gardner

p.s. You should check out The Landing Page Analyzer. Why? Because – hyperbole alert – it’s the single greatest tool in the history of the world when it comes to grading your landing pages.

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9 Creative Sticky Bar Examples – Plus 21 New Unbounce Templates

Designing Friction For A Better User Experience

In experience design, friction is anything that prevents users from accomplishing their goals or getting things done. It’s the newsletter signup overlay covering the actual content, the difficult wording on a landing page, or the needless optional questions in a checkout flow. It’s the opposite of intuitive and effortless, the opposite of “Don’t make me think.”
Having said that, friction can still be a good thing sometimes. In game design, for example, friction is actually required.

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Designing Friction For A Better User Experience

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