Tag Archives: design

7 Reasons to Lay a Bet on Instagram Micro-Influencers in 2018

If you believe that launching an advertising campaign is enough to beat your competitors, we have bad news for you then: those days are far behind us. And truth to be told: most customers opt for skipping an ad as they are fed up with the overly polished professional pictures that seem too good to be true. As Forbes has revealed, customers crave authenticity. Thus, marketers are seeking out ways to deliver the genuine messages that align with their brand principles. For this reason, the collaboration with influencers has been booming over the past few years. The numbers speak for…

The post 7 Reasons to Lay a Bet on Instagram Micro-Influencers in 2018 appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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7 Reasons to Lay a Bet on Instagram Micro-Influencers in 2018

Submitting Forms Without Reloading The Page: AJAX Implementation In WordPress

If you have ever wanted to send a form without reloading the page, provide a look-ahead search function that prompts the user with suggestions as they type, or auto-save documents, then what you need is AJAX (also known as XHR). A behind-the-scenes request is sent to the server, and returning data to your form. Whenever you see a loader animation after you have made some action on the page, it’s probably an AJAX request being submitted to the server.

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Submitting Forms Without Reloading The Page: AJAX Implementation In WordPress

Taking A Look At The State Of Progressive Images And User Perception

“Progressive Images” is a hot topic these days. We often come across articles explaining techniques on how to avoid showing an empty space where an image will load. Medium and Facebook are examples of websites and mobile apps that apply this pattern.
I recently wrote about different ways to use SVG as placeholders, and this year’s PerfPlanet’s Performance Calendar included two posts that further describe SQIP, a technique based on blurred SVGs: Progressive Image Loading using Intersection Observer and SQIP and SQIP — Vague Vectors for Performant Previews.

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Taking A Look At The State Of Progressive Images And User Perception

A tactical guide to creating emotional connections with your customers

Anxiety. Relief. Pain. Desire. Frustration. We’ve been talking a lot about emotion lately. And for data-driven marketers, it’s easy to…Read blog postabout:A tactical guide to creating emotional connections with your customers

The post A tactical guide to creating emotional connections with your customers appeared first on WiderFunnel Conversion Optimization.


A tactical guide to creating emotional connections with your customers

Exploring New Worlds: A Smashing Creativity Challenge

Time flies! Did you know that it has been more than nine years already since we first embarked on our wallpapers adventure? Nine years is a long time, and sometimes we all should break out of our comfort zones and try something new, right?
We’d love to invite you to a little creativity challenge: Get out your pens, paint brushes, camera, or fire up your favorite illustration tool, and design a desktop wallpaper for March 2018.

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Exploring New Worlds: A Smashing Creativity Challenge

Using Media Queries For Responsive Design In 2018

Back in July 2010, I wrote an article for Smashing Magazine entitled “How To Use CSS3 Media Queries To Create A Mobile Version of Your Website.” Almost eight years on, that article still receives a lot of traffic. I thought it would be a nice idea to revisit that subject, now that we have layout methods such as Flexbox and Grid Layout. This article will take a look at the use of media queries for responsive design today, and also have a look at what is coming in the future.


Using Media Queries For Responsive Design In 2018

A Comprehensive Guide To Product Design

(This is a sponsored article.) What is a product? Until recently, the term was used only in relation to something material and often found in a retail store. Nowadays, it is coming to mean digital products as well. Apps and websites are modern products.
When it comes to building great products, design is the most important “feature.” We’ve moved into the stage where product design dominates — it’s what sets companies apart and gives a real edge over competitors.

Original article:  

A Comprehensive Guide To Product Design

Offboarding In The Online World

By now, we’ve all heard about onboarding — the beginning of a relationship between a company and a user — but what about offboarding? Both go hand in hand as being two of the most important interactions you can have with a user, but offboarding gets much less publicity and sometimes is even altogether ignored. So, what exactly is it, and why is it so important?
Offboarding is usually described as the interaction between a company and their customer at the end of the customer journey.


Offboarding In The Online World

Be Watchful: PHP And WordPress Functions That Can Make Your Site Insecure

Security of a WordPress (or any) website is a multi-faceted problem. The most important step anyone can take to make sure that a site is secure is to keep in mind that no single process or method is sufficient to ensure nothing bad happens. But there are things you can do to help. One of them is to be on the watch, in the code you write and the code from others you deploy, for functions that can have negative consequences.

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Be Watchful: PHP And WordPress Functions That Can Make Your Site Insecure

4 Ways to Use Advanced Triggers & Targeting to Craft Delightful Popups

I’ve already talked at length about how to design more delightful popups by using The Delight Equation, and today I want to extend that concept by discussing the triggers and advanced targeting you can use to make popup experiences even better.

I think we’d all agree that showing a popup to your visitors on every visit is a bad idea. We can also agree that generic offers and untargeted messaging is a big turnoff.

That’s where triggers and targeting can make a big difference to the user experience.

Advanced Trigger and Targeting Matrix

Below, I’ve sketched out an interaction matrix leveraging the triggering and targeting features that Unbounce Popups & Sticky Bars can use. I’ve filled in a few ideas, and in the rest of today’s Product Awareness Month post I’ll explain how four of these concepts work, including some live demos because it’s really easy and fun to do with Unbounce.

Fair warning. Some of these ideas are a little “out there”. However, I find that being a little ridiculous helps unlock your creativity. And we all need a little more creativity in our marketing.

Use Case #1: Choose Your Own Adventure (CYOA)

Trigger: Entrance, Timed, or Scroll Up
Targeting: URL

This is a great way to learn about the intentions of your visitors.

We’ve been running experiments on our “What is a Landing Page?” page to figure out what people want to do when they arrive. interesting. On that page, I asked the question “What are your landing page needs?” providing three options (each with their own next step CTA):

I’ll be sharing complete results from this experiment at the end of the month.

CYOA Demos

Pro Tip: You can attach a parameter to a URL (?ttdemo1 for instance) which lets you use URL targeting to only show the popup in that instance. Because I want to keep you on this page, I’m just going to provide three links that reload this page, but with individual URL parameters.

  1. Entrance trigger demo
    with URL parameter targeting ?ttdemo1
  2. Scroll Up trigger demo
    with URL parameter targeting ?ttdemo2
  3. Time Delay trigger demo
    with URL parameter targeting ?ttdemo3

To set this up, I simply duplicated the first popup twice, and set the URL targeting and trigger options appropriately.

What’s even cooler is that because I used the URL targeting for any Unbounce.com URL that contains ?ttdemo1, the experience can be shown to anyone, via any link, just by appending the URL parameter. Like this link to our homepage. #mindblownmuch?

Scroll Up and Time Delay are good triggers to use to capture the attention of people who may not have found what they’re looking for. Like U2. Scroll Up is great for mobile as it’s a little bit like an exit signal on desktop.

Make sure you track these pathways in Google Analytics and stick a heat map on the page (I use Hotjar) so you can get a simple visual of where people are clicking. This is one of the original click maps for “What is a Landing Page?”.

Once you’ve learned something about your visitors’ needs you can start making changes to the page to reflect that. I’ll be digging into a concept I’m calling “No-Touch CRO” next week, which has more examples of how you can use Popups and Sticky Bars to learn about your visitors without having to change your site.

Use Case #2: You Didn’t See My Most Valuable Page (MVP)

Trigger: Exit
Targeting: Cookie

Every website has pages that we consider critical to the conversion experience. For you, it might be the features page, the pricing page, or the homepage. It could even be a blog post that’s particularly good at convincing people to sign up.

How dare someone come to your site without visiting your favorite pages! Let’s be realistic though, not everyone has the time, inclination, motivation, or easily identifiable path to get to where you want them to go.

I’m calling this use case “You didn’t see my MVP!” – as it’s designed to at least make sure they’re given an opportunity to see your magic content.

This is how it works:

  1. Drop a cookie on your most valueable page (MVP).
  2. Set up a Popup or Sticky Bar to fire on exit when the MVP cookie is NOT present.

Pretty simple right?

MVP Demo **Desktop Only**

Follow these instructions to see a demo. It’s desktop only because you can trigger an exit popup on a phone.

  1. Click here
    To reload this page adding a URL parameter ?ttdemomvp.
  2. Trigger the exit popup
    Move your mouse out of the browser as if you are going to close it.
  3. Click the button on the popup to visit the MVP page
    The cookie will be set on that page.
  4. Click the back button to return to this page
  5. Refresh this page and try to trigger the exit popup
    Now that the cookie has been set the popup won’t fire, as we’ve already seen your high-converting content.

Use Case #3: Maybe Later

Trigger: Entrance + Click
Targeting: URL + Cookie

“Maybe Later” is one of my favorite concepts to come out of this month’s exploration. You can read the full post about it here, and I’ll provide the elevator pitch below.

“Maybe Later” is a Solution to Increase Engagement and Reduce Frustration

As you can see in the sketch above, instead of the now classic YES/NO popup “Maybe Later” includes a third option called, you guessed it, “Maybe Later”.

It’s more than just a third button, here’s how it works:

  1. The popup appears when you enter the site. You can choose “No” to get rid of it, “Yes” to take advantage of it, or “Maybe Later” to register your interest but get it out of your way.
  2. When you click “Maybe Later” a cookie is set to log your interest.
  3. Now while you are browsing the rest of the site, a Sticky Bar – targeted at the cookie that was set – appears at the bottom (or top) of the page, with a more subtle reminder of the offer, so that you know it there and ready if you decide to take advantage of it.
  4. If you decide against the offer, you can click “No thanks” on the Sticky Bar, the cookie is deleted, and the offer is hidden for good.

The core purpose of this idea is to put the control back with the shopper while creating an effective method for the retailer to engage with you, with your permission.

“Maybe Later” Demo

Follow these instructions and you’ll see “Maybe Later” in action:

Please note: the demo is desktop only right now.

  1. Visit this page (opens in new window).
  2. Click the “Maybe Later” button and the popup will close.
  3. Refresh that page and you’ll see a Sticky Bar with the same offer appear at the bottom.
  4. Come back to this page.
  5. Refresh this page and you’ll see the Sticky Bar here too.
  6. Click “No thanks” to get rid of it when you’ve had enough :D

Use Case #4: Location Redirect

Trigger: Entrance
Targeting: URL + Location

It’s common for e-commerce businesses to have localized websites like amazon.com/amazon.ca/amazon.co.uk etc. But sometimes you need to redirect people to the correct country because the link they clicked is coming from an affiliate (or other) that’s only pointing to the US domain.

The simplest way to handle this scenario is to create a popup that combines an entrance trigger with URL and Geo Location targeting.

You can then target a “We have a Canadian Store, Eh! Wanna go there instead?” message on the U.S. site to visitors who’s location is in Canada.

I created two popups. One to be shown to Canadians, and one to the rest of the world using the location targeting settings.

Click here to see the popup. If you’re in Canada you’ll see a redirect popup, and if you’re anywhere else you’ll see a “Continue to the U.S. store” popup.

And here’s a video of me VPN’ing to New York to show how the popup changes.

There are so many ways you can combine triggers, targeting, and frequency to create popup experiences that treat your visitors with relevance and respect. If you have any cool combos that you’re using, please chuck ’em into the comments so we can discuss how they work.


p.s. Don’t forget to give the 30-day trial of Unbounce a go. You get landing pages, popups, and sticky bars all included in your plan.

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4 Ways to Use Advanced Triggers & Targeting to Craft Delightful Popups