Tag Archives: marketing

4 Ways to Use Advanced Triggers & Targeting to Craft Delightful Popups

I’ve already talked at length about how to design more delightful popups by using The Delight Equation, and today I want to extend that concept by discussing the triggers and advanced targeting you can use to make popup experiences even better.

I think we’d all agree that showing a popup to your visitors on every visit is a bad idea. We can also agree that generic offers and untargeted messaging is a big turnoff.

That’s where triggers and targeting can make a big difference to the user experience.

Advanced Trigger and Targeting Matrix

Below, I’ve sketched out an interaction matrix leveraging the triggering and targeting features that Unbounce Popups & Sticky Bars can use. I’ve filled in a few ideas, and in the rest of today’s Product Awareness Month post I’ll explain how four of these concepts work, including some live demos because it’s really easy and fun to do with Unbounce.

Fair warning. Some of these ideas are a little “out there”. However, I find that being a little ridiculous helps unlock your creativity. And we all need a little more creativity in our marketing.

Use Case #1: Choose Your Own Adventure (CYOA)

Trigger: Entrance, Timed, or Scroll Up
Targeting: URL

This is a great way to learn about the intentions of your visitors.

We’ve been running experiments on our “What is a Landing Page?” page to figure out what people want to do when they arrive. interesting. On that page, I asked the question “What are your landing page needs?” providing three options (each with their own next step CTA):

I’ll be sharing complete results from this experiment at the end of the month.

CYOA Demos

Pro Tip: You can attach a parameter to a URL (?ttdemo1 for instance) which lets you use URL targeting to only show the popup in that instance. Because I want to keep you on this page, I’m just going to provide three links that reload this page, but with individual URL parameters.

  1. Entrance trigger demo
    with URL parameter targeting ?ttdemo1
  2. Scroll Up trigger demo
    with URL parameter targeting ?ttdemo2
  3. Time Delay trigger demo
    with URL parameter targeting ?ttdemo3

To set this up, I simply duplicated the first popup twice, and set the URL targeting and trigger options appropriately.

What’s even cooler is that because I used the URL targeting for any Unbounce.com URL that contains ?ttdemo1, the experience can be shown to anyone, via any link, just by appending the URL parameter. Like this link to our homepage. #mindblownmuch?

Scroll Up and Time Delay are good triggers to use to capture the attention of people who may not have found what they’re looking for. Like U2. Scroll Up is great for mobile as it’s a little bit like an exit signal on desktop.

Make sure you track these pathways in Google Analytics and stick a heat map on the page (I use Hotjar) so you can get a simple visual of where people are clicking. This is one of the original click maps for “What is a Landing Page?”.

Once you’ve learned something about your visitors’ needs you can start making changes to the page to reflect that. I’ll be digging into a concept I’m calling “No-Touch CRO” next week, which has more examples of how you can use Popups and Sticky Bars to learn about your visitors without having to change your site.

Use Case #2: You Didn’t See My Most Valuable Page (MVP)

Trigger: Exit
Targeting: Cookie

Every website has pages that we consider critical to the conversion experience. For you, it might be the features page, the pricing page, or the homepage. It could even be a blog post that’s particularly good at convincing people to sign up.

How dare someone come to your site without visiting your favorite pages! Let’s be realistic though, not everyone has the time, inclination, motivation, or easily identifiable path to get to where you want them to go.

I’m calling this use case “You didn’t see my MVP!” – as it’s designed to at least make sure they’re given an opportunity to see your magic content.

This is how it works:

  1. Drop a cookie on your most valueable page (MVP).
  2. Set up a Popup or Sticky Bar to fire on exit when the MVP cookie is NOT present.

Pretty simple right?

MVP Demo **Desktop Only**

Follow these instructions to see a demo. It’s desktop only because you can trigger an exit popup on a phone.

  1. Click here
    To reload this page adding a URL parameter ?ttdemomvp.
  2. Trigger the exit popup
    Move your mouse out of the browser as if you are going to close it.
  3. Click the button on the popup to visit the MVP page
    The cookie will be set on that page.
  4. Click the back button to return to this page
  5. Refresh this page and try to trigger the exit popup
    Now that the cookie has been set the popup won’t fire, as we’ve already seen your high-converting content.

Use Case #3: Maybe Later

Trigger: Entrance + Click
Targeting: URL + Cookie

“Maybe Later” is one of my favorite concepts to come out of this month’s exploration. You can read the full post about it here, and I’ll provide the elevator pitch below.

“Maybe Later” is a Solution to Increase Engagement and Reduce Frustration

As you can see in the sketch above, instead of the now classic YES/NO popup “Maybe Later” includes a third option called, you guessed it, “Maybe Later”.

It’s more than just a third button, here’s how it works:

  1. The popup appears when you enter the site. You can choose “No” to get rid of it, “Yes” to take advantage of it, or “Maybe Later” to register your interest but get it out of your way.
  2. When you click “Maybe Later” a cookie is set to log your interest.
  3. Now while you are browsing the rest of the site, a Sticky Bar – targeted at the cookie that was set – appears at the bottom (or top) of the page, with a more subtle reminder of the offer, so that you know it there and ready if you decide to take advantage of it.
  4. If you decide against the offer, you can click “No thanks” on the Sticky Bar, the cookie is deleted, and the offer is hidden for good.

The core purpose of this idea is to put the control back with the shopper while creating an effective method for the retailer to engage with you, with your permission.

“Maybe Later” Demo

Follow these instructions and you’ll see “Maybe Later” in action:

Please note: the demo is desktop only right now.

  1. Visit this page (opens in new window).
  2. Click the “Maybe Later” button and the popup will close.
  3. Refresh that page and you’ll see a Sticky Bar with the same offer appear at the bottom.
  4. Come back to this page.
  5. Refresh this page and you’ll see the Sticky Bar here too.
  6. Click “No thanks” to get rid of it when you’ve had enough :D

Use Case #4: Location Redirect

Trigger: Entrance
Targeting: URL + Location

It’s common for e-commerce businesses to have localized websites like amazon.com/amazon.ca/amazon.co.uk etc. But sometimes you need to redirect people to the correct country because the link they clicked is coming from an affiliate (or other) that’s only pointing to the US domain.

The simplest way to handle this scenario is to create a popup that combines an entrance trigger with URL and Geo Location targeting.

You can then target a “We have a Canadian Store, Eh! Wanna go there instead?” message on the U.S. site to visitors who’s location is in Canada.

I created two popups. One to be shown to Canadians, and one to the rest of the world using the location targeting settings.

Click here to see the popup. If you’re in Canada you’ll see a redirect popup, and if you’re anywhere else you’ll see a “Continue to the U.S. store” popup.

And here’s a video of me VPN’ing to New York to show how the popup changes.

There are so many ways you can combine triggers, targeting, and frequency to create popup experiences that treat your visitors with relevance and respect. If you have any cool combos that you’re using, please chuck ’em into the comments so we can discuss how they work.


p.s. Don’t forget to give the 30-day trial of Unbounce a go. You get landing pages, popups, and sticky bars all included in your plan.

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4 Ways to Use Advanced Triggers & Targeting to Craft Delightful Popups

[Mobile] How to Turn Your Blog Posts Into a Mobile App Experience – Using Sticky Bars

With so much of your traffic coming from people’s phones, it’s essential that we start to craft exceptional mobile experiences. This means going beyond simple responsive design if you’re going to create a superior mobile UX (user experience) that stands out from your competition.

IMPORTANT: Use your phone to read this post – it’s designed as a mobile experience.

***Click here to show a mobile nav bar***. The concept here is to use a nav bar with icons, to turn this blog post into an app-like mobile user experience. Click the nav buttons to move up and down the blog post on your phone and you’ll get a sense of how the experience has changed from a regular blog post reading experience.

You can use this technique with landing pages, blog posts, or anywhere you want to create a mobile app experience.

For those reading on desktop, this is what you’ll see at the bottom of your mobile browser.

Why Do Landing Pages (and Your Blog) Need Good Mobile UX?

When a landing page or blog post is long, there will most likely be a small percentage of visitors who will actually read the whole thing. You can increase engagement, and make a better experience if you guide people to the most important chapters or segments of the content.

***Click here to show the mobile nav bar***.

To achieve this you can use a navigation bar with clearly labeled sections that are not only helpful but and also feels like you’re inside an app native to your phone.

Turning Your Landing Page into an App-Like Mobile Experience with Unbounce Sticky Bars – in 4 Simple Steps

I’ve set it up so there are 4 main sections in the blog post that you can navigate to using the sticky app nav. So go ahead and click the nav icons to jump to each of the four steps you can follow to add this experience to your own landing pages and blog posts.

Step #1 – Create a Sticky Bar With Retina-Grade Icons

I created a sticky bar with four icons. To make them retina I made them with a width of 160px and a height of 130px, and shrank them to 80×65 in the Unbounce builder. To do this, I added 4 boxes and set the background style to be “Image” and “Background to fit container”. Then I added a fully transparent button above each of the images (because boxes don’t have a link action) to link to each of the 4 page sections.

Step #2 – Add Anchor Links and Sections

You can do this by setting the link action of the icons to point to a page element ID. For instance, the horizontal rule (line) that appears above step #2, has an ID of “section2”. In Unbounce this looks like the settings below. Note that the target of the link is set to “Parent Frame” as the Sticky Bar is set in an iframe above the page.

Step #3 – Hide the Close Button with CSS

As with many hacks that I’ve come up with for Product Awareness Month, this one requires that we hide the “Close” button that is part of the Sticky Bar functionality. When your Sticky Bar is used for promotional purposes it’s important that people can close it. But when you’re creating a navigational experience, the bar becomes part of the interface, and we need it to be always present.

To do this, you need to add a line of CSS to the landing page or blog that you want it to appear on. Note: this is not an official Unbounce feature, so your best bet for geeking out with functionality will be in the Unbounce community.

.ub-emb-iframe-wrapper .ub-emb-close visibility: hidden;

Step #4 – Look at Your Phone and Say Hells Yeah!

I can’t state enough how much I think this is a better mobile experience, so please give it a try and join the conversation in the comments (or ping me on Twitter).


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[Mobile] How to Turn Your Blog Posts Into a Mobile App Experience – Using Sticky Bars

How Crazy Egg is Helping Portsmouth City Council to Improve its User Experience

crazy egg case study portsmouth city council

If your company relies only on analytics software to interpret and give insights on raw numbers, you are probably missing out. Numbers can give answers to many questions, like where are your users coming from, which page they visit, how long do they stay on your website and many more. However, if you want to know also HOW they visit your website, then you should start using heat maps. This article is about a case study of how the city of Portsmouth (UK) is using Crazy Egg to improve user experience and to help reorganize key pages and services. In…

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How Crazy Egg is Helping Portsmouth City Council to Improve its User Experience

7 UX Mistakes Every Designer Unknowingly Commits (And How To Fix Them)

The door outside my office reads: PUSH. Guess what? That’s the handiwork of our HR team. (Thanks, HR team.) The special signage has come to my rescue and to the rescue of office mates so many times. Otherwise, by now we would’ve ripped apart the carpet below, through our mindless pulling and pushing. Initially, I used to blame myself for being so stupid and clumsy for pulling and pushing the door in all the wrong directions, almost always. But then, when I stumbled upon the book Design of Everyday Things by Don Norman I realized how wrong I was. I…

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7 UX Mistakes Every Designer Unknowingly Commits (And How To Fix Them)

Doing the Two-Step: Opt-In Forms That Is [A Psychology Principle With Conversion Data]

I’ve no idea how to actually do the two-step. Apparently it looks a little something like this:

It’s way too complex for me. Fortunately, when it comes to marketing, the two-step opt-in form is much simpler.

What is a Two-Step Opt-In Form?

Well for starters it’s a two-time hyphenated term that’s really annoying to type. Functionally though, instead of including a form on your landing page, blog, or website, you use a link, button, or graphic to launch a popup that contains your form.

Why are Two-Step Opt-In Forms Good For Conversion?

There are two reasons why this approach is good for conversion rates, both of which have an element of behavioural psychology.

  • Foot in the Door (FITD): The FITD technique is an example of compliance psychology. By design, it’s good because the form is launched after a user-driven request. They clicked the link to subscribe with the intent to do exactly that, subscribe (or whatever the form’s conversion goal is). The click demonstrates the reaction to a modest request, creating a level of commitment that makes the visitor more likely to complete the form (the larger request) when it’s presented.
  • Perceived friction: Because there is no visible form, the idea of filling out a form is not really top of mind. This reduces the amount of effort required in your visitor’s mind.

What Does a Two-Step Opt-In Form Look Like?

They look a little like this aetful sketch I did last night.

Let’s try a demo. You can subscribe to follow along with Product Awareness Month here.
Clicking that link uses the two-step concept to launch a popup containing the subscribe form.

Pretty simple, right?

You could also click on any of the images below to do the same thing.

I configured all of these with Unbounce Popups by targeting this blog post URL and using the “On Click” trigger option set to function when an element with the ID #pam-two-step-v1 is clicked.

This trigger option is awesome because you can apply it to any element on your pages. And as you’ve just seen, you can have as many different popups as you like, all attached to different page elements.

You Can Also Use a Sticky Bar for a Two-Step Opt-In Form

The functionality is exactly the same if you want to use a Sticky Bar. Click the image below to show a Sticky Bar with a form, at the top of the page.

How Do Two-Step Opt-In Forms Perform?

Great question! I’m glad you asked.

Throughout Product Awareness Month I’ve sprinkled a few two-step opt-in popup links like this one: Subscribe Now. I’m also using the exact same popup using the exit trigger, so visitors see it when they are leaving the page.

To compare the data, the exit popup obviously gets seen a lot more as it triggers once for everyone. Conversely, the “On Click” popup gets fewer views because it’s a subtle CTA that only appears in a few places.

You can see some initial conversion rates below from the Unbounce dashboard.

Not huge sample sizes just yet (I’ll report on this again at the end of the month), but the difference is staggering.

The “On Click” triggered popup conversion rate is 1169% better than the exit popup.

Convinced yet? I hope so. Now I’d like to challenge you to try your own experiments with popup triggers and the awesome two-step opt-in form.

Sign up for a 30-day trial and build some Popups today. You also get the Sticky Bar and Landing Page products included in your account.


p.s. Come back tomorrow to see a video interview I did with the awesome Head of Marketing at Shopify Plus, Hana Abaza.

More here – 

Doing the Two-Step: Opt-In Forms That Is [A Psychology Principle With Conversion Data]

Designing for Subscription: 6 UX Musts for Increasing Sign Ups

Your music is being streamed on all your devices with Apple Music and your favorite shows find a home at Netflix. Your physical store can accept payments via your Shopify subscription and now you can even get your basics like underwear or healthy food delivered to you through services like Stance and Graze respectively. Subscription services are not just the future of e-commerce anymore. They are very much the present. Subscription services are great for consumers as they get to experience much more content than they do with one-off purchases (think entire music libraries instead of a single album). They…

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Designing for Subscription: 6 UX Musts for Increasing Sign Ups

5 Really Bad Website Popup Examples

If you want to craft a delightful marketing experience and you’re using popups, you need to make sure you hold them to the same high standards as the content they are covering up. You can learn a lot by looking at bad website popup examples.

Once you understand what not to do, you’ll default to starting your own popup designs from a better baseline.

What does a bad popup design actually look like?

Well, it depends on your judging criteria, and for the examples below, I was considering these seven things, among others:

  1. Clarity: Is it easy to figure out the offer really quickly?
  2. Relevance: Is it related to the content of the current page?
  3. Manipulation: Does it use psychological trickery in the copy?
  4. Design: Is it butt ugly?
  5. Control: Is it clear what all options will do?
  6. Escape: Can you get rid of it easily?
  7. Value: Is the reward worth more than the perceived (or actual) effort?

The following popup examples, each make a number of critical errors in their design decisions. Take a look, and share your own worst popup design examples in the comments!

#1 – Mashable Shmashable

What’s so bad about it?

If you peer into the background behind the popup, you’ll see a news story headline that begins with “Nightmare Alert”. I think that’s a pretty accurate description of what’s happening here.

  • Design: Bad. The first thing I saw looks like a big mistake. The Green line with the button hanging off the bottom looks like the designer fell asleep with their head on the mouse.
  • Clarity: Bad. And what on earth does the headline mean? click.click.click. Upon deeper exploration, it’s the name of the newsletter, but that’s not apparent at all on first load.
  • Clarity: worse. Then we get the classic “Clear vs. Clever” headline treatment. Why are you talking about the pronunciation of the word “Gif”? Tell me what this is, and why I should care to give you my email.
  • Design: Bad. Also, that background is gnarly.

#2 – KAM Motorsports Revolution!

What’s so bad about it?

It’s motorsports. It’s not a revolution. Unless they’re talking about wheels going round in circles.

  • Clarity: Bad. The headline doesn’t say what it is, or what I’ll get by subscribing. I have to read the fine print to figure that out.
  • Copy: Bad. Just reading the phrase “abuse your email” is a big turn off. Just like the word spam, I wasn’t thinking that you were going to abuse me, but now it’s on my mind.
  • Relevance: Bad. Newsletter subscription popups are great, they have a strong sense of utility and can give people exactly what they want. But I don’t like them as entry popups. They’re much better when they use an exit trigger, or a scroll trigger. Using a “Scroll Up” trigger is smart because it means they’ve read some of your content, and they are scrolling back up vs. leaving directly, which is another micro-signal that they are interested.

#3 – Utterly Confused

(Source unknown – I found it on confirmshaming.tumblr.com)

What’s so bad about it?

I have no earthly clue what’s going on here.

  • Clarity: Bad. I had to re-read it five times before I figured out what was going on.
  • Control: Bad. After reading it, I didn’t know whether I would be agreeing with what they’re going to give me, or with the statement. It’s like an affirmation or something. But I have no way of knowing what will happen if I click either button. My best guess after spending this much time writing about it is that it’s a poll. But a really meaningless one if it is. Click here to find out how many people agreed with “doing better”…
  • It ends with “Do Better”. I agree. They need to do a lot better.

#4 – Purple Nurple

What’s so bad about it?

  • Manipulation: Bad. Our first “Confirm Shaming” example. Otherwise known as “Good Cop / Bad Cop”. Forcing people to click a button that says “Detest” on it is so incongruent with the concept of a mattress company that I think they’re just being cheap. There’s no need to speak to people that way.
  • I found a second popup example by Purple (below), and have to give them credit. The copy on this one is significantly more persuasive. Get this. If you look at the section I circled (in purple), it says that if you subscribe, they’ll keep you up to date with SHIPPING TIMES!!! Seriously? If you’re going to email me and say “Hey Oli, great news! We can ship you a mattress in 2 weeks!”, I’ll go to Leesa, or Endy, or one of a million other Casper copycats.

#5 – Hello BC

What’s so bad about it?

Context: This is an entry popup, and I have never been to this site before.

  • Relevance: Bad. The site is Hellobc.com, the title says “Supernatural British Columbia”, and the content on the page is about skydiving. So what list is this for? And nobody wants to be on a “list”, stop saying “list”. It’s like saying email blast. Blast your list. If you read the first sentence it gets even more confusing, as you’ll be receiving updates from Destination BC. That’s 4 different concepts at play here.
  • Design: Bad. It’s legitimately butt ugly. I mean, come on. This is for Beautiful Supernatural British Columbia ffs. It’s stunning here. Show some scenery to entice me in.
  • Value: Bad. Seeing that form when I arrive on the page is like a giant eff you. Why do they think it’s okay to ask for that much info, with that much text, before I’ve even seen any content?
  • Control: Bad. And there’s not any error handling. However, the submit button remains inactive until you magically click the right amount of options to trigger it’s hungry hungry hippo mouth to open.

Train. Wreck.

Well, that’s all for today, folks. You might be wondering why there were so few popup examples in this post. Honestly, when the team was rallying to find me a bunch of examples, we all struggled to find many truly awful ones. We also struggled to find many really awesome ones.

This is where YOU come in!

Send me your terrible and awesome popup examples!

If you have any wonderfully brutal, or brutally wonderful examples of website popup design, I’d really appreciate a URL in the comments. If you could share the trigger details too that would be rad (e.g. exit, entrance, scroll, delay etc.).

Tomorrow’s Post is about Awesome Popup Examples! YAY.

So get your butt back here same time tomorrow, where I’ll be sharing my brand new Popup Delight Equation that you can use to grade your own popup designs.


p.s. Don’t forget to subscribe to the weekly updates.

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5 Really Bad Website Popup Examples

Product Marketing Month: Why I’m Writing 30 Blog Posts in 30 Days

alt : https://unbounce.com/photos/30-in-30.mp4https://unbounce.com/photos/30-in-30.mp4

We Have 1.06 Products. Do we suck at product marketing?

I wrote that statement on a whiteboard at the start of a website brainstorm session.

What does 1.06 products mean?

1.06 sums up my frustration at the adoption rate of our new products. Yup, Unbounce is now more than just a landing page builder. We released two new products, namely “overlays” and “sticky bars”, and we grouped them together under an umbrella term “Convertables”.

The number 1 represents our flagship industry-leading landing page product (100% of our customers have adopted it), and the .06 represents the tragic adoption rate of our new products (6%).

And yes, you’d be correct if you noted that “Convertables” isn’t a real word, but then neither is Unbounce, so we went with it after a notable amount of company-wide polling, and general corporate groupthink. More on that later.

So, how does this scenario result in me writing 30 blog posts about product marketing?

Rewind to October 5th: I was in a meeting with fellow co-founders Rick, Carl, and Carter, openly expressing my frustration with the adoption numbers, and Carter interrupted me to ask, “Okay, fine, but what are you going to do about it?”.

Then this video happened…

Awesome, right?! Yeah, it is, until the moment I realized it’s been exactly 301 days since I last wrote a blog post (I’ve been focusing on public speaking), making this level of bravado a tad audacious at best. Aaand, yes I realize I was a little intoxicated in the video.

But, I’ve learned over the years, that being a bit ridiculous in my promises is the only way I really know how to get shit done. When I tell everyone that I’m doing something big, the self-imposed peer pressure is what motivates me to make sure I complete my mission.

Enter Product Marketing Month (PMM): A Product Marketing Journey

This brings me to our blog. We’ve never written much about our products on the blog, in fact, we’ve actively avoided it to let the content speak for itself as an educational pillar of the community, and to remain non-salesy.

I’ve realized though, that it doesn’t make much business sense to be that overtly humble in all marketing communications. There has to be a way to balance exposing people to your product without it detracting from the experience.

It’s my fault in many ways. When I started our blog back in 2009, I had a mission to be different from our competitors, to not come across as a salesperson, and just to provide value and entertaining content that stood out.

We dominated the realm of conversion content for many years, but in an increasingly competitive SaaS martech space, our content is no longer number one, and it’s time that we change our approach.

Which is why we’re doing a blog takeover for the whole of January.

Our goal is to explore a category we’ve not covered before (product marketing), but also to expose a transparent window – transparency is one of our six core values at Unbounce – into our journey as a company, as a marketing team, and myself personally, to become better product marketers.

For me, it’s the first time I’ve ever been involved in product marketing, which will make it a fascinating personal journey reinventing myself as a different kind of marketer.

I’m also cutting the number of speaking gigs I do in 2018 in half, because let’s be honest, in this moment, the success of Unbounce can be more rapidly impacted by me staying home than being on the road.


Along the way, I’ll be opening up the Unbounce vault to share our core metrics with you. This will include our churn and product adoption metrics, which we hope to be able to lift in a big way throughout this 30-day experiment. There will be data check-ins throughout, with a halfway report, and then a full “Results Show” at the end.

I’ll also be digging into our analytics to see what the engagement and attribution looks like for every one of the 30 blog posts.

Some of the content will revolve around the learnings and experiences of becoming a better product marketer, and the rest will be an exploration of the ways we’re trying to rethink what our products are, what they mean to our customers, and how we can do a better job communicating their benefits (with some case studies and new ways of thinking – I hope).

I say “I hope” because I’m writing this as you read it. That’s what tends to happen when you commit to something as absurd as 30-in-30.

Follow Along << Mid-Post CTA

I encourage you to follow along by subscribing to our weekly update emails at the bottom of the page. I’m really keen to have our community (that’s you) help us explore how to do this properly, and hopefully, we’ll all learn how to do a better job of marketing our products.

This is a screenshot of the subscribe form at the bottom of the post. Thought you should know.

You can also subscribe by clicking here to launch a popup which contains the subscribe form. << product marketing much?

Aaand I’ve configured it so you’ll see an exit popup when you leave this page. Note, that I’m doing this to show the product in a relevant and hopefully useful manner.

Unbounce Product Adoption Metrics

How do we measure adoption at Unbounce? To understand, it helps to explain a little about how we define a customer. In the old days, a customer was any signup, someone who started a 30-day trial. Over time we learned we should be measuring a little deeper into the customer lifecycle, and decided a customer was someone who paid us twice; once after the 30-day trial, and again after sixty days.

In 2017 we modified this further to someone who pays us three times, giving us a much better sense of true churn numbers.

To be considered a customer who has adopted our products, we have an additional set of app usage criteria:

For landing pages adoption means: a customer who has built and published one or more pages, has set up a custom domain, configured an integration with another tool, and has paid us three times.

For “Convertables” (Overlays & Sticky Bars) adoption means: a customer who has built and published a popup or sticky bar, installed our one-line global Javascript on their website, received at least 10 conversions, and has paid us three times.

Full transparency: 6% adoption for a new product sucks. It sucks really bad.

So what went wrong? Why was adoption so low?

We made some mistakes, namely…

Mistake #1: We called a popup an overlay.
Mistake #2: We created a fictitious umbrella term “Convertables” for only two child products, and for a few months, only one child product.
Mistake #3: We assumed that people would find and use these two products, hidden behind said umbrella term in the app.
Mistake #4: We assumed that the functional user of our landing page product would be the same person who needs to use overlays popups and sticky bars.

How do we un-f*** this problem?

The first thing we’re doing is removing any public-facing mentions of the term “Convertables”. This has excited the marketing team because it’s much easier to market something when you know how to describe it.

Beyond that, the approach I’m taking is a combination of four primary tenets:

  1. First, is a concept I call “Productizing Our Technology” or POT for short. This is about discovering new and novel ways that our platform can be used, that people either haven’t imagined or simply didn’t know was possible.
  2. Second, is exploring the entire Unbounce ecosystem, from the app, to the website, our content channels, and our community, to see how we could do a better job of exposing the benefits of our products to those who can benefit from them.
  3. Third, is using the Product Marketing Month blog takeover to create interactive demonstrations right here on the blog – the goal of which is to reduce the Time to Value (TTV) by creating more obvious ah-ha moments.
  4. Fourth, understanding who the various target personas and functional users of the different products are, and adjusting our targeting and marketing communications to find and speak to those potentially different users.

In regards to #3 the blog takeover, if you take a look at the top of the screen, you’ll see a header bar like this:

Or this one, if you have scrolled down the page:

If you look at the hierarchy of information from left to right, you see: 1) Who we are: logo, 2) What we do: value prop, 3) How to take action: the three big orange buttons.

This is hugely different to the rest of the blog, which retains the navigation of the whole site (I’ve thought that was incongruent for a long time).

My hope is that the new header bar helps more people know what we do, and how our products can help. I’ll be tracking engagement with the 3 CTAs and comparing these 30 posts against our other blog content in terms of its ability to get people to sign up.

Productizing Our Technology: Landing Pages, Popups, & Sticky Bars

I had my own ah-ha moment when I started imagining all the ways that I could hack/modify/extend the ways the Unbounce conversion platform can be used. We have 3 core pieces of product technology (not including our AI/Machine Learning efforts that will power our technology in the future): landing pages, popups, and sticky bars.

By taking our core tech, combining the available features, with new jQuery scripts, CSS, and some 3rd-party integrations, it’s possible to create a plethora of new “mini-products” that if embraced by the community, might inform future product direction.

Take a look at the spreadsheet below. This is my POT matrix. The complete sheet currently houses over 120 new product ideas.

Productizing Unbounce Technology
(Click image for full-size view)

Across the top (in yellow) are the core products, their features (such as targeting, triggers, display frequency), and the different hacks, data sources, and integrations, that can be combined to produce the new products listed in green in the first column.

Each product is flagged as being in one of three states:

NOW: These products are possible now with our existing feature set.
MVP: These products are possible by adding some simple scripts/CSS to extend the core.
NEW: These products would require a much deeper level of product or website development to make them possible. These are the examples that came from “blue sky” ideation, and are a useful upper anchor for what could be done.

I’ll be explaining these use cases in greater detail as the month progresses, and I’ll be building some of them directly into these blog posts as I write them. << FTR this will involve me reverting to my long-extinct coding background to hack the shit out of the blog to show you what I’m talking about.

Please Follow Along

That’s the intro, that’s what happened, and what we’re going to do to try and fix it. Subscribe to the weekly email updates, join the discussion in the comments, and chat directly with me on Twitter.

There is also a full calendar at the bottom of every post that will link to all 30 PMM topics as they roll out.

What’s coming on day 2 of PMM?

Tomorrow’s post is called “55 Simple/Hard/Brilliant Things Your Marketing Team Should Be Doing to Improve Product Awareness & Adoption”. It’s based on the results of rapid-fire brainstorms which exposed quick-win tactics all product marketers can use to expose your products in small and simple ways, to build to a critical mass of awareness.

This should be very relevant to anyone in marketing, and doubly so to those working for a SaaS business.

Here’s to kicking off 2018 in a blaze of product marketing glory.

Oli Gardner

p.s. Please jump into the comments below to let me know what products you’re currently trying to take to market.

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Product Marketing Month: Why I’m Writing 30 Blog Posts in 30 Days

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It seems influencer marketing keeps exponentially growing in popularity. Looking at Google Trends, the data agrees: The question is when you’ve established a relationship, what do you do then? According to Tapinfluence, 67.6% of marketers consider finding relevant influencers their largest influencer marketing challenge. But what about after those campaigns have run their course? How do you turn influencer relationships into ongoing relationships geared towards growth? For many industries, ambassador programs are the answer. They empower influencers with effective content while providing a solid and ongoing ROI. Today, I’ll share four steps to executing effective ambassador marketing campaigns. You’ll learn…

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How to Generate More Sales From an Ambassador Strategy

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Our top 7 blog posts of 2017

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