40 Delightful High-Quality Free Fonts

Every now and then, we look around, select fresh free high-quality fonts and present them to you in a brief overview. The choice out there is enormous, so the time you need to find them is usually time you should be investing in your projects. We search for them and find them so that you don’t have to. [Links repaired February/18/2017]
In this selection, we’re pleased to present Signika, Plastic Type, Bariol, Alegreya, Metropolis, Typometry and other quality fonts.

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40 Delightful High-Quality Free Fonts

Simulating The Letterpress: From Live Filters In Fireworks To CSS Code

One of the visual effects that is a mainstay in my Web design toolkit is the letterpress effect. Used properly, it’s a quick way to make text blend better with the layout, as if it were machine-stamped onto the background. Think of what a home appliance marquee or a professional business card looks (and feels) like, and you’ll know what I’m talking about.
Further Reading on SmashingMag: Sketch, Illustrator or Fireworks?

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Simulating The Letterpress: From Live Filters In Fireworks To CSS Code

Do Mobile And Desktop Interfaces Belong Together?

The term “responsive design” has gathered a lot of well-deserved buzz among Web designers. As you probably know, it refers to an easy way to dynamically customize interfaces for different devices and to serve them all from the same website, with no need for a separate mobile domain.
It solves one major problem, and very elegantly: how to adapt visual interfaces for mobile, tablet and desktop browsers. But when unifying a website, you have to solve problems other than how it will appear in different browsers, which could make the task much more difficult than you first realize.

Read this article – 

Do Mobile And Desktop Interfaces Belong Together?

Guide To WordPress Coding Standards

Whenever we set code to screen, we must follow some sort of logic. You may well be the only person who understands that logic, but you still make the effort. The reason we follow standards and practices is to adhere to a common logic, so that we find each other’s code understandable and sensible.

Today, we’ll delve into the gaping maw of knowledge that is the standards and practices of WordPress coding.

Original article – 

Guide To WordPress Coding Standards

12 Commandments Of Software Localization

You’ve presented the new website and everyone loves it. The design is crisp, the code is bug-free, and you’re ready to release. Then someone asks, “Does it work in Japanese?”
You break out in a cold sweat: you have no idea. The website works in English, and you figured other languages would come later. Now you have to rework the whole app to support other languages. Your release date slips, and you spend the next two months fixing bugs, only to find that you’ve missed half of them.

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12 Commandments Of Software Localization

The Personality Layer

“Oh hai Smashing Magazine!” That’s one of the dozen ways that Flickr welcomes its users upon signing in every time. It’s an easily overlooked detail, one that the service would work without flawlessly. Yet this detail is a big part of Flickr’s particular design character that would be missed if it wasn’t there.

This is how Flickr greets its users, changing the language upon every sign-in.
These easily overlooked details are the ones that I’m particularly interested in because of the reaction they are capable of causing in users.

Originally posted here – 

The Personality Layer

Are You Giving Your Users Positive Feedback?

We love to tell users that they have done something wrong. We have error messages for everything from poorly formatted telephone numbers to incorrect logins. But what about our user’s successes, do we celebrate them? Do we tell them they are doing something right?
It is as important to tell users that they are doing things right, as it is to inform them when they make a mistake. This kind of positive reinforcement is key to a pleasurable user experience.

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Are You Giving Your Users Positive Feedback?

Keys To Better Communication With Clients

I recently spoke with a prospective client who started the conversation by saying that he had called us because he was unhappy with his website’s current design and development team. Questioning what about his current team he didn’t care for, I discovered that it wasn’t the company’s product or its prices — he was satisfied with the work they did for him and felt that he was charged fairly for it.

Originally posted here:  

Keys To Better Communication With Clients

Coding Q&A With Chris Coyier: Code Smell And Type On A Grid

Howdy, folks! Welcome to the new incarnation of Smashing Magazine’s Q&A. It’s going to work like this: you send in questions you have about CSS, and at least once a month we’ll pick out the best questions and answer them so that everyone can benefit from the exchange. Your question could be about a very specific problem you’re having, or it could be a question about a philosophical approach. We’ll take all kinds.

Link: 

Coding Q&A With Chris Coyier: Code Smell And Type On A Grid

It’s Time To Stop Blaming Internet Explorer

_Earlier this week we published two articles by Louis Lazaris: one on why old browsers are holding back the Web and another encouraging Web users to upgrade their browsers and use modern browsers other than IE. This article presents another perspective on this issue. Nicholas C. Zakas, a well-respected member of the developer community, goes into specifics of why we should focus on the good parts of our job so we can tolerate the bad ones and why fixating on circumstances that you can’t change isn’t a recipe for success.

Continued here:  

It’s Time To Stop Blaming Internet Explorer

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