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AMP: The Easiest Way to Build Lightning-Fast Mobile Pages is Almost Here

AMP is coming to the Unbounce Builder
If you run paid ads, chances are you have a mobile campaign or two (or two hundred) live right now. Whether we like it or not, most of us live tethered to our smartphones, relying on them to entertain us, keep us connected, and guide us to the nearest bike repair shop. And as such, behavior on mobile is shaping how marketers need to operate.

Over the last four years, we were inundated with messages declaring it was finally “the year of mobile”, so much so that it felt like our industry was crying wolf. Then in 2016, it finally happened: Mobile surpassed desktop in terms of both usage as well as Google search queries. Today, more than 60% of the world is accessing the internet through mobile devices, and that number is expected to climb.

Mobile surpasses desktop in October 2016

image via Tech Crunch.

The problem with this change? 2016 was two full years ago, and even though we were all warned to think mobile-first, advertisers forged ahead, bloating our responsive landing pages with massive high-res images, and animations. We were simply shrinking heavy content for small screen sizes. In turn, everyone’s mobile pages loaded turtle-slow (leaving visitors bouncing).

But we can’t ignore proper mobile experiences any more.

This year Google made pagespeed an official ranking factor for mobile search, introduced mobile speed score, and perhaps most important—they’re backing the Accelerated Mobile Pages open-source project: a means of developing web pages that load in (approximately) half a second! In short, the search giant’s putting their foot down and demanding a better, faster mobile web.

So how you can ensure your ads continue to appear in the SERP (considering load time is a factor)? And how can you give your landing pages a better shot to convert? Let’s walk through this need for speed together.

There’s still some lag

Unlike on social platforms, search advertisers have been a bit slow to jump onto the mobile bandwagon (no pun intended). Despite more searches happening on mobile, most advertisers are currently spending about an equal amount on desktop and mobile. In the 2018 State of Mobile report, Mary Meeker of Kleiner Perkins estimates that this gap represents about a seven billion dollar opportunity. In other words, the future is bright for mobile advertising and we’ll all likely adjust our spend accordingly very soon.

The question is, how will you prepare for this?

The shift to mobile advertising is underway

Image courtesy of slide 96 of the 2018 State of Mobile report.

It’s not about screen size, it’s about behavior

When mobile emerged as a hot topic, it was all about building mobile responsive, and then about building websites that were “mobile first.”

I distinctly remember being in the crowd at Unbounce’s first-ever Call to Action Conference back in 2014, when my marketing prayers were answered: Unbounce announced the ability to design mobile pages. But fast forward to today and we know that having a mobile version of your landing page is simply table stakes, as is splitting your campaign targeting by device.

Mobile responsive design was certainly a step forward, but now we can’t just reuse the same content across multiple devices.

To help illustrate why, just think about when you’re searching for something on your phone. You’re probably searching for something because you want it now. In the past two years alone, Google searches for “near me” (implying the intent to buy) have seen 500% growth.

When targeting these kinds of queries, you need to craft an experience that speaks to the searcher’s immediate need to find something locally—and fast. Every second your page lags, the more impatient the visitor.

Google Trends for search term "Near Me"

Looks like I’m not the only one looking for services “near me”. Image via Think With Google.

Personally, I have a bad habit of searching reviews and comparisons for an item while I’m in a store looking at the product in question. It’s hard to get me into a brick-and-mortar store in the first place, so you best believe I’m going to save myself a second trip, researching the best of the best, even in store aisles.

And I’m not alone: Between 2015-2017, the number of mobile searches including “best” on mobile increased by 80%, with consumers comparing products as simple as salt (likely right in the store or at point-of-purchase, like me):

image courtesy of Think With Google

Image courtesy of Think with Google.

Many of us shoppers are even completing the entire checkout process on-the-go. Last year, more than 40% of online purchases in the US were made on mobile during the months of November and October. So we’ve reached peak busy and are knocking out our Christmas shopping lists while we’re taking transit or waiting in line.

Why is this behavior so important?

Well, with so many using smartphones to search and browse on the go, slow-loading content is killing your potential conversions.

From a marketer’s perspective: for every second that a landing page takes to load, conversions drop by 12%—and 53% of smartphone users will abandon a page entirely if it takes more than three seconds to load.

These days, if your page isn’t anything but instant, visitors won’t stick around to convert, and you risk getting penalized by Google.

Maybe you’ve noticed the brand new Mobile Speed Score under the “landing page” tab in your account? This new column and ten-point score is another indication that Google is serious about mobile speed.

Example of Mobile Speed Score (image)

Have you been seeing any scores populate in your Mobile Speed Score column? Has it been helpful? Let us know in the comments!

Moreover, not all data connections are created equal

For those of us living in a metropolitan area, we spend a lot of our time jumping from our home wifi connections, to work, and back. For those times in between though, we’re in some kind of data limbo, with speeds ranging from 3G to LTE. A few times in my life, I’ve even gone to the dark place that is EDGE.

But what if I told you that 70% of the world is actually searching Google on a 3G connection or slower? Yup, you read that right. Even if you’re cruising on wifi or LTE, you might have potential customers living on the edge of data—or close to. On a 3G connection, the average mobile page takes a whopping 19 seconds to load, which means most of your visitors are abandoning your web pages before they’ve even seen them.

Curious how much traffic you’re actually losing to mobile pagespeed? Enter your landing page in this free Google tool to see the percentage.

So much for converting, hey!? You’ve paid for the ad click (sometimes quite handsomely, I might add), yet a portion of your visitors are leaving before they even see your content.

So it’s time to build faster landing pages somehow.

Not only will your visitors appreciate this, but Google will reward you. After all, they’re in the business of selling ads. As we mentioned, pagespeed is now factored into Landing Page Experience (one of the three core components of Quality Score). If you speed up your landing pages, you’ll see higher Quality Scores, an improved Ad Rank, and larger Search Impression Share (your ads will show more often).

You’ll basically give your landing pages a fighting chance to be seen and convert.

Faster mobile pages will produce a higher Google Ads Quality Score

AMPing up your pagespeed

Now, while you can implement a few manual fixes for faster landing pages—like compressing your images, reducing the amount of elements on your page, and even watching how many scripts are on there—even these methods produce diminishing returns at some point.

And this is where AMP can help.

If you haven’t heard of AMP (short for Accelerated Mobile Pages) it’s essentially a framework for coding simple, stripped down landing pages that load super fast (we’re talkin’ half-a-second-fast). It’s comprised of three elements: AMP HTML, AMP JS, and AMP Cache.

For us non-developers, AMP HTML is essentially a modified version of standard HTML, preventing us from creating pages that load slowly. Marketers can sometimes be guilty of designing beautiful pages with crisp, high-res images, parallax elements, and every tracking script under the sun. We love it, but that person looking for the closest place to fix their flat tire? Not so much.

AMP JS, on the other hand, ensures all of these elements load in an effective way. In my opinion, the third component, AMP Cache, is really AMP’s bread and butter. With AMP Cache, your landing page is cached by Google (or other third parties) so when a visitor requests your page from a platform like Google, it is served almost instantly. Which means the visitor isn’t stuck downloading every single image on their measly 3G connection before they can see your offer.

To implement AMP HTML and JS markup (to code a page from scratch), you’ll need to know a little bit more about web development, or know someone who does. AMP is only a few years old, and is an open-source project that is constantly being improved.

Every page on the framework also needs to pass through the AMP validator, which basically scans the page to make sure it adheres to all the requirements of AMP. If there are changes to the page that break validation, you might get stuck serving up your regular-ol’ too-slow mobile version.

Overall, it can become a burden on your development team if you’re constantly asking them to add a new AMP feature, keep pages validated, and build new ones for each campaign.

So we’re building AMP, the Unbounce way

I’ve always believed in keeping a strong relationship with the web developers at your company. They do amazing things and are typically working with a long backlog of website updates, some that you’ve probably requested yourself. And just like we don’t think you should be bugging developers for landing pages at all, we also want you to save them the headache of building AMP versions of all of your landing pages.

It’s been four years since I joined Unbounce’s mobile responsive beta at the Call to Action Conference, and later tomorrow I’ll be taking to the stage at CTAConf 2018 to share that we’ve entered closed beta for AMP in Unbounce. You’ll soon be able to create AMP landing pages in the same simple, pixel-perfect, drag and drop builder that you know and love. We hope you’re as excited as we are.

Build an AMP page in Unbounce in our beta

Get on the list: Unbounce’s AMP beta

If you’re ready to lower your bounce rates and stay BFF with your web devs, add your name to the early access list for the next phase of beta testing by following this link. You’ll be the very first to know as soon as we add spots or enter open beta, and you’ll be on your way to building lightning-fast mobile landing pages.

Are you as AMPed as we are? Let us know what you think about it in the comments!

More here – 

AMP: The Easiest Way to Build Lightning-Fast Mobile Pages is Almost Here

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6 Inspiring Talks to Binge Watch, as Recommended by Expert Marketers

You know how word of mouth is like the Holy Grail of marketing? There’s nothing quite as powerful as someone whose opinion you trust simply saying, “hey, check this out.”

Well, the other day my colleagues and I were talking about talks: conference talks, TED Talks, university lectures, a few candid post-dinner nuggets of wisdom from a tipsy aunt. We were recommending ones we’ve found helpful or inspiring as marketers (whether the topics focused on marketing directly, or were more broadly about professional development and personal growth). Surely other marketers want to know what’s worth watching too, we thought. And nobody wants to sift through an endless YouTube haystack of “find your passion, move to Bali, start a blog, now I’m a millionaire”-style videos to find those shiny needles, right?

Luckily we have a whole list of trusted someones coming to speak at Call to Action Conference August 28-29, and gift bags to hold for ransom if they don’t answer our emails. So we went straight to the source to ask our marketing experts about their favourite talks.

Ranging from strategy to copywriting to user experience to CRO, our speakers for this August know their stuff and have made it to the top of their fields. They’re smart cookies who can suss out what’s worth listening to, and below are some of their sage suggestions. Give ‘em a look and if you have some of your own must-watch recommendations for talks you’ve loved and quote to this day, let us know in the comments!

Want to see the marketing pros featured below talk the talk? Use the code “CTAConfTalks” at checkout for 35% off all ticket prices for Unbounce’s annual conference this August.

Ross Simmonds, Digital Marketing Strategist and Founder of Hustle & Grind

Find him on Twitter:@TheCoolestCool

CTAConf 2018 Talk: Beyond Google: How to Attract Relevant Traffic Through Diverse Channels

Recommends: Conversion Copywriting and the Death of Guesswork by Joanna Wiebe

“The biggest insight I took from Joanna’s talk was the process you take people through when it comes to conversion optimization. Specifically, the importance of not leading with the project but instead leading with the pain. Start by talking about the problem and the agitations, then reveal the solution.

Runner-up: The Surprising Power of Small Habits by James Clear

“This is a great rundown of mental models and techniques that can help people be more productive. It shows marketers, professionals, and any entrepreneur the value of the little things. The story around compounding efforts leading to expertise is a message I think more people need to understand and embrace. No one starts as an expert. No one starts as the best of all time. It’s persistence and a layer of consistency around small things that compound to make up the skills that differentiate the best from the rest.”

Veronica Romney, Founder and President of SoLoMo Inc.


Find her on Twitter:@vromney

CTAConf 2018 Talk: Going Beyond the Basics of Facebook Advertising

Recommends: Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Action by Simon Sinek

“This talk came to my mind instantly. It’s by far my favourite, and I think the most inspiring, TED Talk for those in marketing and entrepreneurs in general. The points Simon makes can benefit a broad audience of businessmen and women who, like me, can get discouraged by comparisons.

In a nutshell, he describes how the values of a company represent the core of that company and why they have chosen to do business. His “Golden Circle” idea is simple, working from the why of the company to how the company will achieve the why, and what that company will produce. Focusing first on the why of business rather than the how is key in marketing, keeping a client base, and gaining new customers. Because people don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it.”

Love recommendations from marketing pros? Don’t miss our interviews with CTAConf speakers April Dunford, Rob Bucci, and Cyrus Shepard for solid advice on product positioning, SEO strategy, and local search.

Momoko Price, Conversion Copywriter and Interaction Designer for Kantan Designs

CTAConf 2018 Talk: Data-Driven Copywriting for Brand-Spanking New Products

Recommends: Growth is Good but Retention is 4+Ever by Brian Balfour

“I absolutely love Brian Balfour’s talk on the importance and impact of optimizing customer retention. It does a fantastic job of summarizing the metrics that really matter when it comes to growing a subscription-based business. This is so easy to ignore when you’re a marketer, since most of us are expected to spend 90% of our time on acquiring new customers and getting the word out about the product.

What’s the point of doing all that work if those new customers never stick around? It’s the equivalent of trying to fill a bucket with a giant hole in it, yet we as marketers rarely think about finding and plugging the hole before adding more water. Brian’s talk clearly maps out and visualizes these metrics in an almost diagnostic way, to give guidance on evaluating your own business’ growth and underscore the power and impact good data has.”

Becky Davis, Director of UX and CRO for Tranzact


Find her on Twitter:@barelyremarkabl

CTAConf 2018 Talk: Conversion Rate Optimization: The Art and Science of Guiding the Drunk

Recommends: The Science and Art of Self Assurance: An interview with The Confidence Code co-author Katty Kay

“My vote is for Adam Grant’s interview with Katty Kay, one of the authors of The Confidence Code. Her book spends time examining the confidence gap between men and women, the reasons behind it, and its effects. It’s really interesting, but that’s not the only reason I’ve chosen it as a favourite.

I chose it because hearing from successful people, men and women alike, who struggle with confidence the way I often do, was comforting for me. That they also over-prepare and stress about tiny mistakes was reassuring. But the biggest impact to me was hearing that if I spoke out, if I asked for things, if I took action, then the results would likely be positive. That pushed me to do so even when I was uncomfortable. I can’t tell you how many times that attitude has opened doors for me because I pushed when I wanted to hold back. If I hadn’t, I would have lost those chances. And every time I did, my own confidence grew and any fears I had became less demotivating.”

Lisa Pierson, The Conversion Copywriter

Find her on Twitter:@piersonlisaj

CTAConf 2018 Talk: I Joined Match.com and Didn’t Get the Love I Expected: Where Was the Onboarding Help When I Needed It?

Recommends: I Got There: How I Overcame Racism, Poverty, and Abuse to Achieve the American Dream by JT McCormick

“I saw a presentation by JT McCormick this year that really moved me. It has nothing to do with marketing or copywriting, but was very inspiring.

There isn’t a video of the talk itself, but I’d highly recommend reading his book I Got There: How I Overcame Racism, Poverty, and Abuse to Achieve the American Dream. In it, he speaks about his difficult childhood and the many hardships he endured. These are not the typical hardships people go through—his were unbelievably difficult. Yet, despite being knocked down over and over again, he managed to not only make something of himself professionally but to not let those events define who he is.

In my own life as an entrepreneur and single mom, almost everything starts and ends with me. There’s no safety net or backup plan. Things can get difficult and they can wear on you. But my life is so much more privileged than JT’s was, and watching his presentation helped me realize that we’re all so much stronger than we think we can be. External events don’t define who we are. And day-to-day life is what you decide it is.

Unbounce’s list of must-watch talks by brilliant speakers (the above experts included) takes place August 28-29th on Vancouver’s Queen Elizabeth Theatre stage. Check out the full agenda and use the code “CTAConfTalks” at checkout to get 35% off the most actionable marketing event and best experiences you’ll have at a conference this year.

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6 Inspiring Talks to Binge Watch, as Recommended by Expert Marketers

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Increase Clicks with these 12 Call-to-Action Phrases

call-to-action-phrases

What happens when nobody clicks on your call-to-action phrases and buttons? You don’t get any leads. Nor do you generate any revenue. That’s the opposite of the point, right? Which is why I tell business owners and marketers to take the time to refine their CTAs. A poorly-written CTA negates all the hard work you do for the rest of your marketing campaign. Someone who visits your website might be with you up until that point, then decide to bail on the conversion. So, how do you write call-to-action phrases that convert? What is the Psychology Behind CTA Phrases? From…

The post Increase Clicks with these 12 Call-to-Action Phrases appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Increase Clicks with these 12 Call-to-Action Phrases

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What Is a Good Conversion Rate? The Answer Might Surprise You

what-is-good-conversion-rate

What is a good conversion rate for your online business? And how do your company’s conversion rates stack up against your competition’s? These are questions I field every day, both from business owners who are struggling and from companies that are killing it. I get it — everyone wants to crush the competition and boost their revenue — but how do you know if you’re making the grade? I’m passionate about metrics because I always want to win. You might feel the same way. To win, though, you have to understand the psychology behind your target customer’s decisions and find…

The post What Is a Good Conversion Rate? The Answer Might Surprise You appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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What Is a Good Conversion Rate? The Answer Might Surprise You

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So You Want to Persuade Users? Make Things Simple!




So You Want to Persuade Users? Make Things Simple!

Lyndon Cerejo



(This article is kindly sponsored by Adobe.) The persuasive design toolbox is filled with powerful tools based on psychology. These tools range from Cialdini’s set of six principles of persuasion to ten times that number of Persuasive Patterns. Presented with all these methods, it can be tempting to use all of them to cover all possible bases, using a shotgun approach, hoping that one will resonate with your target users.

However, applying persuasion principles and patterns in a haphazard manner just ends up being persuasive design clutter. Like user experience design, designing for everyone is designing for no one. Randomly thrown together persuasive techniques will also make users feel manipulated, not in control, making them abandon the site or experience. The key to persuading your users is to keep it simple: using focused persuasive techniques and tactics that will work for your users.

Persuasion Funnel

AIDA is an acronym used in marketing and advertising to describe the stages that a customer goes through in the purchase process. The stages of Attention, Interest, Desire and Action, generically follow a series of cognitive (thinking) and affective (feeling) stages culminating in a behavioral (doing e.g. purchase or trial) stage. This should sound familiar since this is what we do through design, especially persuasive design.

When it comes to persuasive design, users go through a few stages between Awareness and Action, and the design should guide them from one stage to the next. I don’t have a clever acronym for it (yet), but the stages the design has to take the users through are:

  • Awareness
  • Relevant
  • Credible
  • Usable
  • Desirable
  • Persuasive
  • Action



(Large preview)

When users are contemplating an action (like booking a hotel room), they have to be aware of your site, app, or experience. Once they begin their journey on your site, they quickly evaluate the experience and either proceed to the next step or leave and go elsewhere. With fewer users continuing to subsequent stages, the number of users at each stage begins to resemble the shape of a funnel as shown above.

Let’s peek inside what could be going on in hypothetical users’ minds as they go through the experience of booking a hotel room for New Year’s Eve in Times Square, and some of the reasons they may drop off in each stage.

Awareness

“Hmmm… Where do I start? Hotel chains promise the lowest rate if we book directly with them, but I won’t be able to see other hotel options around Times Square. Hotel… Maybe I should try an online travel agency like Trivago (looks like the Trivago guy / Trivago girl advertising works!) to find a wider range of hotels. I’m going to also quickly Google it to see if there are other options.”

Users have to be aware of your site, app or experience to use it — Duh!

Relevant

“I found HotelTonight on Google. It looks like a great way to get rooms last minute, but not this far in advance — it’s not relevant to me.”

If your experience is not relevant to the task they are trying to accomplish, users will leave and try elsewhere. If your products or services are relevant, but not findable by the user, work on your navigation, search, and content layout to ensure your products and services are visible. Everything does not have to be one click away, but if the user gets the scent of information, or cues that make them think they are on the right path, they will follow the trail to that information.

Credible

“This design looks like it hasn’t been updated since the [GeoCities era](http://www.arngren.net/).

— Warning bells go off in head —

I’m out of here.”

Users are aware of many of the risks available online and look for trust indicators including a known brand and domain, secure site, professional design, real-world contact information and third-party certificates or badges. Incorporate these elements to create a comfort level for the user.

Usable

“I can’t figure out where things are in the navigation, and the search results had hundreds of unhelpful results. The homepage has nice big images, but that meant I had to scroll before I could see any real content.”

Usability is surprisingly still an issue with many sites. Follow User Experience best practices during design, and test with users to validate that the design is usable.

Desirable

“This reminds me of Craigslist — it is usable, but the design does not make me want to stay and use it. I’ll try that other hotel website that provides an immersive, interactive experience as I search for hotels.”

As much as we like to believe it, users’ decisions are not always rational, and very often driven by emotion, and we can address that through design. Usability is about making it work well; this is about making it beautiful as well.

In his book Emotional Design, Don Norman explains: “Attractive things do work better — their attractiveness produces positive emotions, causing mental processes to be more creative, more tolerant of minor difficulties.” Don talks about the three different aspects of design: visceral, behavioral, and reflective. Visceral design is about appearance, behavioral about the pleasure and effectiveness of use, and reflective design involves the rationalization and intellectualization of a product.

Persuasive

“Oh, Wow! That’s a long list of hotels, with plenty of availability for New Year’s Eve. There’s no real reason to book now. I’ll just come back to book after Thanksgiving…”

The user was interested, able, and willing, but the design did not motivate him to take intended action. Use relevant persuasion techniques that apply to your user to move them toward the desired action.


Examples of persuasive methods while shopping on Travelocity for a hotel room for New Year’s Eve.


Examples of persuasive methods while shopping on Travelocity for a hotel room for New Year’s Eve. (Large preview)

Action

“Oh, Wow! 65% of hotels are already booked in this area for New Year’s Eve. I better make a reservation now. . This looks like a nice hotel, and it also offers free cancellation – I’m reserving it now!”

The user who made it to this stage was interested, able, and willing, and the design nudged him to take intended action of making a reservation before leaving the site.

Persuasion is not about applying all available principles and patterns to your designs, but systematically identifying how you can address users’ barriers and motivators during each step of the journey, and guiding your users through the funnel to take the desired action.

The KISS Approach

Most of us are familiar with the acronym KISS: “Keep It Simple, Stupid,” a principle advocating simplicity as a key goal in design by avoiding unnecessary complexity. Let’s borrow that acronym for a 4-step approach to persuasive design.

Know The Right Behavior To Target

The first step is knowing the behavior you would like to target, and identifying the simplest action that can lead to that behavior change. Take the example of term life insurance companies who, to put it very bluntly, stand to benefit if their policyholders are healthy and don’t die while the policy is active. While those companies have a long-term ambitious goal of helping their policyholders lead healthy lives (mutually beneficial), that could be broken down into a simpler target behavior of walking 10,000 steps daily. This behavior is simple to understand, achieve, measure, and contributes to the long-term goal of healthier policyholders.

One such insurance company is offering new policyholders the latest Apple Watch for a low initial down payment ($25). The ongoing monthly payments can be waived each month that the policyholder leads an active lifestyle and exercises regularly (e.g. walks about 10,000 steps a day). About half the people who participated have achieved monthly goals, despite potential privacy implications.


John Hancock Term Life Insurance Apple Watch offer targets walking about 10,000 steps a day.


John Hancock Term Life Insurance Apple Watch offer targets walking about 10,000 steps a day. (Large preview)

Identify Barriers And Motivators

User research for persuasive design digs below the surface thinking level to the feeling level, and moves beyond the rational to the emotional level, as shown below. Getting to know your users at a deeper level will help you use psychology to focus your design to get users to engage in the target behavior identified above. User interviews that focus on users’ feelings and emotions are used to uncover barriers and motivators they consciously or subconsciously face while trying to achieve the target behavior. This helps us identify which blocks we need to weaken, and which motivators we should strengthen, through persuasive design techniques and tactics.


Tip of the iceberg user research diagram


(Large preview)

Simplify The Experience

Simplify the design experience of the first stages of the funnel, as users go through the mental verifications of relevancy, credibility, and usability of the experience. This includes making it easy for the user to find what they are looking for, credibility indicators like professional design, contact information, and third-party certificates or badges, as well as addressing usability issues. As Steve Krug put it very succinctly: “Don’t Make Me Think”.

Select Appropriate Triggers

Users who have made it this far in the process are interested in something you have to offer. As a designer, you have to nudge them to take the desired action. A good starting point is Robert Cialdini’s, six key principles of persuasion:

  1. Reciprocity
    People are obliged to give something back in exchange for receiving something.
  2. Scarcity
    People want more of those things they can have less of.
  3. Authority
    People follow the lead of credible, knowledgeable experts.
  4. Consistency
    People like to be consistent with the things they have previously said or done.
  5. Liking
    People prefer to say yes to those that they like.
  6. Consensus (Social Proof)
    Especially when they are uncertain, people will look to the actions and behaviors of others to determine their own.

These principles can be applied through dozens of different persuasive design patterns and methods, some of which have been previously published on Smashing Magazine (patterns, triggers), or in the books listed in the resources at the end. As you may notice, many persuasive patterns are related to UI patterns, because part of persuasion is reducing friction and simplifying what the user needs to do at any given point in time. For example, the persuasive pattern of Limited Choice can be realized through UI Pattern of Progressive Disclosure.

Given that there are dozens of patterns and methods (depending on where you look), it is important to selectively use methods that will resonate with your users. Applying all design patterns in the hope of some working will result in persuasion clutter and overwhelm the user, possibly driving them away from your site.

Examining Persuasion

Let’s take a closer look at the earlier example of the term life insurance through the eyes of someone who is motivated (shopping for life insurance) and has the ability (to pay monthly life insurance cost). Like me, let’s assume that this user was made aware of this through a sponsored post on Facebook. During the stages of awareness and relevance, there are a few persuasive triggers as shown below that make the user click “Learn More”.


facebook


(Large preview)

Clicking the “Learn More” button takes the user to a landing page that we will examine in sections for a persuasive flow:




(Large preview)

The user’s primary motivation in shopping for term life insurance is: “Protect Family,” and a big barrier is “High Cost.”

  1. Reputable Name (Credibility)
    Even if you’ve not heard of this company, John Hancock is a famous person and the term used as a synonym in the United States for one’s signature. The company reinforces it’s longevity later on the page.
  2. Toll-free Number (Credibility)
    Established and legitimate organization.
  3. Message Framing
    Live healthy, is also reinforced by the image of a family enjoying outdoors.
    “This life insurance product will help me live longer, lead a happy life like them, and protect my family in case something happens, and won’t cost much.”

  4. People Like Me & Association
    This family looks like mine (or the family next door) — I can see myself in this wide-open field (visceral and reflective triggers).
  5. Extrinsic Reward
    An Apple watch for $25 — that’s a bonus here!
  6. Visual Cueing
    The person in focus (stereotypical breadwinner) has his gaze directly focused at the form below, leading the user to the next step.
  7. Foot In The Door
    This quote won’t cost anything — zip, nada.
  8. Computer As A Social Actor
    The information takes a conversational tone and format, not the usual form in rows and columns. The information seems reasonable to generate a quote.
  9. Commitment & Consistency
    By filling this quick, easy, and free form, chances are that the user will act consistently and proceed when it comes to the next step (application), unless there’s another barrier (price, benefits, etc.)



    (Large preview)

  10. Control
    The user has a choice of devices.
  11. Extrinsic Rewards
    More rewards to be earned.
  12. Control
    The user controls how much they pay (the more active, the less you’ll pay). Also, in case the user does is not active, the cost is framed as just $13 (for a month).
  13. Credibility
    The company reinforces longevity and protector of America.
  14. Authority
    Licensed Coverage Coach (not just a sales agent).
  15. Flow
    One way to keep users in the flow and not get distracted is by disabling the social media links (which could raise the question: why display them?).

That took longer to dissect and read than it does in real life, where most of this is processed consciously and subconsciously in a few seconds, often with a glance or two.

Apart from the methods establishing credibility, the persuasive methods are used to strengthen the primary motivator of “Protect Family” (get insurance, extrinsic reward will help me live longer for my family), and weaken the barrier of “High Cost” (low monthly cost, additional savings, no ongoing watch payments). Note how they work together and don’t conflict or clutter the experience.

Conclusion

Persuasion is all around us, in our everyday lives. As designers, we can use ethical persuasive design methods to get users to take some action. With plenty of persuasive methods available, we have to be selective about what we use. We can use the KISS approach to keep it simple:

  • Know the right behavior to target
  • Identify barriers and motivators
  • Simplify the experience
  • Select appropriate triggers

KISS also reminds us to Keep It Simple & Straightforward, by selecting a simple target behavior, simplifying the experience for the user, and by applying persuasive techniques that will lead to the target behavior without overwhelming the user.

Further Reading

This article is part of the UX design series sponsored by Adobe. Adobe XD tool is made for a fast and fluid UX design process, as it lets you go from idea to prototype faster. Design, prototype, and share — all in one app. You can check out more inspiring projects created with Adobe XD on Behance, and also sign up for the Adobe experience design newsletter to stay updated and informed on the latest trends and insights for UX/UI design.

Smashing Editorial
(yk, il)


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So You Want to Persuade Users? Make Things Simple!

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Landing Page Video Best Practices – Is Animated or Live Action Better?

landing page video 2018

Just because landing page videos have been seen to increase conversions doesn’t mean you can throw up any shoddy video and expect results. There are a few landing page video best practices that you’ll want to review first, such as whether to use live-action style or animation. The answer to this question depends on your industry, competition and several other factors to be discussed in this piece. As a general rule, taking the road less traveled to differentiate yourself from your competition is a good start. But I don’t want you making important decisions without knowing the pros and cons…

The post Landing Page Video Best Practices – Is Animated or Live Action Better? appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Landing Page Video Best Practices – Is Animated or Live Action Better?

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A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating the Best Call to Action for Conversions

best call to action

Fewer than 25 percent of businesses express satisfaction with their conversion rates. That’s pretty depressing. Conversion rate optimization (CRO) doesn’t improve your conversion rates overnight, but it sets you up for success. Part of CRO involves optimizing your calls to action for conversions. How is the best call to action for conversions? There’s no single call-to-action formula that can magically convince most of your leads to convert, but if you’re willing to get to know your audience, experience with different CTAs, and test variations, you’ll get closer to the conversion rates you want. We’ll be covering lots of information, so…

The post A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating the Best Call to Action for Conversions appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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A Step-by-Step Guide to Creating the Best Call to Action for Conversions

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Once Upon A Time: Using Story Structure For Better Engagement




Once Upon A Time: Using Story Structure For Better Engagement

John Rhea



Stories form the connective tissue of our lives. They’re our experiences, our memories, and our entertainment. They have rhythms and structures that keep us engaged. In this article, we’ll look at how those same rhythms and structures can help us enrich and enhance the user experience.

In his seminal work Hero With A Thousand Faces, Joseph Campbell identified a structure that rings true across a wide variety of stories. He called this “The Hero’s Journey,” but his book explaining it was 300+ pages so we’ll use a simplified version of Campbell’s work or a jazzified version of the plot structure you probably learned about in elementary school:


The Hero’s journey begins in the ordinary world. An inciting incident happens to draw the hero into the story. The hero prepares to face the ordeal/climax. The hero actually faces the ordeal. Then the hero must return to the ordinary world and finally there is resolution to the story.


Once upon a time… a hero went on a journey.

The ordinary world/exposition is where our hero/protagonist/person/thing/main character starts. It’s the every day, the safe, the boring, the life the hero already knows.

The inciting incident is the event or thing that pulls or (more often) pushes the hero into the story. It’s what gets them involved in the story whether they want to be or not.

In the rising action/preparation phase, the hero prepares (sometimes unknowingly) for the ordeal/climax which is when they go up against the villain (and prevail!).

After the hero prevails against the villain, they must return to their ordinary world and bring back the new knowledge and/or mythical object they got from/for defeating the villain.

Finally, in the Resolution, we tie up all the loose ends and throw a dance party.

We can apply this same structure to the experience of the user or — as I like to call it — the “user journey.”

  • Ordinary World
    Where the user starts (their every day).
  • Inciting Incident
    They have a problem they need solved.
  • Rising Action
    They’ve found your product/service/website and they think it might work to solve their problem, but they need to decide that this is the product/service/website will solve their problem. So in this step they gather facts and figures and feelings to determine if this thing will work. It could be deciding if the type of video game news covered on this site is the kind of news they want to consume or deciding whether this type of pen will solve their writing needs or whether the graphic design prowess of this agency can make their new website super awesome.
  • The Ordeal
    The fight to make a decision about purchasing that pen or adding that news site to your regularly checked sites or contacting that agency for a quote.
  • The Road Back
    Decision made, the road back is about moving forward with that purchase, regular reading, or requesting the quote.
  • Resolution
    Where they apply your product/service/website to their problem and it is mightily solved.

If we consider this structure as we look at user interactions, there are lots of ways we can put ourselves in the user’s shoes and optimize their experience, providing support (and sometimes a good shove) exactly when they need it.

Here are some techniques. Some apply to just one part of the User Journey while some apply to several parts at once:

Journey With Your Users

Stories take time. Movies aren’t done in two minutes; they take two hours to watch and absorb. They are a journey.

If you always only ever shout “BUY! BUY! BUY!” you may make a few quick sales, but you won’t encourage long-term loyalty. Journey with your users, and they’ll count on you when they have a problem you can solve.

InVision’s newsletter journeys with you. In this recent newsletter, they sent an article about Questlove and what we can learn from him concerning creativity. If you click through, other than the URL, the word “InVision” does not appear on the page. They’re not pushing the sale, but providing relevant, interesting content to the main audience of people who use their products. I haven’t yet been in the market for their services, but if/when I am, there won’t be much of an Ordeal or fight for approval. They’ve proven their worth as a traveling companion. They’re someone I can count on.


InVision provides great, usable content that addresses customer interests and needs without shoving their products in your face.


InVision is on a quest to have you love them.

Journeying with your users can take many forms, only one of which is content marketing. You could also build training programs that help them move from beginner to expert in using your app or site. You could add high touch parts to your sales process or specific technical support that will help you come alongside your user and their needs. In contexts of quick visits to a website you might use visuals or wording that’s down-to-earth, warm, welcoming, and feels personable to your main audience. You want to show the user they can count on you when they have a problem.

Give ‘Em A Shove

Users need an inciting incident to push them into the user journey, often more than one push. They have a lot going on in their lives. Maybe they’re working on a big project or are on vacation or their kid played frisbee with their laptop. They may have lost or never opened your first email. So don’t hesitate to send them a follow-up. Show them the difference between life without your product or service and life with it. Heroes are pushed into a story because their old life, their ordinary world, is no longer tenable given the knowledge or circumstances they now have.

Nick Stephenson helps authors sell more books (and uses the hero’s journey to think through his websites and marketing). Last fall he sent out a friendly reminder about a webinar he was doing. He gets straight to the point reminding us about his webinar, but provides value by giving us a way to ask questions and voice concerns. He also lets us know that this is a limited time offer, if we want the new life his webinar can bring we’ve got to step into the story before it’s too late.


Nick Stephenson follows up with content and value to help his audience not miss out on opportunities.


Didn’t want you to miss out if your cat barfed on your keyboard and deleted my last email.

Give your users more than one opportunity to buy your product. That doesn’t mean shove it down their throat every chance you get, but follow up and follow through will do wonders for your bottom line and help you continue to build trust. Many heroes need a push to get them into the story. Your users may need a shove or well-placed follow up email or blaring call to action too.

Give Out Magic Swords

By now you know your users will face an ordeal. So why not pass out magic swords, tools that will help them slay the ordeal easily?

Whenever I have tried to use Amazon’s Web Services, I’ve always been overwhelmed by the choices and the number of steps needed to get something to work. A one button solution it is not.

But on their homepage, they hand me a magic sword to help me slay my dragon of fear.


AWS touts how easy it is to get up and running.


The horror-stories-of-hard are false. You can do this.

They use a 1-2-3 graphic to emphasize ease. With the gradient, they also subtly show the change from where you started (1) to where you’ll end (3) just like what a character does in a story. My discussion above could make this ring hollow, but I believe they do two things that prevent that.

First, number two offers lots of 10-minute tutorials for “multiple use cases” There seems to be meat there, not a fluffy tutorial that won’t apply to your situation. Ten minutes isn’t long, but can show something substantially and “multiple use cases” hints that one of these may well apply to your situation.

Second, number three is not “You’ll be done.” It’s “Start building with AWS.” You’ll be up and running in as easy as 1, 2, 3. At step 3 you’ll be ready to bring your awesome to their platform. The building is what I know and can pwn. Get me past the crazy setup and I’m good.

Find out what your user’s ordeal is. Is it that a competitor has a lower price? Or they’re scared of the time and expertise it’ll take to get your solution to work? Whatever it is, develop resources that will help them say Yes to you. If the price is a factor, provide information on the value they get or how you take care of all the work or show them it will cost them more, in the long run, to go with a different solution.

No One is Average

So many stories are about someone specific because we can identify with them. Ever sat through a movie with a bland, “everyman” character? Not if you could help it and definitely not a second time. If you sell to the average person, you’ll be selling to no one. No one believes themselves to be average.

Coke’s recent “Share a Coke” campaign used this brilliantly. First, they printed a wide variety of names on their products. This could have backfired.


For Coke’s Share a Coke campaign they printed the names of many different people on their bottles.


You got friends? We got their name on our product. Buy it or be a terrible friend. Your choice. (Photo by Mike Mozart from Funny YouTube, USA)

My name isn’t Natasha, Sandy or Maurice. But it wasn’t “Buy a Coke,” it was “Share a Coke.” And I know a Natasha, a Sandy, and a Maurice. I could buy it for those friends for the novelty of it or buy my name if I found it ( “John” is so uncommon in the U.S. it’s hard to find anything that has my name on it besides unidentified men and commodes.)

So often we target an average user to broaden the appeal for a product/service/website, and to an extent, this is a good thing, but when we get overly broad, we risk interesting no one.

You Ain’t The Protagonist

You are not the protagonist of your website. You are a guide, a map, a directional sign. You are Obi-Wan Kenobi on Luke’s journey to understand the force. That’s because the story of your product is not your story, this isn’t the Clone Wars (I disavow Episodes I-III), it’s your user’s story, it’s A New Hope. Your users are the ones who should take the journey. First, they had a big hairy problem. They found your product or service that solved that big hairy problem. There was much rejoicing, but if you want them to buy you aren’t the hero that saves the day, you’re the teacher who enables them to save their day. (I am indebted to Donald Miller and his excellent “Story Brand” podcast for driving this point home for me.)

Zaxby’s focuses on how they’ll help you with messages like “Cure your craving” and “Bring some FLAVOR to your next Event!” The emphasis on “flavor” and “your” is borne out in the design and helps to communicate what they do and how they will help you solve your problem. But “you”, the user, is the hero, because you’re the one bringing it to the event. You will get the high fives from colleagues for bringing the flavor. Zaxby’s helps you get that victory.


Zaxby’s focuses all of their language on how their chicken helps you.


With Zaxby’s chicken YOU’re unstoppable.

Furthermore, we’re all self-centered, some more than others, and frankly, users don’t care about you unless it helps them. They only care about the awards you’ve won if it helps them get the best product or service they can. They are not independently happy for you.

At a recent marketers event I attended, the social media managers for a hospital said one of their most shared articles was a piece about the number of their doctors who were considered the top doctors in the region by an independent ranking. People rarely shared the hospital’s successes before, but they shared this article like crazy. I believe it’s because the user could say, “I’m so great at choosing doctors. I picked one of the best in the region!” Rather than “look at the hospital” users were saying “look at me!” Whenever you can make your success their success you’ll continue your success.

Celebrate Their Win

Similar to above, their success is your success. Celebrate their success and they’ll thank you for it.

Putting together any email campaign is arduous. There are a thousand things to do and it takes time and effort to get them right. Once I’ve completed that arduous journey, I never want to see another email again. But MailChimp turns that around. They have this tiny animation where their monkey mascot, Freddie, gives you the rock on sign. It’s short, delightful, and ignorable if you want to. And that little celebration animation energizes me to grab the giant email ball of horrors and run for the end zone yet again. Exactly what Mailchimp wants me to do.


Mailchimp celebrates your completed mail campaign with a rock on sign.


Gosh, creating that email campaign made me want to curl into the fetal position and weep, but now I almost want to make another one.

So celebrate your user’s victories as if they were your own. When they succeed at using your product or get through your tutorial or you deliver their website, throw a dance party and make them feel awesome.

The Purchase Is Not The Finish Line

The end of one story is often the beginning of another. If we get the client to buy and then drop off the face of the Earth that client won’t be back. I’ve seen this with a lot of web agencies that excel in the sales game, but when the real work of building the website happens, they pass you off to an unresponsive project manager.

Squarespace handles this transition well with a “We got you” email. You click purchase, and they send you an email detailing their 24/7 support and fast response times. You also get the smiling faces of five people who may or may not, have or still work there. And it doesn’t matter if they work there or never did. This email tells the user “We’ve got you, we understand, and we will make sure you succeed.”


Squarespace doesn’t leave you once they’ve gotten you to buy. They send you an email showing off their 24/7 support and how they’re going to make you awesome.


We’ve got your back, person-who-listened-to-a-podcast-recently and wanted to start a website.

This harkens all the way back to journeying with your user. Would you want to travel with the guy who leaves as soon as you got him past the hard part? No, stick with your users and they’ll stick with you.

The Resolution

We are storytelling animals. Story structure resonates with the rhythms of our lives. It provides a framework for looking at user experience and can help you understand their point of view at different points in the process. It also helps you tweak it such that it’s a satisfying experience for you and your users.

You got to the end of this article. Allow me to celebrate your success with a dance party.

Celebrating your conquest of this article with a gif dance party.
Let the embarrassing dancing commence!
Smashing Editorial
(cc, ra, il)


Originally posted here: 

Once Upon A Time: Using Story Structure For Better Engagement

How To Make A WordPress Plugin Extensible

Have you ever used a plugin and wished it did something a bit differently? Perhaps you needed something unique that was beyond the scope of the settings page of the plugin.

I have personally encountered this, and I’m betting you have, too. If you’re a WordPress plugin developer, most likely some of your users have also encountered this while using your plugin.

Here’s a typical scenario: You’ve finally found that plugin that does everything you need — except for one tiny important thing. There is no setting or option to enable that tiny thing, so you browse the documentation and find that you can’t do anything about it. You request the feature in the WordPress plugin’s support forum — but no dice. In the end, you uninstall it and continue your search.

Imagine if you were the developer of this plugin. What would you do if a user asked for some particular functionality?

The ideal thing would be to implement it. But if the feature was for a very special use case, then adding it would be impractical. It wouldn’t be good to have a plugin setting that only 0.1% of your users would have a use for.

You’d only want to implement features that affect the majority of your users. In reality, 80% of users use 20% of the features (the 80/20 rule). So, make sure that any new feature is highly requested, and that 80% of your users would benefit from it, before implementing it. If you created a setting for every feature that is requested, then your plugin would become complicated and bloated — and nobody wants that.

Your best bet is to make the plugin extensible, code-wise, so that other people can enhance or modify it for their own needs.

In this article, you’ll learn about why making your plugin extensible is a good idea. I’ll also share a few tips of how I’ve learned to do this.

What Makes A Plugin Extensible?

In a nutshell, an extensible plugin means that it adheres to the “O” part of the SOLID principles of object-oriented programming — namely, the open/closed principle.

If you’re unfamiliar with the open/closed principle, it basically means that other people shouldn’t have to edit your code in order to modify something.

Applying this principle to a WordPress plugin, it would mean that a plugin is extensible if it has provisions in it that enable other people to modify its behavior. It’s just like how WordPress allows people to “hook” into different areas of WordPress, but at the level of the plugin.

A Typical Example Of A Plugin

Let’s see how we can create an extensible plugin, starting with a sample plugin that isn’t.

Suppose we have a plugin that generates a sidebar widget that displays the titles of the three latest posts. At the heart of the plugin is a function that simply wraps the titles of those three posts in list tags:


function get_some_post_titles() 
  $args = array(
      'posts_per_page' => 3,
  );

  $posts = get_posts( $args );

  $output = '
    '; foreach ( $posts as $post ) $output .= '
  • ' . $post->post_title . '
  • '; $output .= '
'; return $output; }

While this code works and gets the job done, it isn’t quite extensible.

Why? Because the function is set in its own ways, there’s no way to change its behavior without modifying the code directly.

What if a user wanted to display more than three posts, or perhaps include links with the posts’ titles? There’s no way to do that with the code above. The user is stuck with how the plugin works and can nothing to change it.

Including A Hundred Settings Isn’t The Answer

There are a number of ways to enhance the plugin above to allow users to customize it.

One such way would be to add a lot of options in the settings, but even that might not satisfy all of the possibilities users would want from the plugin.

What if the user wanted to do any of the following (scenarios we’ll revisit later):

  • display WooCommerce products or posts from a particular category;
  • display the items in a carousel provided by another plugin, instead of as a simple list;
  • perform a custom database query, and then use those query’s posts in the list.

If we added a hundred settings to our widget, then we would be able to cover the use cases above. But what if one of these scenarios changes, and now the user wants to display only WooCommerce products that are currently in stock? The widget would need even more settings to accommodate this. Pretty soon, we’d have a gazillion settings.

Also, a plugin with a huge list of settings isn’t exactly user-friendly. Steer away from this route if possible.

So, how would we go about solving this problem? We’d make the plugin extensible.

Adding Our Own Hooks To Make It Extensible

By studying the plugin’s code above, we see a few operations that the main function performs:

  • It gets posts using get_posts.
  • It generates a list of post titles.
  • It returns the generated list.

If other people were to modify this plugin’s behavior, their work would mostly likely involve these three operations. To make our plugin extensible, we would have to add hooks around these to open them up for other developers.

In general, these are good areas to add hooks to a plugin:

  • around and within the major processes,
  • when building output HTML,
  • for altering post or database queries,
  • before returning values from a function.

A Typical Example Of An Extensible Plugin

Taking these rules of thumb, we can add the following filters to make our plugin extensible:

  • add myplugin_get_posts_args for modifying the arguments of get_posts,
  • add myplugin_get_posts for overriding the results of get_posts,
  • add myplugin_list_item for customizing the generation of a list entry,
  • add myplugin_get_some_post_titles for overriding the returned generated list.

Here’s the code again with all of the hooks added in:


function get_some_post_titles() 
  $args = array(
      'posts_per_page' => 3,
  );

  // Let other people modify the arguments.
  $posts = get_posts( apply_filters( 'myplugin_get_posts_args', $args ) );

  // Let other people modify the post array, which will be used for display.
  $posts = apply_filters( 'myplugin_get_posts', $posts, $args );

  $output = '
    '; foreach ( $posts as $post ) // Let other people modify the list entry. $output .= '
  • ' . apply_filters( 'myplugin_list_item', $post->post_title, $post ) . '
  • '; $output .= '
'; // Let other people modify our output list. return apply_filters( 'myplugin_get_some_post_titles', $output, $args ); }

You can also get the code above in the GitHub archive.

I’m adding a lot of hooks here, which might seem impractical because the sample code is quite simple and small, but it illustrates my point: By adding just four hooks, other developers can now customize the plugin’s behavior in all sorts of ways.

Namespacing And Context For Hooks

Before proceeding, note two important things about the hooks we’ve implemented:

  • We’re namespacing the hooks with myplugin_.
    This ensures that the hook’s name doesn’t conflict with some other plugin’s hook. This is just good practice, because if another hook with the same name is called, it could lead to unwanted effects.
  • We’re also passing a reference to $args in all of the hooks for context.
    I do this so that if others use this filter to change something in the flow of the code, they can use that $args parameter as a reference to get an idea of why the hook was called, so that they can perform their adjustments accordingly.

The Effects Of Our Hooks

Remember the unique scenarios I talked about earlier? Let’s revisit those and see how our hooks have made them possible:

  • If the user wants to display WooCommerce products or posts from a particular category, then either they can use the filter myplugin_get_posts_args to add their own arguments for when the plugin queries posts, or they can use myplugin_get_posts to completely override the posts with their own list.
  • If the user wants to display the items in a carousel provided by another plugin, instead of as a simple list, then they can override the entire output of the function with myplugin_get_some_post_titles, and instead output a carousel from there.
  • If the user wants to perform a custom database query and then use that query’s posts in the list, then, similar to the first scenario, they can use myplugin_get_posts to use their own database query and change the post array.

Much better!

A Quick Example Of How To Use Our Filters

Developers can use add_filter to hook into our filters above (or use add_action for actions).

Taking our first scenario above, a developer can just do the following to display WooCommerce products using the myplugin_get_posts_args filter that we created:

add_filter( 'myplugin_get_posts_args', 'show_only_woocommerce_products' );
function show_only_woocommerce_products( $args ) 
   $args['post_type'] = 'product';
   return $args;

We Can Also Use Action Hooks

Aside from using apply_filters, we can also use do_action to make our code extensible. The difference between the two is that the first allows others to change a variable, while the latter allows others to execute additional functionality in various parts of our code.

When using actions, we’re essentially exposing the plugin’s flow to other developers and letting them perform other things in tandem.

It might not be useful in our example (because we are only displaying a shortcode), but it would be helpful in others. For example, given an extensible backup plugin, we could create a plugin that also uploads the backup file to a third-party service such as Dropbox.

“Great! But Why Should I Care About Making My Plugin Extensible?”

Well, if you’re still not sold on the idea, here are a few thoughts on why allowing other people to modify your plugin’s behavior is a good idea.

It Opens Up the Plugin to More Customization Possibilities

Everyone has different needs. And there’s a big chance your plugin won’t satisfy all of them, nor can you anticipate them. Opening up your plugin to allow for modifications to key areas of your plugin’s behavior can do wonders.

It Allows People to Introduce Modifications Without Touching the Plugin’s Code

Other developers won’t be forced to change your plugin’s files directly. This is a huge benefit because directly modifying a plugin’s file is generally bad practice. If the plugin gets updated, then all of your modifications will be wiped.

If we add our own hooks for other people to use, then the plugin’s modifications can be put in an external location — say, in another plugin. Done this way, the original plugin won’t be touched at all, and it can be freely updated without breaking anything, and all of the modifications in the other plugin would remain intact.

Conclusion

Extensible plugins are really awesome and give us room for a lot of customization possibilities. If you make your plugin extensible, your users and other developers will love you for it.

Take a look at plugins such as WooCommerce, Easy Digital Downloads and ACF. These plugins are extensible, and you can easily tell because numerous other plugins in WordPress’ plugins directory add functionality to them. They also provide a wide array of action and filter hooks that modify various aspects of the plugins. The rules of thumb I’ve enumerated above have come up in my study of them.

Here are a few takeaways to make your plugin extensible:

  • Follow the open/closed principle. Other people shouldn’t have to edit your code in order to modify something.
  • To make your plugin extensible, add hooks in these places:
    • around and within major processes,
    • when building the output HTML,
    • for altering post or database queries,
    • before returning values from a function.
  • Namespace your hooks’ names with the name of your plugin to prevent naming conflicts.
  • Try passing other variables that are related to the hook, so that other people get some context of what’s happening in the hook.
  • Don’t forget to document your plugin’s hooks, so that other people can learn of them.

Further Reading

Here are some resources if you want to learn more about extending plugins:

Smashing Editorial
(mc, ra, al, yk, il)

Original post:  

How To Make A WordPress Plugin Extensible

“Maybe Later” – A New Interaction Model for Ecommerce Entrance Popups

I’d guess that over half of the e-commerce stores I visit use entrance popups to advertise their current deal. Most often it’s a discount.

What is an Entrance Popup and What’s Wrong With Them?

They are as they sound. A popup that appears as soon as you arrive on the site. They’re definitely the most interruptive of all popups because you’ve not even had a chance to look around.

I get why they are used though because they work really well at one thing – letting you know that an offer exists, and what it is. And given high levels of competition for online dollars, it makes sense why they would be so prolific.

The intrusion isn’t the only point of frustration. There’s also the scenario where you arrive on a site, see an offer appear, you find it interesting and potentially very valuable (who doesn’t want 50% off?), but you want to do some actual looking around – the shopping part – before thinking about the offer. And when you’re forced to close the popup in order to continue, it’s frustrating because you want the offer! You just don’t want it right now.

So, given the fact that they are so common, and they’re not going anywhere anytime soon, and they create these points of frustration, I’ve been working on developing a few alternative ways to solve the same problem.

The one I want to share with you today is called “Maybe Later”.

“Maybe Later” is a Solution to Increase Engagement and Reduce Frustration

As you saw in the header image, instead of the now classic YES/NO popup – the one that gets abused by shady marketers (Technology isn’t the Problem, We Are.) – “Maybe Later” includes a third option called, you guessed it!

The middle option gives some control back to the shopper.

It’s more than just a third button, here’s how it works (I’ll refer to the sketch opposite):

  1. The popup appears when you enter the site. You can choose “No” to get rid of it, “Yes” to take advantage of it, or “Maybe Later” to register your interest but get it out of your way.
  2. When you click “Maybe Later” a cookie is set to log your interest.
  3. Now while you are browsing the rest of the site, a Sticky Bar – targeted at the cookie that was set – appears at the bottom (or top) of the page, with a more subtle reminder of the offer, so that you know it there and ready if you decide to take advantage of it.
  4. If you decide against the offer, you can click “No thanks” on the Sticky Bar, the cookie is deleted, and the offer is hidden for good.

The core purpose of this idea is to put the control back with the shopper while creating an effective method for the retailer to engage with you, with your permission.


Follow our Product Awareness Month journey >> click here to launch a popup with a subscribe form (it uses our on-click trigger feature).


Visual Hierarchy on Popup Buttons

When you have more than a single button, it’s important to establish visual design cues to indicate how the hierarchical dominance plays out. For you as a marketer, the most important of the three buttons is YES, MAYBE LATER is second, and NO is the least.

You can create a better user experience for your visitors by using the correct visual hierarchy and affordance when it comes to button design. In the image below, there is a progression of visual dominance from left to right (which is the correct direction – in Western society). Left is considered a backward step (in online interaction design terms), and right is a progression to the goal.

From left to right we see:

  • The NO button: is designed as a ghost button which has the least affordance and weight of the three.
  • The MAYBE LATER button: gains some solidity by increasing the opacity
  • The YES button: has a fully opaque design represented by the primary call to action colour of the theme.

You can achieve a similar level of dominance by making the secondary action a link instead of a button, which is a great visual hierarchy design technique. What I don’t like is when people do this, but they make the “No thanks” link really tiny. If you’re going to provide an option, do it with a little dignity and make it easy to see and click.

See the “Maybe Later” Popup-to-Sticky-Bar Model in Action

Alrighty, demo time! I have a few instructions for you to follow to see it in action. I didn’t load the popup on this page as it’s supposed to be an entrance popup and I needed to set the scene first. But I’ll use some trickery to make it happen for you.

Follow these instructions and you’ll see “Maybe Later” in action:

Please note: this is desktop only. Reason being is that Google dislikes entrance popups on mobile. Sticky Bars are the Google-friendly way to present promos on mobile, so they work, but the combo isn’t appropriate.

  1. Visit this page (opens in new window).
  2. Click the “Maybe Later” button and the popup will close.
  3. Refresh that page and you’ll see a Sticky Bar with the same offer appear at the bottom.
  4. Come back to this page.
  5. Refresh this page and you’ll see the Sticky Bar here too.
  6. Click “No thanks” to get rid of it when you’ve had enough :D

Here’s the entrance Popup you will see:

Maybe Later - A New  interaction model for ecommerce entrance popups

And the Sticky Bar you will see following that:

How to Use “Maybe Later” on Your Website

If you’d like to give it a try, follow the instructions below in your Unbounce account. (You should sign up for Unbounce if you haven’t already: you get Landing Pages, Popups, and Sticky Bars all in the same builder).

You can also see what Popups and Sticky Bars look like on your website by entering your URL on our new Live Preview Tool.

“Maybe Later” Setup Instructions

Caveat: This is not an official Unbounce feature, and as such is not technically supported. But it is damn cool. And if enough people scream really hard, maybe I’ll be able to persuade the product team to add it to the list. And please talk to a developer before trying this in a production environment.

Step 1: Create a Popup in Unbounce

Step 2: Add “Maybe Later” Script to the Popup

In the “Javascripts” window located in the bottom-left.

Add the following script “Before the body end tag”, replacing “lp-pom-button-50” with the id of your “Maybe Later” button, and unbounce.com with your own domain.

document.getElementById("lp-pom-button-50").onclick = function() 
parent.postMessage(JSON.stringify('later'), 'https://unbounce.com');

Step 3: Set URL Targeting on Popup

Set up the URL targeting for where you want the popup to appear. I chose the post you’re reading right now (with a ?demo extension so it would only fire when I sent you to that URL).

Step 4: Set Cookie Targeting on Popup

Set up the cookie targeting to “Not show” when the “Maybe Later” cookie is present. The cookie is set when the button is clicked. (You’ll see how in step 9).

Step 5: Create a Sticky Bar in Unbounce

Step 6: Add “Maybe Later” Script to the Sticky Bar

Add the following script “Before the body end tag”, replacing “lp-pom-button-45” with the id of your “No Thanks” button, and unbounce.com with your own domain.

document.getElementById("lp-pom-button-45").onclick = function() 
parent.postMessage(JSON.stringify('laterForget'), 'https://unbounce.com');

Step 7: Set URL Targeting on Sticky Bar

Set up the URL targeting for where you want the Sticky Bar to appear. This might be every page on your e-commerce site, or in my case just this post and another for testing.

Step 8: Set Cookie Targeting on Sticky Bar

Set the Trigger to “Arrival”, Frequency to “Every Visit”, and Cookie Targeting to show when the cookie we’re using is set. (You’ll see how it’s set in the next step).

Step 9: Add “Maybe Later” Code to Your Website

This is some code that allows the Popup and Sticky Bar to “talk” to its host page and set/delete the cookie.

// On receiving message from the popup set a cookie
window.onload = function() 
function receiveMessage(e) 
var eventData = JSON.parse(e.data);
// Check for the later message
if (eventData === 'later') 
document.cookie = "mlshowSticky=true; expires=Thu, 11 May 2019 12:00:00 UTC; path=/";

if (eventData === 'laterForget') 
document.cookie = "mlshowSticky=; expires=Thu, 01 Jan 1970 00:00:00 UTC; path=/;";

}
// Listen for the message from the host page
window.addEventListener('message', receiveMessage);
}

Step 10: Enjoy Being Awesome

That’s all, folks!


What Do You Think?

I’d love to know what you think about this idea in the comments, so please jump in with your thoughts and ideas.

Later (maybe),
Oli

p.s. Don’t forget to see what Popups and Sticky Bars look like on your website with the new Live Preview Tool

View original: 

“Maybe Later” – A New Interaction Model for Ecommerce Entrance Popups