Tag Archives: australia

A Simple Guide to Link Prospecting

link prospecting

You can break down SEO into two major categories: On-Page SEO: Ensuring your title tags, meta tags, site architecture and content are optimized for near-perfect search engine comprehension and indexing. Link Building: Getting other websites to link back to your site. In today’s post, we’re going to focus on #2 because it can be the most rewarding in terms of traffic gains, but it’s also the most difficult because a lot of it is beyond your control. Link building is truly an art and link prospecting is the smartest way to ensure your highest level of success. Let’s get into…

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A Simple Guide to Link Prospecting

The Making of a Localized Digital UK Marketing Campaign

Globes
Thinking about going global? Dip your toes in with a geo-targeted marketing campaign. Image via Shutterstock.

If your company is based in North America, you’re probably marketing to North Americans. Heck, even if you’re not based in North America, you might be focusing your marketing efforts on Americans.

We do it at Unbounce. Even though we’re Canadian, we focus our marketing primarily on the USA. We even spell things the way our friendly southern neighbors do (see what I did there?). Not to mention we schedule our emails, webinars, blog posts, marketing campaigns and pretty much anything else based on North American time zones.

Unbounce holiday video screenshot
Yes, we made a Canadian-themed holiday video filled with stereotypes like plaid-wearing curlers :)

I wrote a post a few months back titled “Kick-Start Your International Marketing Strategy by Leveraging Your Content.” In it I talked about how investing in a global marketing strategy isn’t as daunting as you might think, nor is it rocket science. It’s about taking what works and doing more of it.

Part of that strategy outlined hiring a local marketer, a “mini CMO” or a full-funnel growth marketer who is also a massively talented “doer” and can crank out impossible amounts of work (like our DACH Marketing Manager, Ben Harmanus, and our Brazilian Marketing Manager, Andrea Amaral).

But what about for places such as the UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand or — heck — even Canada? Do you hire a local marketer there?

Maybe you do, maybe you don’t. But what if I told you that you could implement a localized, geo-targeted digital marketing campaign without having to hire a local marketer or leave the comfort of your office?

We did it at Unbounce, and you can, too.

1. Create an online event for a specific region

The United Kingdom is Unbounce’s third largest market, right after the US and Canada. Even so, we had never done anything targeted to get more UK business. Nor had we done anything to address their unique concerns as customers (yet).

All our webinars are hosted at 11:00 am PST / 2:00 pm EST. This meant that any savvy marketer in the UK would have to watch a webinar in real-time at 7:00 pm GMT. Right between work and dinner — or wait, should I say supper?

Sure, our UK audience could always watch the recording — but what about that feeling associated with watching an event live? What about asking a question during Q&A? What about participating in the Twitter chat in real-time?

Enter UK Marketing Day.

UK Marketing Day landing page
Our UK Marketing Day landing page Made in Unbounce and integrated with Marketo.

The campaign idea was simple: to recognize the UK market by delivering something especially for them, a carefully curated online event — a virtual conference — scheduled in their time zone.

2. Partner with local marketers

Don’t have a local marketer (yet)? You don’t need one.

Partner with people who are local marketers.

For UK Marketing Day we partnered with Marketo and Citrix Gotowebinar. I know what you’re thinking — isn’t Marketo headquartered in San Mateo, CA? And isn’t Citrix Gotowebinar from Fort Lauderdale, FL? Yep, they are. But they also have UK offices. Which means they hired local marketers who knew the local market and would double and triple check my North American habits. And when you’re doing localized marketing campaigns the devil is in the details.

For example, when I wrote the initial landing page copy, I used the date format MMDDYYYY. Gemma Falconer, Campaign Manager, Northern Europe for Citrix Gotowebinar, quickly corrected my mistake before the campaign launched.

Date format by country
Oh hey look. The US is apparently the only country that uses the MMDDYYYY format.

Partnering with marketers and companies on the ground not only makes sure your localized, geo-targeted campaign is on point, it’s also huge in terms of reach and exposure.

Plus co-marketing allows two or more companies to work on a project together, doing less work for more reward. Who doesn’t want that?

By levering the relationships and reach of a partner, co-marketing campaigns are designed to deliver more leads, buzz and awareness, with less work.

While we could have just marketed this virtual event to our own UK audience, co-marketing offered us an incredibly valuable ingredient that should be part of every successful marketing campaign — localized or not.

3. Hammer down content and speakers

Should you get local experts to attract the local target audience? Or should you get international thought leaders? There is no wrong answer here.

For UK Marketing Day we decided to go with a mix of both.

We wanted to make sure we had a range of international speakers, local marketers and, most importantly, thought leaders who specialize in a range of marketing verticals (such as SEO, PPC, CRO and email).

We included Dave Chaffey, a well-known email and marketing automation expert in the UK and Europe, as well as Amy Harrison, a web copywriter based out of Brighton.

We called up PPC expert Purna Virji from Philly, and also Chicago-based Andy Crestodina, speaker and author focused on content marketing and analytics. Orbit Media, the agency Andy heads up actually responded with this when we asked Andy to partake:

We would love to join in on the UK love. We actually have a surprisingly large audience over there as well.

CRO expert Talia Wolf, based out of Israel, and international SEO consultant Aleyda Solís, based in Madrid, joined the day as well.

4. Market to your geo-targeted audience (and their neighbors!)

It may sound obvious, but make sure to market to your geo-targeted audience in their language (watch that North American spelling) and in their time zone.

UK Marketing Day promo tweet
3:00 am in Vancouver means it’s 11:00 am in the UK.

Schedule your social media posts, emails and blog posts (like the one I sent below) during their business hours.

UK Marketing Day email example

And invite their neighbors, too.

Although we blatantly called the event UK Marketing Day, we made a point to reach out to marketing folks in Ireland. And we ensured our email copy reflected that invitation.

UK Marketing Day tweet

5. Nurture your leads

The marketing campaign is done. What now?

In the pre-marketing phase, I sent an email to our Director of Campaign Strategy. I wanted to talk about what we could do with those fresh UK Marketing Day leads after we got ‘em.

Hey Corey,

UK Marketing Day is coming up. Which means it is going to end. Which means we need to think about nurturing those leads.

I would like to chat quickly about a lead nurture track that is keeps in mind localization. The last thing I want is a UK-dedicated marketing campaign and we drop the ball when it finishes.

Ideas I have:

  • A demo in the UK time zone.
  • A customer webinar that is in the UK

The most important element post-campaign? Make sure you don’t drop the ball on the localized marketing campaign you worked so hard to create. If you invite leads to a product demo after the campaign or host a “further down the funnel” webinar, make sure it’s scheduled during their business hours.

Is a localized campaign really necessary?

You might be thinking why go through all this trouble to create something localized? Is the ROI really there? Maybe, maybe not.

You don’t have to start big and hire a full-on dedicated EMEA team. You can also start smaller and initiate a localized marketing campaign.

My advice to you: If you’re planning on investing in a global go-to-market strategy, creating a localized marketing campaign before you even hire in that area is a great first step.

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The Making of a Localized Digital UK Marketing Campaign

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Color your way to Conversions!

Red means passion, black is equal to luxury and yellow gives a feeling of freshness. Use orange for your CTAs to increase conversions and this case study proved that red is a better button color than green… BLAH!

There are more than 16 million colors and any great blog-post that you come across on the internet will tell you the “feelings” conveyed by only a handful of colors. If you sell to people from different ethnicity and cultures, choosing colors for your website can become even more difficult as one color that relates to wealth and prosperity in a country may relate to mourning in another. How do you go about it then?

In this post I will help you choose colors for your website’s CTAs, background and other important entities that you want people to focus on. A believer of “one size doesn’t fit all” and “data (not opinions and experience) gets most respect“, I will not be able to spill out some magic potion and tell you the exact colors you should use. But I promise to take you through 3 actionable tips that you could go back and test right away to increase your website’s conversions.

1) Color the Primary Goal of your Website to Make it Stand Out

Imagine a shopping list of 20 items, all items written in blue ink except for one which is in red. If asked to scan this list for 10 seconds, which item do you think you are most likely to recall later? Multiple experiments have confirmed that outliers (or the item in red in the example) is what people remember most often. This is because of a phenomenon known as the Von Restroff effect (also known as isolation effect) which states that an item that stands out is more likely to be remembered than others.

Applying this to your websites, if you want your calls to action to get immediate attention, make them stand out. Use a color that has high contrast compared to your background and that hasn’t been used for any other entity on the page. Look at how Facebook and LinkedIn do it on their homepage:

Facebook homepage
LinkedIn homepage

Choosing a contrasting color for your primary CTA is not very difficult. You just have to look for a color diagonally opposite to that of your background color or most-used color on your page from the color wheel.

color_wheel

Image Credit: Wikipedia

Let’s for a moment go back to the red button v/s green button case study. Have a closer look at the screenshot below. You will find that the color scheme of the original page has some emphasis towards green. The Performable logo is green, the screenshot used on the page has some elements in green and one of the features also has an icon in green. A quick scan doesn’t really make the CTA stand out from the rest of the elements. I wouldn’t be surprised if testing the original page against a variation with the CTA in yellow or orange would produce same or better results.

red_green_button_case_study

The important takeaway from this case study is to create a visual contrast for your goal. End of the day, it’s not the button color that is going to sell your stuff but how prominently you display it for people to take a decision before abandoning your website for the competitors’.

2) Choose Colors that are “All”-User Friendly

In United States alone, about 7% of males (roughly 10.5 million men) and 0.4% of females have some form of color blindness. In Australia, these percentages are 8 for men and 0.4 for women. The most common problem being difficulty in telling red from green.

Needless to say, when deciding colors for your website and the areas where you want people to focus on, it becomes imperative to keep in mind people who have some form of color blindness. And if you have a SaaS product, that shows some results in charts and graphs, it becomes even more important to choose the right colors so that they are easily distinguishable for everyone. See below, how a contrast between foreground and background appears to people with certain forms of color blindness. You will notice that while eyes with normal vision would easily be able to read the text, people with Protanopia and Deuteranopia (most common forms of color blindness) will just not be able to read what’s written.

Normal vision:

normal_color_vision

How the above appears to people with Protanopia:

protanopia

And to people with Deuteranopia:

deuteranopia

Image Credit: Studiopress.com

Common solutions to ensure a great experience for everyone:

  • Choose colors many steps away from each other on the color wheel
  • Use tints (mixture of color with white) for background and shades (mixture of color with black) for foreground (or vice versa). Or make one element even more dark and the other even more light to create better contrast.

3) Train Visitors with your Color Key

Consider how bar graphs work. To look at data of one particular type, you just follow its color or pattern. Once you understand what a particular color or pattern bar stands for, you are able to compare easily focusing only on that particular color or pattern.

Similarly, if you use one color consistently on your website for a particular CTA (say signup), you will subconsciously train your users with the meaning of that color on the website. As an example, let’s suppose someone is evaluating a SaaS product on your website. And you have a shiny orange button for free trial on every page. When done evaluating their eyes will look for the orange thing, on whichever page they are, to sign up.

This way, you can even tell them which colors correspond to a heading, which means links and which call for a purchase.

See how CampaignMonitor does it beautifully. CTA buttons on all of their pages, which ask people to sign up for an account, are in green. And for no other CTA has the same color been used. This createa a consistent visual memory for visitors.

campaignmonitor_homepage

Let’s Talk

How has your experience with website colors been? Tried any A/B tests that worked well? Or may be which didn’t? Would love to hear all of it in the comments section below!

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Color your way to Conversions!