Tag Archives: best practices

The 16 Website Design Best Practices For Conversions in 2018

website design best practices

First impressions matter more than you might think. When a visitor accesses your website for the first time, regardless of the page, he or she makes a split-second judgment about the design. In fact, three-quarters of consumers say they base their impression of a company’s credibility on its web design. Furthermore, 94 percent of first impressions are based exclusively on design. Before your visitor reads a single word of copy, he or she already has an impression of your company. That’s why it’s essential to follow website design best practices that directly impact conversions. You don’t just want your website…

The post The 16 Website Design Best Practices For Conversions in 2018 appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Link to original: 

The 16 Website Design Best Practices For Conversions in 2018

10 Easy Practices To Boost Travel Website Booking

Is it easy to boost travel website booking?

Let’s face it—conversions do not come easy for travel websites.

On an average, more than 95% traffic on travel websites leave without purchasing anything, almost on a whim. Most of the time, the reasons behind it are lengthy marketing funnels, complex search parameters, complicated checkout processes, multiple forms, and massive personalization. All these factors make travel eCommerce as one of the trickiest online businesses.

If your website has also been seeing a similar trend, then you are not alone.

But you can always improve this figure by optimizing your funnel and analyzing user behaviour so that more visitors turn into customers. A thorough understanding of visitor pain points and interest areas will help you improve customer experience.

The following infographic provides some tips that you can implement on your website to make more visitors convert, that is, complete the transaction.

boost travel website booking

The post 10 Easy Practices To Boost Travel Website Booking appeared first on VWO Blog.

Continue reading:

10 Easy Practices To Boost Travel Website Booking

[Infographic] 10 Easy Practices To Boost Travel Website Booking

Is it easy to boost travel website booking?

Let’s face it—conversions do not come easy for travel websites.

On an average, more than 95% traffic on travel websites leave without purchasing anything, almost on a whim. Most of the time, the reasons behind it are lengthy marketing funnels, complex search parameters, complicated checkout processes, multiple forms, and massive personalization. All these factors make travel eCommerce as one of the trickiest online businesses.

If your website has also been seeing a similar trend, then you are not alone.

But you can always improve this figure by optimizing your funnel and analyzing user behaviour so that more visitors turn into customers. A thorough understanding of visitor pain points and interest areas will help you improve customer experience.

The following infographic provides some tips that you can implement on your website to make more visitors convert, that is, complete the transaction.

boost travel website booking

The post [Infographic] 10 Easy Practices To Boost Travel Website Booking appeared first on VWO Blog.

More – 

[Infographic] 10 Easy Practices To Boost Travel Website Booking

Don’t Ever Launch an Overlay Without This Checklist [FREE DOWNLOAD]

24-point-overlay-checklist-650

Did you know I’m psychic? It’s true. Your favourite color is orange. You once lived on Chestnut Lane. You’ve googled “email best practices” at some point in your marketing career.

Okay, so one out of three ain’t bad — amirite?

The point is, best practices are important to marketers. Whether it’s email, landing pages or social media, best practices provide a jumping off point for a lot of what we do. And guess what, overlays — whether you’re already using them or thinking about using them — are no exception.

Overlays can sometimes get a bad rap for being intrusive or irrelevant. Often, though, these UX offenders are simply not designed or targeted with best practices in mind.

So, before you launch a new overlay…

Download the 24-Point Overlay Checklist

Never launch another mediocre overlay.
By entering your email you’ll receive weekly Unbounce Blog updates and other resources to help you become a marketing genius.

View post:

Don’t Ever Launch an Overlay Without This Checklist [FREE DOWNLOAD]

Just How Proven Are *Those* Proven CRO Tips?

In an article I wrote for Kissmetrics last month, I called for marketers and copywriters to be wary of so-called “best practices” and I believe you should treat CRO case studies with the same skepticism. Space constraints in that article prevented me from exploring the idea further, but I knew that I wanted to write something else […]

The post Just How Proven Are *Those* Proven CRO Tips? appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Originally posted here:  

Just How Proven Are *Those* Proven CRO Tips?

Thumbnail

Mobile Marketing Optimization Q&A

Chris Goward was the keynote speaker at the Conversions@Google Summit on October 20th 2014. His presentation on Mobile Marketing Optimization spurred a great Question and Answer period.

Here is how Chris defined mobile optimization during his presentation:

A lot of people think mobile is the difference between a desktop and a phone. Some people – if you are really advanced – are looking at tablets. This is not the reality. This is not mobile. The reality is there is an infinite number of devices now, and infinite number of screen sizes and iterations. And, they are changing all the time.

Stop thinking of mobile as a phone versus a desktop. Mobile is a state of being – it is a context.

Mobile is a verb – it is not a device.

 

Q&A Recap

The transcript of the Q&A session is below:

Q: You have talked about having a team to do mobile optimization. But we have limited resources and in our case we just can’t have that many people working on it. Do you have any suggestions on what to focus on, and what to leave apart for a while?

A: You are right. Conversion rate optimization is a multi-disciplinary system, and it is very rare to find one or two people that have the skill to do all of it. You need to understand marketing, the customer, design, user experience, wireframing, and a lot of technical tasks as well. A lot of times the technical stuff – such as how to speed up a page, or how to implement a test are hugely important. Look at what you have internally, do you have designers, coders? Maybe pull a portion of their time away to focus on that.

You really need a conversion champion, who understands the process for continuous testing and building that knowledge base. That’s the most important part. And that’s what we have done. We have created conversion teams that have all the components – designers, coders, strategists and account managers. They are like outsource teams for companies.

Q: Should you re-test variations you used 6 or 12 months ago?

Yes, we do this on an annual basis. We will do testing for 12 months, than we will go back to last year and re-test our original winner. This validates that all the improvements throughout the year have been cumulative. And when we look at this, and do the calculation – for the past 24 months – they have been.

This is a really good idea to do. At least, if nothing more than to silence the critics who say, “ Oh come on, 24% lift, is that actually happening.” And it is – it works.  But also there are seasonality nuances that you want to take into account. Especially when you have a seasonal business. We are finding during peak urgency periods the winners can change dramatically versus during lower periods; because peoples internal urgency is different, and their response to different messages changes.

So going back to test is worth doing. But give yourself some time and run through a bunch of tests, and then go back and validate. And if nothing else, this can be used as a tech check to make sure your statistical significance is working out.

Q: Do you have any kind of tips for dealing with HIPPO’s (Highest Paid Person’s Opinion) who don’t want a test to run to completion, or don’t want to wait for accurate results?

A: So you are digging into one of the biggest problems. Organizational change is one of the biggest barriers to conversion rate optimization – especially with senior marketers, who have never taken this approach, because it is a completely different way of thinking.  Most marketers grew up in the gut feeling, intuition, school of marketing where you find an insight and run with it. This is a different way of doing it – it is actually a merge of data and intuition. And so ya, you will have people watching the tests who are impatient. They want to just finish it – saying, “Why are you wasting your time with all this statistical mumbo jumbo?” The first thing you want to do is identify who are going to be barriers. Identify who are the champions and the supporters. Run some under the radar tests with the supporters, without the detractors knowing. Secret tests. And get some momentum that way. So you’ve got some wins, you have some valid lifts – now you have proof that this is a way that can genuinely lead to improvement. So you might not start on the homepage, for example. And then, shop that around and share the results.

Actually there are a whole bunch of tactics – I have a blog post on ‘Nine Strategies for Becoming the Marketing Optimization Champion Your Company Can’t Live Without’. Do the lunches, start the skunk-works tests, create momentum, do the shopping around of your results, and build support. You’ve got to get one beach head in senior management that’s a supporter. And then they can fight your battles at the C-Level, otherwise ya, you are out manned.

Q: The problem for us is collecting enough sample size. You showed us all these tests and iterating and iterating again. If we were to do the entire cycle and actually measure actual revenue improvement, rather than the micro conversion improvement, it would take us about 10 months. So any tips for people that struggle to get enough sample size to get a statistically significant results?

A: Traffic is the biggest barrier to conversion optimization – it is true. And there are few work arounds. But – there are principles for lower traffic tests:

1. Run more dramatic changes. This doesn’t necessarily mean dramatic design changes, instead run dramatic cognitive changes – for example it might be value proposition that is quite a bit different.

2. Run fewer variation. Run away from multivariate and only run two or three variations.

3. Test on your high traffic pages with only a few variations. Then take those insights and apply them to your lower traffic pages.

4. Become comfortable running longer tests. There is nothing wrong with having tests in market that go longer.

Q: Could you talk a little on the things that you would not test. At our office, everyone has ideas on what to test and we keep adding to the list.  We have a testing road map for the next ten years!

A: You have an underlying questions there. You want to test everything, and you have total support for testing, but you’ve got road map for ten years – that means you don’t have the traffic to support your desire to test. And really, that’s unskilled testing. Skilled testing is looking at the traffic you’ve got, prioritizing what are the insights you want to gain from it, and testing what’s important.

Use the PIE Framework. This is a framework we use for prioritizing our tests to prioritize by potential importance and ease. By doing this you will always be testing the most important questions for your company. If you generate insights and conversion LIFT, then it doesn’t matter how much you have because you will only be testing what is important.

Q:  Do you have a key take away for B2B online testing?

A: The goal is really important in B2B.  You may be converting leads, and you need to look at quality of leads. We do a lot of work for Magento Enterprise. Not on the e-commerce platform, but trying to get people to sign up. And so, whenever we are testing we want to track those leads through quality at the call center to find out if the test generates more revenue or is it just creating more volume of leads. If you can, looking at tracking phone numbers that go into the call center to go straight through to opportunity and revenue value.

Also, B2B usually has lower traffic, so all the same principles of lower traffic testing as well.

Another tip is staying away from interesting, but not revenue generating, micro conversions.

Q: Do you have any recommendations for testing tools for native apps?

A: There are a whole bunch of testing tools now, and there are several that are pretty good. We have been using Optimizely a lot. It is pretty decent in features, and does a good job. Visual Website Optimizers is good as well.  A/B Tasty, in France, is a really good tool too. Worth checking out. Google has content experiments – it’s okay. There are some other higher priced ones – Monetate, Maximizer, Adobe, Site Specs. There is a whole bunch, but those are the ones that are easier to get into. We always combine testing tools with the analytics – whether it is google analytics or adobe. You want to make sure you are doing the back end analysis too.

Q: You were talking about how important segmentation is. If you for example get an A/B test result that your returning customers convert better than your new customer. Then what’s your next step?

A: Returning customers convert better than new customers – there is really nothing there you can work with. But if you run a test and then you see that returning customers convert better on variation B, and new customers convert better on variation C. Now you have a potential insight about your customers. The segments. And now you can start to drill into why: why do they convert better – even slightly – on the other one. You have a potential insight you can build on, create a hypothesis, and create a test that is targeted at that potential insight.

After this you can build that hypothesis into a finding, which becomes a theory, which becomes something you can use predictively. And that’s when it gets really powerful.

For more information on segmentation, I have a blog post called ‘8 Steps to Amazing Website Segmentation Success.’

Q: You have talked about iteration a lot. How many tests would you run in parallel? For example on an ecommerce site at different levels of the cart.

A: How many tests can you run in parallel? It is depends on the traffic. You can run a lot of tests as long as you have the technical chops to keep the segments separate. Visitors will be pre-segmented before they get into the test, and then within the segments we will run parallel paths. But that’s for an ecommerce site with a lot of traffic. So we are talking about half million monthly is when you can start to get into that. With less than that then you usually want to stay at one or two parallel segments. You have got to be very careful if you are doing that to make sure there is not cross pollution of tests, that all of the cells are completely separate, and that you don’t have any tests intermingling – because if they aren’t separate you will get really screwed up results.

The post Mobile Marketing Optimization Q&A appeared first on WiderFunnel Marketing Conversion Optimization.

From: 

Mobile Marketing Optimization Q&A

Thumbnail

The Surprising Power of Testing your Gut Instinct for Business

You can’t analyze how a great painting makes you feel. You can’t compute the beauty of a sunset. There’s no algorithm for the ocean’s majesty.

Similarly, some of the best ideas in business come in a wonderful, inexplicable flashes of insight.

I was in New York for a couple days this week and then in Tofino, a beautiful beach town perched on a rock outcropping on British Columbia’s Vancouver Island.

The experience of the ocean, wind, rain, fog, sun and golden eagles can’t be explained. It must be felt.

I think it was particularly poignant in contrast to New York’s bustle. Now, I love New York; it gets in your bones. It’s the closest place I’ve found to get real Neapolitan-style pizza. And it’s bustle might just as well be a different planet than Tofino.

Chris Goward in New York and Tofino

Contrasting immersive experiences

Those contrasting immersive experiences got me thinking about how much we can rely on data versus intuition in decision-making. How much should we be able to rationalize versus feel?

Tweet this:

How much should we be able to rationalize versus feel?

Using your subconscious thinking system

In Thinking, Fast and Slow, nobel prize winner Daniel Kahneman tells us that we have two ways of making decisions: System 2 is our controlled, conscious where we make choices and decisions. System 1 operates in the background, monitoring our environment constantly and forming impressions from this information. It’s our intuitive “Spidey sense” that gives us an intuitive feel about what we’re sensing.

Kahneman tells us that System 1, our subconscious awareness, informs our System 2 thinking more than we often think. And overreliance on System 2 results in tunnel vision.

Even before Kahneman’s research, Maxwell Maltz described how to trust your brain’s Servo Mechanism to find answers for you subconsciously. In Psycho-Cybernetics, he shows how to combine intense, focused research and thinking with periods of rest and percolation time. Your brain has the ability to solve problems for you without your conscious effort.

Tweet this:

Your brain has the ability to solve problems for you without your conscious effort.

How often have you come up with great ideas when you least expect them? As you’re falling asleep, perhaps? Or while talking with a friend about a different subject? That’s your Servo Mechanism at work.

Solutions don’t always come from purely logical step-by-step deduction.

Tweet this:

Solutions don’t always come from purely logical step-by-step deduction
You won’t find the best answers solely through analysis.

Tweet this:

You won’t find the best answers solely through analysis

A/B testing enables more intuition, not more data

This week I’m reading On Becoming a Leader by Warren Bennis. It’s a classic, inspiring leadership since 1989, and much of it could have been written today. Warren says:

“American organizational life is a left-brain culture, meaning logical, analytical, technical, controlled, conservative, and administrative. We, to the extent we are its products, are dominated and shaped by those same characteristics. Our culture needs more right-brain qualities, needs to be more intuitive, conceptual, synthesizing and artistic.”

This is exactly what an A/B testing culture enables. By relying on A/B testing to validate decision-making, a company can use more intuition rather than less.

Tweet this:

By relying on A/B testing to validate decision-making, a company can use more intuition rather than less

Now, you may question how I can claim this: Isn’t A/B testing a logical process?

Yes, it is.

But, it actually helps reduce your reliance on logic. Hear me out for a moment.

Without a rigorous A/B testing system, companies need much more research, rationale, business cases, and cross-departmental stakeholder buy-in to make decisions.

Tweet this:

Without A/B testing, companies need much more research, rationale, business cases, to make decisions
Decisions become complex and people often use CYA methodology for backing themselves up. (CYA = Cover Your Ass, in case you’re new to organizational behaviour.)

All that rationale building takes time. Lots of time. It slows decision-making and turns nimble companies into bureaucratic dinosaurs.

Daniel Kahneman also made this observation.

Because adherence to standard operating procedures is difficult to second-guess, decision makers who expect to have their decisions scrutinized with hindsight are driven to bureaucratic solutions—and to an extreme reluctance to take risks

But, in A/B testing-driven companies, decisions are made quickly, combining the power of professional intuition and expert gut-feeling with rigorous testing.

Tweet this:

In A/B testing-driven companies, decisions are made quickly, combining the power of intuition with rigorous testing

Yes, we use plenty of structure and process for developing powerful test hypotheses, but we also are open to the inspirational eureka moments where preparation meets inspiration.

Using testing to empower your intuition

When those inspiring ideas strike, you don’t need to backfill binders of research to support a decision—you can simply test it. The risk of a bad decision is eliminated when it’s a test.

If your company feels stuck in analysis paralysis, maybe you need more testing.

Tweet this:

If your company feels stuck in analysis paralysis, maybe you need more testing
You can then worry less about building strict A to Z logic and, instead, go with your gut a little more. Let your hair down. Try something different. Combine innovation with rigour. Rock your market with your flashes of (tested) insight.

The secret to A/B testing success

I’m often asked how WiderFunnel continues to lift our clients’ profits year after year. Our current average of 680% ROI across all clients is not an easy benchmark to maintain.

Tweet this:

Our average of 680% ROI across all clients is not an easy benchmark to maintain

The secret is a mix of messy intelligence-building with rigorous process, including continuous A/B testing of all our ideas. I read 50+ books a year and our entire team is just as focused on learning new things all the time.

We practice lateral thinking, learning in diverse subjects, work in diverse industries and hire diverse skillsets to create our cross-functional team.

All that diversity of raw material consolidates into startlingly simple insights that deliver powerful results.

  • The winning headline that can’t be deduced
  • The strange call-to-action that compels visitors to convert
  • The obscure image concept that communicates the message
  • The new website design or page layout approach that dramatically clarifies navigation.

All combined rigorous preparation and testing with trusting our gut to take risks and try new things.

We are mavericks, continuously taking emotional risk by releasing new ideas into the wild and removing that perceived risk with testing.

What gut feeling intuition have you tested lately?

Tweet this:

What gut feeling intuition have you tested lately?

The post The Surprising Power of Testing your Gut Instinct for Business appeared first on WiderFunnel Marketing Conversion Optimization.

More here: 

The Surprising Power of Testing your Gut Instinct for Business

Thumbnail

Test Being Different To Make Massive Gains

Or, How to Warm Your Head in Winter and Lift Your Conversion Rate

Liv Tyler rocks a toque

Liv Tyler wearing a toque

I’m going to tell you two things today:
1. A “toque” is a kind of knitted hat worn in Canada in winter
2. To make big wins, sometimes you need to try something different.

The other day, my daughter decided that her grandma’s tea cozy would make a good toque.

It wasn’t because the other kids were wearing tea cozies on their heads – it wasn’t a new trend and she wasn’t following fashion. She just felt like trying something different. And you know what? It worked for her – she rocked that tea cozy.

The funny thing is: I don’t think it took any courage for her to do it. She’s the kind of person who (so far at least) hasn’t been convinced other people’s opinions should dictate her actions.

I think there are plenty of companies that could benefit from her approach.

You see, when it comes to websites, too many companies get stuck staring at their competitors for guidance

Tweet this:

When it comes to websites, too many companies get stuck staring at their competitors for guidance
– especially looking at the industry leaders – and assuming that if they mimic the competition’s way of doing things, they’ll see the same results. They look at the leader’s website design and strategy, and use it as a template for their own…

It’s hard not to focus on the leaders – I get that. It’s common to think that because they’re leaders, they must be doing everything right. They must be testing everything they do.

Think again.

Don’t assume what you see has been tested

The big name sites you’re looking at may not A/B test as much as you assume.

Tweet this:

The big name sites you’re looking at may not A/B test as much as you assume
Or they’re not testing all areas. Look at how many still have rotating home page carousels. Smaller companies with high traffic sometimes have an easier job instilling a testing culture than some at the enterprise level. Political resistance and inertia are stronger in bigger companies. And where there is resistance to trying something new, there’s a good chance they’re doing the wrong things. The things that used to work. The things the internal opinion “experts” like.

It could be that the big-company politics have handcuffed them to existing designs and old ways of doing things. It may be that their agency of internal designers hold more sway than their analytics folks. Or their analysts have been relegated to mere report-producers. It may be that they are leaving a lot of money on the table through an under-performing website.

Is that what you want to copy?

Don’t Copy the Leader

Plus, even if they are testing, their results won’t all apply to you. The merchandising approach that works for Amazon won’t necessarily work for your site.

Tweet this:

The merchandising approach that works for Amazon won’t necessarily work for your site
Dell’s product descriptions may not be the best for you.

It’s easy to pick on the big guys, but many of them clearly are doing the right things. And even smaller companies have some politics or, more likely, are dominated by one or two strong personalities.

The good news? Regardless of politics or personalities, being open to a structured approach to testing, and to finding new ways of doing things – will gain you a competitive advantage.

At WiderFunnel, we’ve been doing conversion optimization for seven years, and we are still learning new things from our test results. If there’s one thing we’ve learned it’s that there are no website “best practices” that work consistently across all industries and customer bases.

Tweet this:

There are no website ‘best practices’ that work across all industries
There are insights, principles, patterns and frameworks we use to get the best results. But we would never just implement without testing them.

This is why we’ve found our cross-industry exposure gives WiderFunnel a unique perspective and advantage. If the learning from A/B tests on travel tourism sites can lead to conversion optimization testing wins for software companies, then it’s a win, regardless of where the inspiration comes from. (And that happens more often than you may think!)

After all, the innovators and industry changers – the Apples, the Dysons, the Amazon.coms – don’t become leaders from copying what the other guys are doing. They’re the ones who come out of left field with a different business model, a different way of thinking about their business, and a new way of doing things. They are often the most evidence-based, and don’t follow the trends. They do the hard work to find out what works for them today, not what worked for someone yesterday.

That embrace of the new approach can be your secret weapon against the incumbents in your industry.

So, instead of spending energy trying to replicate what the big guys are doing, have the courage to try something new. To make big wins, try something different. The good news is, that kind of courage is practically risk-free if you follow the continuous conversion optimization process. The only risk you’ll take is the risk of standing out, looking different, and NOT following the leaders in your industry.

The risk of wearing a tea cozy as a toque…

Tea cozy toque

She rocks the tea cozy toque

After all, if you look at the innovators who end up building remarkable companies, in the beginning, they all appeared – to the naysayers at least – to be wearing tea cozies as toques.

The post Test Being Different To Make Massive Gains appeared first on WiderFunnel Marketing Conversion Optimization.

Taken from: 

Test Being Different To Make Massive Gains

Thumbnail

14 Ways to Have Digital Marketing Success in 2014

2013 was a great year for conversion optimization. We saw digital marketers making it their #1 priority, tied with Content Marketing. Conversion Optimization moved up from 34 to 39% of marketers making it their top priority.
Top Priorities for Digital Marketers

Demand for knowledge about “conversion optimization” continues to grow since it emerged in 2007, as shown in Google Trends:

At the same time as “search engine optimization” is declining in popularity:

We’ve seen the industry evolve considerably. In the “early days” of WiderFunnel we spent much of our time educating companies about why conversion optimization was important. A lot of people understand that now.

Today, we get a lot of marketers calling WiderFunnel who are advocating for conversion testing within their companies and need help to get better results.

So, where will we see companies getting the best results in 2014?

Here’s what the most successful digital marketers will have in common in 2014

  1. They understandContent without conversion is just free publishing.”

    Tweet this:

    2014 Digital Marketing Tip #1: Content without conversion is just free publishing

  2. Mobile is a big player in their plans, and mobile is different in 2014. Screens are bigger and more varied even than today. Successful marketers realize that mobile visitors are the same people as desktop visitors. They’re just standing in a different spot with different needs at the moment. Here’s a primer on mobile conversion optimization. Multi-device CRO is happening now, (yes WiderFunnel does that!) yet true multi-device marketing won’t be widespread until 2015.

    Tweet this:

    2014 Digital Marketing Tip #2: Optimize for mobile, but mobile is different in 2014

  3. They skip “big data” in favour of “smart data.” There’s always been lots of data, but size is less important than how you use it. In fact, there’s good evidence that “big data” is one of the lamest buzzwords of 2013. Don’t misunderstand me—the potential is real and we’re all about using data, but the hype will fizzle.

    Tweet this:

    2014 Digital Marketing Tip #3: Skip the big data buzz in favour of smart data

  4. Yes, testing is a tactic and it’s really just a mechanism that supports better decision-making for marketers. Testing alone is just a feature. To that end, they value all well-planned tests as winners (even the losing ones because they learn from them).

    Tweet this:

    2014 Digital Marketing Tip #4: Testing is just a tactic that supports better decision-making for marketers.

  5. They abandon their website redesign plans. Instead, they use Evolutionary Site Redesign (ESR).

    Tweet this:

    2014 Digital Marketing Tip #5: Abandon your website redesign plans. Instead, use ESR.

  6. They look at optimizing every layer of their websites: usability, branding and content. Looking at the experience holistically allows for more potential impact.

    Tweet this:

    2014 Digital Marketing Tip #6: Optimize every layer of your website: usability, branding and content

  7. They move beyond technophilia. Conversion optimization is not a technological challenge – it’s a set of people questions. Tools don’t solve problems. Smart people do.

    Tweet this:

    2014 Digital Marketing Tip #7: Move beyond technophilia. Tools don’t solve problems. Smart people do.

  8. They align their website goals up to their marketing and business goals using the goals waterfall.

    Tweet this:

    2014 Digital Marketing Tip #8: Move beyond technophilia. Tools don’t solve problems. Smart people do.

  9. They don’t chase after tips and tricks. Instead, they formulate powerful questions to ask their prospects, which are unique to their business.

    Tweet this:

    2014 Digital Marketing Tip #9: Don’t chase after tips & tricks. Instead, formulate powerful questions.

  10. Landing page optimization is just one subset of their marketing optimization strategy. They optimize all customer touchpoints throughout their marketing funnel with deep insights into customer segment idiosyncrasies.

    Tweet this:

    2014 Digital Marketing Tip #10: Optimize all customer touchpoints throughout your marketing funnel

  11. They are a strong marketing optimization champion.

    Tweet this:

    2014 Digital Marketing Tip #11: Be a strong marketing optimization champion this year
    Your organization needs a marketing optimization champion. Your company needs you to step up and be an influence for marketing testing. Fortunately, being your organization’s champion is very rewarding. Marketing testing is one of the most easily provable strategies, and the rationale for it is unassailable. When you stand as an advocate of the data-driven approach, you’ll reap the rewards in your career. Data advocates inevitably rise to positions of influence.

  12. They tie results to revenue.

    Tweet this:

    2014 Digital Marketing Tip #12: Tie your marketing optimization results to revenue lift
    When you present results, don’t just show the improvement in conversion rate or KPIs. Tie the result to revenue to give real cash impact. Percentages are intangible, but everyone relates to cash. What would you rather get: a X% conversion rate lift, or $Y,000,000 greater profit?

  13. They foster momentum and knowledge sharing throughout the organization.

    Tweet this:

    2014 Digital Marketing Tip #13: Foster momentum and knowledge sharing throughout your organization
    Many of WiderFunnel’s clients have used our results analysis presentations to create an internal event in the organization. The champion invites members from throughout the company to see the results of tests, guess the winners, and discuss what was learned. Their entire marketing team is on a continuous learning curriculum (starting by reading You Should Test That!)

  14. They hire the best marketing optimization experts available (like WiderFunnel!)

    Tweet this:

    2014 Digital Marketing Tip #14: You should hire the best marketing optimization experts available — WiderFunnel

What would you add?

What are your tips for digital marketers in 2014?

Add your thoughts below.

The post 14 Ways to Have Digital Marketing Success in 2014 appeared first on WiderFunnel Marketing Conversion Optimization.

Link:  

14 Ways to Have Digital Marketing Success in 2014

Thumbnail

10 Lead Generation Landing Page Tips

At its core, lead generation is all about getting and keeping the attention of prospective leads. People respond well to things they like. Even though your ad got their attention and their click, it’s vitally important that they still like what they see after the click.

People also do what is comfortable and trustworthy. They avoid pain, angst and work. The more specifically your landing experience can speak their language and earn their trust, the more likely they will be to engage and convert.

The landing page is where you have the best chance to really impact your lead generation results because it’s completely under your control. Higher conversion rates translate directly into less cost for more leads. And best practices lead to best customers. Lead quality is a function of the user’s experience. It’s all within your control as a marketer. It’s not voodoo. It’s not a secret sauce. And it’s not rocket science.

10 Tips…

Here are ten tips that will help you create lead gen landing pages that will boost your conversion rates and reduce your cost per lead…

1. Set clear expectations at the top.

Way up at the tip top of your lead funnel (TOFU) lies an ad that sets expectations. If those expectations are unclear or misleading, everything else will collapse in an epic failure. You can check for this by looking at your campaign landing page’s bounce rate — the percentage of people who land and leave without engaging. If that number is high — say 40% or more — you should take a look at the expectations being set in your ads.

2. Use specific, targeted landing pages & messaging.

This is a bit of an extension of #1 above. Your ad should be complemented with specific, targeted landing page messaging that matches the ad. The first thing a user sees on the landing page should immediately reinforce why they clicked through. Keep in mind, they didn’t ponder your ad and debate its merits before clicking. They just impulsively charged forward, gave you less than two seconds of attention, and judged whether you were worthy or not. Since average conversion rates are under 5%, it’s safe to assume that 95% of the time, people don’t extend their click into much more. If you’re specific with your landing message, you will engage 60-80% of your visitors.

3. Find out why.

Tips 1 & 2 help put your ad and landing message on the same page — no pun intended. But once you’ve reinforced that they’re in the right place, you can now try and get more precise and find out why. Digging for user intent helps you learn a little bit about them so that you can make your message about you more specific to their precise reason for visiting. This is a form of segmentation. You’re getting your visitors to put themselves into more specific groups so that your offer is more relevant and appealing to them. When something is more relevant and appealing, it is much more likely to result in conversion. Cha-ching!

4. Stay on message with their need.

It’s not about you. It’s not about you. It’s not about you. The less your landing page is about you and the more it’s about them, the more you will engage and convert. Focus on benefits, not on features. Frame everything through those specific lenses you uncovered with segmentation. If they said they work for a small business, target your message to small businesses. Stay on message with their need. Don’t wander or you’ll encourage them to wander off. And exits are the opposites of conversions.

attachment-52862c25e4b0f6fc5e486493

5. Keep the hoop-jumping to a minimum

You’re looking for a lead, right? That probably means you need a form filled out. The shorter the form, the higher the likelihood that it will be completed. Keep the hoop- jumping to a minimum too. For every question you add, or hoop you hold up, ask yourself and your organization if you are willing to trade your need for their lead. If the answer is ‘yes’, then by all means ask the question. If not, be easy and be successful.

6. Keep the gorilla 100% focused on the banana.

Many lead-gen offers trade something for the lead — maybe a white paper, a coupon, an offer code, etc. That’s the banana. Your visitor is the gorilla. As long as you keep the banana right under the gorilla’s nose, he doesn’t notice much else. But the second he loses the scent of that banana, he’s susceptible to distraction. Staying positive, means keeping the gorilla 100% focused on the banana. Don’t let anything come between the two. Even your form button should reference the banana — ‘get white paper’ will catch a lot more gorillas than ‘submit’.

7. Practice “fair exchange.”

Tip #6 spoke to keeping the offer right under the nose of the visitor. This one’s about making sure that what you’re offering and what you’re asking for in a lead gen form are of similar value. People are willing to do more for things they want more. So if you’re trading the greatest thing since sliced bread for a lead, you can probably ask for a lot in return. But if your offering is a white paper or coupon, odds are you’re going to find a far less receptive audience for your long form or legalese. If your requirements are proportionate to your offer, you will be more successful and generate more leads.

8. Reduce distraction, increase clarity.

Distraction is public enemy number one for lead generation. Your landing page or conversion path should be a laser-focused, message specific oasis — far outside of the rattle & hum of the web, or even your website. Navigation is a distraction. Tangential messages are recipes for disaster. Keeping your user experience narrow, clear and concise will keep visitors more engaged and make them more likely to convert. Clarity is your friend.

attachment-52862db5e4b0911e074ef353

9. Think beyond the landing page.

Headline, sub-headline, bullets, form, button…the typical landing page can be so boring. Lead generation landing pages don’t have to be cookie-cutter — you, yes YOU — are too good to have a boring landing page. You should experiment with different types of experiences…experiences that are contextual relevant, highly seductive and deeply engaging. Take, for example, conversion paths….sets of pages that take the content typically squeezed on one landing page and divide it up over several pages. Instead of one massive page appealing to all people, conversion paths use segmentation (tip #3) to get people into smaller groups that can then be succinctly messaged to take action. Think in terms of short, punchy, targeted pages of laser-focused content. Each page requires mere seconds of attention that increases user desire and moves them to click again. Conversion paths are a great way to provide your visitors with a better digital experience.

10. Test unique traffic streams.

The one and only way to know where you stand with many of the preceding tips is to test alternatives. There are no hard and fast rules to tell you exactly what you need to do for your market and your situation. In fact, even within your own reality, you’re likely to see wildly disparate user behaviors that make alternatives more successful in some cases and less successful in others. You need to be engaged in traffic source-specific testing of landing page alternatives. This isn’t as hard as it sounds and it’s the key to lifting your conversion rate and pummeling your lead cost. You need to try things. And you need to know — with statistical certainty — which things work in which situations.

More inspiration.

There you have it, ten tips for lead generation landing experiences. We’ve been blogging about lead generation landing page best practices for years. I encourage you to check out the below resources. We hope to educate, inspire & help you test and optimize your way to more conversions. Enjoy!

50 Landing Page Best Practices [SlideShare]

8 Lead Generation Landing Page Tips [SlideShare]

See the original article here:  

10 Lead Generation Landing Page Tips