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How Indian Brands Drive Conversions On Independence Day

How Brands Drive Conversion on Independence Day

The Indian Independence day is right around the corner. For consumers in India, it’s a day of rejoice and celebration. And, for marketers, it opens a box of opportunities.

For marketers, the opportunity to leverage spirit of Independence translates into consumers’ buying decision for marketers.

In India, especially during major festivals and occasions like Independence Day, you can expect cutthroat rivalry among major brands. And yet, there are big winners in such intense situations.

How does this happen?

What are the strategies and tactics that these brands deploy to successfully pull off a nationwide campaign?

We studied various campaigns of India’s largest online brands to find out the answer.  

And we saw that there were five different ploys deployed to pique the interest of the average online consumer in India that resulted in the success of these campaigns.

1. Tapping into consumers’ emotions

Independence Day is the time of the year when citizens are filled with joy and hopes for prosperity for the whole nation. Marketers very well understand these emotions and know how to leverage these to their advantage.

A fitting example would be the outstation campaign by Ola, one of the largest cab aggregator in India.

When the Independence day is close to a weekend, people love to travel a lot. Weekend getaways are popular among the public, and folks love to spend time with their friends and relatives at places nearby.

Ola appealed to its customers’ emotions by offering them outstation deals during the Independence week. The company even offered an INR 300 discount for its first-time outstation users. Ola also partnered with Club Mahindra and Yatra to offer deals on hotel stays.

Ola Outstation Email

Ola encourages taking a holiday while thinking about it as a viable brand for traveling to nearby getaways.

2. Limited Period Offer

The sad part of these festive sales and offers is that these need to end after a short span. These campaigns generally run from 2 to 5 days around the festival.

For example, Flipkart Freedom Sale which celebrates India’s spirit of Independence only ran for 4 days, so people had limited time to buy what they wanted to.

Freedom Sale Flipkart

Most consumers plan their purchases for such special occasions to get the best deals for the intended product. For others, marketing events, sales, and giveaways always take place with an expiration date.

Setting up such a trigger pushes prospective buyers to make purchases fast, to avoid missing out on the deals.

3. Creating a Sense of Urgency with the help of Micro Events

Some brands build upon the limited nature of the sale and go out all guns blazing to create a sense of urgency.

On top of the limited nature of the sale event, there are few micro-events incorporated into the sale that runs for a few hours to minutes. These sales are exclusive to people who can decide and act fast as they come with an additional discount.

Amazon does this very well with their lightning deals, which generally last from 2-6 hours throughout the event (which itself is 4-day long). The lightning deals have an additional discount on an already stated discount. The catch is the limited time and the sense of urgency it creates.

amazon-lighting-deal

If people have to buy a product which has a lightning deal, they can add it to their cart and checkout under 15 minutes or the deal is gone forever.

4. Exclusive Product Launch

These festive events also leverage their audience’s interest by providing exclusive product offers during a sale.

It is highly useful to build anticipation among shoppers. And, in India, Amazon attracted consumers from the smartphone market. India is known as the mobile-first country, where over half the population owns a smartphone.

keyone-launch

Amazon saw huge boosts in sales due to Smartphone and had exclusive launch of various devices such as Blackberry KeyOne, LG Q6, and the Oneplus 5’s Soft Gold variant. The result was a massive 10X increase in the sales for Amazon through just their Big Indian Sale Event.

5. Omnichannel Promotion and User Experience

Most major brands understand their users and customers. India is predominantly a mobile-first market with a decent penetration when it comes to computers. People love to shop using their mobile devices as well as use their laptops or PCs to make a purchase.

And most users want omnichannel access to the brand of their choice. We saw that a major chunk of brands embraced this philosophy over the Independence week.

For instance, my primary communication happens on my cell phone and brands saw my interaction on cell phones were far more than the email or website and therefore most of the promo I received was over mobile push or in-app rather than through email or website.

Grofers Freedom Sale

Also, there were deals that promoted usage of multiple channels to buy products. Grofers offered an INR 100 discount to shoppers who were open to buying stuff using their mobile app.

Appeal to Your Customers’ Emotions; Don’t Stop Experimenting

Customers are spoilt for choices when the whole nation is celebrating. In these times, marketers need not be intimidated or overwhelmed by their customers. They have to leverage these emotions and keeping building experiences with the help of experimentation.

These are major strategies that have been successfully demonstrated by brands to be effective. You need to understand emotional cues of your customers and accordingly create an effective campaign.

By tapping into your customer’s cognitive tendencies, you can build healthy, long-term relationships with your customers.

The post How Indian Brands Drive Conversions On Independence Day appeared first on VWO Blog.

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How Indian Brands Drive Conversions On Independence Day

Why We’re Addicted To Our Smartphones, But Not Our Tablets

Remember all of the wisecracks about executives and their BlackBerry addictions? Back then, constant contact was limited to the few and the mighty — relatively speaking, of course. But now, the last laugh might be on us. In record time, our smartphones have become indispensable, and as mobile technology has become integrated into nearly every aspect of our lives, our smartphones are shifting from device to dependency.
But while it’s now clear that we are locked in an intense relationship with our smartphones, one has to wonder why this courtship hasn’t turned into a love triangle with tablets.

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Why We’re Addicted To Our Smartphones, But Not Our Tablets

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Why No One is Reading Your Emails on Mobile

keanu-email-featured
Optimize your emails and help Keanu turn that frown upside down!

Did you know that almost 66% of all emails are now opened on a mobile device? A statistic all marketers should be aware of, no doubt, but what should really grab your attention is that 75% of people who receive email that isn’t optimized for mobile will just delete it.

If you’re a marketer who is sending emails that haven’t been optimized for mobile, you’re missing out on so much of the action that you might as well choose another profession.

The good news is that there are solutions to your mobile woes, none of which require you to be a rocket surgeon. Just a little bit of data mixed with a little bit of design with a dash of common sense thrown in for good measure.

Here are four reasons your emails might not be getting opened and read on mobile – and what you can do to correct it.

1. You’re not teasing the content of the email

The crucial first step of any marketing email is getting people to open it. In most mobile email apps you have three lines to convince your audience to open and read that email: the subject line, the first line and the from line.

image-subject-line-image

Our friend Aaron Orendorff has written a handy guide that breaks down the importance of these three fields and how to get the most out of them. Here’s what he says, in a nutshell.

Subject lines

An ellipsis can’t tell anyone what you really mean, so before your subject lines start trailing off into a mess of meaningless dots, remember that you have just 20-30 characters to reach your mobile readers.

That actually works out quite well, as 28-39 character subject lines get the highest click rates.

With so few words at your disposal, you may wonder which ones will do the best job of reaching your future readers. Aaron breaks that down as well, with a little help from the good folks over at Retention Science:

  • Personal words like “you” and “I” work well, as do slang terms and colloquialisms. Even emoticons are starting to help open rates here at Unbounce, however slightly. The point is that your email should sound like it’s coming from a human.
  • Emotional words that give your audience some sort of attachment to your value proposition are super good.
  • In one study, using pop culture references saw an open rate of 26% over ones with traditional subject lines, which were opened only 16% of the time.

But don’t get carried away. You still have to make sure that you’re matching your subject line with the copy on your landing page. “You can learn to dance like Beyonce!” might fit the criteria above, but if you’re selling car parts, you probably won’t get too far.

Mobile email message match
Make it your own. Image credit: vi.wikipedia.org

First lines

The best kind of marketing is sincere and personal. According to Aaron:

The first line of your automated emails should read as much like the first line of a real email as possible.

Unbounce co-founder Oli Gardner often does this in his emails to prospects. A couple of examples of first lines from Oli:

CRO Day was one of the proudest moments of my professional career.

Hard to believe, but Page Fights is one year old!

They read much like an email that you’d get from a friend, which prospects are more likely to open.

From lines

Automated emails should come from a real person and not look like they’re coming from an automated system.

Again, Aaron sums it up perfectly:

Avoid from lines like support@yoursite.com, customerservice@yoursite.com, sale@yoursite.com, or, worst of all, the dreaded word auto.

Instead of sending the email from your company as a whole, send it from a specific person with a face and a name.

This article from Crazy Egg reveals some numbers behind personalized From lines. According to one study, personalized emails had a 29% higher open rate and 41% unique click-through rate.


Personalized emails can receive 29% higher open rates and 41% unique CTR!
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As a marketer who is trying to get email content opened, read and acted on, adding a personal touch is a simple way of getting your audience to open your emails and click through to the next stage.

2. Your font size is creating friction

You work hard on the content of your emails, and so you want to make sure people are actually able to read them.

I subscribed to The Economist the other day. Their content is great, their delivery through their apps is spot on, but this email that I got after I signed up was a prime example of what not to do.

mobile-email-fail

What is that, an email for ants? Here’s a better job from our friends at Inbound.org.

inbound-email

Well, that’s much easier to read! The text is much larger and doesn’t require a microscope or any pinching or zooming.

So, how do you make sure that your text is readable on any given device?

While the iPhone automatically resizes tiny text, other devices won’t – so you want your font to be legible by default.

This comprehensive article on the Salesforce Canada blog recommends a minimum font size of 14 pixels for text in the body of the email, with minimum 22 pixels for headers.

But you’ve really got to test yourself to find that sweet spot for your audience.


If no one can read the tiny font in your mobile emails, you’re better off not sending them.
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3. The design of your emails is getting in the way

Good email design is all about enabling readers to actually see your content.

As my colleague Brad puts it: “Get out of my way so I can read the damn email.”

This isn’t a statistical analysis, but it does speak to the heart of what we’re trying to get at: the best designs are the ones where the people reading the mobile emails are not aware of the design.

If you include images in your emails to mobile readers, there’s a good chance they won’t even be seen. As Rose Barrett at Storyports points out, 43% of Gmail users read email without turning the image display on. Some mobile email clients, like the Blackberry and Windows phone clients, block images by default.

Mobile-Email-Client-Image-Blocks
Image credit: Storyports.com

The way around this, according to Barrett, is to use HTML emails instead of text emails with images added. You’ll still get to send highly stylized and informative text to your readers, and because CTA buttons are separate from the images, they’ll still appear in your email.

And if you do decide to use images, don’t forget to keep the design consistent between your email and your landing page. Good design match never hurts conversions.

The key is to keep it simple. And don’t forget to test. What works for one audience may not work for yours, so make sure you’re testing all the things!

4. Your call to action isn’t very touching

By now you get that there is limited space on a mobile device, and the real estate that you do have is valuable. The point of your email is to get people to click a link that takes them to your awesome landing page.

Give your email readers the ability to click that link by making your call to action button big enough for them to see, and big enough for them to actually be able to tap it with their thumbs.

You want to avoid text links as CTAs in your mobile emails. Remember, your mobile audience is all thumbs (badoom pssh), and you can reduce friction by making your CTA big and beautiful.

Below is another email from Oli that shows this in action. The CTA button is large enough to see and large enough to actually tap.

Mobile email cta

Make your CTA buttons in mobile emails big enough so readers will want to tap that.
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Chris Hexton at Optimizely does a great job of breaking down the art of the email CTA. The goal here is not so different from that of your landing page: make your CTA stand out.

Chris is fond of using the CRAFT method of CTA design. That means making your CTAs:

  • Colorful: Make them stand out from the rest of the text
  • Relevant: Keep CTAs in line with the message in the email
  • Actionable: Keep it clear, direct and understandable
  • Forceful: Tell your readers what to do
  • Targeted: Speak to what your readers’ needs and aspirations

By doing so, you give your readers a reason to take action and convert.

Mobile is not going anywhere

Take the time to get to know them by going through your email analytics to see how many are interacting with your emails via mobile. Dig in deep and see what you can learn about them. Offer them great experiences whether they’re on mobile or desktop by making sure that both your emails and your landing pages are mobile responsive.

Not adjusting to the needs of your mobile customer means that you’re leaving money on the table. And we’d hate to see you do that.

As always, we’d love to hear from you. Are you seeing a lift in your conversions by making use of any of these tactics? Let us know in the comments below!


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Why No One is Reading Your Emails on Mobile

How To Set Weights And Styles With The @font-face Declaration

If people are on your website, they’re probably either skimming quickly, looking for something, or they’ve found what they’re looking for and want to read it as easily as possible. Either way, keeping text readable will help them achieve their goal. [Links checked February/21/2017]
Bold and Italic Help to Organize Content A few months ago, I wrote an article on “Avoiding Faux Weights and Styles with Google Web Fonts.” I ended the article by showing that weights and styles are an important UX element when setting text.

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How To Set Weights And Styles With The @font-face Declaration

How To Give Our Clients The Best Deal In Mobile

Are we cheating our clients when it comes to mobile? More precisely, are we allowing our desire for mobile work to get in the way of providing our clients with the best solution for their business needs? This is the uncomfortable question we asked ourselves recently when redesigning our agency’s website, and we want to discuss it with the broader Web community: You, dear reader.
When redesigning our own website, we were forced to challenge our reasons for putting so much emphasis on mobile development.

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How To Give Our Clients The Best Deal In Mobile

Separate Mobile Website Vs. Responsive Website

The US presidential race is heading into full swing, which means we’ll soon see the candidates intensely debate the country’s hot-button issues. While the candidates are busy battling it out, the Web design world is entrenched in its own debate about how to address the mobile Web: creating separate mobile websites versus creating responsive websites.
It just so happens that the two US presidential candidates have chosen different mobile strategies for their official websites.

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Separate Mobile Website Vs. Responsive Website

Mobile Prototyping With Axure RP

Validating a design through user testing is necessary for the success of almost any product. And it’s even more critical in the mobile application space, where context and individual devices play an important role in how a product is experienced.
Fortunately, interactive prototyping is a time-tested way to quickly get your design onto a user’s device and into their hands. So, let’s look at why prototyping matters and explore one powerful tool that will enable you to do it quickly.

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Mobile Prototyping With Axure RP

iPhone App Designs Reviewed: Critique Board and Lessons Learned

Some time ago I started a mobile app design review section on our company’s website. The idea behind this “Crit Board” was simple: if mobile developers want to create apps that people want to buy, they’ll need help with design and usability. But most of the time they can’t afford it. On our Crit Board, developers can send us their mobile apps (iPhone apps, Android apps, Blackberry apps) along with questions and problems, and we (free of charge) will pick apart key usability issues, illustrate our design recommendations and post our findings.

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iPhone App Designs Reviewed: Critique Board and Lessons Learned

How To Design Style Guides For Brands And Websites

A website is never done. Everyone has worked on a project that changed so much after it launched that they no longer wanted it in their portfolio. One way to help those who take over your projects is to produce a style guide.
Edward Tufte once said: “Great design is not democratic; it comes from great designers. If the standard is lousy, then develop another standard.” Although there’s no stopping some clients from making their website awful, by creating a style guide, you’re effectively establishing rules for those who take over from you.

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How To Design Style Guides For Brands And Websites

Web Development For The iPhone And iPad: Getting Started

According to AdMob, the iPhone operating system makes up 50% of the worldwide smartphone market, with the next-highest OS being Android at 24%. Sales projections for the Apple iPad run anywhere from one to four million units in the first year. Like it or not, the iPhone OS, and Safari in particular, have become a force to be reckoned with for Web developers. If you haven’t already, it’s time to dive in and familiarize yourself with the tools required to optimize websites and Web applications for this OS.

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Web Development For The iPhone And iPad: Getting Started