Tag Archives: border

Understanding CSS Layout And The Block Formatting Context

There are a few concepts in CSS layout that can really enhance your CSS game once you understand them. This article is about the Block Formatting Context (BFC). You may never have heard of this term, but if you have ever made a layout with CSS, you probably know what it is. Understanding what a BFC is, why it works, and how to create one is useful and can help you to understand how layout works in CSS.

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Understanding CSS Layout And The Block Formatting Context

Useful Adobe Fireworks Resources: Extensions (Part 1)

Fireworks is an excellent UI design tool; however, Adobe decided to feature-freeze it back in 2013 and (at the same time) did not offer any replacement tool to its users. Nevertheless, since Fireworks runs fine today on the latest Mac OS X and Windows OS, and since it still offers a solid UI-design feature set, many designers continue to use it and rely on it daily.
For those of you who are searching for a similar tool, Sketch 3.

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Useful Adobe Fireworks Resources: Extensions (Part 1)

Coding Q&A With Chris Coyier: Code Smell And Type On A Grid

Howdy, folks! Welcome to the new incarnation of Smashing Magazine’s Q&A. It’s going to work like this: you send in questions you have about CSS, and at least once a month we’ll pick out the best questions and answer them so that everyone can benefit from the exchange. Your question could be about a very specific problem you’re having, or it could be a question about a philosophical approach. We’ll take all kinds.

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Coding Q&A With Chris Coyier: Code Smell And Type On A Grid

Equal Height Column Layouts with Borders and Negative Margins in CSS

“What? Another “Equal Height Columns” article? Enough already!” If this is what you think, then think again because this solution is different. It does not rely on any of the usual tricks. It does not use images, nor extra markup, nor CSS3, nor pseudo-classes, nor Javascript, nor absolute positioning. All it uses is border and negative margin. Please note that this article will also demonstrate different construct techniques and will brush up on a few concepts.

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Equal Height Column Layouts with Borders and Negative Margins in CSS

CSS 2.1 and CSS 3 Help Cheat Sheets (PDF)

Today we are glad to release two useful cheat sheets that will help you quickly look up the right CSS 2.1-property or an obscure CSS 3 property. The style sheets contain most important properties, explanations and keywords for each property. The help sheets were created by GoSquared and released for Smashing Magazine and its readers.

Download the cheat sheets for free! The CSS 2.1 Help Sheet covers Syntax, Font, Text, Margins, Padding, Border, Position, Background, List, Media Types and Keywords.

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CSS 2.1 and CSS 3 Help Cheat Sheets (PDF)

You Can Use CSS3 Right Now

CSS3 makes a designer’s work easier because they’re able to spend less time hacking their CSS and HTML code to work in IE and more time crafting their design. It is the future of web design and can be used today.
This article will hopefully show you to care a little less about making everything pixel perfect in IE. It will inspire you to spend more time making your designs exquisite in the rest of the browsers while serving up a working and perfectly accessible website for IE.

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You Can Use CSS3 Right Now

The New Hotness: Using CSS3 Visual Effects

Previously in this series on CSS3, we talked not only about how to create scalable and compelling buttons but about how to effectively use new CSS3 properties to speed up development and quickly create rich page elements. In this final article of the series, we’ll really get into it and use CSS3 visual effects to push the envelope.
Not everything in this article is practical, or even bug-free, but it’s a fun primer on what’s in the pipeline for Web design.

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The New Hotness: Using CSS3 Visual Effects

Pushing Your Buttons With Practical CSS3

CSS3 is the partially implemented sequel to the CSS2 spec we all know and love. It’s already popping up in new browsers such as Firefox 3.5, Safari 4 and Chrome. In this article, the first of the articles that explore practical (and even far-fetched) implementation of CSS3, we start by applying CSS3 to something we all have to create: buttons.
Calls to action are critical for any website, and a compelling, attention-grabbing, clickable button goes a long way toward driving that engagement.

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Pushing Your Buttons With Practical CSS3

CSS Background – Everything You Need To Know

The CSS Background is one of the fundamentals that you simply need to know. We will cover the basics of using CSS backgrounds, including properties such as background-attachment. We’ll show some common tricks that can be done with the background as well as what’s in store for background in CSS 3 (including four new background properties!).
You may also want to check out the following Smashing Magazine articles:
Simple Responsive Images With CSS Background Images [Ask SM] Transparent Background, Positioning Problem Backgrounds In Web Design: Examples And Best Practices CSS: Innovative Techniques and Practical Solutions Working With Background in CSS 2 Overview We have five main background properties to use in CSS 2.

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CSS Background – Everything You Need To Know

Mastering CSS, Part 1: Styling Design Elements

CSS is one of the most important building blocks of modern web design. Standards demand the use of CSS for formatting and styling pages, and with good reason. It’s lighter-weight and capable of much more than older methods like tables.
And CSS isn’t nearly as tricky as some people tend to believe. Below are fresh tips and techniques for creating and styling design elements with CSS. They’re a good place to start if you’re new to CSS but are valuable even if you’re a veteran designer.

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Mastering CSS, Part 1: Styling Design Elements