Tag Archives: browser

Debugging CSS Grid Layouts With Firefox Grid Inspector

You may have heard quite a bit of talk about a CSS feature called “Grid” this year. If you are someone who cringes when you hear the words “CSS” and “grid” in the same sentence, then I highly suggest you check out this new CSS module called CSS Grid.
Browsers render HTML elements as boxes according to the CSS box model, and CSS Grid is a new layout model that provides authors the ability to control the size and position of these boxes and their contents.

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Debugging CSS Grid Layouts With Firefox Grid Inspector

Designing For A Browserless Web

What happens when we take the web browser out of web browsing? Google’s new “Add to Homescreen” feature delivers fast, focused web experiences that are indistinguishable from those of a native app. What can designers learn from the successes of early adopters such as Twitter, and how can we leverage app-like design patterns to tackle this brand new set of user experience challenges?
The “Add to Homescreen” installation process, as shown on Google Chrome Developer’s mobile website (Image source) (Large preview) We’ve seen debates on the topic of native versus web experiences.

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Designing For A Browserless Web

Web Development Reading List: Announcing Changes, A Design Kit, DNA Malware, And Why Meaning Is An Advantage

You might have noticed it already: in the past few weeks you might have missed Anselm’s Web Development Reading List issues here on SmashingMag. No worries, from now on, we’ll switch to collecting the most important news of each month in one handy, monthly summary for you. If you’d like to continue reading Anselm’s weekly reading list (and we encourage you to!), you can still do so via email, on wdrl.

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Web Development Reading List: Announcing Changes, A Design Kit, DNA Malware, And Why Meaning Is An Advantage

Follow the Trail of Profits Hiding in Your Website with Crazy Egg’s Confetti Report

Confetti is a compelling report that shows you in high definition where individual clicks are happening on your web pages with colored-coded dots. Being able to visually see where your visitors are clicking can tell you a lot about your web page’s design and how it’s helping (or hurting) your goals and conversions. Metrics Selector In the upper-left corner of the Confetti Report, you’ll see our Metrics Selector. By clicking on the metrics in the legend, you can switch between: Search terms Day of week Time of click Browser …and 16 other metrics! Being able to segment your Confetti Report…

The post Follow the Trail of Profits Hiding in Your Website with Crazy Egg’s Confetti Report appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Follow the Trail of Profits Hiding in Your Website with Crazy Egg’s Confetti Report

Enhancing CSS Layout: From Floats To Flexbox To Grid

Earlier this year, support for CSS grid layout landed in most major desktop browsers. Naturally, the specification is one of the hot topics at meet-ups and conferences. After having some conversations about grid and progressive enhancement, I believe that there’s a good amount of uncertainty about using it. I heard some quite interesting questions and statements, which I want to address in this post.

Progressively enhanced CSS Layout, with Flexbox and CSS Grid.

“When can I start using CSS grid layout?” “Too bad that it’ll take some more years before we can use grid in production.” “Do I need Modernizr in order to make websites with CSS grid layout?” “If I wanted to use grid today, I’d have to build two to three versions of my website.” The CSS grid layout module is one of the most exciting developments since responsive design. We should try to get the best out of it as soon as possible, if it makes sense for us and our projects.

The post Enhancing CSS Layout: From Floats To Flexbox To Grid appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Enhancing CSS Layout: From Floats To Flexbox To Grid

Introducing The Website Speed Test Image Analysis Tool

Web developers spend their days writing hypertext, but, byte for byte, most of the web is composed of images. It is hard to overstate the effect that images have on the average web page’s performance; faster websites have broader reach and a higher impact. The first and most important thing you can do to improve the performance of your website’s images is figure out how to measure them.
Enter Website Speed Test, a free and drop-dead-simple tool that leverages our (Cloudinary’s) image smarts to let you measure, diagnose and (crucially) communicate about the image performance of any website.

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Introducing The Website Speed Test Image Analysis Tool

Web Development Reading List #188: Real-World Accessibility, Flexbox Madness, And The Ephemerality Of Things We Build

CSS is an amazing tool which we constantly use but we don’t seem to honor it appropriately. Whenever I see the growing browser support of the :focus-within selector, the much wanted justify-content: space-evenly for Flexbox or how great CSS Grids already work, I feel really grateful to have such awesome tools available to work with.
And with advanced new media queries such as prefers-reduced-motion, screen and (color), or pointer, we get amazing tools to improve accessibility and usability of our websites.

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Web Development Reading List #188: Real-World Accessibility, Flexbox Madness, And The Ephemerality Of Things We Build

Better Form Design: One Thing Per Page (Case Study)

In 2008, I worked on Boots.com. They wanted a single-page checkout with the trendiest of techniques from that era, including accordions, AJAX and client-side validation.
Each step (delivery address, delivery options and credit-card details) had an accordion panel. Each panel was submitted via AJAX. Upon successful submission, the panel collapsed and the next one opened, with a sliding transition.
It looked a little like this:
Boots’ single-page checkout, using an accordion panel for each step.

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Better Form Design: One Thing Per Page (Case Study)

An Abridged Cartoon Introduction To WebAssembly

There’s a lot of hype about WebAssembly in JavaScript circles today. People talk about how blazingly fast it is, and how it’s going to revolutionize web development. But most conversations don’t go into the details of why it’s fast. In this article, I want to help you understand what exactly it is about WebAssembly that makes it fast.
But first, what is it? WebAssembly is a way of taking code written in programming languages other than JavaScript and running that code in the browser.

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An Abridged Cartoon Introduction To WebAssembly

What You Need To Know About OAuth2 And Logging In With Facebook

In case you’re wondering what OAuth2 is, it’s the protocol that enables anyone to log in with their Facebook account. It powers the “Log in with Facebook” button in apps and on websites everywhere.
This article shows you how “Log in with Facebook” works and explains the protocol behind it all. You’ll learn why you’d want to log in with Facebook, Google, Microsoft or one of the many other companies that support OAuth2.

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What You Need To Know About OAuth2 And Logging In With Facebook