Tag Archives: budget

The Online Business Owner’s Periodical Website Sanity Checklist

Website Checklist

A common oversight of many online businesses is NOT using their own websites. Simply put, they don’t spend time in their visitors’ shoes. Many site owners are busy with day-to-day, business-as-usual tasks, working on new features or promotional campaigns or whatever other millions of things there are sitting on their to-do lists. Very few spend time checking up on their own online properties to make sure everything is in working order. For a business owner, whose time is valuable, this job can be handed off to an intern, virtual assistant, or entry-level employee. It’s a good idea to make a…

The post The Online Business Owner’s Periodical Website Sanity Checklist appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Original link: 

The Online Business Owner’s Periodical Website Sanity Checklist

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Prototyping (But Were Afraid To Ask)

Prototypes are my framework for learning new tools, platforms and techniques. A prototype works as hard proof that an idea will or won’t work. It is central to my entire creative process and is the medium I use to relate to the people and businesses I collaborate with.
I’m gushy about prototypes because I think they can work wonders, but I also think they don’t get they’re due. Prototyping is usually not incorporated into project timelines at all or, if it is, usually as some tangential deliverable to a larger project.

Source: 

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Prototyping (But Were Afraid To Ask)

8 Things You Need to Know to Improve Your Influencer Marketing Campaign

influencer

You’re going to start your very first influencer marketing campaign, and you want to make sure it’s a success. Or maybe you’ve executed a few campaigns before, and you want the next one to deliver better results. Either way, knowing how to manage your campaign effectively is crucial if you want influencer marketing to work for you. While it’s not always easy to manage influencer marketing campaigns, you’ll find it much easier if you remember the following steps: 1. Set Up a Goal You should always start with a defined goal, regardless of whether it’s influencer marketing or any other…

The post 8 Things You Need to Know to Improve Your Influencer Marketing Campaign appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Continued – 

8 Things You Need to Know to Improve Your Influencer Marketing Campaign

Create a Data-Driven Content Strategy in 1 Day [INFOGRAPHIC]

If you’re a content writer, you might think that data analytics isn’t relevant to you (I know I did). But you’d be wrong. Data and content are actually a match made in heaven. If you collect the right data, you can find out what type of content resonates with your audience  — isn’t that a writer’s ultimate goal?

By developing a data-driven content strategy, you are ensuring the content you’re producing is relevant to your current readers as well as your prospects (who may not know who the heck you are). Plus, the chances are high your competitors already have a data-driven content strategy, so creating one for your business is just, well, good business.

Are you freaking out?

Well stop. Building a data-driven content strategy doesn’t have to take longer than a day. Yep, you read that right: one day. Oh, and if you use free tools like we suggest, it’s also easy on the budget (something your boss will no doubt appreciate).

Our friends at JBH Agency have designed a beautiful step-by-step infographic showing you exactly how to build your data-driven content strategy: all you need is 24 hours, a few free tools and one clever human.

Psst: If you’re more of a reader than a visual learner, check out the original article that inspired this infographic, written by Unbounce’s Brad Tiller.
Data-driven content strategy infographic

Embed this infographic on your site

This article is from – 

Create a Data-Driven Content Strategy in 1 Day [INFOGRAPHIC]

Is Egocentric Copy Alienating Your Prospects?

woman lifting weights and looking in mirror
“Who writes the best copy? I write the best copy.” Image via pixabay.com

Do you know what the most common advice is for people trying to make new friends?

Stop talking about yourself and ask about the other person.

People love to talk about themselves, so by giving into the other person’s desire to do so, you come across as ultimately likeable.

Well guess what? The same is true of landing page copy.

It’s an all-too-common mistake that business owners and marketers make when crafting their own campaign landing pages. When tasked with making their online business stand out from the pack, they default to shouting their own virtues from the rooftops. They think that if consumers know all about how wonderful they are (or their product is), conversions will hop right into their lap.

But the harsh reality is your audience couldn’t care less.

Landing pages can be tricky. You need to be persuasive enough in a single page to convince the casual visitor to take action and convert. By simply talking yourself up, you’re missing the mark completely for one very important reason:

It’s not about you, it’s about your audience.

Just as you might be inclined to go on and on about how great your business is, your audience is only interested in how you can help them. It’s human nature — we are innately wired to be most concerned about number one.

In other words, to engage your audience and convince them to convert, you need to write copy that appeals to their own self interests. If you can’t do that effectively, your audience will likely seek a solution to their problem elsewhere.


Engage and convert your audience with copy that appeals to their own self interests.
Click To Tweet


Let’s explore a few different types of self-indulgent copy — mistakes you may not even realize you’re making — and how you can do better.

Signs of ego-driven copy

Landing page copy should be written with one goal in mind: To convince visitors to convert. If you go into it with any other motivations, you’re setting yourself up to fail.

When it comes to egocentric landing page copy, there are two distinct varieties: author-centric copy and company-centric copy. Let’s dig into both.

1. Author-centric copy

Author-centric copy can creep up when the copywriter is more interested in showing off their writing talents than writing persuasive copy designed for conversions.

You may be a prolific writer with an Ivy League vocabulary and a style all your own. But once you start writing to impress, rather than to persuade, you have already lost a large chunk of your audience. Some may not understand your word choices, but the bigger problem is that you are missing the point of landing page copy to begin with.


Once you start writing to impress, you’ve already lost a chunk of your audience.
Click To Tweet


Note the example below. HLT is an online learning platform. After careful consideration, I figured out that this landing page is meant for it’s partner program, but it’s still hard to know what that entails or what the benefits are. The author of this copy seems to be more concerned with setting a tone than with enticing a conversion.

landing page screenshot

Take the headline for example: “Embracing the Mobile Mind Shift.”

Do you have any idea what this means? Does it entice you to fill out the form next to it? Not at all.

It might be thought provoking, it doesn’t make for a very enticing headline. It doesn’t make it crystal clear what you’re going to get by filling out the form, which is a missed opportunity.

While there is certainly a time and place to win readers over with your thoughtful prose and witticisms, a tightly honed landing page isn’t it. Copy containing overly flowery or clichéd language may make the writer feel good about his or her abilities, but it does very little to make potential partners feel confident that their pains are understood (or that they’ll be addressed).

2. Company-centric copy

This is a much more common form of landing page narcissism that can destroy your conversions. Consider the headline in the following example from Co-Construct, the self-proclaimed “#1 Highest Rated Remodel and Custom Home Building Software.”

company-centric landing page

Everybody is looking for “#1,” so what’s wrong with this? The problem is with what’s missing:

  1. Why is it rated the best? Who rated it number one?
  2. What’s the unique value proposition? What can this software uniquely offer me that its competitors can’t?
  3. What specific concerns, pain points or fears does it address?
  4. How will this particular software benefit me? How will it make my life easier?

By simply speaking to how great your company, product or service is, you’re missing a huge opportunity to convey what your prospect will get out of the deal.

Never mistake your own enthusiasm for what will motivate your customers.

How to turn it around

So now that we know some of the more common mistakes, how do we turn the mirror away from ourselves and toward our audience?

Turn your brags into benefits

When it comes to persuasive landing page copy, it’s all about consumer benefits. So you must ask yourself: “How will my offering benefit my target customer?”

Start with what you already have. Go through your existing copy, and every time you see a braggy statement about your business, rework it so it concretely addresses a validated pain point with a benefit. For example:

“#1 Highest Rated Remodel and Custom Home Building Software” becomes “Complete Your Home Remodel Faster & Under Budget.”

Addressing the pains your product or service alleviates and offering concrete solutions is incredibly effective in landing page copy. Chances are, your current landing page partially addresses these elements, but it’s up to you to polish each point to make them overtly obvious and benefit-driven.

Lyft is an on-demand car service currently in hard-core recruitment mode for drivers. Their driver-targeting campaign does a great job of using two separate benefits in one succinct headline:

lyft landing page
Lyft’s driver campaign combines two benefits into one super compelling headline.

Final thoughts

One of the most fundamental principles of winning people over is to stop talking about yourself, and ask about them. It is incredibly effective when it comes to making friends, and the same is true when trying to maximize online conversions.

By simply asking, “What worries my customers?” or “How will my product help them?” you will be in the right frame of mind to craft much more persuasive copy.

When you put your own ego on the shelf and start speaking to your ideal customer’s self interests, you can expect to see your conversions take off like crazy. Which is, ironically, a nice little ego boost.


anigif_enhanced-buzz-32309-1353011666-19

Taken from – 

Is Egocentric Copy Alienating Your Prospects?

Thumbnail

Build a Killer Conversion Strategy with Nothing but Time and Empathy

Clear Your Calendar
You don’t need to hire an expensive CRO team to do great work. Just be ready to clear your calendar.

Conversion rate optimization is about different things to different people. For some, it’s simply about haphazardly changing elements on a page until people click more, and then it’s optimized! High fives all around!

You should not listen to those people.

If you want to build a real CRO strategy, based on sustainable optimization practices that will help you build a long-term business, ask the real experts. The ones who have staked their reputations and their livelihoods on their CRO knowledge.

This past April 9th, those experts came together to create over 24 hours of free programming, and over 10,000 people attended online and in-person events throughout the world.

We called it CRO Day. Well, we actually called it 2015 International Conversion Rate Optimization Day, but that didn’t fit into a hashtag.

With so many of the world’s top conversion minds sharing their techniques with the world, we thought this the perfect time to distill their wisdom into a punchy blog post!

Read on to learn what pros like Joanna Wiebe, Brian Massey, Talia Wolf and others think is crucial to building a killer CRO strategy that won’t just get you more clicks, but give you a better understanding of your customers.

If you don’t have the money, you’ll have to make the time

Joanna Wiebe and Brian Massey
Joanna Wiebe and Brian Massey, pictured at Call to Action Conference 2014

In their Ask Me Anything About CRO session, Joanna and Brian were asked what they felt the proper budget for a CRO team was. Their answer was instant and simultaneous:

One million dollars.

Okay, great. If you have a million dollars to spend on CRO, hit these two up.

On the off-chance that you don’t, you can work out a rough budget by multiplying the value of your conversions by a reasonable, estimated increase. Brian explained:

If I increase things by 10%, what is my annual increase in profit? That gives you an idea of what the upside is. So if you say, we could make $200,000 more with a 10% increase, yeah, I’m willing to spend $10,000, $20,000, $50,000 on conversion optimization.

If you can quantify the business impact that will come with increased conversions, you’ll have a better idea of just how much you should invest in CRO.

But how do you make CRO work on a small or non-existent budget? Joanna has some choice advice:

Take the budget that you have and apply it to learning. If you don’t have a lot of money, you have to have time. You don’t get to have no money and no time.

Thankfully, there are tons of free resources available that will help you become a CRO expert. (Like the over 24-hours of freely available content that was recorded during CRO day.)

And as Brian went on to elaborate, there are various free or inexpensive tools for analytics, click-tracking, session-tracking and conversion testing that become incredibly powerful once you’ve mastered the CRO basics.


If you can’t invest in a CRO team, spend your time learning to be a team of one.
Click To Tweet


For the biggest conversion wins, test content over style

One of the most common CRO anecdotes is that changing the button color will increase your conversions, from anywhere between 5% and 100-billion-percent, depending on who’s telling the story.

It’s true that visual elements like button colors and background images can make measurable differences, but you’re not likely to see a huge impact from just fiddling with graphics. At least, that’s according to Ben Hunt, author of Convert!.

Ben HuntDuring his When CRO Goes Wrong webinar, he presented the results of 50 A/B tests he had run on both his own site and his clients’ sites, and broke down the differences in impact between style changes, content changes and changes that included both.

Ben Hunt's Graph
Comparing 50 A/B tests he had run, Ben realized that content changes far outperformed stylistic ones.

What he found was that purely stylistic changes tended to impact a page’s conversion rate by a mere 5%, and that he’s never reached a double-digit impact with stylistic changes alone.

Color, graphics, typography — does it matter? Yes, a little bit. But look at the content changes. They are typically between 5 and 20% — that’s the normal range when you’re changing content — and generally positive.

When someone comes to your site, they’re looking for real answers to a problem that they can’t solve on their own. Your content — be it copy, video, or informational graphics — is what’s going to provide those answers. So test it and perfect it.

This isn’t to say that strong design isn’t critical to having high-performing landing pages. But if you start by perfecting your message, you can then move on to create a design that supports it.

And that’s a surefire way to generate bigger wins with less effort.


To win big conversion boosts, test and perfect your message, not your color palette.
Click To Tweet


Always be testing! No, seriously, do it

Once you’ve tested and discovered elements that perform well, it can be tempting to apply them all across your site and then move on something shiny and new.

While you shouldn’t necessarily spend all of your time iterating on basic elements, you should continue to explore new ideas for every element of your marketing campaigns. After all, the web is always changing, and so is your audience.

Adam AvramescuIf anyone knows about page optimization, it would be Adam Avramescu, head of education at Optimizely. He’s designed an experimental framework to help ensure that you are always learning from your tests, which he presented in a webinar entitled How To Create High-Converting Marketing Experiences with CCD and A/B Testing, which also included our own Oli Gardner.

Experimental-Framework

Adam’s framework is a cyclical process, with the final step leading back to the first. Let’s break down each step:

  • Determine the conversions to improve based on the KPIs that matter to your business (like your existing conversions, traffic, or revenue)
  • Form a hypothesis on how the conversion rate could be improved
  • Identify the variables — elements on your site — that can be adjusted to fulfill your hypothesis, and how they must be adjusted to do so
  • Run the experiment — an A/B or multivariate test — and wait patiently until you have enough conversions to be confident in the result
  • Measure the results and, based on what you can glean from them, decide which conversions you should improve next

As Adam says:

Optimization is a journey, not a destination. If testing is something you’re doing once, you’re leaving money on the table. Instead of testing one thing once, test everything, all of the time.


Hypothesize, test, learn and iterate — and do it all over again. Forever.
Click To Tweet


Learn from your losers

Talia WolfIn the Top 5 Obstacles in CRO & How to Overcome Them Hangout, Talia Wolf of Conversioner reminded us that the the purpose of running optimization tests isn’t solely about increasing your conversion rate — it’s about learning from your experiments.

The whole idea of conversion optimization is not just to increase your conversion rate, per se. You want to be able to scale it and learn from the results of your tests. …

When you’re doing CRO the right way and you build hypotheses, and you have a strategy for each test, you are then able to understand the results — fail or win — because they are about your customer.

Bryan EisenbergWhat does it mean for your tests to be “about your customer”? Bryan Eisenberg of Market Motive suggests that instead of being in the business of selling your products, you should be in the business of helping your customers buy them:

Missed clicks, bounced visits and missed conversions are failures. When we throw ads up there and people don’t click, it means that we missed our targets. We didn’t understand them. When they click and they bounce right off, we didn’t satisfy them.

If they go through and they browse several pages but don’t convert, we didn’t help them buy. We didn’t answer all of their objections, answer all the questions they have in order to feel confident in purchasing from us.

Reframing failure not as a failure to convince, but as a failure to adequately address the concerns and needs of our audience will allow you to understand not just went wrong with a losing variant, but why.


Conversion failures are a failure to understand your audience.
Click To Tweet


Play the long game

Conversion rate optimization isn’t about short-sighted “hacks” to get people to click a button that does whatever. If you approach it from that perspective, you might see some short-term gains, but you’ll fail to attract the very best customers for your business. And who are they? These are the questions Joanna recommends you ask yourself:

Who is most likely to buy your product, use it, be happy with it, tell their friends and then come back for more? … Does your value prop resonate with your ideal customer so strongly that they are absolutely willing to part with their money to get what you got?

CRO is a process that you have to invest in. And not just money or your time, but your intellect and your heart. Doing so is what has made the above experts so renowned for their work.

We’re only able to scratch the surface here, but if you want access to the 24+ hours of recordings from CRO Day, head over to the CRO Day website. It’ll take a while to get through everything, so consider starting with the events mentioned in this article. Trust us — it’s worth the time investment.


Continued here:  

Build a Killer Conversion Strategy with Nothing but Time and Empathy

Getting The Most Out Of Your Web Conference Experience

To be a web professional is to be a lifelong learner. The ever-changing landscape of our industry requires us to continually update and expand our knowledge so that our skills do not become outdated. One of the ways we can continue learning is by attending professional web conferences. But with so many seemingly excellent events to choose from, how do you decide which is right for you?
During the course of my career, I have had the good fortune to attend a number of conferences, workshops and professional events.

Link:  

Getting The Most Out Of Your Web Conference Experience

Effectively Planning UX Design Projects

Planning user experience (UX) projects is a balancing act of getting the right amount of user input within the constraints of your project. The trick is to work out the best use of your time. How can you get the most UX goodness for your client’s budget? This article explains how to choose the right mix of tools for the task at hand.
Getting Started With UX Planning The planning phase is all about understanding what you have been asked to do and working out the best combination of activities that will give you the outcome you need, within the time, budgetary and resource constraints of the project.

Original article:  

Effectively Planning UX Design Projects

iPhone App Designs Reviewed: Critique Board and Lessons Learned

Some time ago I started a mobile app design review section on our company’s website. The idea behind this “Crit Board” was simple: if mobile developers want to create apps that people want to buy, they’ll need help with design and usability. But most of the time they can’t afford it. On our Crit Board, developers can send us their mobile apps (iPhone apps, Android apps, Blackberry apps) along with questions and problems, and we (free of charge) will pick apart key usability issues, illustrate our design recommendations and post our findings.

View the original here:

iPhone App Designs Reviewed: Critique Board and Lessons Learned

35 Stunning Macro Photography Ideas

Macro photography is also known as close-up photography. Compared to other types of photography, macro photography is quite difficult, because of the nifty equipment, lightning and other techniques involved. However, in the end it comes down to what kind of pictures you want to take and what level of precision you are striving for. In this inspirational showcase, we’ve collected some beautiful macro pictures, as well as some useful macro photography tutorials – for people at all levels of experience.

Source article – 

35 Stunning Macro Photography Ideas