Tag Archives: building

Hanapin’s PPC Experts Share How to Boost Your AdWords Quality Score with Landing Pages

It’s happened to the best of us. You return from lunch, pull up your AdWords account, and hover over a keyword only to realize you have a Quality Score of just three (ooof). You scan a few more keywords, and realize some others are sitting at fours, and you’ve even got a few sad twos.

Low Quality Scores like this are a huge red flag because they mean you’re likely paying through the nose for a given keyword without the guarantee of a great ad position. Moreover, you can’t necessarily bid your way into the top spot by increasing your budget.

You ultimately want to see healthy Quality Scores of around seven or above, because a good Quality Score can boost your Ad Rank, your resulting Search Impression Share, and will help your ads get served up more often.

To ensure your ads appear in top positions whenever relevant queries come up, today we’re sharing sage advice from PPC experts Jeff Baum and Diane Anselmo from Hanapin Marketing. During Marketing Optimization Week, they spoke to three things you can do with your landing pages today to increase your Quality Score, improve your Ad Rank, and pay less to advertise overall.

But first…

What is Quality Score (and why is it such a big deal?)

Direct from Google, Quality Score is an estimate of the quality of your ads, keywords, and landing pages. Higher quality ad experiences can lead to lower prices and better ad positions.

You may remember a time when Quality Score didn’t even exist, but it was introduced as a way for you to understand if you were serving up the best experiences possible. Upping your score per keyword (especially your most important ones) is important because it determines your Ad Rank in a major way:

Cost Per Click x Quality Score = Ad Rank

To achieve Quality Scores of seven and above you’ll need to consider three factors. We’re talkin’: relevancy, load time, and ease of navigation, which are consequently the very things Diane and Jeff say to focus on with your landing pages.

Below are the three actions Hanapin’s dynamic duo suggest you take to get the Ad Rank you deserve.

Where can you see AdWords Quality Score regularly?
If you’re not already keeping a close eye on this, simply navigate to Keywords and modify by adding the Quality Score column. Alternatively, you can hover over individual keywords to view case-by-case.

Tip 1) Convey the Exact Same Message From Ad to Landing Page

One of the perks of building custom landing pages fast, is the ability to carry through the exact same details from your ads to your landing pages. A consistent message between the two is key because it helps visitors recognize they’ve landed in the right place, and assures someone they’re on the right path to the outcome they searched for.

Here’s an ad to landing page combo Diane shared with us as an example:

Cool, 500 business cards for $8.50—got it. But when we click through to the landing page (which happens to be the brand’s homepage…)

  • The phone number from the ad doesn’t match the top of the page where we’ve landed.
  • The price in the ad headline doesn’t match the website’s headline exactly ($8.50 appears further down on the page, but could cause confusion).
  • While the ad’s CTA is to “order now”, the page we land on has tons to click on and offers up “Free Sample Kit” vs. an easy “Order Now’ option to match the ad. Someone may bounce quickly because of the amount of options presented.

As Jeff told us, the lesson here is that congruence builds trust. If you do everything to make sure your ads and landing pages are in sync, you’ll really benefit and likely see your Quality Score rise over time.

In a second example, we see strong message match play out really well for Vistaprint, wherein this is the ad:

And all of the ad’s details make it through to the subsequent landing page:

Improve your AdWords Quality Score with landing pages like Vistaprint's here.

In this case:

  • The price matches in the prominent sub-headline
  • The phone number matches the ad
  • Stocks, shapes and finishes are mentioned prominently on the landing page after they’re seen in the ad
  • The landing page conveys the steps involved in “getting started” (the CTA that appears most prominently).

Overall, the expectations are set up in the ad and fulfilled in the landing page, which is often a sign this advertiser is ideally paying less in the long run.

Remember: Google doesn’t tell you precisely what to fix.
As Jeff mentioned in Hanapin’s MOW talk, Google gives you a score, but doesn’t tell you exactly what to do to improve it. Luckily, we can help with reco’s around page speed, CTAs and more. Run your landing page through our Landing Page Analyzer to get solid recommendations for improving your landing pages.

Tip 2) Speed up your landing page’s load time

If you’re hit with a slow-loading page, you bounce quickly, and the same goes for prospects clicking through on your ads.

In fact, in an account Jeff was working on at Hanapin over the summer, in just one month they saw performance tank dramatically because of site speed. Noticing that most of the conversion drop off came from mobile, they quickly learned desktop visitors had a higher tolerance for slower load times, but they lost a ton of mobile prospects (from both form and phone) because of the lag.

Jeff recalls:

“we saw our ad click costs were going up, because our Quality Score was dropping due to the deficiency in site speed”.

Your landing page size (impacted by the images on your page) tends to slow load time, and—as we’ve seen with the Unbounce Landing Page Analyzer—82.2% of marketers have at least one image on their landing page that requires compression to speed things up.

As Jeff and Diane shared, you can check your page’s speed via Google’s free tool, Page Speed Insights and get their tips to improve. Furthermore, if you want to instantly get compressed versions of your images to swap out for a quick speed fix, you can also run your page through the Unbounce Landing Page Analyzer.

Pictured above: the downloadable images you can get via the Analyzer to improve your page speed and performance.

Tip 3) Ensure your landing page is easy to navigate

Using Diane’s analogy, you can think of a visit to your landing page like it’s a brick and mortar store. In other words, it’s the difference between arriving in a Nike store during Black Friday, and the same store any other time of the year. The former is a complete mess, and the latter is super organized.

Similarly, if your landing page experience is cluttered and visitors have to be patient to find what they’re looking for, you’ll see a higher bounce rate, which Google takes as a signal your landing page experience isn’t meeting needs.

Instead, you’ll want a clear information hierarchy. Meaning you cover need-to-know information quickly in a logical order, and your visitor can simply reach out and grab what they need as a next step. The difference is the visitor being able to get in and check out in a matter of minutes with what they wanted.

This seems easy, but as Diane says,

“Sometimes when thinking about designing sites, there’s so much we want people to do that we don’t realize that people need to be given information in steps. Do this first, then do that…”

As Jeff suggested, with landing pages, less can be more. So consider where you may need multiple landing pages for communicating different aspects of your offer or business. For example, if you own a bowling alley that contains a trampoline park and laser tag arena, you may want separate ads and landing pages for communicating the party packages for each versus cramming all the details on one page that doesn’t quite meet the needs of the person looking explicitly for a laser tag birthday party.

The better you signpost a clear path to conversion on your landing pages, the better chance you’ll have at a healthy Quality Score.

The job doesn’t really end

On a whole, Diane and Jeff help their clients at Hanapin achieve terrific Ad Rank by making their ad to landing pages combos as relevant as possible, optimizing load time, and ensuring content and options are well organized.

Quality Score is something you’ll need to monitor over time, and there’s no exact science to it. Google checks frequently, but it may be a few weeks until you see your landing page changes influence scores.

Despite no definitive date range, Diane encourages everyone to stay the course, and you will indeed see your Quality Score increase over time with these landing page fixes.

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Hanapin’s PPC Experts Share How to Boost Your AdWords Quality Score with Landing Pages

Live Stream From Awwwards Berlin 2018: Showcasing Trends In UX Design

Designing the best experience is a challenge, and every designer and developer has their own way of tackling it. But, well, no matter how different our approaches are, one thing is for sure: We can learn a lot from each other.
To give you your dose of UX inspiration, we are happy to announce that our dear friends at Adobe, are streaming live from the Awwwards Conference which will take place in Berlin on February 8th and 9th.

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Live Stream From Awwwards Berlin 2018: Showcasing Trends In UX Design

Technology isn’t the Problem, We Are. An Essay on Popups.

Today I want to talk a bit about what it’s like, as a marketer, to be marketing something that’s difficult to market.
Stop blaming the popups for what bad marketers do.
You see, there’s a common problem that many marketers face, and it’s also one of the most asked questions I hear when I’m on the road, as a speaker:

“How do I great marketing for a boring product or service?”

That’s a tough challenge for sure, although the good news is that if you can inject some originality you’ll be a clear winner, as all of your competitors are also boring. However, I think I can one-up that problem:

“How do I do great marketing for something that’s universally hated, like popups?”

We knew we had a big challenge ahead of us when we decided to release the popups product because of the long legacy of manipulative abuse it carries with it.

In fact, as the discussion about product direction began in the office, there were some visceral (negative) reactions from some folks on the engineering team. They feared that we were switching over to the dark side.

It makes sense to me that this sentiment would come from developers. In my experience, really good software developers have one thing in common. They want to make a difference in the world. Developers are makers by design, and part of building something is wanting it to have a positive impact on those who use it.

To quell those types of fears requires a few things;

  • Education about the positive use cases for the technology,
  • Evidence in the form of good popup examples, showcasing how to use them in a delightful and responsible manner,
  • Features such as advanced triggers & targeting to empower marketers to deliver greater relevance to visitors,
  • And most important of all – it requires us to take a stance. We can’t change the past unless we lead by example.

It’s been my goal since we started down this path, to make it clear that we are drawing a line in the sand between the negative past, and a positive future.

Which is why we initially launched with the name “Overlays” instead of popups.

Overlays vs. Popups – The End of an Era

It made a lot of sense at the time, from a branding perspective. Through podcast interviews and public speaking gigs, I was trying to change the narrative around popups. Whenever I was talking about a bad experience, I would call it a popup. When it was a positive (and additive) experience, I’d call it an overlay. It was a really good way to create a clear separation.

I even started to notice more and more people calling them overlays. Progress.

Unfortunately, it would still require a lot of continued education to make a dent in the global perception of the terminology, that with the search volume for “overlays” being tiny compared to popups, factored heavily into our decision to pivot back to calling a popup a popup.

Positioning is part of a product marketer’s job – our VP of Product Marketing, Ryan Engley recently completed our most recent positioning document for the new products. Just as the umbrella term “Convertables” we had been using to include popups and sticky bars had created confusion, “Overlays” was again making the job harder than it should have been. You can tell, just from reading this paragraph alone that it’s a complex problem, and we’re moving in the right direction by re-simplifying.

The biggest challenge developing our positioning was the number of important strategic questions that we needed to answer first. The market problems we solve, for who, how our product fits today with our vision for the future, who we see ourselves competing with, whether we position ourselves as a comprehensive platform that solves a unique problem, or whether we go to market with individual products and tools etc. It’s a beast of an undertaking.

My biggest lightbulb moment was working with April Dunford who pushed me to get away from competing tool-to-tool with other products. She said in order to win that way, you’d have to be market leading in every tool, and that won’t happen. So what’s the unique value that only you offer and why is it important?

— Ryan Engley, VP Product Marketing at Unbounce

You can read more about our initial product adoption woes, and how our naming conventions hurt us, in the first post in the series – Product Marketing Month: Why I’m Writing 30 Blog Posts in 30 Days.

Let’s get back to the subject of popups. I think it’s important to look back at the history of this device to better understand how they came about, and why they have always caused such a stir.

Browser Interaction Models & the History of the Popup

The talk I was doing much of last year was called Data-Driven Design. As part of the talk, I get into interaction design trends. I’ve included the “Trendline” slide below.

You can see that the first occurrence of a popup was back in 1998. Also, note that I included Overlays in late 2016 when we first started that discussion.

Like many bad trends, popups began as web developers started trying to hack browser behavior to create different interruptive interaction modes. I know I made a lot of them back in the day, but I was always doing it to try to create a cool experience. For example, I was building a company Intranet and wanted to open up content in a new window, resize it, and stick it to the side of the screen as a sidebar navigation for the main window. That was all good stuff.

Tabbed browsers have done a lot to help clean up the mess of multiple windows, and if you couple that with popup blockers, there’s a clear evolution in how this type of behavior is being dealt with.

Then came the pop-under, often connected to Malware virus schemes where malicious scripts could be running in the background and you wouldn’t even know.

And then the always fun “Are you sure you want to do that?” Inception-like looping exit dialogs.

Developers/hackers took the simple Javascript modal “Ok” “Cancel” and abused it to the point where there was no real way out of the page. If you tried to leave the page one modal would lead to another, and another, and you couldn’t actually close the browser window/tab unless you could do it within the split second between one dialog closing and the next opening. It was awful.

So we have a legacy of abuse that’s killed the perception of popups.

What if Popups Had Been Built Into Browsers?

Imagine for a moment that a popup was simply one of many available interaction models available in the browsing experience. They could have had a specification from the W3C, with a set of acceptable criteria for display modes. It would be an entirely different experience. Sure, there would still be abuse, but it’s an interesting thought.

This is why it’s important that we (Unbounce and other like-minded marketers and Martech software providers) take a stance, and build the right functionality into this type of tool so that it can be used responsibly.

Furthermore, we need to keep the dialog going, to educate the current and future generations of marketers that to be original, be delightful, be a business that represents themselves as professionals, means taking responsibility for our actions and doing everything we can to take the high road in our marketing.

I’ll leave you with this thought:

Technology is NOT the problem, We Are.

It’s the disrespectful and irresponsible marketers who use manipulative pop-psychology tactics for the sake of a few more leads, who are the problem. We need to stop blaming popups for bad experiences, and instead, call out the malicious marketers who are ruining it for those trying to do good work.

It’s a tough challenge to reverse years of negative perception, but that’s okay. It’s okay because we know the value the product brings to our customers, how much extra success they’re having, and because we’ve built a solution that can be configured in precise ways that make it simple to use in a responsible manner (if you’re a good person).

Get your butt back here tomorrow to see 20+ delightful website popup examples. More importantly, I’ll also be sharing “The Delight Equation”, my latest formula for measuring quantifying how good your popups really are.

See you then!


p.s. Don’t forget to subscribe to the weekly updates.

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Technology isn’t the Problem, We Are. An Essay on Popups.

The Evolution Of User Experience Design

(This is a sponsored post.) We’re fortunate enough to be working at an incredibly exciting time in our industry. Yes, the challenges are considerable, but the opportunities are – equally – transformational. It’s never been a more exciting time to work as a User Experience (UX) designer.
Great designers deliver wonderful, considered and memorable experiences. Doing that isn’t easy and – through this series of articles – I’ll provide a wealth of pointers to ensure you’re on the right track.

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The Evolution Of User Experience Design

Welcome To The Next Level Of Mobile App Development

(This is a sponsored article.) As users spend 89% of their mobile time inside apps — and 56% of all traffic is now mobile — creating a mobile app has become a top priority for many businesses. Statistics show that the average American spends more than two hours a day on their mobile device. Having a mobile app can be beneficial for your company for a number of reasons. But we all know that building an app from scratch is difficult — the gap between a concept and solution is wide and requires a lot of time, effort and money.


Welcome To The Next Level Of Mobile App Development

A Simple Guide to Link Prospecting

link prospecting

You can break down SEO into two major categories: On-Page SEO: Ensuring your title tags, meta tags, site architecture and content are optimized for near-perfect search engine comprehension and indexing. Link Building: Getting other websites to link back to your site. In today’s post, we’re going to focus on #2 because it can be the most rewarding in terms of traffic gains, but it’s also the most difficult because a lot of it is beyond your control. Link building is truly an art and link prospecting is the smartest way to ensure your highest level of success. Let’s get into…

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A Simple Guide to Link Prospecting

How to Design a High Converting Mobile Lead Generation Flow

mobile lead

Everything is moving towards mobile. For examples, Google penalizes you if your site isn’t mobile optimized and Facebook Ad CPC (cost per click) is much cheaper on mobile compared to desktop. More than half of the world’s web traffic now comes from mobile phones. This means more and more potential customers are viewing your website on their phones. If you still haven’t optimized your site’s conversions for mobile user experience, then chances are you’re losing money. On top of that, audience targeting is way more successful on mobile than on desktop, so you can’t afford to put off mobile any…

The post How to Design a High Converting Mobile Lead Generation Flow appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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How to Design a High Converting Mobile Lead Generation Flow

What is Web Spam?

Web Spam: Intentional attempts to manipulate search engine rankings for specific keywords or keyword phrase queries. But isn’t that what SEO is? Trying to get your website content to rank better in search engine results? Well… There’s a fine line between doing everything you can to give your website content the best shot at ranking well in the search engines, vs. trying every sneaky trick possible. The Old Days of Web Spam – Keywords, Keywords, Keywords Everywhere! The first search engines (Lycos, HotBot, AltaVista to name a few) used a fairly basic approach to ranking webpages. For the most part,…

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What is Web Spam?

Meet XRespond Testing Tool: Let’s Make Building Responsive Websites Simpler

The way people consume information is constantly evolving. As web designers and developers, we keep up with all of the different screen shapes and sizes, learning to create beautiful, flexible software. Yet most of the available tools still don’t reflect the nature and diversity of the platform we’re building for: the browser.
When I was making my first responsive website in 2012, I quickly realized how inefficient and time-consuming the constant browser window resizing was.

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Meet XRespond Testing Tool: Let’s Make Building Responsive Websites Simpler

Is Success Down To The Quality Of Your Work?

One of the biggest fallacies of our industry is that good work speaks for itself. It is a self-delusional lie that those with a good reputation tell themselves to explain their success.
Success means many things to many people. Some think it is getting to work on projects they love; others believe it is earning a lot of money, still others consider it is getting to spend more time with the family.


Is Success Down To The Quality Of Your Work?