Tag Archives: building

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Tripwire Marketing: Lure in More Customers With 12 Slam-Dunk Ideas

tripwire marketing

You’re unhappy with your conversion rate. People just aren’t buying what you’re selling. The solution might lie in tripwire marketing. The term tripwire marketing might sound a little shady, like you’re trying to get one over on your customer. That’s not the case at all. Marketing and advertising experts have been using tripwire marketing for decades in one form or another, and it works just as well online as it does in brick-and-mortar stores. In fact, it’s even more effective because you can more easily stay in touch with the customer. What is tripwire marketing? And how does it work?…

The post Tripwire Marketing: Lure in More Customers With 12 Slam-Dunk Ideas appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Tripwire Marketing: Lure in More Customers With 12 Slam-Dunk Ideas

Advanced CSS Layouts With Flexbox and CSS Grid

Full-day workshop • June 28th
This workshop is designed for designers and developers who already have a good working knowledge of HTML and CSS. We will cover a range of CSS methods for achieving layout, from those you are safe to use right now even if you need to support older version of Internet Explorer through to things that while still classed as experimental, are likely to ship in browsers in the coming months.

Link – 

Advanced CSS Layouts With Flexbox and CSS Grid

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Meet Smashing Book 6: New Frontiers In Web Design




Meet Smashing Book 6: New Frontiers In Web Design

Vitaly Friedman



Let’s make sense of the front-end and UX madness. Meet Smashing Book 6 with everything from design systems to accessible single-page apps, CSS Custom Properties, Grid, Service Workers, performance patterns, AR/VR, conversational UIs & responsive art direction. And you can add your name into the book, too. About the book ↓.

Smashing Book 6 is dedicated to the challenges and headaches that we are facing today, and how to resolve them. No chit-chat, no theory: only practical, useful advice applicable to your work right away.

Smashing Book 6

Book

$29 $39Print + eBook

Printed, quality hardcover. Free airmail shipping worldwide. Sep 2018.

eBook

$14.90 $19Get the eBook

PDF, ePUB, Kindle. First chapters are already available.

About The Book

With so much happening in front-end and UX these days, it’s getting really hard to stay afloat, isn’t it? New technologies and techniques appear almost daily, and so navigating through it all in regular projects is daunting and time-consuming. Frankly, we just don’t have time to afford betting on a wrong strategy. That’s why we created Smashing Book 6, our shiny new book that explores uncharted territories and seeks to establish a map for the brave new front-end world.

You know the drill: the book isn’t about tools; it’s about workflow, strategy and shortcuts to getting things done well. Respected members of the community explore how to build accessible single-page apps with React or Angular, how to use CSS Grid Layout, CSS Custom Properties and service workers as well as how to load assets on the web in times of HTTP/2 and bloated third-party scripts.

We’ll also examine how to make design systems work in real-life, how to design and build conversational interfaces, AR/VR, building for chatbots and watches and how to bring responsive art-direction back to the web.

Print shipping in late September 2018., hardcover + eBook. 432 pages. Written by Laura Elizabeth, Marcy Sutton, Rachel Andrew, Mike Riethmueller, Harry Roberts, Lyza D. Gardner, Yoav Weiss, Adrian Zumbrunnen, Greg Nudelman, Ada Rose Cannon and Vitaly Friedman. Pre-order the book today.

A look inside the book

Book

$29 $39Print + eBook

Printed, quality hardcover. Free airmail shipping worldwide. Shipping: Sept 2018.

eBook

$14.90 $19Get the eBook

PDF, ePUB, Kindle. First chapters are already available.

Why This Book Is For You

We worked hard to design the book in a way that it doesn’t become outdated quickly. That’s why it’s more focused on strategy rather than tooling. It’s about how we do things, but not necessarily the tools we all use to get there.

Table of Contents

The book contains 11 chapters, with topics ranging from design to front-end. Only practical advice, applicable to your work right away.

  • Making design systems work in real-life
    by Laura Elizabeth
  • Accessibility in times of SPAs
    by Marcy Sutton
  • Production-ready CSS Grid layouts
    by Rachel Andrew
  • Strategic guide to CSS Custom Properties
    by Mike Riethmueller
  • Taming performance bottlenecks
    by Harry Roberts
  • Building an advanced service worker
    by Lyza Gardner
  • Loading assets on the web
    by Yoav Weiss
  • Conversation interface design patterns
    by Adrian Zumbrunnen
  • Building chatbots and designing for watches
    by Greg Nudelman
  • Cross Reality and the web (AR/VR)
    by Ada Rose Cannon
  • Bringing personality back to the web
    by Vitaly Friedman
laura elizabeth
marcy sutton
rachel andrew
mike riethmuller
harry roberts
lyza d gardner
yoav weiss
adrian zumbrunnen
greg nudelman
ada rose edwards
vitaly friedman

From left to right: Laura Elizabeth, Marcy Sutton, Rachel Andrew, Mike Riethmuller, Harry Roberts, Lyza Gardner, Yoav Weiss, Adrian Zumbrunnen, Greg Nudelman, Ada Rose Edwards, and yours truly.

Book

$29 $39Print + eBook

Free airmail shipping worldwide. Sep 2018. Pre-order now and save 25%

eBook

$14.90 $19Get the eBook

PDF, ePUB, Kindle. You can start reading right away.

Download the Sample Chapter

To sneak a peek inside the book, you can download Vitaly’s chapter on bringing personality back to the web (PDF, ca. 18MB). Enjoy!

Goodie: New Frontiers In Web Design Wallpaper

To celebrate the pre-release of the book , Chiara Aliotta designed a set of mobile and desktop wallpapers for you to indulge in. Feel free to download it (ZIP, ca. 1.4MB).

New Frontiers In Web Design Wallpaper
Get ready for the new frontiers in web design with Chiara’s beautiful wallpaper.

About The Designer

Chiara AliottaThe cover was designed by the fantastic Chiara Aliotta. Chiara is an Italian award-winning designer with many years of experience as an art director and brand consultant. She founded the design studio Until Sunday and has directed the overall artistic look and feel of different tech companies and not-for-profit organizations around the world. We’re very happy that she gave Smashing Book 6 that special, magical touch.

Add Your Name To The Book

We kindly appreciate your support, and so as always, we invite you to add your name to the printed book: a double-page spread is reserved for the first 1.000 people. Space is limited, so please don’t wait too long!

Add your name to the book
A double-page spread is reserved for the first 1.000 readers. Add your name to the printed book.

Book

$29 $39Print + eBook

Free airmail shipping worldwide. Sep 2018. Pre-order now and save 25%

eBook

$14.90 $19Get the eBook

PDF, ePUB, Kindle. You can start reading right away.

Smashing Editorial
(cm)


Originally posted here:

Meet Smashing Book 6: New Frontiers In Web Design

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How To Deliver A Successful UX Project In The Healthcare Sector




How To Deliver A Successful UX Project In The Healthcare Sector

Sven Jungmann & Karolin Neubauer



A mid-career UX researcher was hired to understand the everyday needs, perceptions, and concerns of patients in a hospital in Berlin, Germany. She used rigorous observation and interviewing methods just like she teaches them to design thinking students at a nearby university. She returned with a handful of actionable insights that our product team found useful, somewhat at least.

However, we were surprised that her recommendations gravitated towards convenience issues such as “Patients want to know the food menu” or “Users struggle to remember who their doctors are.” Entirely missing were reports of physical and psychological complaints. We would at least have expected sleeping problems: Given that 80% of working Germans don’t sleep well and nearly 10% even appear to have severe sleeping disorders (link in German), why did no one mention it?

“We only see what we know.”

— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)

If you are a UX researcher about to embark on a project with hospitalized patients and you want to avoid missing out on deep concerns and problems of users, then maybe this article can help you strengthen your awareness for particular challenges of clinical UX.

It is difficult to get in touch with real patients and get permission from clinical staff to access the right people. We are fortunate to have access to a network of more than 100 hospitals in Germany thanks to our sister Helios Kliniken GmbH, which is Europe’s largest private hospital provider. Our experience with clinical UX research taught us the importance of stressing that we cannot assume that patients bring up relevant concerns by themselves.

We describe three reasons we think are important to improve the quality and quantity of your findings. Generally speaking, this article emphasizes the need for UX practitioners to be mindful of their participants’ emotional and physical state. But we also discuss how we think UX researchers should prepare for and conduct a research project in the healthcare sector.

The Three B’s That Complicate UX Research In Hospitals

We’ve been thinking much about user research in hospital settings recently. Our new company, smart Helios, a digital health development firm, is a spin-off of Helios Kliniken, Europe’s largest private hospital chain. To inform our lean software development, we thoroughly embrace iterative empathetic observation and end-user interviews at each step of a development cycle (i.e., ideation, prototyping, and testing).

We learned that qualitative research in a hospital setting brings its challenges. We think it is worth considering them, especially those we discuss here, called the three B’s: Biases, Barriers, and Background.

Here’s an overview:

  1. Biases
    Psychological mechanisms can affect our patients’ thinking and hence diminish the results of our findings.
  2. Barriers to trust
    Patients rarely share intimate needs with a non-medical interviewer easily. This can create blind spots in our research.
  3. Background
    Internal and external factors such as wealth, socio-economic status, sanitation, education, and access to healthcare can influence our health as well as the care patients receive. The quality of care also depends on the hospital’s infrastructure and staff experience with a particular disease or procedure. These differences make it challenging to generalize findings.

We also discuss remedies that can help overcome these challenges and distill more valuable insights. They include:

  • Conducting a thorough and well-prepared interview.
  • Including healthcare providers in the process.
  • Drawing on quantitative data to guide some of the qualitative user research.

Biases: We Are Fantastic At Lying To Ourselves, Whether Or Not We’re Patients

Psychologists call them cognitive biases: they negatively affect how accurately we perceive and remember events or feelings, and we possess impressive amounts of them.

For example, people remember information better if it is more recent or salient. If you ask a patient about the initial appointment with her oncologist (this is rarely good news), don’t be surprised if she remembers only a quarter of it. Hospitalized patients are typically overwhelmed by the unfamiliar situation they’re in and often under stress and that influences their memory.

Hence it makes a difference when you ask them in their patient journey. Even in one day, patients face different problems that affect what’s top of mind at the moment you observe or interview them:

  • In the morning, when the painkillers have worn off during sleep, regaining control over physical pain is all that matters.
  • During the day, worries about upcoming procedures might dominate their thoughts or they could be focused on their hunger while they’re not allowed to eat or drink ahead of a diagnostic test.
  • In the evening, they might be afraid that they won’t be able to update their relatives appropriately.
  • At night, some struggle to sleep because of the hospital noise or their worries.

Takeaways:

  • Try interviewing users at different times of the day and different moments of their journey and take note of how findings vary.
  • Always get an orientation about where your users stand within their patient journey. Explore what happened in the previous hours or days and what diagnostics or treatments lie ahead of them.
  • Beware that our psyches possess a plethora of mechanisms to limit rationality and prevent past events from entering our conscious mind. You cannot control them all, but it improves your research if you notice them.

Barriers To Trust: Who Is Asking Matters, Too

It’s not just about how and when; it also matters who is asking. Even if a patient agrees to speak with us, what she shares will highly depend on how much she trusts us. One of us observed as a clinician how often his patients need to build up trust, sometimes over days until they ‘confess’ certain concerns. That’s especially true when problems have a psychological component (e.g., sleeping disorders) or are stigmatized (e.g., certain infectious diseases).

The more knowledgeable you are about health problems, the better you can steer interviews towards relevant issues. If you do this empathetically, your interviewees might find it easier to speak about them. Don’t get frustrated, however, if they don’t. Some people need a lot of trust, and there’s rarely a shortcut to earning it. In these cases, there’s something else you can do: include subjects who are not your target users but still have crucial insights in your interviews.

Take the nurse, for example. She might know from her previous night shift how many patients had trouble sleeping and who might agree to talk about it. The doctors will know which crucial questions they get asked frequently. And the housekeeping staff can share stories about the patients’ hygiene concerns. Listen closely to them: many of the staffs’ pain points likely hint to patients’ pain points, too. The more observers you allow to shed light on one subject, the better your chances to understand your patients’ experiences and the broader your perception of the system will be.

Takeaways:

  • Try to interview people involved in your users’ care.
  • Ask the clinical staff for guidance on which patients to ask about specific problems.
  • Even if patients are your primary users, make sure to ask health care providers, such as doctors, nurses, or therapists about common patient needs.
  • Schedule repeated interviews with patients if possible to build the trust necessary for sharing critical concerns.

The ‘living’ patient journey map.


A large, printed and ‘living’ patient journey helps to constantly challenge and refine assumptions. (Large preview)

Background: Mind The Worlds In And Around The Patients

Different patients have different needs. This is obvious, and part of the reason why UX researchers develop personas, conduct semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, and observe subjects to explore the multiple realities of our participants. But there’s still a problem we can’t dismiss. Even within our hospitals inside Germany, people’s realities can differ greatly depending on their income, education, insurance, place of residence, etc.

What you discover in one hospital or region might not apply elsewhere. This can be a problem if you want to deploy your products at scale. If you have the opportunity, you should go the extra mile to conduct UX research in different hospitals to understand the needs and what drives adoption.

If some regions show poor sales, conduct field research in these regions to revisit your personas. In fact, don’t just challenge the personas, also explore the environment.

Here’s an example of why that matters: We developed a tool that relies on data from a hospital information system. This worked well in one clinic were staff was spread over different parts of the building, turning digital communication into an effective medium. In another hospital, however, the relevant people sat in the same room, making face-to-face communication significantly better than typing information into electronic records.

Takeaways:

  • Go beyond personas or archetypes and seek to understand the different realities between hospitals, wards, and regions.
  • Develop and constantly improve a rollout-playbook that lists local challenges and how you solved them to inform future expansions.

Sorry, Ignorance Is Not Bliss

Some UX researchers seem to believe that it is beneficial to enter an interview unprepared to avoid bias. Some shy away from acquiring relevant medical knowledge, thinking that (since they are not trained medical professionals) they won’t grasp the concepts anyway. Some feel that understanding the medical context of their interviewees’ situation will not add value to their research since they solely focus on the subjective experience of the disease.

But in evidence-based healthcare, conducting research on patients without previous peer-reviewed literature and guideline research is not only unprofessional but often even considered unethical. We should not fall prey to the illusion that ignorance frees us from bias.

The good news is that in healthcare, we are privileged to have a large body of well-conducted studies and systematic reviews available online, many of them free to access. PubMed is an excellent and open source, tutorials on how to use are abundantly available online (we think this is a good primer). Or if you have the budget, paid sites like UpToDate provide comprehensive disease reviews written both for professionals and for laypeople.

We know that UX researchers who are rightfully focused on ‘getting out of the building’ might not enjoy spending many hours on literature research but we are convinced that this will help you form better hypotheses and questions.

Moreover, if you start with clearly predefined research questions and seek answers in the scientific medical literature, you might save time and discover questions that you wouldn’t have thought of. For example, it is advised that individuals undergoing hip surgery should practice using crutches before the operation because it is already difficult enough even without the postoperative pain and swelling. This knowledge, obtained from literature research, could help move from more open questions, such as:

  • “How do patients prepare for a hip replacement surgery?” or
  • “What perceived needs to patients have ahead of hip surgery?”

To more concrete questions such as:

  • “What are the most important preparatory measures that many patients are currently unaware of?”

Takeaway:

  • Do a systematic literature review to inform your research.

Let The Data Guide You And You Guide The Data

To take this further, we’re also developing methods to use quantitative analytics and Deep Learning to guide our qualitative research. Our machine learning engineer just deployed AI to crawl the web for colon cancer blogs to identify hot topics that remained unmentioned in qualitative reviews. We defined “hot” as having many views, many comments, and many likes.

Or you can uncover semantic structures (see picture). These findings can then guide the UX researchers. Similarly, qualitative research can yield hypotheses that we can try to validate with passively collected data. For example, if you think that sleeping problems are common, you could (user consent provided) use your app to measure phone use at night as a proxy for sleeplessness.


Informing our researchers about hot topics in colon cancer using machine learning (topic modeling, credits Yuki Katoh and Ellen Hoeven)


Deploying topic modeling to find semantic structures in texts on colon cancer to inform our qualitative researchers. (Large preview)

Conclusion

Many of our suggestions are not new to well-trained UX researchers. We are aware of that. But in our experience, it is worth stressing the importance of mindfulness towards the three Bs: Biases, Barriers to trust, and Background. Here’s a summary of some of the recommendations to overcome the 3 Bs:

  • Prepare interviews with literature research on the topic (e.g., on Pubmed.gov).
  • Ask doctors which patients are suitable for interview.
  • Include those who care for your users, including nurses, therapists, and relatives.
  • Cooperate with the data scientists or web analysts in your team, if you have them.
  • Understand that it takes users time to build trust to tell you about some needs.
  • Explore how realities differ not only by personas, but also by regions and hospitals.
  • Stay aware that, no matter how much you try, the influence of the 3Bs can only be reduced, and not entirely removed.

We wish you well and thank you for making the world a healthier place.


The authors would like to thank their former colleague, Tim Leinert, for his thoughtful input to this piece.

Smashing Editorial
(cc, ra, yk, il)


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How To Deliver A Successful UX Project In The Healthcare Sector

Becoming A UX Leader




Becoming A UX Leader

Christopher Murphy



(This is a sponsored article.) In my previous article on Building UX Teams, I explored the rapidly growing need for UX teams as a result of the emergence of design as a wider business driver. As teams grow, so too does a need for leaders to nurture and guide them.

In my final article in this series on user experience design, I’ll explore the different characteristics of an effective UX leader, and provide some practical advice about growing into a leadership role.

I’ve worked in many organizations — both large and small, and in both the private and public sectors — and, from experience, leadership is a rare quality that is far from commonplace. Truly inspiring leaders are few and far between; if you’re fortunate to work with one, make every effort to learn from them.

Managers that have risen up the ranks don’t automatically become great leaders, and perhaps one of the biggest lessons I’ve learned is that truly inspirational leaders — those that inspire passion and commitment — aren’t as commonplace as you’d think.

A UX leader is truly a hybrid, perhaps more so than in many other — more traditional — businesses. A UX leader needs to encompass a wide range of skills:

  • Establishing, driving and articulating a vision;
  • Communicating across different teams, including design, research, writing, engineering, and business (no small undertaking!);
  • Acting as a champion for user-focused design;
  • Mapping design decisions to key performance indicators (KPIs), and vice-versa, so that success can be measured; and
  • Managing a team, ensuring all the team’s members are challenged and motivated.

UX leadership is not unlike being bi-lingual — or, more accurately, multi-lingual — and it’s a skill that requires dexterity so that nothing gets lost in translation.

This hybrid skill set can seem daunting, but — like anything — the attributes of leadership can be learned and developed. In my final article in this series of ten, I’ll explore what defines a leader and focus on the qualities and attributes needed to step up to this important role.

Undertaking A Skills Audit

Every leader is different, and every leader will be informed by the different experiences they have accumulated to date. There are, however, certain qualities and attributes that leaders tend to share in common.

Great leaders demonstrate self-awareness. They tend to have the maturity to have looked themselves in the mirror and identified aspects of their character that they may need to develop if they are to grow as leaders.

Having identified their strengths and weaknesses and pinpointing areas for improvement, they will have an idea of what they know and — equally important — what they don’t know. As Donald Rumsfeld famously put it:

“There are known knowns: there are things we know we know. We also know there are known unknowns: That is to say, we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns: the things we don’t know we don’t know.”

Rumsfeld might have been talking about unknown unknowns in a conflict scenario, but his insight applies equally to the world of leadership. To grow as a leader, it’s important to widen your knowledge so that it addresses both:

  • The Known Unknowns
    Skills you know that you don’t know, which you can identify through a self-critical skills audit; and
  • The Unknown Unknowns
    Skills you don’t know you don’t know, which you can identify through inviting your peers to review your strengths and weaknesses.

In short, a skills audit will equip you with a roadmap that you can use as a map to plot a path from where you are now to where you want to be.


a map that you can use to plot a path from where you are now to where you want to be


Undertaking a skills audit will enable you to develop a map that you can use to plot a path from where you are now to where you want to be. (Large preview)

To become an effective leader is to embark upon a journey, identifying the gaps in your knowledge and — step by step — addressing these gaps so that you’re prepared for the leadership role ahead.

Identifying The Gaps In Your Knowledge

One way to identify the gaps in your knowledge is to undertake an honest and self-reflective ‘skills audit’ while making an effort to both learn about yourself and learn about the environment you are working within.

To become a UX leader, it’s critical to develop this self-awareness, identifying the knowledge you need to acquire by undertaking both self-assessments and peer assessments. With your gaps in knowledge identified, it’s possible to build a learning pathway to address these gaps.

In the introduction, I touched on a brief list of skills that an effective and well-equipped leader needs to develop. That list is just the tip of a very large iceberg. At the very least, a hybrid UX leader needs to equip themselves by:

  • Developing an awareness of context, expanding beyond the realms of design to encompass a broader business context;
  • Understanding and building relationships with a cross-section of team members;
  • Identifying outcomes and goals, establishing KPIs that will help to deliver these successfully;
  • Managing budgets, both soft and hard; and
  • Planning and mapping time, often across a diversified team.

These are just a handful of skills that an effective UX leader needs to develop. If you’re anything like me, hardly any of this was taught at art school, so you’ll need to learn these skills yourself. This article will help to point you in the right direction. I’ve also provided a list of required reading for reference to ensure you’re well covered.

A 360º Assessment

A 360º degree leadership assessment is a form of feedback for leaders. Drawn from the world of business, but equally applicable to the world of user experience, it is an excellent way to measure your effectiveness and influence as a leader.

Unlike a top-down appraisal, where a leader or manager appraises an employee underneath them in the hierarchy, a 360º assessment involves inviting your colleagues — at your peer level — to appraise you, highlighting your strengths and weaknesses.

This isn’t easy — and can lead to some uncomfortable home truths — but it can prove a critical tool in helping you to identify the qualities you need to work on. You might, for example, consider yourself an excellent listener only to discover that your colleagues feel like this is something you need to work on.

This willingness to put yourself under the spotlight, identify your weaknesses, address these, and develop yourself is one of the defining characteristics of leaders. Great leaders are always learning and they aren’t afraid to admit that fact.

A 360º assessment is a great way to uncover your ‘unknown unknowns’, i.e. the gaps in your knowledge that you aren’t aware of. With these discoveries in hand, it’s possible to build ‘a learning road-map’ that will allow you to develop the skills you need.

Build A Roadmap

With the gaps in your knowledge identified, it’s important to adopt some strategies to address these gaps. Great leaders understand that learning is a lifelong process and to transition into a leadership role will require — inevitably — the acquisition of new skills.

To develop as a leader, it’s important to address your knowledge gaps in a considered and systematic manner. By working back from your skills audit, identify what you need to work on and build a learning programme accordingly.

This will inevitably involve developing an understanding of different domains of knowledge, but that’s the leader’s path. The important thing is to take it step by step and, of course, to take that first step.

We are fortunate now to be working in an age in which we have an abundance of learning materials at our fingertips. We no longer need to enroll in a course at a university to learn; we can put together our own bespoke learning programmes.

We now have so many tools we can use, from paid resources like Skillshare which offers “access to a learning platform for personalized, on-demand learning,” to free resources like FutureLearn which offers the ability to “learn new skills, pursue your interests and advance your career.”

In short, you have everything you need to enhance your career just a click away.

It’s Not Just You

Great leaders understand that it’s not about the effort of individuals, working alone. It’s about the effort of individuals — working collectively. Looking back through the history of innovation, we can see that most (if not all) of the greatest breakthroughs were driven by teams that were motivated by inspirational leaders.

Thomas Edison didn’t invent the lightbulb alone; he had an ‘invention factory’ housed in a series of research laboratories. Similarly, when we consider the development of contemporary graphical user interfaces (GUIs), these emerged from the teamwork of Xerox PARC. The iPod was similarly conceived.

Great leaders understand that it’s not about them as individuals, but it’s about the teams they put together, which they motivate and orchestrate. They have the humility to build and lead teams that deliver towards the greater good.

This — above all — is one of the defining characteristics of a great leader: they prioritize and celebrate the team’s success over and above their own success.

It’s All About Teamwork

Truly great leaders understand the importance that teams play in delivering outcomes and goals. One of the most important roles a leader needs to undertake is to act as a lynchpin that sits at the heart of a team, identifying new and existing team members, nurturing them, and building them into a team that works effectively together.

A forward-thinking leader won’t just focus on the present, but will proactively develop a vision and long-term goals for future success. To deliver upon this vision of future success will involve both identifying potential new team members, but — just as importantly — developing existing team members. This involves opening your eyes to the different aspects of the business environment you occupy, getting to know your team, and identifying team members’ strengths and weaknesses.

As a UX leader, an important role you’ll play is helping others by mentoring and coaching them, ensuring they are equipped with the skills they need to grow. Again, this is where a truly selfless leader will put others first, in the knowledge that the stronger the team, the stronger the outcomes will be.

As a UX leader, you’ll also act as a champion for design within the wider business context. You’ll act as a bridge — and occasionally, a buffer — between the interface of business requirements and design requirements. Your role will be to champion the power of design and sell its benefits, always singing your team’s praises and — occasionally — fighting on their behalf (often without their awareness).

The Art Of Delegation

It’s possible to build a great UX team from the inside by developing existing team members, and an effective leader will use delegation as an effective development tool to enhance their team members’ capabilities.

Delegation isn’t just passing off the tasks you don’t want to do, it’s about empowering the different individuals in a team. A true leader understands this and spends the time required to learn how to delegate effectively.

Delegation is about education and expanding others’ skill sets, and it’s a powerful tool when used correctly. Effective delegation is a skill, one that you’ll need to acquire to step up into a UX leadership role.

When delegating a task to a team member, it’s important to explain to them why you’re delegating the task. As a leader, your role is to provide clear guidance and this involves explaining why you’ve chosen a team member for a task and how they will be supported, developed and rewarded for taking the task on.

This latter point is critical: All too often managers who lack leadership skills use delegation as a means to offload tasks and responsibility, unaware of the power of delegation. This is poor delegation and it’s ineffective leadership, though I imagine, sadly, we have all experienced it! An effective leader understands and strives to delegate effectively by:

  • defining the task, establishing the outcomes and goals;
  • identifying the appropriate individual or team to take the task on;
  • assessing the team member(s) ability and ascertaining any training needs;
  • explaining their reasoning, clearly outlining why they chose the individual or team;
  • stating the required results;
  • agreeing on realistic deadlines; and
  • providing feedback on completion of the task.

When outlined like this, it becomes clear that effective delegation is more than simply passing on a task you’re unwilling to undertake. Instead, it’s a powerful tool that an effective UX leader uses to enable their team members to take ownership of opportunities, whilst growing their skills and experience.

Give Success And Accept Failure

A great leader is selfless: they give credit for any successes to the team; and accept the responsibility for any failures alone.

A true leader gives success to the team, ensuring that — when there’s a win — the team is celebrated for its success. A true leader takes pleasure in celebrating the team’s win. When it comes to failure, however, a true leader steps up and takes responsibility. A mark of a truly great leader is this selflessness.

As a leader, you set the direction and nurture the team, so it stands to reason that, if things go wrong — which they often do — you’re willing to shoulder the responsibility. This understanding — that you need to give success and accept failure — is what separates great leaders from mediocre managers.

Poor managers will seek to ‘deflect the blame,’ looking for anyone but themselves to apportion responsibility to. Inspiring leaders are aware that, at the end of the day, they are responsible for the decisions made and outcomes reached; when things go wrong they accept responsibility.

If you’re to truly inspire others and lead them to achieve great things, it’s important to remember this distinction between managers and leaders. By giving success and accepting failure, you’ll breed intense loyalty in your team.

Lead By Example

Great leaders understand the importance of leading by example, acting as a beacon for others. To truly inspire a team, it helps to connect yourself with that team, and not isolate yourself. Rolling up your sleeves and pitching in, especially when deadlines are pressing, is a great way to demonstrate that you haven’t lost touch with the ‘front line.’

A great leader understands that success is — always — a team effort and that a motivated team will deliver far more than the sum of its parts.

As I’ve noted in my previous articles: If you’re ever the smartest person in a room, find another room. An effective leader has the confidence to surround themselves with other, smarter people.

Leadership isn’t about individual status or being seen to be the most talented. It’s about teamwork and getting the most out of a well-oiled machine of individuals working effectively together.

Get Out Of Your Silo

To lead effectively, it’s important to get out of your silo and to see the world as others do. This means getting to know all of the team, throughout the organization and at every level.

Leaders that isolate themselves — in their often luxurious corner offices — are, in my experience, poor leaders (if, indeed, they can be called leaders at all!). By distancing themselves from the individuals that make up an organization they run the very real risk of losing touch.

To lead, get out of your silo and acquaint yourself with the totality of your team and, if you’re considering a move into leadership, make it your primary task to explore all the facets of the business.

The Pieces Of The Jigsaw

To lead effectively, you need to have an understanding of others and their different skills. In my last article, Building a UX Team, I wrote about the idea of ‘T-shaped’ people — those that have a depth of skill in their field, along with the willingness and ability to collaborate across disciplines. Great leaders tend to be T-shaped, flourishing by seeing things from others’ perspectives.

Every organization — no matter how large or small — is like an elaborate jigsaw that is made up of many different interlocking parts. An effective leader is informed by an understanding of this context, they will have made the effort to see all of the pieces of the jigsaw. As a UX leader, you’ll need to familiarize yourself with a wide range of different teams, including design, research, writing, engineering, and business.

To lead effectively, it’s important to push outside of your comfort zone and learn about these different specialisms. Do so and you will ensure that you can communicate to these different stakeholders. At the risk of mixing metaphors, you will be the glue that holds the jigsaw together.

Sweat The Details

As Charles and Ray Eames put it:

“The details aren’t the details, they make the product.”

Great leaders understand this: they set the bar high and they encourage and motivate the teams they lead to deliver on the details. To lead a team, it’s important to appreciate the need to strive for excellence. Great leaders aren’t happy to accept the status quo, especially if the status quo can be improved upon.

Of course, these qualities can be learned, but many of us — thankfully — have them, innately. Few (if any) of us are happy with second best and, in a field driven by a desire to create delightful and memorable user experiences, we appreciate the importance of details and their place in the grand scheme of things. This is a great foundation on which to build leadership skills.

To thrive as a leader, it’s important to share this focus on the details with others, ensuring they understand and appreciate the role that the details play in the whole. Act as a beacon of excellence: lead by example; never settle for second best; give success and accept failure… and your team will follow you.

In Closing

As user experience design matures as a discipline, and the number of different specializations multiplies, so too does the discipline’s need for leaders, to nurture and grow teams. As a relatively new field of expertise, the opportunities to develop as a UX leader are tremendous.

Leadership is a skill and — like any skill — it can be learned. As I’ve noted throughout this series of articles, one of the best places to learn is to look to other disciplines for guidance, widening the frame of reference. When we consider leadership, this is certainly true.

There is a great deal we can learn from the world of business, and websites like Harvard Business Review (HBR), McKinsey Quarterly, and Fast Company — amongst many, many others — offer us a wealth of insight.

There’s never been a more exciting time to work in User Experience design. UX has the potential to impact on so many facets of life, and the world is crying out for leaders to step up and lead the charge. I’d encourage anyone eager to learn and to grow to undertake a skills audit, take the first step, and embark on the journey into leadership. Leadership is a privilege, rich with rewards, and is something I’d strongly encourage exploring.

Suggested Reading

There are many great publications, offline and online, that will help you on your adventure. I’ve included a few below to start you on your journey.

  • The Harvard Business Review website is an excellent starting point and its guide, HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Leadership, provides an excellent overview on developing leadership qualities.
  • Peter Drucker’s writing on leadership is also well worth reading. Drucker has written many books, one I would strongly recommend is Managing Oneself. It’s a short (but very powerful) read, and I read it at least two or three times a year.
  • If you’re serious about enhancing your leadership credentials, Michael D. Watkins’s The First 90 Days: Proven Strategies for Getting Up to Speed Faster and Smarter, provides a comprehensive insight into transitioning into leadership roles.
  • Finally, HBR’s website — mentioned above — is definitely worth bookmarking. Its business-focused flavor offers designers a different perspective on leadership, which is well worth becoming acquainted with.

This article is part of the UX design series sponsored by Adobe. Adobe XD is made for a fast and fluid UX design process, as it lets you go from idea to prototype faster. Design, prototype, and share — all in one app. You can check out more inspiring projects created with Adobe XD on Behance, and also sign up for the Adobe experience design newsletter to stay updated and informed on the latest trends and insights for UX/UI design.

Smashing Editorial
(ra, il)


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Becoming A UX Leader

Hanapin’s PPC Experts Share How to Boost Your AdWords Quality Score with Landing Pages

It’s happened to the best of us. You return from lunch, pull up your AdWords account, and hover over a keyword only to realize you have a Quality Score of just three (ooof). You scan a few more keywords, and realize some others are sitting at fours, and you’ve even got a few sad twos.

Low Quality Scores like this are a huge red flag because they mean you’re likely paying through the nose for a given keyword without the guarantee of a great ad position. Moreover, you can’t necessarily bid your way into the top spot by increasing your budget.

You ultimately want to see healthy Quality Scores of around seven or above, because a good Quality Score can boost your Ad Rank, your resulting Search Impression Share, and will help your ads get served up more often.

To ensure your ads appear in top positions whenever relevant queries come up, today we’re sharing sage advice from PPC experts Jeff Baum and Diane Anselmo from Hanapin Marketing. During Marketing Optimization Week, they spoke to three things you can do with your landing pages today to increase your Quality Score, improve your Ad Rank, and pay less to advertise overall.

But first…

What is Quality Score (and why is it such a big deal?)

Direct from Google, Quality Score is an estimate of the quality of your ads, keywords, and landing pages. Higher quality ad experiences can lead to lower prices and better ad positions.

You may remember a time when Quality Score didn’t even exist, but it was introduced as a way for you to understand if you were serving up the best experiences possible. Upping your score per keyword (especially your most important ones) is important because it determines your Ad Rank in a major way:

Cost Per Click x Quality Score = Ad Rank

To achieve Quality Scores of seven and above you’ll need to consider three factors. We’re talkin’: relevancy, load time, and ease of navigation, which are consequently the very things Diane and Jeff say to focus on with your landing pages.

Below are the three actions Hanapin’s dynamic duo suggest you take to get the Ad Rank you deserve.

Where can you see AdWords Quality Score regularly?
If you’re not already keeping a close eye on this, simply navigate to Keywords and modify by adding the Quality Score column. Alternatively, you can hover over individual keywords to view case-by-case.

Tip 1) Convey the Exact Same Message From Ad to Landing Page

One of the perks of building custom landing pages fast, is the ability to carry through the exact same details from your ads to your landing pages. A consistent message between the two is key because it helps visitors recognize they’ve landed in the right place, and assures someone they’re on the right path to the outcome they searched for.

Here’s an ad to landing page combo Diane shared with us as an example:

Cool, 500 business cards for $8.50—got it. But when we click through to the landing page (which happens to be the brand’s homepage…)

  • The phone number from the ad doesn’t match the top of the page where we’ve landed.
  • The price in the ad headline doesn’t match the website’s headline exactly ($8.50 appears further down on the page, but could cause confusion).
  • While the ad’s CTA is to “order now”, the page we land on has tons to click on and offers up “Free Sample Kit” vs. an easy “Order Now’ option to match the ad. Someone may bounce quickly because of the amount of options presented.

As Jeff told us, the lesson here is that congruence builds trust. If you do everything to make sure your ads and landing pages are in sync, you’ll really benefit and likely see your Quality Score rise over time.

In a second example, we see strong message match play out really well for Vistaprint, wherein this is the ad:

And all of the ad’s details make it through to the subsequent landing page:

Improve your AdWords Quality Score with landing pages like Vistaprint's here.

In this case:

  • The price matches in the prominent sub-headline
  • The phone number matches the ad
  • Stocks, shapes and finishes are mentioned prominently on the landing page after they’re seen in the ad
  • The landing page conveys the steps involved in “getting started” (the CTA that appears most prominently).

Overall, the expectations are set up in the ad and fulfilled in the landing page, which is often a sign this advertiser is ideally paying less in the long run.

Remember: Google doesn’t tell you precisely what to fix.
As Jeff mentioned in Hanapin’s MOW talk, Google gives you a score, but doesn’t tell you exactly what to do to improve it. Luckily, we can help with reco’s around page speed, CTAs and more. Run your landing page through our Landing Page Analyzer to get solid recommendations for improving your landing pages.

Tip 2) Speed up your landing page’s load time

If you’re hit with a slow-loading page, you bounce quickly, and the same goes for prospects clicking through on your ads.

In fact, in an account Jeff was working on at Hanapin over the summer, in just one month they saw performance tank dramatically because of site speed. Noticing that most of the conversion drop off came from mobile, they quickly learned desktop visitors had a higher tolerance for slower load times, but they lost a ton of mobile prospects (from both form and phone) because of the lag.

Jeff recalls:

“we saw our ad click costs were going up, because our Quality Score was dropping due to the deficiency in site speed”.

Your landing page size (impacted by the images on your page) tends to slow load time, and—as we’ve seen with the Unbounce Landing Page Analyzer—82.2% of marketers have at least one image on their landing page that requires compression to speed things up.

As Jeff and Diane shared, you can check your page’s speed via Google’s free tool, Page Speed Insights and get their tips to improve. Furthermore, if you want to instantly get compressed versions of your images to swap out for a quick speed fix, you can also run your page through the Unbounce Landing Page Analyzer.

Pictured above: the downloadable images you can get via the Analyzer to improve your page speed and performance.

Tip 3) Ensure your landing page is easy to navigate

Using Diane’s analogy, you can think of a visit to your landing page like it’s a brick and mortar store. In other words, it’s the difference between arriving in a Nike store during Black Friday, and the same store any other time of the year. The former is a complete mess, and the latter is super organized.

Similarly, if your landing page experience is cluttered and visitors have to be patient to find what they’re looking for, you’ll see a higher bounce rate, which Google takes as a signal your landing page experience isn’t meeting needs.

Instead, you’ll want a clear information hierarchy. Meaning you cover need-to-know information quickly in a logical order, and your visitor can simply reach out and grab what they need as a next step. The difference is the visitor being able to get in and check out in a matter of minutes with what they wanted.

This seems easy, but as Diane says,

“Sometimes when thinking about designing sites, there’s so much we want people to do that we don’t realize that people need to be given information in steps. Do this first, then do that…”

As Jeff suggested, with landing pages, less can be more. So consider where you may need multiple landing pages for communicating different aspects of your offer or business. For example, if you own a bowling alley that contains a trampoline park and laser tag arena, you may want separate ads and landing pages for communicating the party packages for each versus cramming all the details on one page that doesn’t quite meet the needs of the person looking explicitly for a laser tag birthday party.

The better you signpost a clear path to conversion on your landing pages, the better chance you’ll have at a healthy Quality Score.

The job doesn’t really end

On a whole, Diane and Jeff help their clients at Hanapin achieve terrific Ad Rank by making their ad to landing pages combos as relevant as possible, optimizing load time, and ensuring content and options are well organized.

Quality Score is something you’ll need to monitor over time, and there’s no exact science to it. Google checks frequently, but it may be a few weeks until you see your landing page changes influence scores.

Despite no definitive date range, Diane encourages everyone to stay the course, and you will indeed see your Quality Score increase over time with these landing page fixes.

Original source:  

Hanapin’s PPC Experts Share How to Boost Your AdWords Quality Score with Landing Pages

Live Stream From Awwwards Berlin 2018: Showcasing Trends In UX Design

Designing the best experience is a challenge, and every designer and developer has their own way of tackling it. But, well, no matter how different our approaches are, one thing is for sure: We can learn a lot from each other.
To give you your dose of UX inspiration, we are happy to announce that our dear friends at Adobe, are streaming live from the Awwwards Conference which will take place in Berlin on February 8th and 9th.

View this article – 

Live Stream From Awwwards Berlin 2018: Showcasing Trends In UX Design

Technology isn’t the Problem, We Are. An Essay on Popups.

Today I want to talk a bit about what it’s like, as a marketer, to be marketing something that’s difficult to market.
Stop blaming the popups for what bad marketers do.
You see, there’s a common problem that many marketers face, and it’s also one of the most asked questions I hear when I’m on the road, as a speaker:

“How do I great marketing for a boring product or service?”

That’s a tough challenge for sure, although the good news is that if you can inject some originality you’ll be a clear winner, as all of your competitors are also boring. However, I think I can one-up that problem:

“How do I do great marketing for something that’s universally hated, like popups?”

We knew we had a big challenge ahead of us when we decided to release the popups product because of the long legacy of manipulative abuse it carries with it.

In fact, as the discussion about product direction began in the office, there were some visceral (negative) reactions from some folks on the engineering team. They feared that we were switching over to the dark side.

It makes sense to me that this sentiment would come from developers. In my experience, really good software developers have one thing in common. They want to make a difference in the world. Developers are makers by design, and part of building something is wanting it to have a positive impact on those who use it.

To quell those types of fears requires a few things;

  • Education about the positive use cases for the technology,
  • Evidence in the form of good popup examples, showcasing how to use them in a delightful and responsible manner,
  • Features such as advanced triggers & targeting to empower marketers to deliver greater relevance to visitors,
  • And most important of all – it requires us to take a stance. We can’t change the past unless we lead by example.

It’s been my goal since we started down this path, to make it clear that we are drawing a line in the sand between the negative past, and a positive future.

Which is why we initially launched with the name “Overlays” instead of popups.

Overlays vs. Popups – The End of an Era

It made a lot of sense at the time, from a branding perspective. Through podcast interviews and public speaking gigs, I was trying to change the narrative around popups. Whenever I was talking about a bad experience, I would call it a popup. When it was a positive (and additive) experience, I’d call it an overlay. It was a really good way to create a clear separation.

I even started to notice more and more people calling them overlays. Progress.

Unfortunately, it would still require a lot of continued education to make a dent in the global perception of the terminology, that with the search volume for “overlays” being tiny compared to popups, factored heavily into our decision to pivot back to calling a popup a popup.

Positioning is part of a product marketer’s job – our VP of Product Marketing, Ryan Engley recently completed our most recent positioning document for the new products. Just as the umbrella term “Convertables” we had been using to include popups and sticky bars had created confusion, “Overlays” was again making the job harder than it should have been. You can tell, just from reading this paragraph alone that it’s a complex problem, and we’re moving in the right direction by re-simplifying.

The biggest challenge developing our positioning was the number of important strategic questions that we needed to answer first. The market problems we solve, for who, how our product fits today with our vision for the future, who we see ourselves competing with, whether we position ourselves as a comprehensive platform that solves a unique problem, or whether we go to market with individual products and tools etc. It’s a beast of an undertaking.

My biggest lightbulb moment was working with April Dunford who pushed me to get away from competing tool-to-tool with other products. She said in order to win that way, you’d have to be market leading in every tool, and that won’t happen. So what’s the unique value that only you offer and why is it important?

— Ryan Engley, VP Product Marketing at Unbounce

You can read more about our initial product adoption woes, and how our naming conventions hurt us, in the first post in the series – Product Marketing Month: Why I’m Writing 30 Blog Posts in 30 Days.

Let’s get back to the subject of popups. I think it’s important to look back at the history of this device to better understand how they came about, and why they have always caused such a stir.

Browser Interaction Models & the History of the Popup

The talk I was doing much of last year was called Data-Driven Design. As part of the talk, I get into interaction design trends. I’ve included the “Trendline” slide below.

You can see that the first occurrence of a popup was back in 1998. Also, note that I included Overlays in late 2016 when we first started that discussion.

Like many bad trends, popups began as web developers started trying to hack browser behavior to create different interruptive interaction modes. I know I made a lot of them back in the day, but I was always doing it to try to create a cool experience. For example, I was building a company Intranet and wanted to open up content in a new window, resize it, and stick it to the side of the screen as a sidebar navigation for the main window. That was all good stuff.

Tabbed browsers have done a lot to help clean up the mess of multiple windows, and if you couple that with popup blockers, there’s a clear evolution in how this type of behavior is being dealt with.

Then came the pop-under, often connected to Malware virus schemes where malicious scripts could be running in the background and you wouldn’t even know.

And then the always fun “Are you sure you want to do that?” Inception-like looping exit dialogs.

Developers/hackers took the simple Javascript modal “Ok” “Cancel” and abused it to the point where there was no real way out of the page. If you tried to leave the page one modal would lead to another, and another, and you couldn’t actually close the browser window/tab unless you could do it within the split second between one dialog closing and the next opening. It was awful.

So we have a legacy of abuse that’s killed the perception of popups.

What if Popups Had Been Built Into Browsers?

Imagine for a moment that a popup was simply one of many available interaction models available in the browsing experience. They could have had a specification from the W3C, with a set of acceptable criteria for display modes. It would be an entirely different experience. Sure, there would still be abuse, but it’s an interesting thought.

This is why it’s important that we (Unbounce and other like-minded marketers and Martech software providers) take a stance, and build the right functionality into this type of tool so that it can be used responsibly.

Furthermore, we need to keep the dialog going, to educate the current and future generations of marketers that to be original, be delightful, be a business that represents themselves as professionals, means taking responsibility for our actions and doing everything we can to take the high road in our marketing.

I’ll leave you with this thought:

Technology is NOT the problem, We Are.

It’s the disrespectful and irresponsible marketers who use manipulative pop-psychology tactics for the sake of a few more leads, who are the problem. We need to stop blaming popups for bad experiences, and instead, call out the malicious marketers who are ruining it for those trying to do good work.

It’s a tough challenge to reverse years of negative perception, but that’s okay. It’s okay because we know the value the product brings to our customers, how much extra success they’re having, and because we’ve built a solution that can be configured in precise ways that make it simple to use in a responsible manner (if you’re a good person).


Get your butt back here tomorrow to see 20+ delightful website popup examples. More importantly, I’ll also be sharing “The Delight Equation”, my latest formula for measuring quantifying how good your popups really are.

See you then!

Cheers
Oli

p.s. Don’t forget to subscribe to the weekly updates.

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Technology isn’t the Problem, We Are. An Essay on Popups.

The Evolution Of User Experience Design

(This is a sponsored post.) We’re fortunate enough to be working at an incredibly exciting time in our industry. Yes, the challenges are considerable, but the opportunities are – equally – transformational. It’s never been a more exciting time to work as a User Experience (UX) designer.
Great designers deliver wonderful, considered and memorable experiences. Doing that isn’t easy and – through this series of articles – I’ll provide a wealth of pointers to ensure you’re on the right track.

Read this article:  

The Evolution Of User Experience Design

Welcome To The Next Level Of Mobile App Development

(This is a sponsored article.) As users spend 89% of their mobile time inside apps — and 56% of all traffic is now mobile — creating a mobile app has become a top priority for many businesses. Statistics show that the average American spends more than two hours a day on their mobile device. Having a mobile app can be beneficial for your company for a number of reasons. But we all know that building an app from scratch is difficult — the gap between a concept and solution is wide and requires a lot of time, effort and money.

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Welcome To The Next Level Of Mobile App Development