Tag Archives: cache

What Are Progressive Web AMPs?

If you’ve been following the web development community these last few months, chances are you’ve read about progressive web apps (PWAs). It’s an umbrella term used to describe web experiences so advanced that they compete with ever-so-rich and immersive native apps: full offline support, installability, “Retina,” full-bleed imagery, sign-in support for personalization, fast, smooth in-app browsing, push notifications and a great UI.
A few of Google’s sample progressive web apps.

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What Are Progressive Web AMPs?

5 Simple Steps To Test Your Varnish Cache Deployment Using Varnishtest

Varnish Cache is an open-source HTTP accelerator that is used to speed up content delivery on some of the world’s top content-heavy dynamic websites. However, the performance or speed that a newcomer to Varnish Cache can expect from its deployment can be quite nebulous.
This is true for users at both extremes of the spectrum: from those who play with its source code to create more complex features, to those who set up Varnish Cache using the default settings.

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5 Simple Steps To Test Your Varnish Cache Deployment Using Varnishtest

How To Build A CLI Tool With Node.js And PhantomJS

In this article, we’ll go over the concepts and techniques required to build a command line tool using Node.js and PhantomJS. Building a command line tool enables you to automate a process that would otherwise take a lot longer.
Command line tools are built in a myriad of languages, but the one we’ll focus on is Node.js.
What We’ll Cover Secret sauce Installing Node.js and npm Process Automation PhantomJS Squirrel How it works The code Packaging Publishing Conclusion Secret Sauce For those short on time, I’ve condensed the core process into three steps.

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How To Build A CLI Tool With Node.js And PhantomJS

Don’t Get Crushed By The Load: Optimization Techniques And Strategies

Despite improvements in broadband and wireless Internet, load is in many ways more of an issue now than it was five years ago. The proliferation of mobile devices, increased user expectations, and the very real risks of losing customers and dropping in search result rankings have laid a heavy burden on developers to optimize loading time at all costs.
In building websites primarily for the desktop environment, the Web development community previously didn’t spend much time concerning itself with load issues.

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Don’t Get Crushed By The Load: Optimization Techniques And Strategies

Talks To Help You Become A Better Front-End Engineer In 2013

Many of us care deeply about developing our craft. But staying up to date can be a true challenge, because the quantity of fresh information we’re regularly exposed to can be a lot to take in. 2012 has been no exception, with a wealth of evolution and refinement going on in the front end.
Great strides have been made in how we approach workflow, use abstractions, appreciate code quality and tackle the measurement and betterment of performance.

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Talks To Help You Become A Better Front-End Engineer In 2013

Secrets Of High-Traffic WordPress Blogs

We all know that WordPress is awesome — but being awesome isn’t always enough. Does it perform well under pressure? Can it deal with traffic from millions of visitors every month? There’s no question that WordPress can be used for your or my blog, but what about multi-author blogs with thousands of comments? How do developers make it scale and perform?
I spoke with the developers behind some of the biggest WordPress blogs on the planet and asked them to tell me their secrets.

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Secrets Of High-Traffic WordPress Blogs

Do Mobile And Desktop Interfaces Belong Together?

The term “responsive design” has gathered a lot of well-deserved buzz among Web designers. As you probably know, it refers to an easy way to dynamically customize interfaces for different devices and to serve them all from the same website, with no need for a separate mobile domain.
It solves one major problem, and very elegantly: how to adapt visual interfaces for mobile, tablet and desktop browsers. But when unifying a website, you have to solve problems other than how it will appear in different browsers, which could make the task much more difficult than you first realize.

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Do Mobile And Desktop Interfaces Belong Together?

Do-It-Yourself Caching Methods With WordPress

There are different ways to make your website faster: specialized plugins to cache entire rendered HTML pages, plugins to cache all SQL queries and data objects, plugins to minimize JavaScript and CSS files and even some server-side solutions.

But even if you use such plugins, using internal caching methods for objects and database results is a good development practice, so that your plugin doesn’t depend on which cache plugins the end user has.

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Do-It-Yourself Caching Methods With WordPress

10 Useful Tips For Ruby On Rails Developers

By Greg Borenstein and Michael ‘MJFreshyFresh’ Jones
Rails is an model-view-controller Web framework written in the Ruby programming language. One of its great appeals is being able to quickly crank out CRUD-based Web applications. A big advantage of Rails over other frameworks is that it values convention over configuration. If you follow the correct conventions, you can avoid lengthy configuration of files, and things just work! Therefore, you spend less time writing boring config files and more time focusing on business logic.

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10 Useful Tips For Ruby On Rails Developers