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How Klickkonzept’s Used User Insights To Help Its Client Boost Revenue By 19.24%

About Klickkonzept

Klickkonzept is a Germany-based, online-marketing-performance agency. It excels in services like SEO, SEA, CRO, social media, and E-Mail Marketing. With the vision of building a 360-degree online marketing concept, it helps its clients in boosting their website KPIs. Klickkonzept firmly believes that all online marketing practices go hand in hand.

This case study is with reference to one of its eCommerce clients, point-rouge, which is an online retail store that sells perfumes, makeup, and other styling products for both women and men.

Observations

With AdWords and price comparison websites being the major traffic sources, point-rouge’s conversion rate was lower than expected. As the Klickkonzept team digged in deeper, it noticed:

revenue boost with user insights A high number of abandoned carts               revenue boost with user insights A high bounce rate on product pages

The data from Google Analytics also highlighted that visitors with a higher session duration tend to convert more.

Challenges

Based on the observations and the current conversion rate, the Klickkonzept team was able to identify the following challenges they needed to address:

  • Not having a clear proposition on the website
  • Less understanding about website visitors
  • Giving more preference to assumption over data and missing out on CRO as a data-driven process

Earlier, point-rouge was not taking any measures, as it was not aware of these challenges.

Objective

The primary goal was set to build a comprehensive understanding of the website visitors, their on-site behaviour, and the pattern they follow to convert. It was necessary to identify the elements that were preventing the visitors from purchasing a product.

As point-rouge is an eCommerce store, Klickkonzept decided to focus mainly on improving user experience on pages with a high potential for conversion. These pages were the home page, product pages, and the checkout page.

In the end, the team wanted to leverage this information to improve point-rouge’s KPIs like bounce rate, session duration, and conversion rate.

Research

Klickkonzept conducted a  “Usability-Testessen” (Testessen= Testdinner) test where they asked some bunch of people to purchase a product from point-rouge’s website and share inputs regarding their experience as a new visitor.

Besides, they ran an on-site survey targeting all the website visitors. This survey was conducted across all the website pages.

Insights

After consolidating all the responses, it was clear that point-rouge had low brand awareness. Visitors did not have sufficient information about point-rouge and its products. The proposition was not being clearly communicated. Though the following 3 USPs were mentioned at some places, these did not have the right positioning to engage the visitors.

Hypothesis

After compiling all the observations from their research, Maurice and his team drilled down to the below hypothesis.

If we put the 3 most important USPs and highlight that visitors can avail free shipping after their second order, the conversion rate will increase by 10%.

Maurice Marquardt

To increase awareness and build trust toward the brand, it was necessary to have clear communication around point-rouge’s propositions. The team created this hypothesis on its VWO dashboard and based on the relevancy score, began the test. It was needed to prioritize hypotheses for testing.

Testrevenue boost with user insights

revenue boost with user insights

To find out the best position for the USPs, it tried a different variation with VWO as its CRO platform. The team decided to have this information in the Header bar to ensure that visitors get to access the relevant information faster. The test was run for 3 weeks for all desktop visitors.

Result & Learning

                                           revenue boost with user insights revenue boost with user insights

The variation performed better than the control across a majority of visitor types. As a result, it facilitated to increase the conversions rate for point-rouge by 7.12%, contributing towards the revenue boost by 19.24%. 

We were pretty lucky. Though, it was a low-hanging fruit, but we did a lot of research to achieve this. The Results speak for itself, and the technical development was pretty fast & easy to do with VWO. I even loved the possibility to write my own JavaScript code.

Maurice Marquardt

Klickkonzept believes that the variation won because visitors got all the relevant information they needed to make a purchase.

Listening to your customers is the key to stepping up your game in Conversion Optimization. Consider what your consumers are thinking and rely on data. With these 2 together, it’s pretty powerful and like Hulk, even those numbers turn green.

Maurice Marquardt

Tweet

Are you currently using any website optimization tool? We’d love to know your experience with it and how successful your tests have been. Drop us an email at sales@vwo.com

The post How Klickkonzept’s Used User Insights To Help Its Client Boost Revenue By 19.24% appeared first on VWO Blog.

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How Klickkonzept’s Used User Insights To Help Its Client Boost Revenue By 19.24%

How Klickkonzept Used User Insights To Help Its Client Boost Revenue By 19.24%

About Klickkonzept

Klickkonzept is a Germany-based, online-marketing-performance agency. It excels in services like SEO, SEA, CRO, social media, and E-Mail Marketing. With the vision of building a 360-degree online marketing concept, it helps its clients in boosting their website KPIs. Klickkonzept firmly believes that all online marketing practices go hand in hand.

This case study is with reference to one of its eCommerce clients, point-rouge, which is an online retail store that sells perfumes, makeup, and other styling products for both women and men.

Observations

With AdWords and price comparison websites being the major traffic sources, point-rouge’s conversion rate was lower than expected. As the Klickkonzept team digged in deeper, it noticed:

revenue boost with user insights A high number of abandoned carts               revenue boost with user insights A high bounce rate on product pages

The data from Google Analytics also highlighted that visitors with a higher session duration tend to convert more.

Challenges

Based on the observations and the current conversion rate, the Klickkonzept team was able to identify the following challenges they needed to address:

  • Not having a clear proposition on the website
  • Less understanding about website visitors
  • Giving more preference to assumption over data and missing out on CRO as a data-driven process

Earlier, point-rouge was not taking any measures, as it was not aware of these challenges.

Objective

The primary goal was set to build a comprehensive understanding of the website visitors, their on-site behaviour, and the pattern they follow to convert. It was necessary to identify the elements that were preventing the visitors from purchasing a product.

As point-rouge is an eCommerce store, Klickkonzept decided to focus mainly on improving user experience on pages with a high potential for conversion. These pages were the home page, product pages, and the checkout page.

In the end, the team wanted to leverage this information to improve point-rouge’s KPIs like bounce rate, session duration, and conversion rate.

Research

Klickkonzept conducted a  “Usability-Testessen” (Testessen= Testdinner) test where they asked some bunch of people to purchase a product from point-rouge’s website and share inputs regarding their experience as a new visitor.

Besides, they ran an on-site survey targeting all the website visitors. This survey was conducted across all the website pages.

Insights

After consolidating all the responses, it was clear that point-rouge had low brand awareness. Visitors did not have sufficient information about point-rouge and its products. The proposition was not being clearly communicated. Though the following 3 USPs were mentioned at some places, these did not have the right positioning to engage the visitors.

Hypothesis

After compiling all the observations from their research, Maurice and his team drilled down to the below hypothesis.

If we put the 3 most important USPs and highlight that visitors can avail free shipping after their second order, the conversion rate will increase by 10%.

Maurice Marquardt

To increase awareness and build trust toward the brand, it was necessary to have clear communication around point-rouge’s propositions. The team created this hypothesis on its VWO dashboard and based on the relevancy score, began the test. It was needed to prioritize hypotheses for testing.

Testrevenue boost with user insights

revenue boost with user insights

To find out the best position for the USPs, it tried a different variation with VWO as its CRO platform. The team decided to have this information in the Header bar to ensure that visitors get to access the relevant information faster. The test was run for 3 weeks for all desktop visitors.

Result & Learning

                                           revenue boost with user insights revenue boost with user insights

The variation performed better than the control across a majority of visitor types. As a result, it facilitated to increase the conversions rate for point-rouge by 7.12%, contributing towards the revenue boost by 19.24%. 

We were pretty lucky. Though, it was a low-hanging fruit, but we did a lot of research to achieve this. The Results speak for itself, and the technical development was pretty fast & easy to do with VWO. I even loved the possibility to write my own JavaScript code.

Maurice Marquardt

Klickkonzept believes that the variation won because visitors got all the relevant information they needed to make a purchase.

Listening to your customers is the key to stepping up your game in Conversion Optimization. Consider what your consumers are thinking and rely on data. With these 2 together, it’s pretty powerful and like Hulk, even those numbers turn green.

Maurice Marquardt

Tweet

Are you currently using any website optimization tool? We’d love to know your experience with it and how successful your tests have been. Drop us an email at sales@vwo.com

The post How Klickkonzept Used User Insights To Help Its Client Boost Revenue By 19.24% appeared first on VWO Blog.

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How Klickkonzept Used User Insights To Help Its Client Boost Revenue By 19.24%

How Klickkonzept Used Visitor’s Insights To Help Its Client Boost Revenue By 19.24%

Klickkonzept is a Germany-based, online-marketing-performance agency that helps its clients in boosting their website KPIs. This case study is with reference to one of its eCommerce clients, point-rouge.

Klickkonzept made a couple of important observations per the data collected from Google Analytics and a usability test done by them. The data highlighted a high number of abandoned carts and a high bounce rate contributing to a low conversion rate.

All these observations helped Klickkonzept understand where the leakage was happening in point-rouge’s conversion funnel. It used these insights and observations to craft the absolute conversion rate optimization (CRO) approach and test it with the VWO conversion optimization platform.

Keeping a clear objective in mind and with the right CRO approach, Klickkonzept was able to get a 19.24% revenue hike and a 7.12% conversion boost for point-rouge.

                                           revenue boost with user insights revenue boost with user insights 

Listening to your customers is the key to stepping up your game in Conversion Optimization. Consider what your consumers are thinking and rely on data. With these 2 together, it’s pretty powerful and like Hulk, even those numbers turn green.

Maurice Marquardt

Download the complete case study to know how Klickkonzept made a revenue boost by leveraging visitor insights with the help of VWO.

Are you currently using any Conversion Optimization Platform? We’d love to know your experience with it and how successful your tests have been. Drop us an email at sales@vwo.com

Check out our resource page for more case studies.

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How Klickkonzept Used Visitor’s Insights To Help Its Client Boost Revenue By 19.24%

How Kula Partners Followed A Structured Conversion Optimization Process Using VWO

The need for a structured, process-driven approach to conversion optimization (CRO) cannot be stressed enough. A structured CRO program is essential to deliver consistent and repeatable improvement in conversion rate and user experience (UX). Only a few organizations and agencies have adopted this approach to optimizing conversions; even fewer have been able to master it.

Kula Partners is one such agency that has actively practiced and advocated a structured CRO program. This story aims to highlight the optimization process followed by Kula Partners and how VWO helped it achieve success at each step of the process.

Based out of Nova Scotia, Canada, Kula Partners is a certified partner with VWO, offering services such as conversion optimization, inbound marketing, and web development. While optimizing conversions for its clients, Jeff White, Principal at Kula Partners, discovered that following a rigorous optimization process is what leads to success.

Synopsis of Kula’s Way of Optimizing for Success

The optimization process at Kula begins with identifying optimization opportunities on a client’s website or landing pages. It is done by closely analyzing website data and user behavior, using a variety of tools. Next, it hypothesizes ways to capitalize on each optimization opportunity. Hypotheses are then prioritized based on a few factors such as potential of improvement and effort in implementation. The hypotheses undergo A/B tests for validation, per its priority list. The results of A/B tests are thoroughly examined, and the learning is documented in a common knowledge repository. This repository is used to generate more hypotheses to optimize the website further. The cycle continues.

As Jeff puts it, “Optimizing a client’s site for conversion always starts for us with listening. We begin by implementing VWO heatmaps, clickmaps, and visitor recordings to see how people are using a site. Combined with analytics from tools such as Google Analytics and HubSpot, we’ll look for the pages that have the biggest opportunities for conversion optimization based on total number of visits and current conversion rates. Once we have a good understanding of how people are using those pages, we’ll implement a series of tests to see how best to improve the conversion rate. Sometimes this takes the form of simple changes to the body copy, button position and format. In other cases, it may mean making much larger bets and designing a wholly different, alternative landing page.

After we’ve an opportunity to implement revisions on a client site, we’ll continue to monitor the results to see how site visitors interact and refine the interface to improve the user experience even further.”

Since 2014, Kula has been trusting VWO for its optimization strategy. It has been using new features as they come up to achieve better conversions for its client websites.

Step-by-Step Process-Oriented Approach to Conversion Optimization

Let’s talk about how Kula puts its well-defined process into practice.

cro-process1

Step1: Identifying Optimization Opportunities

The first step in optimizing a website for more conversions is to establish baselines. This means setting up key metrics or goals that clearly indicate visitor actions and conducting quantitative analysis around these goals. Visitor actions leading to completion of a final goal (such as Checkout in case of eCommerce) are tracked as funnels. The website conversion funnel is extremely effective in spotting leaks—pages from which most users drop off.

Kula uses robust tools such as Google Analytics and HubSpot to track key metrics and discover potential leaks. These tools also point to high-value pages on a website—the pages that attract the highest traffic and the pages that contribute to many conversions.

Jeff says, “We identify opportunities for testing through a number of ways. We establish website funnels in tools such as HubSpot, Google Analytics and MixPanel. We then monitor conversion rates across the funnel to see areas that may be ripe for improvement. “

Step 2: Analyzing Visitor Behavior

After identifying potential leaks, the next step is to analyze how visitors are interacting with these pages on the website. This calls for a qualitative analysis of how visitors behave on the website. Such analysis provides significant insights about why visitors are behaving in a certain way. For example, if a lot of visitors are abandoning sessions on a eCommerce home page, a heatmap or visitor recording can be used to find out what category of products they were looking for and what specific problems they faced while searching for the product. Knowing what deters users from completing a conversion step is an opportunity for optimization.

At Kula, the team takes help of VWO capabilities such as Heatmaps, Scrollmaps, Visitor Recordings, and Form Analysis to understand the usage habits of visitors. It also uses VWO On-page Surveys to directly ask visitors for feedback.

Jeff shares, “As stated above, we always start our tests by observing the present usage habits of site visitors through heatmaps, clickmaps, and visitor recordings. If it makes sense, we may also gather subjective data through exit surveys. Once we have found where users stumble, we formulate specific tests to try to improve conversion.

Here’s how Kula analyzed visitor behaviors for their clients, using VWO’s advanced capabilities:

Using Heatmaps to Improve Traffic Flow

Kula Partners was working on optimizing the Halifax International Airport Authority (HIAA) website by highlighting information for airport visitors at the forefront: arrivals and departures, parking information, and directions. Although the new website saw major traffic increase (more than 300%), the team continued to scout for more optimization opportunities.

A heatmap report of the HIAA home page revealed interesting insights—68% of all clicks on the home page were on the Departures tab and only 6% clicked back to the Arrivals tab.

screen-shot-2016-06-01-at-8-54-27-am-1024x650

Kula realized that this made perfect sense. Most of the traffic on the website home page would be coming to check when their flight is scheduled to depart. Far less people would look at the arrivals; they would do that only before receiving someone at the airport.

Based on this insight, Kula decided to make Departures as the default view on the home page. As a result, it saw a 20% drop in the number of visitors that clicked the other tab, which was Arrivals in this case.

Using Website Surveys Directly Provides Insights from Actual Visitors

This time, Kula was optimizing the website of Tirecraft—a company providing superior tires, wheels, accessories, and automotive services. The objective in this case was to increase the number of quotes users submit on the website.

To do that, it first tried to understand what prevented visitors from submitting a quote. It went ahead with a website survey and asked the website visitors, “What stopped you from submitting a quote request today?”

Visitors could choose their answers from the following options:

  • I prefer to purchase this product in person.
  • There was no pricing information available.
  • I need more information.
  • I can’t buy the product I want online.
  • Other.

The result of the survey highlighted the major pain points that users faced.

tirecraft-exit-surveys

An overwhelming number of visitors responded with the second option “There was no pricing information available.”

Using Visitor Recordings to Optimize User Experience

Jeff shared an example of how Kula is using visitor recordings to help its clients.

We recently completed a large UX analysis project with a series of visitor recordings for a luxury extended stay apartment company with a national presence in Canada. Through this process, we’ve been able to develop a series of over 100 recommendations for improvement of the user experience. Our plan is to begin a series of extensive innovative A/B tests, starting with their product pages and moving to other areas of the site from there.”

Step 3: Planning and Prioritizing Testing Hypotheses

The insights and observations collected from quantitative and qualitative analyses act as fuel for the optimization engine. Our next key task is to manage this library of insights and build hypotheses for testing based on data insights.

A typical hypothesis statement looks like: Based on the observation that visitors are abandoning cart because they can’t find security seals on the checkout page, I expect that adding security seals on the checkout page will address the trust issues for visitors not completing the purchase.

There is a hypothesis aimed at addressing each optimization opportunity. Just as a thorough website analysis brings up multiple optimization opportunities, the hypotheses are also numerous. At most instances, it is not possible to validate all these hypotheses through A/B tests simultaneously. At that point, the hypotheses are prioritized on factors, including the potential to deliver positive results and ease of implementation. Prioritizing these hypotheses helps us pinpoint which tests to run first and which ones to park for future.

Kula also follows a similar prioritization model. Jeff adds, “Although we don’t specifically follow any single prioritization framework, our process most closely aligns with the PIE framework. As an agency with considerable dev chops, we’re lucky in that we can implement nearly any level of test no matter how complex. The question at that point is whether or not there’s enough potential lift in conversion to make the adjustment worthwhile.

The prioritization is usually implemented with the help of project management tools.

We record and detail our hypotheses for client tests using our project management tool, JIRA. We also maintain detailed notes about how to conduct tests and implement them in VWO, using Confluence, so that all Kula team members can quickly reference the correct processes.” explains Jeff.

Step 4: Validating Hypotheses with Testing

After the hypotheses are created and prioritized, it is time to test them. Testing a hypothesis helps you validate your thought process, and a winner assures the percentage of gain you’ll achieve by executing the change on the website. Based on the complexity of the change to be implemented, you should choose the type of test to run. For instance, it makes more sense to experiment with multivariate tests on websites with heavy traffic than on pages with low traffic.

Jeff talks about his experience with testing while he was working with rest of the team on creating a new version of the website to match the new positioning.

“We rolled out a version of the new layout for our HubSpot landing pages four months before we began designing the full site. The result was pretty solid—on our most popular asset landing page, we saw a conversion lift of nearly 10%. This gave us the confidence to deploy the design more widely.

Here is a screenshot of the test variations with the old version on the left and the new one on the right:”

kula_innovative_ab_testing-1024x987

Step 5: Analyzing Test Results and Documenting the Learning

The last leg of the optimization journey focuses on analyzing how the test results tie to visitor behavior and on saving learning from this analysis for future optimization.

Jeff explains, “When running tests, we review the results from VWO but also look at how GA and HubSpot are reporting on the changes in conversion or traffic behavior. We definitely document our results from previous tests in order to inform our future tests. These are also used in our presentations to clients on why/how we should implement CRO for their businesses.

Key Takeaways

  1. A process-driven strategy for optimizing conversions is the key to long-term success.
  2. To run the optimization engine for long-term growth, businesses need to adopt a structured approach that generates insights and learning that to act as fuel for this engine.
  3. The optimization process begins with first putting the baselines in place and finding areas of potential leaks. Next comes an in-depth view of how the visitors are behaving, that is, qualitative research. This is followed by recording and prioritizing hypotheses, which are validated through structured A/B testing.

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Eating Our Own Dogfood – How To Optimize For Revenue As A SaaS Business

It wouldn’t be an exaggeration to say that we at VWO are very passionate about experimentation.

Not only have we built a product around A/B testing and conversion optimization, but we are always looking for ways to run experiments on our website.

Recently, we got our entire team to actively research and contribute ideas for optimization on our website and ran multiple tests. This post is a narrative of what we did after.

Who Is This Post for?

This post will help SaaS growth-hackers, marketers, and optimization experts to predict the business value from a test.

The aim of this post is to not only share the tests we ran on our website, but also introduce a revenue-based framework that predicts the business impact of an A/B test and prioritizing on the basis of it.

Revenue-Based Optimization

Need for a Model

After we propelled our team to suggest ideas for testing, we had more than 30 hypotheses looking at us, but no distinct way of knowing which of these to take up first. Of course, there is a range of prioritizing frameworks available, but we particularly wanted to look at the ones that would directly impact our revenue.

This framework helped us project the potential impact on the revenue from each test. Here’s what we did:

Step 1

We decided to identify high-impact pages and winnow the pages that were not as important for our business, that is, pages where no goal conversions take place. We looked at Google Analytics for pages with the:

  • Highest Amount of Traffic
    (We used “New Users” to nullify visits by existing customers.)
  • Highest Number of Goal Conversions
    (Goal conversion, which contributes to your overall business goal, is the main goal for your website. In our case, this meant all qualified lead-generating forms. A free trial or request a demo qualifies a visitor as a lead with a genuine interest in our product; or, as the industry popularly refers to it, a Marketing Qualified Lead.)

This gave us a list of pages which were high-value in terms of, either traffic generation or last touch before conversions.

We identified the following key pages:

  • Free-trial page
  • Request-a-demo page
  • Homepage
  • Pricing page
  • Features page
  • Blog pages (All)
  • Contact-us page

Step 2

Our main objective was to project an estimated increase in the revenue due to a particular test. If your test increases the conversion rate by say 20%, what would this mean for your business and, in turn, the revenue?

This is how our marketing funnel looked like:

VWO Marketing Funnel

Note: You should use data from the recent 3–6 months, and the average (mean) of each step. This is to accurately reflect what to expect from your testing and be relevant to your business.

For each of the “Key Pages” we identified in the first step, we also dug out the corresponding numbers at each funnel stage. We’ve explained each stage of the funnel and how it is calculated:

a) Key Page Traffic: The total number of pageviews per Key Page (new users in our case). You can find the data in Google Analytics.

b) Total Conversions: The total number of leads generated from each particular page. If there is an additional qualification your company follows, source this data from your preferred CRM or Marketing Automation software. For example, at VWO, we use Clearbit to qualify our leads in Salesforce.

c) Opportunities: The total number of opportunities generated for your sales team. This data will be available in your CRM; make sure to count qualified opportunities only.

d) Customers:  The total number of customers created in a month.

e) MRR (New): Or monthly recurring revenue, means revenue booked on a monthly basis; you can use this to estimate annual recurring revenue, or ARR, as well.

Step 3

Now that we had all the numbers needed in our arsenal, I decided to calculate some more internal benchmarks. This gave us the performance of our marketing and/or sales funnel.

  1. We computed the conversion rate of a particular page, using the following formula:
    Existing conversion rate = (Total Conversions Key Page Traffic); this is represented as %
  2. The conversion of your leads into opportunities:
    (Opportunities ÷ Total conversions) × 100, represented as %
  3.  The conversion rate of opportunities into customers:
    (Customers ÷ Opportunities) × 100, represented as %
  4.  The average revenue per user or ARPU:
    Total MRR  ÷ Total number of paying customers

Now all you have to do is to impute these numbers in this template.
Revenue-based Testing Model
The model uses all of that data and projects how much revenue increase or decrease you can estimate based on your test results. This estimate can give you a good idea of where to begin or prioritize your testing.

Step 4 (Optional)

This is where it may get tricky. At VWO, we sell both Enterprise plans and Standard plans. So to be fair, we must estimate each cohort with separate data and individual conversion rates.

For example, Opportunity creation % for an Enterprise plan may be lower, but a Standard plan is easier to convert. You may want to decide what type of plan do you want to focus on.

We, for instance, used website traffic and Alexa rank as the benchmark for lead qualification. We attributed more value to the leads that came in through key pages and prioritized them.

This led us to the next step, which is the qualification rate of the said lead of high value. This rate may be in the range 30–50%, depending on your definition.

It was interesting to note that each page had a different qualification rate. For example, we get better quality leads from our Request a demo page than we do from our free trial or blog post page.

Tests Conducted:

After we had the model in place, we played around with the increase or decrease in our conversion rates. This was to identify what would be our best optimization opportunities?

The free trial pages and the home page were among the high-priority pages, in terms of the impact of revenue. (Unfortunately, I can’t share the exact numbers with you.) We first looked at the hypotheses on the free trial page:

Test 1 – Free Trial Page

Our hypothesis was “Illustrating VWO features and social proof on the free trial page will compel users to sign up for the free trial.”

Here is a screenshot of what it looks like in VWO.
hypothesis-free-trial

Bonus tip: VWO has recently launched a new capability called PLAN that lets you manage and prioritize your testing hypotheses. To learn more about this capability, visit the VWO evolution page.

This is what the control looked like:

Free Trial Control

Our heatmap data also showed a lot of users clicking the features page after accessing the free trial page.

Screenshot of heatmap data:

Heatmap Screenshot for test

We created a variation which included the features we offer to solve this issue. Here’s a screenshot of the same.

This is our current free trial page:

Free Trial Page(New)(Variation)

We ran the test for over 2 months. The result was an increase of 6% in our conversion rate, which led to increased revenues.

Test 2 – Request a Demo CTA (A/B Test)

The main CTA on the homepage has been the free trial CTA. The headline on the homepage was “A/B Testing Software for Marketers.”

The hypothesis for the test was “We will get more qualified leads through a request a demo CTA on the homepage.”

This is what the control looked like:

Homepage Control

We came up with a more targeted copy and changed the existing CTA to Request A Demo. Here is what the variation looked like:

Homepage variation

We also wanted to change our positioning due to our foray into Conversion Optimization. The results from this test were that our variation beat the control and had more than 31% improvement in the conversion rate.

Based on the first example, we have already implemented the new free-trial page as our main free-trial page now. Based on the second test, we updated our current home page.

All in all, this model helped us correctly predict the best optimization opportunities, make our testing better, and more strategically aligned to business goals.

Let me know your experience with this model and how you go about testing.

Would love to hear your feedback on this!

Free-trial CTA

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Eating Our Own Dogfood – How To Optimize For Revenue As A SaaS Business

The Realities Of User Experience Design Within The Luxury Industry

For luxury companies and upscale lifestyle service providers, excellence in experience is an essential component of the value delivered. Conceptually different from the mass market, the luxury domain relies not only on offering the highest differentiated products and services, but on delivering experiential value.

The Realities Of UX Design In The Luxury Industry

Adopting technology and embracing a digital presence through platforms and initiatives, the luxury industry today is tackling the challenge of designing an unparalleled user experience (UX) online. In this article, we’ll present a case study and share observations on the peculiarities of the UX design of a luxury lifestyle service platform and its mobile apps.

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The Realities Of User Experience Design Within The Luxury Industry

Building “Topple Trump”, An Interactive Web-Based Quiz Game (Case Study)

Editor’s Note: When it comes to elections, we are each given a choice in how to express our opinions and beliefs. Some designers and developers use their skills to further articulate their choice in one person. Here’s a glimpse into how Topple Trump!, an interactive responsive quiz game, was designed and built — combined with some valuable lessons learned along the way. This article is about techniques and strategies, so please avoid political flame in the comments.

Creating an online quiz that is simple to use, looks great and is really fun to play is one thing. Basing it on Donald Trump’s polarizing presidential campaign is another.

Building 'Topple Trump', An Interactive Web-Based Quiz Game (Case Study)

The brainchild of Parallax director and developer Andy Fitch, Topple Trump! has gone on to win numerous awards. But it was a real team effort that brought the game to life. Here’s a glimpse into precisely how that happened, touching on the development process, design considerations and some valuable lessons learned along the way.

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Building “Topple Trump”, An Interactive Web-Based Quiz Game (Case Study)

How To Run A Side Project: Screenings Case Study


Did you know you have a superpower? No, I’m not talking about super-strength, sticking to walls or pushing metal claws out of your forearms (although you might have those as well, for all I know).

Screenings: A Side-Project Case Study

If you work on the web — which I assume you do if you’re reading this — your superpower is side projects. Unlike your regular job, where you have to listen to your boss or please your client, a side project lets you take on an alternate identity, one of which you’re in charge and no one can stop you.

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How To Run A Side Project: Screenings Case Study

Approaches For Multiplatform UI Design Adaptation: A Case Study


There is no winner in the battle between iOS and Android, and we all know that. If a product succeeds on one platform, it will undoubtedly be ported to the other. Sometimes app developers don’t even bother waiting, and release apps for both platforms simultaneously. For designers this means only one thing — they will have to adapt an application’s UI and UX to another platform while ensuring a consistent design language across the product.

Three Approaches For Multiplatform UI Design Adaptation: A Case Study

There are three different scenarios for UI multiplatform adaptation: retaining brand consistency; aligning with the conventions specific to the platform; and seeking a balance between the two. We decided to analyze these three approaches by looking at the most popular apps out there so that you get some insight into what method might work best for you.

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Approaches For Multiplatform UI Design Adaptation: A Case Study

Making Time: Redesigning A Calendar Experience For Android


In UX design, few things are more intricate than time and personal time management — only a good arsenal of mobile design patterns and information architecture principles can save you. This is the story of redesigning the UX for a popular calenda tool on Android: Business Calendar. We’ll cover designing systems, interaction design problems, scaling across screens and platforms, research, and big business decisions and their outcomes.

Making Time: Redesigning A Calendar Experience For Android

Business Calendar started out as a side project, a one-man show, and is now run by a team of eight in Berlin. The app was very successful right from the time Android entered the mainstream market, and it now has an active user base of 2 million. But instead of modernizing the design and usability regularly, the developers focused on implementing user requests and customization options. Outdated design and new features stuffed in had made the app heavy and complex — full of features, hard to maintain for the team, hardly accessible for new users.

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Making Time: Redesigning A Calendar Experience For Android