Tag Archives: case studies

Know How Uptowork Brought in Visitor’s Trust and Reduced The Cart Abandonment Rate

Regardless of what product or service you are offering, the above quote stands true for all ecommerce players. Trust plays a key role to increase the conversion rate on your checkout page, getting more revenue and more customers from your existing traffic base. And that happens when your visitors trust your brand. Trust plays a very significant role at every step of a user journey. If your target audience doesn’t trust your brand, they might not visit your website. And even if they land on your website, they might not purchase from you.

What happens when visitors don’t trust you?

  • Low conversion rate
  • High cart abandonment rate 
  • High bounce rate

“In eCommerce, everything hinges on trust. If they don’t trust you, they won’t buy from you.”

Jeremy Smith

So how do you earn the trust of your visitors and motivate them to buy your product?

Building trust is a long-term process, and it doesn’t happen overnight. However, there are some actionable tips that can be given a shot. Some time ago, we created this exhaustive list of tips for eCommerce brands. Among these, adding a trust seal on the checkout page to convince potential customers that the process is safe and secure can be a great option.A survey conducted by Matthew Niederberger on Actual Insights found that “61% of participants said they have at one time NOT completed a purchase because there were no trust logos present.”

What Is a Trust Seal/Trust Badge?

A trust seal, sometimes called a secure site seal, is something you’re likely already familiar with if you’ve ever noticed small badges displayed on a website, particularly on store or payment pages.

Our client, Uptowork, experienced a great deal of results by earning visitors’ trust by following the same approach. Let’s see how they did it.

Background: The Company

Uptowork is a a career site and online resume building platform. The platform is easy to use, fast, and professional. Uptowork targets all types of job aspirants, especially especially those, who struggle with building their resume in traditional text editors. You can always refer to their blog for some quick tips for your resume. Most of the traffic coming to Uptowork website is organic and through AdWords.

Investigating and Identifying the Issue

Although organic medium was paying off well for them by getting substantial traffic, they wanted to improve the percentage of visitors making a purchase and converting into customers besides the surprisingly high cart abandonment rate.

Reduce cart abandonment rate with VWO

When they analyzed their visitor journey, they noticed that a lot of visitors are checking out the product and adding it to their carts, but not making the final purchase. This resulted in a high cart abandonment rate and low conversion rate.

Earlier Approach

The Uptowork team tried making a couple of changes on the website and closely analyzed the GA data to see if it worked.  

  • They made some changes, but GA and other tools were not capable enough to give them all the answers.
  • They also did not A/B test them, so there was no direct comparison that could be made.

All this made them doubt the data they had.

Finding the Gap

The Uptowork team understood that there was a huge gap between what the brand wanted to convey and what the visitors perceived. They understood that the one thing lacking was visitor trust on the website.

Keeping an Objective in Mind

With the objective of filling this trust gap and reducing the cart abandonment rate, the team began its research. While doing the research, it came across this article on the VWO blog<, which includes actionable tips to build trust again for an eCommerce website.

Key Idea

The key idea was to completely redesign the cart page and add a McAfee trust badge on their cart page to convey a sense of security to its visitors.

Hypothesis

“We added a McAfee badge to our cart with the assumption that it will reduce the percentage of people leaving the cart. And it did “

Bases on their research they came up with hypothesis of adding a McAfee badge to gain visitor’s trust. They hoped that adding a McAfee badge will ensure a secure payment gateway for visitors and uplift the brand image. And thus, reduce the cart abandonment rate and increase conversion rate.

“While we were hoping for the badge to work, we had our doubts about how such a small change will make any impact”

Implementing and Testing

Almost a month-long test was ran for their entire user base with the help of  VWO AB testing capability.

Control

Reduce cart abandonment rate with VWO

Variation

Reduce cart abandonment rate with VWO

Result

The results of this test perfectly aligned with its hypothesis. Adding the McAfee seal reduced its abandoned cart rate and increased the conversion rate by 1.27 %.

Learning

“We were almost sure that such a small badge wouldn’t have any impact on our bottom line. If it wasn’t for the test we would just remove it and wonder what happened to our sales. VWO made it really easy to prepare the test and track the results.”

Rafał Romański

The team believed that visitors recognize this badge from other places, and it builds a sense of security.

“We aren’t a huge brand (yet!) and trust is still something we have to take care about. Using visual cues like that can bring that little extra reassurance we need.”

Rafał Romański

Final Thoughts

“We use VWO to test any visual or content changes that might impact our bottom line. It turns lengthy discussions about what should we do into easy to setup tests that bring results to the table, not opinions. I think this has been the biggest value we got out of using VWO (along with the hundreds of dollars we managed to save on mistakes we would’ve made without it!).”

Rafał Romański

When a small change inspired from a blogpost showed such impact on the conversion rate, you can just imagine the impact of a planned conversion rate optimization for eCommerce.

“Trust comes from delivering everyday on what you promised as a manager, an employee and a company.”

Robert Hurley

The Wall Street Journal

Do you need some tips to optimize your eCommerce conversion rate? Drop us a line at sales@vwo.com, or get in touch with our services team.

The post Know How Uptowork Brought in Visitor’s Trust and Reduced The Cart Abandonment Rate appeared first on Blog.

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Know How Uptowork Brought in Visitor’s Trust and Reduced The Cart Abandonment Rate

Why VWO Emerged As Colart’s First Choice For An Optimization Platform

We spoke with Patxi Gadanon, who works as a Senior Web Manager for one of the leading fine arts brands in the UK, called Colart. In his role, Gadanon ensures that all websites within his purview provide excellent user experience and display up-to-date content. Colart has been a VWO customer since early 2017, after Gadanon evaluated several A/B testing tools including Optimizely. He explained how he arrived at the conclusion that VWO is the right web testing and conversion optimization solution for the Colart brand.

Evaluation Parameters

When Gadanon started working at Colart in January 2017, he quickly realized that its website would engage visitors more if optimized with the help of web testing and conversion rate optimization (CRO) practices. As he started looking for the ideal web testing solution for Colart, Gadanon evaluated his options on the following parameters:

  • Quality of customer support
    Does the tool have a dedicated support team? What is their availability like? Do they respond in time? Can they answer technical questions regarding test implementation?

To implement a scalable testing process, Gadanon needed to set up and run tests with minimal IT help.

  • Ease of use
    Is the tool easy to use? How much effort and resources would it take to train the team on it?

A tool that is easy to use would help his team resolve subjective debates with visitor data.

  • Tool features
    Does the solution meet all requirements? Does it integrate with other tools and analytics platforms easily?

“The primary objective of the website,” Gadanon said, “is to build credibility in the Colart brand. Although we sell our products through the website, we do not identify as an ecommerce company. We measure success in terms of visitor engagement.” Therefore, in-depth visitor behavior analysis was a critical requirement.

  • Pricing
    How flexible are the pricing options? Is the tool within the budget? Will the Digital Director approve the quotation?

The team used several tools for different requirements and managed to get some quick wins, but it soon became obvious that they should look for a solution that would help them bring everything under their testing program at one place. It was important to select an all-features-in-one tool that allowed testing on multiple domains from a single platform.

Based on these factors, Gadanon shortlisted two options—VWO and Optimizely—and proposed these to Louise, his manager and the Digital Director at Colart. Even though Gadanon had used Optimizely for his previous employer and was comfortable using it, he drew up a quick price and feature comparison and got demos for both tools before making a decision.

What Didn’t Work with Optimizely

When asked why he did not choose Optimizely for Colart, Gadanon cited its poor technical support during the presales period. The team at Optimizely did not share the code with him and preferred to speak with developers instead. This was a problem because development for the Colart website is not done in-house. Gadanon also sensed a reluctance to provide a solution even after the problem had been identified. “I had to keep following up for help. It felt like I was begging to get more support, even after I had mentioned that we were in a rush to decide on an A/B testing solution. By the time the Optimizely demo was scheduled, we had already made up our minds to go with VWO instead,” Gadanon said.

He was also aware that Optimizely slowed down websites, and that didn’t help either. Gadanon’s team had received poor feedback about the flicker that visitors noticed on websites running tests by using Optimizely. It is now a widely acknowledged issue across digital media.

More importantly, Optimizely charges users separately for each domain it runs tests on. The digital team at Colart manages several sub-brands and approximately 20 web domains that they concurrently wanted to run tests on from a single account. The inflexible per-domain pricing model was, therefore, a deal-breaker for Gadanon and his team.

Why VWO Emerged as the Tool of Choice for Colart

VWO emerged as the preferred solution for Colart for a variety of reasons.

  1. VWO Support (Presales and Post-Purchase)

Gadanon was impressed with both the presales and post-sales support that he received from VWO. “I can trust the VWO Support team to respond quickly and give me a clear, straightforward response, even when it’s something I would not like to hear,” he explains.

VWO provides 24×7 hands-on support across phone, email, and chat. VWO also has in-app guided onboarding and an up-to-date knowledge base containing all the information users would ever need. Even better, enterprise customers get dedicated customer success managers to help them set up their accounts and get testing immediately.

  1. Flexible Pricing

VWO also has a flexible pricing model that worked for Colart and its sub-brands. If a team like Gadanon’s wants to run tests on multiple domains from a single account, it can simply pay by the average number of unique monthly visitors on its website, no matter how many domains it runs tests on within that visitor quota—and this is precisely what they chose to do.

More information about VWO pricing plans is available here.

  1. Better Product

No impact on the page load time

VWO uses asynchronous code to serve campaign data, compared to synchronous code used by Optimizely.

Asynchronous means that the code contacts VWO servers in the background, downloads, and processes the test package while the rest of the page continues to load and render in the browser as usual.

Optimizely’s synchronous code makes the browser wait until Optimizely can deliver the test package, long enough for visitors to notice.

And in the improbable case of VWO servers being unavailable, the original page gets loaded, ensuring that visitors’ experiences remain unaffected. This is why Gadanon’s team has never received complaints about a flickering issue with VWO.

Friendly UI
Gadanon also found the VWO user interface to be intuitive and easy to browse. While commenting that the dashboard is organized well, he described it as a “wizard” that holds a lot of information and options and allows for a steeper learning curve for nontechnical people like him.

VWO Heatmaps
While Gadanon admits that his team hasn’t used the platform to its full potential, he notes that the Colart brand has benefited from VWO in multiple ways.

Optimizely lets its customers manage and run A/B tests and personalize their website for visitors. On the other hand, VWO provides a data-driven testing solution that connects every step in the visitor journey to impact conversion rates. Customers can bring their entire conversion optimization program on a single, connected platform—track business goals, analyze visitor behavior, build data-driven hypotheses, run tests, and personalize content.
Using the Analyze capability of VWO, Gadanon and his team have been able to analyze visitors’ behaviors on the Colart website. “We use heatmaps and scrollmaps to ensure that the design elements of every new page are working for our website visitors,” he stated.

On-page Surveys

The digital team at Colart has also used VWO Surveys to settle internal, subjective debates. When they noticed that in some instances, pages hit per session and time on site were high, they wanted to find out if people were lost or if the content was not engaging enough. Some team members attributed it to poor site navigation and user experience. To verify this hypothesis, Gadanon setup on-page surveys which revealed that 90% of visitors who took the survey were satisfied with the site and approximately 50% were happy with the site experience, leaving no room for further debate.

Minimal IT Dependency

Gadanon notes that with VWO, his team has been able to set up and run tests with little IT help. The team usually tests changes to website content to see what visitors prefer and then plans to increase the testing frequency in the future.

It helps that the team does not need to integrate VWO with many third-party tools apart from its analytics platform. Therefore, it requires less support from a developer than it would have needed if it had chosen Optimizely.

Conclusion

Considering the experience of Gadanon and his team with both Optimizely and VWO, it becomes clear that VWO is the ideal A/B testing and conversion optimization platform for Colart and its many sub-brands. As a connected conversion optimization platform, VWO has helped the team deliver an improved user experience to its digital audience. It comes as no surprise then that Gadanon describes VWO as the “Swiss knife of web testing—an A/B testing tool as well as a research and monitoring tool for websites.”

Looking for a detailed feature comparison between VWO and Optimizely? Find it here.

The post Why VWO Emerged As Colart’s First Choice For An Optimization Platform appeared first on Blog.

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Why VWO Emerged As Colart’s First Choice For An Optimization Platform

VWO Was Colart’s First Choice As An Optimization Platform

We spoke with Patxi Gadanon, who works as a Senior Web Manager for one of the leading fine arts brands in the world, called Colart. In his role, Gadanon ensures that all websites within his purview provide excellent user experience and display up-to-date content. Colart has been a VWO customer since early 2017, after Gadanon evaluated several A/B testing tools including Optimizely. He explained how he arrived at the conclusion that VWO is the right web testing and conversion optimization solution for the Colart brand.

Evaluation Parameters

When Gadanon started working at Colart in January 2017, he quickly realized that its website would engage visitors more if optimized with the help of web testing and conversion rate optimization (CRO) practices. As he started looking for the ideal web testing solution for Colart, Gadanon evaluated his options on the following parameters:

Quality of customer support
Does the tool have a dedicated support team? What is their availability like? Do they respond in time? Can they answer technical questions regarding test implementation?
To implement a scalable testing process, Gadanon needed to set up and run tests with minimal IT help.

Ease of use
Is the tool easy to use? How much effort and resources would it take to train the team on it?
A tool that is easy to use would help his team resolve subjective debates with visitor data.

Tool features
Does the solution meet all requirements? Does it integrate with other tools and analytics platforms easily?
“The primary objective of the website,” Gadanon said, “is to build credibility in the Colart brand. Although we sell our products through the website, we do not identify as an ecommerce company. We measure success in terms of visitor engagement.” Therefore, in-depth visitor behavior analysis was a critical requirement.

Pricing
How flexible are the pricing options? Is the tool within the budget? Will the Digital Director approve the quotation?

The team used several tools for different requirements and managed to get some quick wins, but it soon became obvious that they should look for a solution that would help them bring everything under their testing program at one place. It was important to select an all-features-in-one tool that allowed testing on multiple domains from a single platform.

Based on these factors, Gadanon shortlisted two options—VWO and Optimizely—and proposed these to Louise, his manager and the Digital Director at Colart. Even though Gadanon had used Optimizely for his previous employer and was comfortable using it, he drew up a quick price and feature comparison and got demos for both tools before making a decision.

What Didn’t Work with Optimizely

When asked why he did not choose Optimizely for Colart, Gadanon cited its poor technical support during the presales period. The team at Optimizely did not share the code with him and preferred to speak with developers instead. This was a problem because development for the Colart website is not done in-house. Gadanon also sensed a reluctance to provide a solution even after the problem had been identified.

“I had to keep following up for help. It felt like I was begging to get more support, even after I had mentioned that we were in a rush to decide on an A/B testing solution. By the time the Optimizely demo was scheduled, we had already made up our minds to go with VWO instead,”

-Gadanon

Adding to the undesirable technical support, Patxi was also aware that Optimizely slowed down websites due to its use of synchronous code to serve campaign data. Gadanon’s team had received poor feedback about the flicker that visitors noticed on websites running tests by using Optimizely. It is now a widely acknowledged issue across digital media.

More importantly, Optimizely charges users separately for each domain it runs tests on. The digital team at Colart manages several sub-brands and approximately 20 web domains that they concurrently wanted to run tests on from a single account. The inflexible per-domain pricing model was, therefore, a deal-breaker for Gadanon and his team.

Why VWO Emerged as the Tool of Choice for Colart

VWO emerged as the preferred solution for Colart for a variety of reasons. Here’s a glimpse at the factors which influenced Patxi’s decision:

VWO Support (Presales and Post-Purchase)

Gadanon was impressed with both the presales and post-sales support that he received from VWO.

“I can trust the VWO Support team to respond quickly and give me a clear, straightforward response, even when it’s something I would not like to hear,” 

-Gadanon

VWO provides 24×7 hands-on support across phone, email, and chat. VWO also has in-app guided onboarding and an up-to-date knowledge base containing all the information users would ever need. Even better, enterprise customers get dedicated customer success managers to help them set up their accounts and get testing immediately.

Flexible Pricing

VWO also has a flexible pricing model that worked for Colart and its sub-brands. If a team like Gadanon’s wants to run tests on multiple domains from a single account, it can simply pay by the average number of unique monthly visitors on its website, no matter how many domains it runs tests on within that visitor quota—and this is precisely what they chose to do.

More information about VWO pricing plans is available here.

Better Product

No impact on the page load time
VWO uses asynchronous code to serve campaign data, compared to synchronous code used by Optimizely. Asynchronous means that the code contacts VWO servers in the background, downloads, and processes the test package while the rest of the page continues to load and render in the browser as usual.

Optimizely’s synchronous code makes the browser wait until Optimizely can deliver the test package, long enough for visitors to notice. And in the improbable case of VWO servers being unavailable, the original page gets loaded, ensuring that visitors’ experiences remain unaffected. This is why Gadanon’s team has never received complaints about a flickering issue with VWO.

Friendly UI
Gadanon also found the VWO user interface to be intuitive and easy to browse. While commenting that the dashboard is organized well, he described it as a “wizard” that holds a lot of information and options and allows for a steeper learning curve for nontechnical people like him.

VWO Heatmaps
While Gadanon admits that his team hasn’t used the platform to its full potential, he notes that the Colart brand has benefited from VWO in multiple ways.

Optimizely lets its customers manage and run A/B tests and personalize their website for visitors. On the other hand, VWO provides a data-driven testing solution that connects every step in the visitor journey to impact conversion rates. Customers can bring their entire conversion optimization program on a single, connected platform—track business goals, analyze visitor behavior, build data-driven hypotheses, run tests, and personalize content.
Using the Analyze capability of VWO, Gadanon and his team have been able to analyze visitors’ behaviors on the Colart website. “We use heatmaps and scrollmaps to ensure that the design elements of every new page are working for our website visitors,” he stated.

On-page Surveys
The digital team at Colart has also used VWO Surveys to settle internal, subjective debates. When they noticed that in some instances, pages hit per session and time on site were high, they wanted to find out if people were lost or if the content was not engaging enough. Some team members attributed it to poor site navigation and user experience. To verify this hypothesis, Gadanon setup on-page surveys which revealed that 90% of visitors who took the survey were satisfied with the site and approximately 50% were happy with the site experience, leaving no room for further debate.

Minimal IT Dependency
Gadanon notes that with VWO, his team has been able to set up and run tests with little IT help. The team usually tests changes to website content to see what visitors prefer and then plans to increase the testing frequency in the future.

It helps that the team does not need to integrate VWO with many third-party tools apart from its analytics platform. Therefore, it requires less support from a developer than it would have needed if it had chosen Optimizely.

Conclusion

Considering the experience of Gadanon and his team with both Optimizely and VWO, it becomes clear that VWO is the ideal A/B testing and conversion optimization platform for Colart and its many sub-brands. As a connected conversion optimization platform, VWO has helped the team deliver an improved user experience to its digital audience. It comes as no surprise then that Gadanon describes VWO as the “Swiss knife of web testing—an A/B testing tool as well as a research and monitoring tool for websites.”

Looking for a detailed feature comparison between VWO and Optimizely? Find it here.

The post VWO Was Colart’s First Choice As An Optimization Platform appeared first on Blog.

Excerpt from – 

VWO Was Colart’s First Choice As An Optimization Platform

How Klickkonzept Used User Insights To Help Its Client Boost Revenue By 19.24%

About Klickkonzept

Klickkonzept is a Germany-based, online-marketing-performance agency. It excels in services like SEO, SEA, CRO, social media, and E-Mail Marketing. With the vision of building a 360-degree online marketing concept, it helps its clients in boosting their website KPIs. Klickkonzept firmly believes that all online marketing practices go hand in hand.

This case study is with reference to one of its eCommerce clients, point-rouge, which is an online retail store that sells perfumes, makeup, and other styling products for both women and men.

Observations

With AdWords and price comparison websites being the major traffic sources, point-rouge’s conversion rate was lower than expected. As the Klickkonzept team digged in deeper, it noticed:

revenue boost with user insights A high number of abandoned carts               revenue boost with user insights A high bounce rate on product pages

The data from Google Analytics also highlighted that visitors with a higher session duration tend to convert more.

Challenges

Based on the observations and the current conversion rate, the Klickkonzept team was able to identify the following challenges they needed to address:

  • Not having a clear proposition on the website
  • Less understanding about website visitors
  • Giving more preference to assumption over data and missing out on CRO as a data-driven process

Earlier, point-rouge was not taking any measures, as it was not aware of these challenges.

Objective

The primary goal was set to build a comprehensive understanding of the website visitors, their on-site behaviour, and the pattern they follow to convert. It was necessary to identify the elements that were preventing the visitors from purchasing a product.

As point-rouge is an eCommerce store, Klickkonzept decided to focus mainly on improving user experience on pages with a high potential for conversion. These pages were the home page, product pages, and the checkout page.

In the end, the team wanted to leverage this information to improve point-rouge’s KPIs like bounce rate, session duration, and conversion rate.

Research

Klickkonzept conducted a  “Usability-Testessen” (Testessen= Testdinner) test where they asked some bunch of people to purchase a product from point-rouge’s website and share inputs regarding their experience as a new visitor.

Besides, they ran an on-site survey targeting all the website visitors. This survey was conducted across all the website pages.

Insights

After consolidating all the responses, it was clear that point-rouge had low brand awareness. Visitors did not have sufficient information about point-rouge and its products. The proposition was not being clearly communicated. Though the following 3 USPs were mentioned at some places, these did not have the right positioning to engage the visitors.

Hypothesis

After compiling all the observations from their research, Maurice and his team drilled down to the below hypothesis.

If we put the 3 most important USPs and highlight that visitors can avail free shipping after their second order, the conversion rate will increase by 10%.

Maurice Marquardt

To increase awareness and build trust toward the brand, it was necessary to have clear communication around point-rouge’s propositions. The team created this hypothesis on its VWO dashboard and based on the relevancy score, began the test. It was needed to prioritize hypotheses for testing.

Testrevenue boost with user insights

revenue boost with user insights

To find out the best position for the USPs, it tried a different variation with VWO as its CRO platform. The team decided to have this information in the Header bar to ensure that visitors get to access the relevant information faster. The test was run for 3 weeks for all desktop visitors.

Result & Learning

                                           revenue boost with user insights revenue boost with user insights

The variation performed better than the control across a majority of visitor types. As a result, it facilitated to increase the conversions rate for point-rouge by 7.12%, contributing towards the revenue boost by 19.24%. 

We were pretty lucky. Though, it was a low-hanging fruit, but we did a lot of research to achieve this. The Results speak for itself, and the technical development was pretty fast & easy to do with VWO. I even loved the possibility to write my own JavaScript code.

Maurice Marquardt

Klickkonzept believes that the variation won because visitors got all the relevant information they needed to make a purchase.

Listening to your customers is the key to stepping up your game in Conversion Optimization. Consider what your consumers are thinking and rely on data. With these 2 together, it’s pretty powerful and like Hulk, even those numbers turn green.

Maurice Marquardt

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Are you currently using any website optimization tool? We’d love to know your experience with it and how successful your tests have been. Drop us an email at sales@vwo.com

The post How Klickkonzept Used User Insights To Help Its Client Boost Revenue By 19.24% appeared first on VWO Blog.

Link to article: 

How Klickkonzept Used User Insights To Help Its Client Boost Revenue By 19.24%

How Klickkonzept Used Visitor’s Insights To Help Its Client Boost Revenue By 19.24%

Klickkonzept is a Germany-based, online-marketing-performance agency that helps its clients in boosting their website KPIs. This case study is with reference to one of its eCommerce clients, point-rouge.

Klickkonzept made a couple of important observations per the data collected from Google Analytics and a usability test done by them. The data highlighted a high number of abandoned carts and a high bounce rate contributing to a low conversion rate.

All these observations helped Klickkonzept understand where the leakage was happening in point-rouge’s conversion funnel. It used these insights and observations to craft the absolute conversion rate optimization (CRO) approach and test it with the VWO conversion optimization platform.

Keeping a clear objective in mind and with the right CRO approach, Klickkonzept was able to get a 19.24% revenue hike and a 7.12% conversion boost for point-rouge.

                                           revenue boost with user insights revenue boost with user insights 

Listening to your customers is the key to stepping up your game in Conversion Optimization. Consider what your consumers are thinking and rely on data. With these 2 together, it’s pretty powerful and like Hulk, even those numbers turn green.

Maurice Marquardt

Download the complete case study to know how Klickkonzept made a revenue boost by leveraging visitor insights with the help of VWO.

Are you currently using any Conversion Optimization Platform? We’d love to know your experience with it and how successful your tests have been. Drop us an email at sales@vwo.com

Check out our resource page for more case studies.

The post How Klickkonzept Used Visitor’s Insights To Help Its Client Boost Revenue By 19.24% appeared first on Blog.

View original post here: 

How Klickkonzept Used Visitor’s Insights To Help Its Client Boost Revenue By 19.24%

How Klickkonzept’s Used User Insights To Help Its Client Boost Revenue By 19.24%

About Klickkonzept

Klickkonzept is a Germany-based, online-marketing-performance agency. It excels in services like SEO, SEA, CRO, social media, and E-Mail Marketing. With the vision of building a 360-degree online marketing concept, it helps its clients in boosting their website KPIs. Klickkonzept firmly believes that all online marketing practices go hand in hand.

This case study is with reference to one of its eCommerce clients, point-rouge, which is an online retail store that sells perfumes, makeup, and other styling products for both women and men.

Observations

With AdWords and price comparison websites being the major traffic sources, point-rouge’s conversion rate was lower than expected. As the Klickkonzept team digged in deeper, it noticed:

revenue boost with user insights A high number of abandoned carts               revenue boost with user insights A high bounce rate on product pages

The data from Google Analytics also highlighted that visitors with a higher session duration tend to convert more.

Challenges

Based on the observations and the current conversion rate, the Klickkonzept team was able to identify the following challenges they needed to address:

  • Not having a clear proposition on the website
  • Less understanding about website visitors
  • Giving more preference to assumption over data and missing out on CRO as a data-driven process

Earlier, point-rouge was not taking any measures, as it was not aware of these challenges.

Objective

The primary goal was set to build a comprehensive understanding of the website visitors, their on-site behaviour, and the pattern they follow to convert. It was necessary to identify the elements that were preventing the visitors from purchasing a product.

As point-rouge is an eCommerce store, Klickkonzept decided to focus mainly on improving user experience on pages with a high potential for conversion. These pages were the home page, product pages, and the checkout page.

In the end, the team wanted to leverage this information to improve point-rouge’s KPIs like bounce rate, session duration, and conversion rate.

Research

Klickkonzept conducted a  “Usability-Testessen” (Testessen= Testdinner) test where they asked some bunch of people to purchase a product from point-rouge’s website and share inputs regarding their experience as a new visitor.

Besides, they ran an on-site survey targeting all the website visitors. This survey was conducted across all the website pages.

Insights

After consolidating all the responses, it was clear that point-rouge had low brand awareness. Visitors did not have sufficient information about point-rouge and its products. The proposition was not being clearly communicated. Though the following 3 USPs were mentioned at some places, these did not have the right positioning to engage the visitors.

Hypothesis

After compiling all the observations from their research, Maurice and his team drilled down to the below hypothesis.

If we put the 3 most important USPs and highlight that visitors can avail free shipping after their second order, the conversion rate will increase by 10%.

Maurice Marquardt

To increase awareness and build trust toward the brand, it was necessary to have clear communication around point-rouge’s propositions. The team created this hypothesis on its VWO dashboard and based on the relevancy score, began the test. It was needed to prioritize hypotheses for testing.

Testrevenue boost with user insights

revenue boost with user insights

To find out the best position for the USPs, it tried a different variation with VWO as its CRO platform. The team decided to have this information in the Header bar to ensure that visitors get to access the relevant information faster. The test was run for 3 weeks for all desktop visitors.

Result & Learning

                                           revenue boost with user insights revenue boost with user insights

The variation performed better than the control across a majority of visitor types. As a result, it facilitated to increase the conversions rate for point-rouge by 7.12%, contributing towards the revenue boost by 19.24%. 

We were pretty lucky. Though, it was a low-hanging fruit, but we did a lot of research to achieve this. The Results speak for itself, and the technical development was pretty fast & easy to do with VWO. I even loved the possibility to write my own JavaScript code.

Maurice Marquardt

Klickkonzept believes that the variation won because visitors got all the relevant information they needed to make a purchase.

Listening to your customers is the key to stepping up your game in Conversion Optimization. Consider what your consumers are thinking and rely on data. With these 2 together, it’s pretty powerful and like Hulk, even those numbers turn green.

Maurice Marquardt

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Are you currently using any website optimization tool? We’d love to know your experience with it and how successful your tests have been. Drop us an email at sales@vwo.com

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How Klickkonzept’s Used User Insights To Help Its Client Boost Revenue By 19.24%

How Kula Partners Followed A Structured Conversion Optimization Process Using VWO

The need for a structured, process-driven approach to conversion optimization (CRO) cannot be stressed enough. A structured CRO program is essential to deliver consistent and repeatable improvement in conversion rate and user experience (UX). Only a few organizations and agencies have adopted this approach to optimizing conversions; even fewer have been able to master it.

Kula Partners is one such agency that has actively practiced and advocated a structured CRO program. This story aims to highlight the optimization process followed by Kula Partners and how VWO helped it achieve success at each step of the process.

Based out of Nova Scotia, Canada, Kula Partners is a certified partner with VWO, offering services such as conversion optimization, inbound marketing, and web development. While optimizing conversions for its clients, Jeff White, Principal at Kula Partners, discovered that following a rigorous optimization process is what leads to success.

Synopsis of Kula’s Way of Optimizing for Success

The optimization process at Kula begins with identifying optimization opportunities on a client’s website or landing pages. It is done by closely analyzing website data and user behavior, using a variety of tools. Next, it hypothesizes ways to capitalize on each optimization opportunity. Hypotheses are then prioritized based on a few factors such as potential of improvement and effort in implementation. The hypotheses undergo A/B tests for validation, per its priority list. The results of A/B tests are thoroughly examined, and the learning is documented in a common knowledge repository. This repository is used to generate more hypotheses to optimize the website further. The cycle continues.

As Jeff puts it, “Optimizing a client’s site for conversion always starts for us with listening. We begin by implementing VWO heatmaps, clickmaps, and visitor recordings to see how people are using a site. Combined with analytics from tools such as Google Analytics and HubSpot, we’ll look for the pages that have the biggest opportunities for conversion optimization based on total number of visits and current conversion rates. Once we have a good understanding of how people are using those pages, we’ll implement a series of tests to see how best to improve the conversion rate. Sometimes this takes the form of simple changes to the body copy, button position and format. In other cases, it may mean making much larger bets and designing a wholly different, alternative landing page.

After we’ve an opportunity to implement revisions on a client site, we’ll continue to monitor the results to see how site visitors interact and refine the interface to improve the user experience even further.”

Since 2014, Kula has been trusting VWO for its optimization strategy. It has been using new features as they come up to achieve better conversions for its client websites.

Step-by-Step Process-Oriented Approach to Conversion Optimization

Let’s talk about how Kula puts its well-defined process into practice.

cro-process1

Step1: Identifying Optimization Opportunities

The first step in optimizing a website for more conversions is to establish baselines. This means setting up key metrics or goals that clearly indicate visitor actions and conducting quantitative analysis around these goals. Visitor actions leading to completion of a final goal (such as Checkout in case of eCommerce) are tracked as funnels. The website conversion funnel is extremely effective in spotting leaks—pages from which most users drop off.

Kula uses robust tools such as Google Analytics and HubSpot to track key metrics and discover potential leaks. These tools also point to high-value pages on a website—the pages that attract the highest traffic and the pages that contribute to many conversions.

Jeff says, “We identify opportunities for testing through a number of ways. We establish website funnels in tools such as HubSpot, Google Analytics and MixPanel. We then monitor conversion rates across the funnel to see areas that may be ripe for improvement. “

Step 2: Analyzing Visitor Behavior

After identifying potential leaks, the next step is to analyze how visitors are interacting with these pages on the website. This calls for a qualitative analysis of how visitors behave on the website. Such analysis provides significant insights about why visitors are behaving in a certain way. For example, if a lot of visitors are abandoning sessions on a eCommerce home page, a heatmap or visitor recording can be used to find out what category of products they were looking for and what specific problems they faced while searching for the product. Knowing what deters users from completing a conversion step is an opportunity for optimization.

At Kula, the team takes help of VWO capabilities such as Heatmaps, Scrollmaps, Visitor Recordings, and Form Analysis to understand the usage habits of visitors. It also uses VWO On-page Surveys to directly ask visitors for feedback.

Jeff shares, “As stated above, we always start our tests by observing the present usage habits of site visitors through heatmaps, clickmaps, and visitor recordings. If it makes sense, we may also gather subjective data through exit surveys. Once we have found where users stumble, we formulate specific tests to try to improve conversion.

Here’s how Kula analyzed visitor behaviors for their clients, using VWO’s advanced capabilities:

Using Heatmaps to Improve Traffic Flow

Kula Partners was working on optimizing the Halifax International Airport Authority (HIAA) website by highlighting information for airport visitors at the forefront: arrivals and departures, parking information, and directions. Although the new website saw major traffic increase (more than 300%), the team continued to scout for more optimization opportunities.

A heatmap report of the HIAA home page revealed interesting insights—68% of all clicks on the home page were on the Departures tab and only 6% clicked back to the Arrivals tab.

screen-shot-2016-06-01-at-8-54-27-am-1024x650

Kula realized that this made perfect sense. Most of the traffic on the website home page would be coming to check when their flight is scheduled to depart. Far less people would look at the arrivals; they would do that only before receiving someone at the airport.

Based on this insight, Kula decided to make Departures as the default view on the home page. As a result, it saw a 20% drop in the number of visitors that clicked the other tab, which was Arrivals in this case.

Using Website Surveys Directly Provides Insights from Actual Visitors

This time, Kula was optimizing the website of Tirecraft—a company providing superior tires, wheels, accessories, and automotive services. The objective in this case was to increase the number of quotes users submit on the website.

To do that, it first tried to understand what prevented visitors from submitting a quote. It went ahead with a website survey and asked the website visitors, “What stopped you from submitting a quote request today?”

Visitors could choose their answers from the following options:

  • I prefer to purchase this product in person.
  • There was no pricing information available.
  • I need more information.
  • I can’t buy the product I want online.
  • Other.

The result of the survey highlighted the major pain points that users faced.

tirecraft-exit-surveys

An overwhelming number of visitors responded with the second option “There was no pricing information available.”

Using Visitor Recordings to Optimize User Experience

Jeff shared an example of how Kula is using visitor recordings to help its clients.

We recently completed a large UX analysis project with a series of visitor recordings for a luxury extended stay apartment company with a national presence in Canada. Through this process, we’ve been able to develop a series of over 100 recommendations for improvement of the user experience. Our plan is to begin a series of extensive innovative A/B tests, starting with their product pages and moving to other areas of the site from there.”

Step 3: Planning and Prioritizing Testing Hypotheses

The insights and observations collected from quantitative and qualitative analyses act as fuel for the optimization engine. Our next key task is to manage this library of insights and build hypotheses for testing based on data insights.

A typical hypothesis statement looks like: Based on the observation that visitors are abandoning cart because they can’t find security seals on the checkout page, I expect that adding security seals on the checkout page will address the trust issues for visitors not completing the purchase.

There is a hypothesis aimed at addressing each optimization opportunity. Just as a thorough website analysis brings up multiple optimization opportunities, the hypotheses are also numerous. At most instances, it is not possible to validate all these hypotheses through A/B tests simultaneously. At that point, the hypotheses are prioritized on factors, including the potential to deliver positive results and ease of implementation. Prioritizing these hypotheses helps us pinpoint which tests to run first and which ones to park for future.

Kula also follows a similar prioritization model. Jeff adds, “Although we don’t specifically follow any single prioritization framework, our process most closely aligns with the PIE framework. As an agency with considerable dev chops, we’re lucky in that we can implement nearly any level of test no matter how complex. The question at that point is whether or not there’s enough potential lift in conversion to make the adjustment worthwhile.

The prioritization is usually implemented with the help of project management tools.

We record and detail our hypotheses for client tests using our project management tool, JIRA. We also maintain detailed notes about how to conduct tests and implement them in VWO, using Confluence, so that all Kula team members can quickly reference the correct processes.” explains Jeff.

Step 4: Validating Hypotheses with Testing

After the hypotheses are created and prioritized, it is time to test them. Testing a hypothesis helps you validate your thought process, and a winner assures the percentage of gain you’ll achieve by executing the change on the website. Based on the complexity of the change to be implemented, you should choose the type of test to run. For instance, it makes more sense to experiment with multivariate tests on websites with heavy traffic than on pages with low traffic.

Jeff talks about his experience with testing while he was working with rest of the team on creating a new version of the website to match the new positioning.

“We rolled out a version of the new layout for our HubSpot landing pages four months before we began designing the full site. The result was pretty solid—on our most popular asset landing page, we saw a conversion lift of nearly 10%. This gave us the confidence to deploy the design more widely.

Here is a screenshot of the test variations with the old version on the left and the new one on the right:”

kula_innovative_ab_testing-1024x987

Step 5: Analyzing Test Results and Documenting the Learning

The last leg of the optimization journey focuses on analyzing how the test results tie to visitor behavior and on saving learning from this analysis for future optimization.

Jeff explains, “When running tests, we review the results from VWO but also look at how GA and HubSpot are reporting on the changes in conversion or traffic behavior. We definitely document our results from previous tests in order to inform our future tests. These are also used in our presentations to clients on why/how we should implement CRO for their businesses.

Key Takeaways

  1. A process-driven strategy for optimizing conversions is the key to long-term success.
  2. To run the optimization engine for long-term growth, businesses need to adopt a structured approach that generates insights and learning that to act as fuel for this engine.
  3. The optimization process begins with first putting the baselines in place and finding areas of potential leaks. Next comes an in-depth view of how the visitors are behaving, that is, qualitative research. This is followed by recording and prioritizing hypotheses, which are validated through structured A/B testing.

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Eating Our Own Dogfood – How To Optimize For Revenue As A SaaS Business

It wouldn’t be an exaggeration to say that we at VWO are very passionate about experimentation.

Not only have we built a product around A/B testing and conversion optimization, but we are always looking for ways to run experiments on our website.

Recently, we got our entire team to actively research and contribute ideas for optimization on our website and ran multiple tests. This post is a narrative of what we did after.

Who Is This Post for?

This post will help SaaS growth-hackers, marketers, and optimization experts to predict the business value from a test.

The aim of this post is to not only share the tests we ran on our website, but also introduce a revenue-based framework that predicts the business impact of an A/B test and prioritizing on the basis of it.

Revenue-Based Optimization

Need for a Model

After we propelled our team to suggest ideas for testing, we had more than 30 hypotheses looking at us, but no distinct way of knowing which of these to take up first. Of course, there is a range of prioritizing frameworks available, but we particularly wanted to look at the ones that would directly impact our revenue.

This framework helped us project the potential impact on the revenue from each test. Here’s what we did:

Step 1

We decided to identify high-impact pages and winnow the pages that were not as important for our business, that is, pages where no goal conversions take place. We looked at Google Analytics for pages with the:

  • Highest Amount of Traffic
    (We used “New Users” to nullify visits by existing customers.)
  • Highest Number of Goal Conversions
    (Goal conversion, which contributes to your overall business goal, is the main goal for your website. In our case, this meant all qualified lead-generating forms. A free trial or request a demo qualifies a visitor as a lead with a genuine interest in our product; or, as the industry popularly refers to it, a Marketing Qualified Lead.)

This gave us a list of pages which were high-value in terms of, either traffic generation or last touch before conversions.

We identified the following key pages:

  • Free-trial page
  • Request-a-demo page
  • Homepage
  • Pricing page
  • Features page
  • Blog pages (All)
  • Contact-us page

Step 2

Our main objective was to project an estimated increase in the revenue due to a particular test. If your test increases the conversion rate by say 20%, what would this mean for your business and, in turn, the revenue?

This is how our marketing funnel looked like:

VWO Marketing Funnel

Note: You should use data from the recent 3–6 months, and the average (mean) of each step. This is to accurately reflect what to expect from your testing and be relevant to your business.

For each of the “Key Pages” we identified in the first step, we also dug out the corresponding numbers at each funnel stage. We’ve explained each stage of the funnel and how it is calculated:

a) Key Page Traffic: The total number of pageviews per Key Page (new users in our case). You can find the data in Google Analytics.

b) Total Conversions: The total number of leads generated from each particular page. If there is an additional qualification your company follows, source this data from your preferred CRM or Marketing Automation software. For example, at VWO, we use Clearbit to qualify our leads in Salesforce.

c) Opportunities: The total number of opportunities generated for your sales team. This data will be available in your CRM; make sure to count qualified opportunities only.

d) Customers:  The total number of customers created in a month.

e) MRR (New): Or monthly recurring revenue, means revenue booked on a monthly basis; you can use this to estimate annual recurring revenue, or ARR, as well.

Step 3

Now that we had all the numbers needed in our arsenal, I decided to calculate some more internal benchmarks. This gave us the performance of our marketing and/or sales funnel.

  1. We computed the conversion rate of a particular page, using the following formula:
    Existing conversion rate = (Total Conversions Key Page Traffic); this is represented as %
  2. The conversion of your leads into opportunities:
    (Opportunities ÷ Total conversions) × 100, represented as %
  3.  The conversion rate of opportunities into customers:
    (Customers ÷ Opportunities) × 100, represented as %
  4.  The average revenue per user or ARPU:
    Total MRR  ÷ Total number of paying customers

Now all you have to do is to impute these numbers in this template.
Revenue-based Testing Model
The model uses all of that data and projects how much revenue increase or decrease you can estimate based on your test results. This estimate can give you a good idea of where to begin or prioritize your testing.

Step 4 (Optional)

This is where it may get tricky. At VWO, we sell both Enterprise plans and Standard plans. So to be fair, we must estimate each cohort with separate data and individual conversion rates.

For example, Opportunity creation % for an Enterprise plan may be lower, but a Standard plan is easier to convert. You may want to decide what type of plan do you want to focus on.

We, for instance, used website traffic and Alexa rank as the benchmark for lead qualification. We attributed more value to the leads that came in through key pages and prioritized them.

This led us to the next step, which is the qualification rate of the said lead of high value. This rate may be in the range 30–50%, depending on your definition.

It was interesting to note that each page had a different qualification rate. For example, we get better quality leads from our Request a demo page than we do from our free trial or blog post page.

Tests Conducted:

After we had the model in place, we played around with the increase or decrease in our conversion rates. This was to identify what would be our best optimization opportunities?

The free trial pages and the home page were among the high-priority pages, in terms of the impact of revenue. (Unfortunately, I can’t share the exact numbers with you.) We first looked at the hypotheses on the free trial page:

Test 1 – Free Trial Page

Our hypothesis was “Illustrating VWO features and social proof on the free trial page will compel users to sign up for the free trial.”

Here is a screenshot of what it looks like in VWO.
hypothesis-free-trial

Bonus tip: VWO has recently launched a new capability called PLAN that lets you manage and prioritize your testing hypotheses. To learn more about this capability, visit the VWO evolution page.

This is what the control looked like:

Free Trial Control

Our heatmap data also showed a lot of users clicking the features page after accessing the free trial page.

Screenshot of heatmap data:

Heatmap Screenshot for test

We created a variation which included the features we offer to solve this issue. Here’s a screenshot of the same.

This is our current free trial page:

Free Trial Page(New)(Variation)

We ran the test for over 2 months. The result was an increase of 6% in our conversion rate, which led to increased revenues.

Test 2 – Request a Demo CTA (A/B Test)

The main CTA on the homepage has been the free trial CTA. The headline on the homepage was “A/B Testing Software for Marketers.”

The hypothesis for the test was “We will get more qualified leads through a request a demo CTA on the homepage.”

This is what the control looked like:

Homepage Control

We came up with a more targeted copy and changed the existing CTA to Request A Demo. Here is what the variation looked like:

Homepage variation

We also wanted to change our positioning due to our foray into Conversion Optimization. The results from this test were that our variation beat the control and had more than 31% improvement in the conversion rate.

Based on the first example, we have already implemented the new free-trial page as our main free-trial page now. Based on the second test, we updated our current home page.

All in all, this model helped us correctly predict the best optimization opportunities, make our testing better, and more strategically aligned to business goals.

Let me know your experience with this model and how you go about testing.

Would love to hear your feedback on this!

Free-trial CTA

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Eating Our Own Dogfood – How To Optimize For Revenue As A SaaS Business

The Realities Of User Experience Design Within The Luxury Industry

For luxury companies and upscale lifestyle service providers, excellence in experience is an essential component of the value delivered. Conceptually different from the mass market, the luxury domain relies not only on offering the highest differentiated products and services, but on delivering experiential value.

The Realities Of UX Design In The Luxury Industry

Adopting technology and embracing a digital presence through platforms and initiatives, the luxury industry today is tackling the challenge of designing an unparalleled user experience (UX) online. In this article, we’ll present a case study and share observations on the peculiarities of the UX design of a luxury lifestyle service platform and its mobile apps.

The post The Realities Of User Experience Design Within The Luxury Industry appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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The Realities Of User Experience Design Within The Luxury Industry

Building “Topple Trump”, An Interactive Web-Based Quiz Game (Case Study)

Editor’s Note: When it comes to elections, we are each given a choice in how to express our opinions and beliefs. Some designers and developers use their skills to further articulate their choice in one person. Here’s a glimpse into how Topple Trump!, an interactive responsive quiz game, was designed and built — combined with some valuable lessons learned along the way. This article is about techniques and strategies, so please avoid political flame in the comments.

Creating an online quiz that is simple to use, looks great and is really fun to play is one thing. Basing it on Donald Trump’s polarizing presidential campaign is another.

Building 'Topple Trump', An Interactive Web-Based Quiz Game (Case Study)

The brainchild of Parallax director and developer Andy Fitch, Topple Trump! has gone on to win numerous awards. But it was a real team effort that brought the game to life. Here’s a glimpse into precisely how that happened, touching on the development process, design considerations and some valuable lessons learned along the way.

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Building “Topple Trump”, An Interactive Web-Based Quiz Game (Case Study)