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Expert SEO and CRO Tips From Klaviyo’s Ecommerce Summit, Part One

Klaviyo:BOS conference notebook

As a marketer, there are only so many conferences I can attend in a year — and this year all three happened to fall within two weeks of each other. By far the best one I attended was Klaviyo: BOS, a two-day summit focused on growth tactics and business strategy for online merchants and ecommerce brands. By the end of Day 1 my notebook was swimming with underlines, stars, and arrows with multiple circles around ideas and topics I wanted to explore once I got back to my co-working space. By the end of Day 2 I was so inspired…

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Expert SEO and CRO Tips From Klaviyo’s Ecommerce Summit, Part One

6 Really Bad Website Popup Examples

If you want to craft a delightful marketing experience and you’re using popups, you need to make sure you hold them to the same high standards as the content they are covering up. You can learn a lot by looking at bad website popup examples.

Once you understand what not to do, you’ll default to starting your own popup designs from a better baseline.

What does a bad popup design actually look like?

Well, it depends on your judging criteria, and for the popup examples below, I was considering these seven things, among others:

  1. Clarity: Is it easy to figure out the offer really quickly?
  2. Relevance: Is it related to the content of the current page?
  3. Manipulation: Does it use psychological trickery in the copy?
  4. Design: Is it butt ugly?
  5. Control: Is it clear what all options will do?
  6. Escape: Can you get rid of it easily?
  7. Value: Is the reward worth more than the perceived (or actual) effort?

The following popup examples, each make a number of critical errors in their design decisions. Take a look, and share your own worst popup design examples in the comments!


#1 – Weather Channel Rudeness

What’s so bad about it?

Okay, I get it Weather.com, ads are one of, or your only, revenue stream. There are plenty of sites who ask you to turn off an ad blocker to read the full article. I don’t have a problem with it, and the main paragraph of text here is okay.

What I *do* have a problem with is the copy on the CTA. “Turn off your ad blocker”.

Really? You can’t even say please? That’s just obnoxious.

Fun fact, the Canadian version of the site doesn’t have this popup. Go figure. ;)
(I had to VPN to get the U.S. version.)

Submitted by Ramona from Impact)


#2 – Mashable Shmashable

What’s so bad about it?

If you peer into the background behind the popup, you’ll see a news story headline that begins with “Nightmare Alert”. I think that’s a pretty accurate description of what’s happening here.

  • Design: Bad. The first thing I saw looks like a big mistake. The Green line with the button hanging off the bottom looks like the designer fell asleep with their head on the mouse.
  • Clarity: Bad. And what on earth does the headline mean? click.click.click. Upon deeper exploration, it’s the name of the newsletter, but that’s not apparent at all on first load.
  • Clarity: worse. Then we get the classic “Clear vs. Clever” headline treatment. Why are you talking about the pronunciation of the word “Gif”? Tell me what this is, and why I should care to give you my email.
  • Design: Bad. Also, that background is gnarly.

#3 – KAM Motorsports Revolution!

What’s so bad about it?

It’s motorsports. It’s not a revolution. Unless they’re talking about wheels going round in circles.

  • Clarity: Bad. The headline doesn’t say what it is, or what I’ll get by subscribing. I have to read the fine print to figure that out.
  • Copy: Bad. Just reading the phrase “abuse your email” is a big turn off. Just like the word spam, I wasn’t thinking that you were going to abuse me, but now it’s on my mind.
  • Relevance: Bad. Newsletter subscription popups are great, they have a strong sense of utility and can give people exactly what they want. But I don’t like them as entry popups. They’re much better when they use an exit trigger, or a scroll trigger. Using a “Scroll Up” trigger is smart because it means they’ve read some of your content, and they are scrolling back up vs. leaving directly, which is another micro-signal that they are interested.

#4 – Utterly Confused


(Source unknown – I found it on confirmshaming.tumblr.com)

What’s so bad about it?

I have no earthly clue what’s going on here.

  • Clarity: Bad. I had to re-read it five times before I figured out what was going on.
  • Control: Bad. After reading it, I didn’t know whether I would be agreeing with what they’re going to give me, or with the statement. It’s like an affirmation or something. But I have no way of knowing what will happen if I click either button. My best guess after spending this much time writing about it is that it’s a poll. But a really meaningless one if it is. Click here to find out how many people agreed with “doing better”…
  • It ends with “Do Better”. I agree. They need to do a lot better.

#5 – Purple Nurple

What’s so bad about it?

  • Manipulation: Bad. Our first “Confirm Shaming” example. Otherwise known as “Good Cop / Bad Cop”. Forcing people to click a button that says “Detest” on it is so incongruent with the concept of a mattress company that I think they’re just being cheap. There’s no need to speak to people that way.
  • I found a second popup example by Purple (below), and have to give them credit. The copy on this one is significantly more persuasive. Get this. If you look at the section I circled (in purple), it says that if you subscribe, they’ll keep you up to date with SHIPPING TIMES!!! Seriously? If you’re going to email me and say “Hey Oli, great news! We can ship you a mattress in 2 weeks!”, I’ll go to Leesa, or Endy, or one of a million other Casper copycats.


#6 – Hello BC

What’s so bad about it?

Context: This is an entry popup, and I have never been to this site before.

  • Relevance: Bad. The site is Hellobc.com, the title says “Supernatural British Columbia”, and the content on the page is about skydiving. So what list is this for? And nobody wants to be on a “list”, stop saying “list”. It’s like saying email blast. Blast your list. If you read the first sentence it gets even more confusing, as you’ll be receiving updates from Destination BC. That’s 4 different concepts at play here.
  • Design: Bad. It’s legitimately butt ugly. I mean, come on. This is for Beautiful Supernatural British Columbia ffs. It’s stunning here. Show some scenery to entice me in.
  • Value: Bad. Seeing that form when I arrive on the page is like a giant eff you. Why do they think it’s okay to ask for that much info, with that much text, before I’ve even seen any content?
  • Control: Bad. And there’s not any error handling. However, the submit button remains inactive until you magically click the right amount of options to trigger it’s hungry hungry hippo mouth to open.

Train. Wreck.


Well, that’s all for today, folks. You might be wondering why there were so few popup examples in this post. Honestly, when the team was rallying to find me a bunch of examples, we all struggled to find many truly awful ones. We also struggled to find many really awesome ones.

This is where YOU come in!

Send me your terrible and awesome popup examples!

If you have any wonderfully brutal, or brutally wonderful examples of website popup design, I’d really appreciate a URL in the comments. If you could share the trigger details too that would be rad (e.g. exit, entrance, scroll, delay etc.).

Tomorrow’s Post is about Awesome Popup Examples! YAY.

So get your butt back here same time tomorrow, where I’ll be sharing my brand new Popup Delight Equation that you can use to grade your own popup designs.

Cheers,
Oli

p.s. Don’t forget to subscribe to the weekly updates.

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6 Really Bad Website Popup Examples

What is a Vanity Metric?

what is a vanity metric

A metric that makes you feel good without telling you anything about your business. Or as Tim Ferris puts it: ‘Vanity metrics: good for feeling awesome, bad for action.’ Vanity metrics are things you can measure that don’t matter. They’re easily changed or manipulated, and they don’t bear a direct correlation with numbers that speak to business success. People use vanity metrics because they don’t know that these numbers don’t really count, or because vanity metrics can make you feel like you’re getting results – even though they don’t really tell you anything about your business health or growth. What’s…

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What is a Vanity Metric?

How Badly Does Your Online Shop Need Live Chat Facility?

From research to purchase, a typical customer journey is fraught with friction and anxiety. 77% of users say they want to contact a real person before buying. Contact can happen through phone, email, chat or social channels. But an overwhelming majority of 73% consumers feel live chat provides the highest satisfaction levels, compared to email with 63% and 44% for phone.

It’s easy to understand why online stores need live chat when you look at the advantages of live chat:

Meme on Live Chat

  • Fast Response Times: Live chat is quicker at resolving queries compared to other channels.
  • Least Obtrusive: Live chat exists only where it is required – the online store.
  • Convenience - a customer can chat to find answers even while doing other things (multi-tasking).
  • Low-Barrier – While on a store, live chat is the easiest channel to find access to.
  • Indirect Enough – consumers are jittery about getting on a call with sales people for fear of being hard-sold to. Live chat is indirect enough, letting consumers get on and off at their convenience.

60% of customers hate waiting for more than a minute for assistance.  43 seconds was the average time to solve a customer problem over chat, in a study involving 85000+ chats.

The above reasons highlight how live chat support is of value to the customer and can indirectly boost sales – happy prospects become paying customers. There are also direct ways that live chat helps business increase sales. Here’s how:

  • Decode Customer Needs: Most live chat softwares tell you where a particular customer came from, giving you an idea about what exactly the customer is looking for.  Or, the number of visits a particular customer made to your site, which might indicate that they are on your site to check if a particular product has become available. Armed with such information, initiating a timely and proactive chat session could effect a sale.
  • Data and Knowledge: Chat softwares log almost every piece information giving you access to data like number of visits, time on page, operating systems used by the customer, geographical data etc. Such data helps the business understand customer behavior, leading to better marketing programs tailored to their needs.

In short, global trends in live chat usage show irrefutable evidence that on-site chat support is here to stay.

With a high adoption rate, little doubt should exist about the efficacy of live chat. It is also moving towards a higher degree of personalization with ideas like co-browsing, where a support person can show the customer around the website, highlighting different areas of importance.

But most studies we found online deal with the efficiency of live chat as a whole medium, with little information about demographic preferences.

Understanding demographic preferences can answer questions like, ‘are there particular segments of audience that live chat is best suited for?” and “are there particular query types that live chat is best suited to resolve?”. Knowledge of such kind can help businesses decide on the priority of including a live chat feature and improve its efficiency and ROI. Software Advice did a survey recently to understand consumer preferences when it comes to live chat.

We chatted up with Craig Borowski, Market Researcher at Software Advice, asking him 5 of the most often asked questions about live chat, its benefits and issues. Here’s it all.

1. Are there any target demographics that seem to need live chat more than the average consumer?

Consumer preference for live chat is inversely correlated with consumer age; as consumer age increases, the preference for live chat decreases. The survey results show that 64% of consumers aged 18-34 have used live chat successfully at least once, while 61% of consumers aged 55+ have never used it successfully.

Live Chat Usage by Age

What this means is if your eCommerce store sells fancy t-shirts, you should have live chat implemented yesterday. Does this mean you don’t need live chat support if it’s hair-wigs that you sell? No. The survey only tells what consumer segment prefers live chat more. The fact remains that live chat is an extremely potent communication channel for all ages, and nearly all types of interaction.

If an online store implements live chat and realizes their audience rarely use it, then it’s more likely due to how it has been implemented than to any demographic variables of their customers.

2. Are there any particular query types that requires live chat more than others?

Live chat is great at providing immediate answers to simple queries, like “Do you have a return policy?”. Most customer queries before and during the purchase are easy to resolve because it is part of the purchase funnel and presumably, the business has thought through all the issues a customer might face and has answers at the tip of its fingers. Chat agents can simultaneously engage as many as 6 customers, making this channel very nimble at resolving simple customer queries. Triggers and automated greetings can also help speed up response times.

The survey results tell a similar story,

Live Chat vs Phone : Query Type

Financial queries are more sensitive by nature and consumers prefer to have those resolved over a more direct communication channel like phone. Typically such queries have more variables and initial responses might not be satisfactory to which customers might have more questions. It’s easier resolved over phone where their questions can be more personal and specific.

Simple queries like ‘where can I find the subscription form?” and shopping queries like “Do you have free shipping?” are not as critical and customers look to find answers to such queries in the quickest means possible – live chat. Such questions should ideally be addressed in the FAQ section as well. But would you want a customer on the payment page to move away to the FAQ page to find answers? Exactly. Including a live chat option helps keep the customer on the road to purchase.

For these above reasons, make sure that you’ve both a phone number and a live chat option on your critical pages. The priority should be to help the customer resolve all of his queries without bouncing off of the page.

This behavior is visible across age groups as well. For each of these query types, consumers belonging to the lower age groups prefer live chat to phone.

Live Chat Preference: Financial Queries
Live Chat Preference: Simple Queries
Live Chat Preference: Shopping Queries

3. Are there certain industries that need live chat more than others?

Some business models will find much faster ROI with their live chat implementations than others. For example, eCommerce sites can realize the benefits of live chat (namely, increased sales) very quickly. Customer interactions in eCommerce settings tend to be simple and straightforward and live chat is the perfect way to handle them.

On the other hand, companies that use live chat for more intricate interactions, like those found with post-sales customer service, may need to make some adjustments after implementing live chat before the true ROI can be had. But it’s not just eCommerce stores that can benefit from having a live chat support option. Here’s how Ez Texting increased signups by 31% using a live chat widget.

4. What are the possible implementation issues adding live chat to your website?

As far as implementation is concerned, live chat is probably one of most painless technologies there is. In most cases it can be added to a website simply by inserting one or two lines of code. It also comes at about half the cost of a call center.

Of course, companies still need to make sure everything is in order before they make live chat available to the public. Wait-times need to be estimated, agent scheduling and training may need to be changed and new company policies may even need to be created. All that aside, generally speaking, a little planning goes a long way and live chat implementations usually go very smoothly.

5. Some live chat widgets pop up right away and others wait until they are requested – which is better?

Unfortunately, there’s really no one-size-fits-all answer. It depends entirely on the context of the website and what goals the company has for it. Generally speaking, you want customers to know that live chat is available, but you do not want to annoy them with it (by having it pop up too frequently). Fortunately, there are many clever ways to offer live chat without going overboard. For example, the chat window can pop up only after a person has spent longer than average on a particular Web page, as this could indicate they have a question about it.

The key is to begin with a clear understanding of how customers currently use the website. To understand the customer and his behavior, mapping out customer journey is immensely useful. Once this is done, it should become clear how live chat should be implemented, and to whom it should be offered, to give customers the opportunity to use it when they need it, but not annoy them with excessive pop-up offers to chat.

You can read the full report of the Software Advice Survey here.

Have you been using live chat for your online shop? How has it worked for you so far and are the findings of the survey in line with your experience of it so far?

Share your experience with us and we’ll all sleep a little wiser tonight.

The post How Badly Does Your Online Shop Need Live Chat Facility? appeared first on VWO Blog.

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How Badly Does Your Online Shop Need Live Chat Facility?

A User-Centered Approach To Web Design For Mobile Devices

For the past few years, we’ve heard pundits declaring each year as “year of the mobile Web”; each year trying to sound more convincing than the previous. Whether 2011 will be the real “year of the mobile” remains to be seen, but what is indisputable is the fact that the mobile usage of the Web is growing and evolving. As it evolves, so does the mobile user experience, driven by advances in mobile device technology — from better browsers on basic mobile phones (or feature phones — remember the Motorola RAZR?

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A User-Centered Approach To Web Design For Mobile Devices

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How To Design Style Guides For Brands And Websites

A website is never done. Everyone has worked on a project that changed so much after it launched that they no longer wanted it in their portfolio. One way to help those who take over your projects is to produce a style guide.
Edward Tufte once said: “Great design is not democratic; it comes from great designers. If the standard is lousy, then develop another standard.” Although there’s no stopping some clients from making their website awful, by creating a style guide, you’re effectively establishing rules for those who take over from you.

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How To Design Style Guides For Brands And Websites

Why Web Designers Should Not Use Ad Blockers

Editor’s Note This post is an article from our new series of “opinion columns,” in which we give people in the Web design community a platform to raise their voice and present their opinion on something they feel strongly about to the community. Please note that the content in this series is not in any way influenced by the Smashing Magazine Editorial team. If you want to publish your article in this series, please send us your thoughts and we will get back to you.

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Why Web Designers Should Not Use Ad Blockers

15 Impressive Case Studies from Behance

The Behance Network is a platform for the creative professional community. The greatest designers in the world post their artwork and portfolio on Behance. I have compiled 15 impressive case studies for your learning and inspiration.
While these case studies are not tutorials that show you step-by-step directions, they are still quite informative. Most of these have multiple screenshots of the artist’s design process. I suggest that you look at all of these and learn from these artists.

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15 Impressive Case Studies from Behance

PNG Optimization Guide: More Clever Techniques

This post is a second part of the article Clever PNG Optimization Techniques that we posted last week. As a web designer you might be already familiar with the PNG image format which offers a full-featured transparency. It’s a lossless, robust, very good replacement of the elder GIF image format. As a Photoshop (or any other image editor) user you might think that there is not that many options for PNG optimization, especially for truecolor PNG’s (PNG-24 in Photoshop), which doesn’t have any.

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PNG Optimization Guide: More Clever Techniques

10 Harsh Truths About Corporate Websites

We all make mistakes running our websites. However, the nature of those mistakes varies depending on the size of your company. As your organization grows, the mistakes change. This post addresses common mistakes among large organizations.
Most of the clients I work with are large organizations: universities, large charities, public sector institutions and large companies. Over the last 7 years, I have noticed certain recurring misconceptions among these organizations. This post aims to dispel these illusions and encourage people to face the harsh reality.

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10 Harsh Truths About Corporate Websites