Tag Archives: chrome

Monthly Web Development Update 2/2018: The Grown-Up Web, Branding Details, And Browser Fast Forward

Every profession is a wide field where many people find their very own, custom niches. So are design and web development today. I started building my first website with framesets and HTML4.0, images and a super limited set of CSS, and — oh so fancy — GIFs and inline JavaScript (remember the onclick=”” attribute?) about one and a half decades ago. It took me four days to learn the initial, necessary skills for that.

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Monthly Web Development Update 2/2018: The Grown-Up Web, Branding Details, And Browser Fast Forward

Using Media Queries For Responsive Design In 2018

Back in July 2010, I wrote an article for Smashing Magazine entitled “How To Use CSS3 Media Queries To Create A Mobile Version of Your Website.” Almost eight years on, that article still receives a lot of traffic. I thought it would be a nice idea to revisit that subject, now that we have layout methods such as Flexbox and Grid Layout. This article will take a look at the use of media queries for responsive design today, and also have a look at what is coming in the future.

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Using Media Queries For Responsive Design In 2018

Automated Browser Testing With The WebDriver API

Manually clicking through different browsers as they run your development code, either locally or remotely, is a quick way to validate that code. It allows you to visually inspect that things are as you intended them to be from a layout and functionality point of view. However, it’s not a solution for testing the full breadth of your site’s code base on the assortment of browsers and device types available to your customers.

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Automated Browser Testing With The WebDriver API

Maximize Your Instagram Sales With Help From These Third-Party Platforms

instagram money

The recent explosion in Instagram hype is capturing the attention of marketers everywhere – especially those of us who are keeping tabs on trends in visual storytelling and social media-based audience building. As of this past fall, when the most recent official Instagram community stats were released, the social channel had over 800 million monthly active users, which makes it over twice as popular as Twitter. And the audience engagement here is also particularly strong – especially in certain niches, as data from Rival IQ demonstrates. Source Recently, the Facebook-owned platform announced the ability for multiple accounts to broadcast live…

The post Maximize Your Instagram Sales With Help From These Third-Party Platforms appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Maximize Your Instagram Sales With Help From These Third-Party Platforms

Monthly Web Development Update 12/2017: Pragmatic Releasing, Custom Elements, And Making Decisions

Today I read an eye-opening article about the current young generation and their financial future. It’s hard to grasp words like “Millenials”, and there’s much talk about specific issues they face, but, for many of us, it’s not easy to understand their struggle — no matter if you’re older or younger than me (I qualify under the Millenial generation). But Michael Hobbes’ entertaining and super informative article revealed a lot to me.

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Monthly Web Development Update 12/2017: Pragmatic Releasing, Custom Elements, And Making Decisions

Designing For A Browserless Web

What happens when we take the web browser out of web browsing? Google’s new “Add to Homescreen” feature delivers fast, focused web experiences that are indistinguishable from those of a native app. What can designers learn from the successes of early adopters such as Twitter, and how can we leverage app-like design patterns to tackle this brand new set of user experience challenges?
The “Add to Homescreen” installation process, as shown on Google Chrome Developer’s mobile website (Image source) (Large preview) We’ve seen debates on the topic of native versus web experiences.

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Designing For A Browserless Web

Monthly Web Development Update 11/2017: Browser News, KRACK and Vary Header Caching

Editor’s Note: Our dear friend Anselm Hannemann summarizes what happened in the web community in the past few weeks in one handy list, so that you can catch up on everything new and important. Enjoy!
Welcome back to our monthly reading list. Before we dive right into all the amazing content I stumbled upon — admittedly, this one is going to be quite a long update — I want to make a personal announcement.

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Monthly Web Development Update 11/2017: Browser News, KRACK and Vary Header Caching

Monthly Web Development Update 10/2017: CSS Grid, CAA Pitfalls, And Image Optimization

Editor’s Note: Welcome to this month’s web development update. Anselm has summarized the most important happenings in the web community that have taken place over the past few weeks in one handy list for you. Enjoy!
As web developers, we’re working in a very diverse environment: We have countless options to specialize in, but it’s impossible to keep up with everything. This week I read an article from a developer who realized that even though he has been building stuff for the web for over seven years, sometimes he just doesn’t understand what’s going on: “I’m slamming my keyboard in frustration as another mysterious error appears in my build script,” he writes.

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Monthly Web Development Update 10/2017: CSS Grid, CAA Pitfalls, And Image Optimization

CSS Grid Challenge: Winners and Templates

CSS Grid is the new layout standard for the web, but we still are just getting started with new layout ideas. Many assume that CSS Grid is just a replacement for table layouts, but that’s simply not true. Others might think that we can use CSS Grid to replicate more advanced print layouts, which brings us closer to what’s possible.
One of the main reasons behind the idea of the CSS Grid Challenge was to have some starting points for layouts, and show what can be achieved with CSS Grids today.

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CSS Grid Challenge: Winners and Templates

Building Inclusive Toggle Buttons

Some things are either on or off and, when those things aren’t on (or off), they are invariably off (or on). The concept is so rudimentary that I’ve only complicated it by trying to explain it, yet on/off switches (or toggle buttons) are not all alike. Although their purpose is simple, their applications and forms vary greatly.

Building Inclusive Toggle Buttons

In this inaugural post, I’ll be exploring what it takes to make toggle buttons inclusive. As with any component, there’s no one way to go about this, especially when such controls are examined under different contexts. However, there’s certainly plenty to forget to do or to otherwise screw up, so let’s try to avoid any of that.

The post Building Inclusive Toggle Buttons appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Building Inclusive Toggle Buttons