Tag Archives: collaboration

Free Online Event On Building And Maintaining Design Systems

(This is a sponsored article.) Everybody’s talking about design systems, but they are more than just a trend. They are a best practice for design consistency and efficiency between designers and developers.
Back in the day, only large companies could afford the effort of building and maintaining a design system. Nowadays, with the growth of new tools and processes, they have become much more feasible for companies of all sizes.

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Free Online Event On Building And Maintaining Design Systems

UX At Scale 2017: Free Webinars To Get Scaling Design Right

Design doesn’t scale as cleanly as engineering. It’s not enough that each element and page is consistent with each other — the much bigger challenge lies in keeping the sum of the parts intact, too. And accomplishing that with a lot of designers involved in the same project.
If you’re working in a growing startup or a large corporation, you probably know the issues that come with this: The big-picture falls from view easily as everyone is focusing on the details they are responsible for, and conceptions about the vision of the design might be interpreted differently, too.

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UX At Scale 2017: Free Webinars To Get Scaling Design Right

Using Slack To Monitor Your App

For the past few months, I’ve been building a software-as-a-service (SaaS) application, and throughout the development process I’ve realized what a powerful tool Slack (or team chat in general) can be to monitor user and application behavior. After a bit of integration, it’s provided a real-time view into our application that previously didn’t exist, and it’s been so invaluable that I couldn’t help but write up this show-and-tell.
It all started with a visit to a small startup in Denver, Colorado.

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Using Slack To Monitor Your App

What You Should Know About The App Design Process

I realized something the other day: I’ve been designing apps for nine years now! So much has changed since the early days and, it feels like developers and designers have been through a rollercoaster of evolutions and trends. However, while the actual look and functionality of our apps have changed, along with the tools we use to make them, there are some things that have very much stayed the same, such as the process of designing an app and how we go through the many phases that constitute the creation of an app.

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What You Should Know About The App Design Process

Developers "Own" The Code, So Shouldn’t Designers "Own" The Experience?

We’ve all been there. You spent months gathering business requirements, working out complex user journeys, crafting precision interface elements and testing them on a representative sample of users, only to see a final product that bears little resemblance to the desired experience.
Maybe you should have been more forceful and insisted on an agile approach, despite your belief that the organization wasn’t ready? Perhaps you should have done a better job with your pattern portfolios, ensuring that the developers used your modular code library rather than creating five different variations of a carousel.

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Developers "Own" The Code, So Shouldn’t Designers "Own" The Experience?

Client Experience Design

Let’s be honest: We designers can be difficult to work with. We might come from a controversial company culture, work an unconventional schedule or get impatient whenever our Internet connection is slower than the speed of light. Would you be at ease with a service provider who matches this description?
When talking to potential clients, be aware that many will have never solicited a professional design service and likely have little understanding of the design process itself.

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Client Experience Design

Making Accessibility Simpler, With Ally.js

I’ve been a web developer for 15 years, but I’d never looked into accessibility. I didn’t know enough people with (serious) disabilities to properly understand the need for accessible applications and no customer has ever required me to know what ARIA is. But I got involved with accessibility anyway – and that’s the story I’d like to share with you today.
At the Fronteers Conference in October 2014 I saw Heydon Pickering give a talk called “Getting nowhere with CSS best practices”.

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Making Accessibility Simpler, With Ally.js

How Being In A Band Taught Me To Be A Better Web Designer

Recently, I was having a discussion with some web design students about the variety of skills a successful web professional must have — skills that go far beyond HTML, CSS, JavaScript and the other technical demands of the profession. During this conversation, one of the students asked me where I learned these skills. My response was not one the class expected. [Links checked March/22/2017]
“By playing in a band,” was my answer.

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How Being In A Band Taught Me To Be A Better Web Designer

Why Companies Need Full-Time Product Managers (And What They Do All Day)

What is a product manager? What do product managers do all day? Most importantly, why do companies need to hire them? Good questions.
The first confusion we have to clear up is what we mean by “product.” In the context of software development, a product is the website, application or online service that users interact with. Depending on the size of the company and its products, a product manager could be responsible for an entire system (such as a mobile app) or part of a system (such as the checkout flow on an e-commerce website across all devices).

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Why Companies Need Full-Time Product Managers (And What They Do All Day)

How To Deal With Workaholism On Web Teams

Workaholism is often confused with hard work. Some people who work on the Web seem not only to disregard its dangers, but to actively promote it. They see it as a badge of honor—but is it really? On the contrary, it’s a serious issue that can damage Web teams. [Links checked February/09/2017]
Before we get started, let’s make one thing clear: A “workaholic” is someone who is addicted to work, someone who is out of balance and out of control.

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How To Deal With Workaholism On Web Teams