Tag Archives: company

How to Get Links For (Almost) Free: SEO Hacks For Tight Budgets

seo hacks

SEO can be expensive, but there are plenty of promotional opportunities that are free and cost-effective if you focus on value exchange and relationships. (Never invest in low-quality spam though — make sure any link building is strategic and carefully supervised). Warnings aside, there are ways to hack around tight budgets and achieve more for less with your link building. You don’t always have to invest in expensive advertising and publishing fees to gain good SEO traction. Here are some ways to get links, mentions, and shares without spending too much money (or time). Most of these tactics will help…

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7 Ways To Accelerate Product Adoption (Without Spamming Your User Base)

speed up product adoption

We tend to make a big deal about leads in the marketing space, and not without good reason. Everything starts with leads. However, for software companies, the real goal is product adoption. We need people actively and consistently using our product. Regardless of our business model, success occurs when users experience that “aha” moment that takes our product from an experiment to a core part of their day-to-day work. So how do we move people from lead to product adopter? How to we give them that “aha” moment? Two words: Strategic Repetition Repetition is a POWERFUL psychological force. Studies have…

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The Beginner’s Guide To Making Facebook Advertising Convert

beginners guide to facebook ads

Most people use Facebook ads to pump up their visitor numbers. Wait, what? Let me be clear. They don’t wake up with that goal in mind, but it’s usually what ends up happening. I see this all the time with clients I work with. The problem isn’t that they can’t set up the Facebook ad campaigns or get visitors to their websites. It’s the next step where things go haywire. The visitors they’re paying for don’t download ebooks, sign up for accounts or buy products. The reason for this simply is that the thing they offer doesn’t appeal to those…

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The Beginner’s Guide To Making Facebook Advertising Convert

The Crazy Egg Guide to Facebook Marketing

The Crazy Egg Guide to Facebook Marketing

If you’re only going to use one social media site for marketing, the chances are it’s going to be Facebook. The now-ubiquitous social networking site has come a long way since its Harvard University origins and has been open to the public since September 2006. Over the years, it has added features that have become synonymous with social media as a whole, including photo sharing, video sharing, messaging and live video. It has also become a platform for other apps and games, has acquired other popular social and messaging networks (most notably Instagram and WhatsApp) and includes advertising. Facebook by…

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10 Questions to Ask Yourself When Your Conversion Rates Are Below Average

10-questions-ab-test-blog
Don’t wait until it’s too late. Check and maintain your conversion rates often, just like you would your car. Image via Shutterstock.

A major faux pas I often see with conversion rates is that businesses only seem to to address them when alarms are triggered.

Conversion rates require ongoing maintenance and should be regular focal points in your optimization and marketing efforts. Like a vehicle engine, they should be checked and maintained regularly.

When conversion rates aren’t what you had expected, it’s not uncommon for marketers and business owners to start making knee-jerk tweaks to on-page elements, hoping to lift conversions through A/B testing. While there may be some benefit to tweaking the size of buttons and adjusting landing page headlines and CTAs, there’s a great deal more to conversion optimization.

You must take a scientific approach that includes qualitative and quantitative data, rather than an à la carte strategy of piecing together what you think might be most effective.

Before making any changes to your landing pages, ask yourself these 10 critical questions:

1. Is there an audience/market fit for the product?

Analyzing the market for your product is something you do in the early stages of product development before launching. It’s part of gathering initial research on your audience and what they want or need. When you experience conversion problems, you may want to revisit this.

Use keyword tools, and platforms like Google Trends to discover the volume of interest in your particular product. If the traffic shows a steady or growing interest, then how well does the product in its current form align with the needs of the people searching for it?

Revisit your audience research and review the needs and problems of your customer. Make sure your product addresses those needs and provides a solution. Then look to how you position the product to ensure customers can see the value.

2. How accurate is your audience-targeting strategy?

There’s nothing quite as frustrating as watching hundreds of people visit your product or landing pages, only to be left with empty carts and no opt-ins.

visitors-no-conversions

It’s not easy to figure out what’s holding them back, but one of the first questions you should ask is whether you’re targeting the right people.

You may very well have a great product for the market, but if you’re presenting it to the wrong audience then you’ll never generate significant interest. This holds true for major, established brands as much as new startups.

Don’t start A/B testing without reading this ebook!

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3. Has trust been established?

Asking people to hand over personal and financial information on the web requires a huge leap of faith. You need to establish trust before asking them to add a product to their carts and complete the checkout process or even to give you their email address.

One study from Taylor Nelson Sofres showed that consumers might terminate as many as 70% of online purchases due to a lack of trust. People may really want what you’re selling, but if they don’t trust you, then they’ll never convert.

There are several ways to establish and grow trust, which include:

establish-trust
Testimonials, notable recognitions and brand affiliations help to build trust among prospective customers. Image via ContentMarketer.io.

4. Do customers understand the benefits and value?

For customers, everything comes down to value, which is the foundation of your unique selling positions (USP.) You can’t just convince someone to buy something through conversion tricks like big buttons and snappy graphics. If they don’t understand the product’s value or how it might benefit them, then they have no reason to buy.

You have to communicate the value of your products accurately and succinctly, breaking down what you’re selling to the most basic level so your customer sees the benefits, rather than just the features.

Here’s a great example that I took from Unbounce:

unbounce-lp-benefits

This landing page put a big the value proposition right up front, mixing in high-impact benefit statements that help seat the value with the audience.

5. What is the purchase experience really like?

It’s important to understand the journey your customer has to follow in order to reach the point where they’re willing to convert. While your landing pages or ecommerce site might look clean, the next step toward a conversion could make the whole thing come crashing down.

Providing top-notch user experiences across all devices is imperative, which includes minimizing the number of clicks necessary to complete the transaction.

Complicated site navigation and checkout processes are among the top causes of cart abandonment. Test your conversion paths internally, and consider trying out a service like UserTesting.com to get unbiased consumer feedback on your UX.

6. Where are the leaks in the funnel?

Figuring out where people exit your site can be a good indicator of why people leave —– at the very least, it can help you narrow down where to start your investigation. Working backwards from the exit point can uncover friction points you didn’t even know existed.

Open your analytics and monitor the visitor flow. Pay close attention to where traffic enters, the number of steps users have to take while navigating from page to page, and trace the point where they typically exit.

Chart your own journey through your website while examining the on-page elements and user experience. Be sure to compare visitor behavior with your funnel visualization to determine when a leak is actually a leak.

7. What are the biggest friction points?

Friction in your sales funnel can be defined as anything that gets in the way of a conversion, either by slowing it down or stopping it completely. Some friction points might include:

  • Slow load times
  • Too many form fields
  • Too many clicks to complete an action
  • Hidden or missing information (like withholding shipping or contact information)
  • Poorly written copy and readability issues
  • Stop words
  • Garish design

(For additional insights into possible friction points in your own funnel, this article from Jeremy Smith, posted on Kissmetrics is a wealth of knowledge.)

You can reduce friction on your own site by taking small steps and testing them to see how they alter your conversion rates. Ask as few questions as possible, avoid overwhelming the customer with too many options, aim for clean and pleasing designs and hire a pro copywriter to make a stronger connection through words.

One of the simplest examples of improvement through the removal of friction comes from Expedia.

expedia-split-test
One seemingly insignificant change can have a dramatic impact on conversion. Image source.

By removing the “company name” field — just a single field on the submission form — Expedia made it easier for people to complete the form. That reduction in friction led to a $12 million increase in profit.

Given the size of Expedia and the volume of traffic they see, you could expect to see a lift like this through A/B testing. Changes don’t always being about such dramatic results, but you’ll never know the potential unless you start testing to remove those friction points in your funnel.

8. How do my customers feel about the process?

When you have concerns about your conversion rates, often the best place to turn for insights are the consumers.

Use feedback tools like a consumer survey to reach out to current customers, as well as those who abandoned their carts midway through the shopping experience. Ask them to provide information on why they made a purchase, why they chose not to, difficulties they experienced while on your site, feedback on design, etc.

This approach not only provides quality insight into what could be the likely cause of poor conversions, but also shows customers (and potential customers) that you’re making an effort to improve your site based on their feedback.

9. What does the data say?

Whenever possible, you want to make changes based on the data you’ve accumulated. Don’t focus solely on the conversion metrics of your website; analyze the data from your social ads and insights, visitor flow, bounce rates, time spent on page and more. Let the data drive your actions; otherwise you’re just firing wildly into the dark and hoping to hit your target.

Whether we’re talking about the ROI for content marketing or boosting ecommerce sales, data always matters. When you make changes, measure the new data and monitor those changes against the original. It’s the only way to know if you’re headed in the right direction.

10. How are my competitors selling this?

While I always warn people not to follow their competitors, you should still be aware of what they’re doing to leverage competitive insights garnered from their market research.

If your conversions are plummeting for specific products or services, look to the competition. How are they positioning their products? What are they doing differently to hook and engage the target audience? Draw comparisons and see how they align with the insights you’ve gleaned from your data to determine which elements you should test and improve upon.

Over to you for the questions

Now it’s time to look at your funnel and start asking the tough questions:

  • Do you need to re-verify product/market fit?
  • How accurate is your audience targeting?
  • Does your audience trust you?
  • Do your customers understand the benefits and value?
  • What’s the purchase experience like for the customer?
  • Where are the leaks in the funnel?
  • Are there major friction points killing conversions?
  • What feedback can customers offer about the process?
  • What does your data say about the conversion process?
  • What are your competitors doing right?

Remember to pay close attention to the numbers and make your changes based on data — not assumptions.

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10 Questions to Ask Yourself When Your Conversion Rates Are Below Average

A 4-Fold Approach to Increasing Conversion Rate on your Website

The problem with a traffic graph that’s going upward is that it’s not determinant of the number of customers. You can keep investing in traffic acquisition strategies until the cows come home, but that won’t yield any tangible results if you don’t optimize your website for conversions.

But how do you go about adopting conversion optimization and increasing conversion on your website?

A formalized conversion optimization program works like this:

  1. Researching into the existing data and finding gaps in the conversion funnel
  2. Planning and developing testable hypotheses
  3. Creating test variations and executing those tests
  4. Analyzing the tests and using the analysis in subsequent tests

In this post, we are going to run you through the ways to increase conversion rate through this scientific process:

Fold 1 – Digging Deep into Research

Research is needed to figure out your current situation and which among the existing processes need to be changed, or completely removed. Here are some steps that you can start with.

  • Finding the Current Conversion Funnel and Leaks
  • Performing Qualitative and Quantitative Data Analysis
  • Setting Goals that Prioritize ROI

Find the Current Conversion Funnel and Leaks

First and foremost, it is imperative to take stock of your current performance and workflows. You can apply an as-is analysis to gather insights on the current conversion rates, user’s journey, and the leaks in the conversion funnel.

Begin with the mapping of your company’s conversion funnel. You can visualize specific sequences in which users are becoming paying customers. This process will help you create a blueprint of how “strangers” can be turned into “promoters.”

Build Customer Journey to Increase Conversion Rate
Source

Peep Laja, conversion optimization expert and founder at ConversionXL has put together a step-by-step guide to creating user flows that are truly consumer-oriented.

In addition to identifying user flows, it is also important to study whether these are working. Are you experiencing churn in an area where you don’t expect to see it? Are you noticing less churn than you originally expected? Is your conversion funnel measuring the full customer journey or is it potentially missing a step?

Eric Fettman, developer of GoogleAnalyticsTest.com, a free resource for Google Analytics training and GA Individual Qualification preparation, makes some interesting observations on conversion funnels and customer journey:

  • Funnels help you visualize the process by providing a step-by-step breakup of the conversion data and churn.
  • User flow analysis helps your company understand points of customer confusion, and refine web copy and product positioning that affect your customer behavior. This analysis also highlights any “bugs” in the sequence that you may not have previously caught.

Perform Qualitative and Quantitative Data Analysis

After finding the workflow and gaps, the next step is to dive deeper into their causes. You can do this by researching on the What, How, and Why or what is often called the Simon Sinek’s golden circle:

Research to Increase Conversion Rate
Source
  • WHAT are users doing on your website
    This includes quantitative analysis of the amount of traffic landing, dropping off or converting from different pages of your website. You can use tools like Google Analytics (GA) for this purpose.
  • HOW are they behaving
    Now that you know a certain number of people are landing on your website, it’d next be useful to know what they are doing there. For instance, if they’re clicking a link or CTA, scrolling down, filling a form, or the like. Various visitor behavior analysis tools like heatmaps, visitor recordings, and form analysis can help achieve this.
  • WHY are they behaving that way
    You can also find out why your users are performing the way they are by qualitative on-page surveys and heuristic analysis.

Set Goals that Prioritize ROI

After peeking into the gaps with your conversion strategy, you should set clear goals for optimization.

It is important to arrive at a quantified expected conversion rate because that gives your testing efforts a direction. Otherwise, you might end up improving the conversion rate on a page by 1% and sit cozy without realizing its actual potential.

You can use benchmarking studies to decide the improvement you can expect through the proposed change. MarketingSherpa defines the following benchmarks for conversion rate optimization:

Conversion Rate Benchmarking

You should find the main goals of your business, based on the current strategy. What are you focused on now? Is it the total users acquired, is it the number of photos uploaded, or is it the revenue generated?

Whatever it is, you want to focus on something that’s neither too soft (“increase brand recognition”) nor too tactical (“increase page views per session”).

Fold 2 – Planning your A/B Tests

Based on this research, you should next plan your A/B tests to increase your conversion rate.

By now, you should have received enough insights to make an educated guess about what changes to your pages or funnel can bring about a desired change.

Construct a Strong Hypothesis

A structured hypothesis paves the direction for your optimization efforts. Even if the hypothesis fails, you can retrace your steps and correct it wherever it went wrong. Without this structured process, optimization efforts may go astray and lose their purpose.

At its core, a hypothesis is a statement that consists of three parts:

You believe that if we [make a change], we expect [a desirable result] because of [corresponding research].

Here’s an example of a good hypothesis.

I believe moving trust signals closer to the billing form will result in 5% more checkouts because the 56% bounce rate from that page could be due to lack of confidence.

For more information, read this post on building strong testing hypotheses.

Prioritize Your Hypotheses

After you have a list of testing hypotheses, the next step is to zero in on the hypothesis to test first. Here is a list of prioritization frameworks such as:

For detailed knowledge, you can read the post on prioritizing A/B testing hypotheses.

Fold 3 – Executing A/B Tests to Increase Conversion Rate

After the planning, it’s time for application. The plan that you’ve charted to optimize your business process needs to be deployed.

Which Type of Test to Run

A/B, Split, and Multivariate are not different alternatives to do a task. These are methods to do different tasks, so choosing any of these should depend entirely on the task at hand.

Split testing (or split URL testing) is used when:

  • Design needs major changes to the original page such that creating a separate page (housed on a different URL) is easier.
  • Back-end changes are necessary.
  • Pages to be tested already exist on different URLs.

Multivariate testing is used when multiple changes are proposed for a single page and you want to test each combination of these changes.

You should opt for an A/B test when the variations are few and not distinct.

How Long Should You Run the Test

You also need to decide the test duration before you start running the test.

The test duration is dependent on the number of visitors your website receives and the expected conversion rate you are looking for. You can use this free test duration calculator to find the duration you should run your tests for.

After you’re clear on these, you can begin creating variations and start running your tests.

Fold 4 – Analyzing Test Results

To conclude, you should also be able to check and analyze test results. This will arm you with information that you can not only apply to the current pages but also use as future learning.

No matter what the result—positive, negative, or inconclusive—it is imperative to delve deeper and gather insights.

When you are analyzing A/B test results, check if you are looking for the correct metric. If multiple metrics (secondary metrics along with the primary) are involved, you need to analyze all of them individually.

You should also create different segments from your A/B tests and analyze them separately to get a clear picture. The results you derive from generic, non-segmented testing will may lead to skewed actions.

Look at how experts derive insights from A/B Test results in this post.

Your Thoughts

How do you increase conversion rate on your website? Write to us in the comments below.

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How To Be A Subject Matter Expert When You Don’t Know The Topic

subject matter expert

Copywriters and content marketers are often required to write about industries or topics they know little about. This can make it a challenge to position your company or client as an authoritative industry voice. You may have strong marketing chops, but what if you’re not an expert on your company’s niche? Knowing what you’re talking about is imperative to your success. Passionate audiences can smell fakes, and they won’t hesitate to let you know when you miss the mark. Fortunately, you aren’t the first intrepid wordsmith to find yourself in this situation. Others in the same position have succeeded. And…

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How To Be A Subject Matter Expert When You Don’t Know The Topic

Your growth strategy and the true potential of A/B testing

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Imagine being a leader who can see the future…

Who can know if a growth strategy will succeed or fail before investing in it.

Who makes confident decisions based on what she knows her users want.

Who puts proven ideas to work to cut spending and lift revenue.

Okay. Now stop imagining, because you can be that leader…right now. You just need the right tool. (And no, I’m not talking about a crystal ball.) I’m talking about testing.

Build a future-proof growth machine at your company

Get this free guide on how to build an optimization program that delivers continuous growth and insights for your business. Learn the in’s and out’s of the proven processes and frameworks used by brands like HP, ASICS, and 1-800 Flowers.



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So many marketers approach “conversion optimization” and “A/B testing” with the wrong goals: they think too small. Their testing strategy is hyper focused on increasing conversions. Your Analytics team can A/B test button colors and copy tweaks and design changes until they are blue in the face. But if that’s all your company is doing, you are missing out on the true potential of conversion optimization.

Testing should not be a small piece of your overall growth strategy. It should not be relegated to your Analytics department, or shouldered by a single optimizer. Because you can use testing to interrogate and validate major business decisions.

“Unfortunately, most marketers get [conversion optimization] wrong by considering it to be a means for optimizing a single KPI (e.g – registrations, sales or downloads of an app). However conversion optimization testing is much much more than that. Done correctly with a real strategic process, CRO provides in-depth knowledge about our customers.

All this knowledge can then be translated into a better customer journey, optimized customer success and sales teams, we can even improve shipping and of course the actual product or service we provide. Every single aspect of our business can be optimized leading to higher conversion rates, more sales and higher retention rates. This is how you turn CRO from a “X%” increase in sign ups to complete growth of your business and company.

Once marketers and business owners follow a process, stop testing elements such as call to action buttons or titles for the sake of it and move onto testing more in-depth processes and strategies, only then will they see those uplifts and growth they strive for that scale and keep.”Talia Wolf, CMO, Banana Splash

Testing and big picture decision making should be intertwined. And if you want to grow and scale your business, you must be open to testing the fundamentals of said business.

Imagine spearheading a future-proof growth strategy. That’s what A/B testing can do for you.

In this post, I’m going to look at three examples of using testing to make business decisions. Hopefully, these examples will inspire you to put conversion optimization to work as a truly influential determinant of your growth strategy.

Testing a big business decision before you make it

Often, marketers look to testing as a way to improve digital experiences that already exist. When your team tests elements on your page, they are testing what you have already invested in (and they may find those elements aren’t working…)

  • “If I improve the page UX, I can increase conversions”
  • “If I remove distracting links from near my call-to-action button, I can increase conversions”
  • “If I add a smiling person to my hero image, I can capture more leads”, etc.

But if you want to stay consistently ahead of the marketing curve, you should test big changes before you invest in them. You’ll save money, time, resources. And, as with any properly-structured test, you will learn something about your users.

A B2C Example

One WiderFunnel client is a company that provides an online consumer information service—visitors type in a question and get an Expert answer.

The marketing leaders at this company wanted to add some new payment options to the checkout page of their mobile experience. After all, it makes sense to offer alternative payment methods like Apple Pay and Amazon Payments to mobile users, right?

Fortunately, this company is of a test-first, implement-second mindset.

With the help of WiderFunnel’s Strategy team, this client ran a test to identify demand for new payment methods before actually putting any money or resources into implementing said alternative payment methods.

This test was not meant to lift conversion rates. Rather, it was designed to determine which alternative payment methods users preferred.

Note: This client did not actually support the new payment methods when we ran this test. When a user clicked on the Apple Pay method, for instance, they saw the following message:

“Apple Pay coming soon!
We apologize for any inconvenience.
Please choose an available deposit method:
Credit Card | PayPal”

marketing-strategy-payment-options
Should this client invest in alternative payment methods? Only the test will tell!

Not only did this test provide the client with the insight they were looking for about which alternative payment methods their users prefer, but (BONUS!) it also produced significant increases in conversions, even though that was not our intention.

Because they tested first, this client can now invest in the alternative payment options that are most preferred by their users with confidence. Making a big business change doesn’t have to be a gamble.

As Sarah Breen of ASICS said,

We’re proving our assumptions with data. Testing allows me to say, ‘This is why we took this direction. We’re not just doing what our competitors do, it’s not just doing something that we saw on a site that sells used cars. This is something that’s been proven to work on our site and we’re going to move forward with it.’

Testing what you actually offer, part I

Your company has put a lot of thought (research, resources, money) into determining what you should actually offer. It can be overwhelming to even ask the question, “Is our product line actually the best offering A) for our users and B) for our business?”

But asking the big scary questions is a must. Your users are evolving, how they shop is evolving, your competition is evolving. Your product offering must evolve as well.

Some companies bring in experienced product consultants to advise them, but why not take the question to the people (aka your users)…and test your offering.

An E-commerce Example

Big scary question: Have you ever considered reducing the number of products you offer?

One WiderFunnel client offers a huge variety of products. During a conversation between our Strategists and the marketing leaders at this company, the idea to test a reduced product line surfaced.

The thinking was that even if conversions stayed flat with a fewer-products variation, this test would be considered a winner if the reduction in products meant money saved on overhead costs, such as operations costs, shipping and logistics costs, manufacturing costs and so on.

marketing-strategy-jam-study
The Jam Study is one of the most famous demonstrations of the Paradox of Choice.

Plus! There is a psychological motivator that backs up less-is-more thinking: The Paradox of Choice suggests that fewer options might mean less anxiety for visitors. If a visitor has less anxiety about which product is more suitable for them, they may have increased confidence in actually purchasing.

After working with this client’s team to cut down their product line to just the essential top 3 products, our Strategists created what they refer to as the ‘Minimalist’ variation. This variation will be tested against the original product page, which features many products.

marketing-strategy-product-offerings
This client’s current product category page features many products. The ‘Minimalist’ variation highlights just their top 3 products.

If the ‘Minimalist’ variation is a clear winner, this client will be armed with the information they need to consider halting the manufacture of several older products—a potentially dramatic cost-saving initiative.

Even if the variation is a loser, the insights gained could be game-changing. If the ‘Minimalist’ variation results in a revenue loss of 10%, but the cost of manufacturing all of those other products is more than 10%, this client would experience a net revenue gain! Which means, they would want to seriously consider fewer products as an option.

Regardless of the outcome, an experiment like this one will give the marketing decision-maker evidence to make a more informed decision about a fundamental aspect of their business.

Cutting products is a huge business decision, but if you know how your users will respond ahead of time, you can make that decision without breaking a sweat.

Testing what you actually offer, part II

Experienced marketers often assume that they know best. They assume they know what their user wants and needs, because they have ‘been around’. They may assume that, because everybody else is offering something, it is the best offering―(the “our-competitors-are-emphasizing-this-so-it-must-be-the-most-important-offering” mentality).

Well, here’s another big scary question: Does your offering reflect what your users value most? Rather than guessing, push your team to dig into the data, find the gaps in your user experience, and test your offering.

“Most conversion optimization work happens behind the scenes: the research process to understand the user. From the research you form various hypotheses for what they want and how they want it.

This informs [what] you come up with, and with A/B/n testing you’re able to validate market response…before you go full in and spend all that money on a strategy that performs sub-optimally.” Peep Laja, Founder, ConversionXL

A B2B Example

When we started working with SaaS company, Magento, they were offering a ‘Free Demo’ of the Enterprise Edition of their software. Offering a ‘Free Demo’ is a best practice for software companies—everybody does it and it was probably a no-brainer for Magento’s product team.

Looking at clickmap data, however, WiderFunnel’s Strategists noticed that Magento users were really engaged with the informational tabs lower down on the product page.

They had the option to try the ‘Free Demo’, but the data indicated that they were looking for more information. Unfortunately, once users had finished browsing tabs, there was nowhere else to go.

So, our Strategists decided to test a secondary ‘Talk to a specialist’ call-to-action.

marketing-strategy-magento-offering
Is the ‘Free Demo’ offering always what software shoppers are looking for?

This call-to-action hadn’t existed prior to this test, so the literal infinite conversion rate lift Magento saw in qualified sales calls was not surprising. What was surprising was the phone call we received 6 months later: Turns out the ‘Talk to a specialist’ leads were far more valuable than the ‘Get a free demo’ leads.

After several subsequent test rounds, “Talk to a specialist” became the main call-to-action on this page. Magento’s most valuable prospects value the opportunity to get more information from a specialist more than they value a free product demo. SaaS ‘best practices’ be damned.

Optimization is a way of doing business. It’s a strategy for embedding a test-and-learn culture within every fibre of your business.

– Chris Goward, Founder & CEO, WiderFunnel

You don’t need to be a mind-reader to know what your users want, and you don’t need to be a seer to know whether or not a big business change will succeed or flop. You simply need to test.

Leave your ego at the door and listen to what your users are telling you. Be the marketing leader with the answers, the leader who can see the future and can plan her growth strategy accordingly.

How do you use testing as a tool for making big business decisions? Let us know in the comments!

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Your growth strategy and the true potential of A/B testing

User Flow Optimization: The CRO Strategy No One Talks About

A/B testing works… sometimes. But more often than not, you’re simply “moving deck chairs around the Titanic” as Larry Kim puts it (making small changes that only generate small returns). Instead, the ‘unicorns’ – or the A/B tests regularly topping 10% conversions – are focused on overhauling their offers and restructuring the flows and funnels through their website. Here’s the step-by-step process my company used to optimize a website’s user flow to deliver 166% increase in leads after three months. Why A/B Testing Isn’t Always That Great A/B tests are awesome in theory. You barely have to lift a mental…

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User Flow Optimization: The CRO Strategy No One Talks About

How “Your Tea” Boosted Revenue by 28% Through Structured Conversion Optimization

An increasing number of companies and agencies are following a structured approach to Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO). Presently, we will be looking at how a tea eCommerce website increased revenue using conversion optimization.

About the Company

Your Tea is an online tea eCommerce site serving health and lifestyle-focused consumers. Tiny Tea Teatox is one of their largest sellers in their diversifying everyday tea product ranges.

Your Tea signed on We Are Visionists (WAV), a digital agency that partners with eCommerce agencies and startups, to help solve their clients’ digital problems ranging from paid advertising to conversion rate optimization.

We got in touch with Joel Hauer, founder at WAV, to know all about their successful optimization exercise that resulted in a 28% improvement in revenue.

Onboarding Your Tea

WAV pitched CRO as part of a raft of complementary services, including SEO and PPC, to improve Your Tea’s online presence.

Joel says, “It made business sense and so it was a straightforward decision for Your Tea. If you can create an uplift in your revenue by improving your product page, why wouldn’t you? We were able to make projections based on anticipated improvements to the site, and those projections were what got us over the line. We are lucky to have such a pragmatic client!

Process of Optimization

What WAV wanted to do was to insulate Your Tea’s revenue stream against any potential declines in traffic and maximize revenues in the periods of high traffic.

While doing so, they decided to follow a formalized approach to CRO, that is, researching their website data and visitors’ behavior intently to create hypothesis and running A/B tests that would impact revenues the most.

The Research Phase

To begin with, they analyzed their website data using Google Analytics (GA) to understand the journey of the visitors. They detected a large number of drop-offs on the product pages of the website, that is, a lot of people were landing on the product pages but not adding anything to the cart. They discovered that the Tiny Tea Teatox product page in particular was attracting the largest amount of traffic, and decided to optimize it first.

On further research on that page, they found that more than 50% of visitors were browsing through mobile. This information compelled WAV to closely analyze the mobile version of Tiny Tea Teatox. They found multiple optimization opportunities. For instance, the CTA was not prominent, there was no detailed description of the products, and more.

Here’s how the original page looked:

A/B test Control

Hypothesis Creation

Since a majority of traffic was coming from mobile in particular, WAV decided to optimize both the desktop and mobile versions of the Your Tea website. They hypothesized that adding a more prominent CTA, along with a detailed description of the product and user reviews would increase add-to-cart from the product page.

Using Visitor Behavior Analysis, they were able to develop their hypotheses further. For instance, by looking into heatmap analysis, they realized that visitors mostly browsed the product description and its benefits.

A large number of visitors also visited the reviews section, thereby making it clear that they were looking for trust elements. WAV decided to add more product information and benefits, along with credible “before and after” images and testimonials to the page. WAV also conducted website surveys and user testing sessions, which confirmed their hypothesis of adding more “credibility proofs” to the page.

The Test

WAV concluded that a full redesign of the product pages could yield better results than a series of incremental improvements from smaller tests. Such a massive redesign required heavy technical work, and WAV used VWO’s Ideact service to create a variation. Below is the screenshot of the control and variation:

Your Tea Control Variation Here’s how the Before And After section in the variation looked like:

Here’s the Why Buy From Us section in the variation that aimed to improve the website’s credibility :

Credibility Proof in the VariationResults

With the tests, they tracked two goals, that is, the add to cart conversion rate and the revenue.

The improvement in add-to-cart actions led to an impressive 28% increase in the revenue. In terms of add-to-cart conversions, control of the test was yielding a conversion rate of 11.3% in contrast to the variation which emerged to be the winner with a conversion rate of 14.5%.

Road Ahead

To capitalize on these higher conversions, an optimized checkout experience is required.

The agency could identify that the checkout pages were receiving multiple views from the same visitors. Users were getting stuck in loops around the checkout page. After they identified what to look for, the data from analytics supported it. Currently, they are testing to optimize the mobile experience on parameters such as anxiety and trust signals.

When asked about his biggest learning of the test, Joel responded: “One thing that came out of this test was learning more about the checkout experience—particularly on mobile.”

Experience Using VWO

Joel remarks, “The work of VWO’s Ideact team in setting up the tests on the technical front to help us record users through the checkout experience was invaluable.”

“We loved working with Rauhan and Harinder from VWO. The willingness to go the extra mile and help us get the maximum insight from our tests was fantastic. Having spoken about the features in the pipeline, we’re excited to see what’s to come.”

What Do You Think?

Do you have any similar experiments to share? Tell us in the comments below.

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How “Your Tea” Boosted Revenue by 28% Through Structured Conversion Optimization