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9 Creative Sticky Bar Examples – Plus 21 New Unbounce Templates

alt : https://unbounce.com/photos/sticky-bar-condoms.mp4https://unbounce.com/photos/sticky-bar-condoms.mp4

Sticky Bars are the less intrusive cousin of the noble Popup. They appear at the top or bottom of the page (and sometimes the sides) when a visitor arrives, leaves, scrolls down or up, stays on the page for a certain time period or clicks a link or button. They have a million useful use cases, some of which you may not have considered.

In today’s Product Awareness Month post, I’ll be sharing:

  • 9 Sticky Bar Examples From Out in the Wild: These are examples the team has found on other folks websites, and a couple of our own.
  • 21 New Unbounce Sticky Bar Templates: Check out our latest designs that you can use today.

To get things started, here’s an example that I’ll talk about later in the new templates section. Click to show a Sticky Bar with a countdown timer.

I’d love to see your Sticky Bars too, so drop me a link in the comments, please.

9 Creative Sticky Bar Examples to Inspire Your Next Campaign

Discounts and newsletter subscriptions are valid, common and effective use cases, but I want to explore different types of interaction design, or campaign concepts that can compliment what you’re already using them for.

#1 Maybe Later

If you’ve been following along with Product Awareness Month (PAM), you’ll have seen the “Maybe Later” concept. This is where an entrance popup morphs into a persistent Sticky Bar when your visitors click the middle “Maybe Later” button instead of yes or no.

You can see a live demo of how it works here. A popup will appear when you arrive. Click “Maybe Later”, then refresh the page and a Sticky Bar will appear, and can be configured to show up site-wide until you convert or say “No Thanks”.


#2 Sticky Bar to Popup

This concept is the exact opposite of “Maybe Later”, and it uses a concept known as a two-step opt-in. Instead of showing a form on the Sticky Bar, it just shows a button to express interest.

Click-Through Sticky Bar

When you click the Sticky Bar CTA it launches a popup to collect the email address. This two-stage concept can increase conversions because the first click establishes intent and a level of commitment to continue – while not showing a scary form right away. I’ll be discussing the two-step opt-in in a future post.

Lead Gen Popup


#3 Sticky Video Widget

You’ve seen these on many blogs I’m sure. It’s really cool functionality for increasing engagement in your videos. You can see a demo here. And instructions on how to implement it can be found in the Unbounce community here.


#4 E-commerce Product Reminder

This example is really cool. As you scroll down a product page on an e-commerce site, an “Add to Cart” Sticky Bar appears when you scroll past the main hero image.


#5 E-commerce Checkout Discount Nudge

This Sticky Bar sticks with you for every step in the photo creation and checkout process. Clearly, they are comfortable with the coupon being applied to the sale because it’s an incredibly competitive business niche and let’s face it when you see a coupon code field you go searching for one. So why not just offer it straight up.

For the record, trying to buy canvas prints to deliver to family in the UK is a freakin’ nightmare. I had to try 8 different sites before one of them would allow me to put a Canadian address in the billing info fields. They are losing a TON of money by not realizing that customers can be in other places.


#6 On-Click Side Slide

On-click Sticky Bars and Popups are the best kind when it comes to a permission-based interaction. You make something interesting and ask people to click on it. In this example, there is an element on the left side of the page which slides in from the side when clicked.

Unbouncer Noah Matsell created a similar thing in Unbounce (see demo here). It doesn’t actually use a Sticky Bar. Instead it’s just a box with text in it. I love how it works. Try it out, and think about all the cool stuff you could stick in a sidebar.


#7 EU Cookie Policy

European Union laws around privacy are some of the toughest in the world, and for the last few years, the EU Cookie Privacy Law required that all EU businesses, as well as international businesses serving EU customers, show a privacy statement with a clickable acknowledgment interaction. I’m not a lawyer so I don’t know all the ins and outs, but needless to say, it’s a great use case that you may not even know that your web team or legal team actually needs.

Coming up in May is the new GDPR legislation which will usurp this law, but offer its own needs and requirements, so stay tuned for more on that, and how you should be dealing with it. In fact, I did a quick poll on Twitter to see what people thought about the cookie law and got an interesting mix of responses. Don’t be in the “Haven’t dealt with it yet” camp when it comes to GDPR. That could get you dinged.

We released a new Cookie Bar template below that you can use until you deal with the new legislation.

#8 Microsite Navigation

Another example from earlier in Product Awareness Month. You can use a Sticky Bar as the connective global navigation that turns a group of landing pages into a microsite.

A really simple way to create a multi-page marketing campaign experience.

#9 Net Promoter Score (NPS)

Net Promoter Score surveys are a method of measuring how your customers feel about your product or service. Based on a scale from 0-10 and the question “How likely are you to recommend company name to a friend?”

Co-founder Carter Gilchrist made this NPS demo to show how it works:


Follow our Product Awareness Month journey >> click here to launch a popup with a subscribe form (it uses our on-click trigger feature).


21 New Unbounce Sticky Bar Templates You Can Use Today

We just released a whole bunch of new Sticky Bar and Popup templates which you can see inside the Unbounce app screenshot below. I chose a few of them to showcase below based on some of the examples I discussed above.


Sticky Bar Template #1: Countdown Timer

Countdown timers are great for creating a sense of urgency, and can have a positive influence on conversions as a result.


Click to show this Sticky Bar at the bottom | at the top.


Sticky Bar Template #2: Location Redirect

If you have multiple websites or online stores, you can use Location Targeting (Unbounce supports city, region, country, and continent) to let people know there is a local version they might want to switch to.


Sticky Bar Template #3: Product Release

Announce product releases on your website to drive people to the features page of the new product.


Sticky Bar Template #4: Cookie Privacy Law

As I mentioned earlier, this is big for companies in Europe, and also businesses who have European customers. On May 25, 2018 this law will be usurped by the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).


Sticky Bar Template #5: Product Beta Access

Build an email list for an upcoming beta release.


Sticky Bar Template #6: Product Hunt Launch

Product Hunt can be a great place to launch new products. To be successful you need to get upvotes and you can use a Sticky Bar to send people there from your website.

Check Out Our Sticky Bar Live Demo

We built a cool tool that shows what Sticky Bars and Popups look like on your site. Simply enter your URL here to preview. It even grabs your brand colors and in this case, Amanda from Orbit Media makes a cameo appearance.

Cheers
Oli Gardner

p.s. You should check out The Landing Page Analyzer. Why? Because – hyperbole alert – it’s the single greatest tool in the history of the world when it comes to grading your landing pages.

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9 Creative Sticky Bar Examples – Plus 21 New Unbounce Templates

“Maybe Later” – A New Interaction Model for Ecommerce Entrance Popups

I’d guess that over half of the e-commerce stores I visit use entrance popups to advertise their current deal. Most often it’s a discount.

What is an Entrance Popup and What’s Wrong With Them?

They are as they sound. A popup that appears as soon as you arrive on the site. They’re definitely the most interruptive of all popups because you’ve not even had a chance to look around.

I get why they are used though because they work really well at one thing – letting you know that an offer exists, and what it is. And given high levels of competition for online dollars, it makes sense why they would be so prolific.

The intrusion isn’t the only point of frustration. There’s also the scenario where you arrive on a site, see an offer appear, you find it interesting and potentially very valuable (who doesn’t want 50% off?), but you want to do some actual looking around – the shopping part – before thinking about the offer. And when you’re forced to close the popup in order to continue, it’s frustrating because you want the offer! You just don’t want it right now.

So, given the fact that they are so common, and they’re not going anywhere anytime soon, and they create these points of frustration, I’ve been working on developing a few alternative ways to solve the same problem.

The one I want to share with you today is called “Maybe Later”.

“Maybe Later” is a Solution to Increase Engagement and Reduce Frustration

As you saw in the header image, instead of the now classic YES/NO popup – the one that gets abused by shady marketers (Technology isn’t the Problem, We Are.) – “Maybe Later” includes a third option called, you guessed it!

The middle option gives some control back to the shopper.

It’s more than just a third button, here’s how it works (I’ll refer to the sketch opposite):

  1. The popup appears when you enter the site. You can choose “No” to get rid of it, “Yes” to take advantage of it, or “Maybe Later” to register your interest but get it out of your way.
  2. When you click “Maybe Later” a cookie is set to log your interest.
  3. Now while you are browsing the rest of the site, a Sticky Bar – targeted at the cookie that was set – appears at the bottom (or top) of the page, with a more subtle reminder of the offer, so that you know it there and ready if you decide to take advantage of it.
  4. If you decide against the offer, you can click “No thanks” on the Sticky Bar, the cookie is deleted, and the offer is hidden for good.

The core purpose of this idea is to put the control back with the shopper while creating an effective method for the retailer to engage with you, with your permission.


Follow our Product Awareness Month journey >> click here to launch a popup with a subscribe form (it uses our on-click trigger feature).


Visual Hierarchy on Popup Buttons

When you have more than a single button, it’s important to establish visual design cues to indicate how the hierarchical dominance plays out. For you as a marketer, the most important of the three buttons is YES, MAYBE LATER is second, and NO is the least.

You can create a better user experience for your visitors by using the correct visual hierarchy and affordance when it comes to button design. In the image below, there is a progression of visual dominance from left to right (which is the correct direction – in Western society). Left is considered a backward step (in online interaction design terms), and right is a progression to the goal.

From left to right we see:

  • The NO button: is designed as a ghost button which has the least affordance and weight of the three.
  • The MAYBE LATER button: gains some solidity by increasing the opacity
  • The YES button: has a fully opaque design represented by the primary call to action colour of the theme.

You can achieve a similar level of dominance by making the secondary action a link instead of a button, which is a great visual hierarchy design technique. What I don’t like is when people do this, but they make the “No thanks” link really tiny. If you’re going to provide an option, do it with a little dignity and make it easy to see and click.

See the “Maybe Later” Popup-to-Sticky-Bar Model in Action

Alrighty, demo time! I have a few instructions for you to follow to see it in action. I didn’t load the popup on this page as it’s supposed to be an entrance popup and I needed to set the scene first. But I’ll use some trickery to make it happen for you.

Follow these instructions and you’ll see “Maybe Later” in action:

Please note: this is desktop only. Reason being is that Google dislikes entrance popups on mobile. Sticky Bars are the Google-friendly way to present promos on mobile, so they work, but the combo isn’t appropriate.

  1. Visit this page (opens in new window).
  2. Click the “Maybe Later” button and the popup will close.
  3. Refresh that page and you’ll see a Sticky Bar with the same offer appear at the bottom.
  4. Come back to this page.
  5. Refresh this page and you’ll see the Sticky Bar here too.
  6. Click “No thanks” to get rid of it when you’ve had enough :D

Here’s the entrance Popup you will see:

Maybe Later - A New  interaction model for ecommerce entrance popups

And the Sticky Bar you will see following that:

How to Use “Maybe Later” on Your Website

If you’d like to give it a try, follow the instructions below in your Unbounce account. (You should sign up for Unbounce if you haven’t already: you get Landing Pages, Popups, and Sticky Bars all in the same builder).

You can also see what Popups and Sticky Bars look like on your website by entering your URL on our new Live Preview Tool.

“Maybe Later” Setup Instructions

Caveat: This is not an official Unbounce feature, and as such is not technically supported. But it is damn cool. And if enough people scream really hard, maybe I’ll be able to persuade the product team to add it to the list. And please talk to a developer before trying this in a production environment.

Step 1: Create a Popup in Unbounce

Step 2: Add “Maybe Later” Script to the Popup

In the “Javascripts” window located in the bottom-left.

Add the following script “Before the body end tag”, replacing “lp-pom-button-50” with the id of your “Maybe Later” button, and unbounce.com with your own domain.

document.getElementById("lp-pom-button-50").onclick = function() 
parent.postMessage(JSON.stringify('later'), 'https://unbounce.com');

Step 3: Set URL Targeting on Popup

Set up the URL targeting for where you want the popup to appear. I chose the post you’re reading right now (with a ?demo extension so it would only fire when I sent you to that URL).

Step 4: Set Cookie Targeting on Popup

Set up the cookie targeting to “Not show” when the “Maybe Later” cookie is present. The cookie is set when the button is clicked. (You’ll see how in step 9).

Step 5: Create a Sticky Bar in Unbounce

Step 6: Add “Maybe Later” Script to the Sticky Bar

Add the following script “Before the body end tag”, replacing “lp-pom-button-45” with the id of your “No Thanks” button, and unbounce.com with your own domain.

document.getElementById("lp-pom-button-45").onclick = function() 
parent.postMessage(JSON.stringify('laterForget'), 'https://unbounce.com');

Step 7: Set URL Targeting on Sticky Bar

Set up the URL targeting for where you want the Sticky Bar to appear. This might be every page on your e-commerce site, or in my case just this post and another for testing.

Step 8: Set Cookie Targeting on Sticky Bar

Set the Trigger to “Arrival”, Frequency to “Every Visit”, and Cookie Targeting to show when the cookie we’re using is set. (You’ll see how it’s set in the next step).

Step 9: Add “Maybe Later” Code to Your Website

This is some code that allows the Popup and Sticky Bar to “talk” to its host page and set/delete the cookie.

// On receiving message from the popup set a cookie
window.onload = function() 
function receiveMessage(e) 
var eventData = JSON.parse(e.data);
// Check for the later message
if (eventData === 'later') 
document.cookie = "mlshowSticky=true; expires=Thu, 11 May 2019 12:00:00 UTC; path=/";

if (eventData === 'laterForget') 
document.cookie = "mlshowSticky=; expires=Thu, 01 Jan 1970 00:00:00 UTC; path=/;";

}
// Listen for the message from the host page
window.addEventListener('message', receiveMessage);
}

Step 10: Enjoy Being Awesome

That’s all, folks!


What Do You Think?

I’d love to know what you think about this idea in the comments, so please jump in with your thoughts and ideas.

Later (maybe),
Oli

p.s. Don’t forget to see what Popups and Sticky Bars look like on your website with the new Live Preview Tool

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“Maybe Later” – A New Interaction Model for Ecommerce Entrance Popups

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25 Things You Can Do With Unbounce that Your UX/Web Team Will Love

It’s Day 3 of Product Marketing Month. Today’s post is about discovering new use-cases for your products that can be useful for different functional users in your customer’s company. — Unbounce co-founder Oli Gardner

If you read the opening post of Product Marketing Month, you would have read about the concept of Productizing Our Technology (POT).

Productizing Our Technology
By taking our core tech, combining the available features, with new jQuery scripts, CSS, and some 3rd-party integrations, it’s possible to create a plethora of new “mini-products” that if embraced by the community, could inform future product direction.

When we created an initial list of product ideas, expanding upon what the base product can already do, I realized that — as we’ve moved from a single product to multiple — we’d not changed our perception of who the functional buyer persona is.

If you look at the table below, notice how product #1 is a standalone landing page used primarily for paid ad campaigns, but products #2 and #3 are designed to be used primarily on your website.

PRODUCT
#1 Landing Pages #2 Popups #3 Sticky Bars
Primary Use Case Use standalone landing pages to convert more of paid (AdWords) traffic. Use on website pages to convert more organic traffic. Use on website pages to convert more organic traffic.
Primary Persona Campaign Strategist Website Owner Website Owner
Secondary Persona Designer Campaign Strategist Campaign Strategist
Tertiary Persona Copywriter Web Designer / Developer Web Designer / Developer

Note: that for the personas listed, these are intentionally general, as it’s still part of our discovery. My goal is simply to show that they are most likely different.

We didn’t immediately realize that the teams using these products may not even be in the same department (marketing vs. web team vs. software development), for example. Or if they are in the same department (marketing), they might not work together on a daily basis.

This is a huge problem because it assumes that someone who runs paid campaigns is also going to be optimizing the organic traffic to a website, and is no doubt one of the reasons for low adoption of product #2 and #3.

A WTF Moment – How Could We Be So Blind?

When we talked to our customers and community members, we uncovered a startling fact: most people thought that the new products could only be used on Unbounce landing pages.

WUUUUTTTT! Not true.

Yes, you can, if you want. But the primary use case for the new products is for your website. We really didn’t see this misconception coming, which shows how important it is to always talk to your customers.

Who uses your products?

If you have more than one product, or if the users of your single product have different job roles, are you targeting and communicating with them in different ways? Or have you assumed that everyone will understand the same messaging?

Web developers are not very likely to be downloading an ebook about marketing, and thus will not be on our mailing list to hear about new products that could, in fact, make their job easier and more productive.

So, today, I’m going to share some of the functional use cases of popups and sticky bars that would be used by the UX and web teams that work on and manage your website. This is a very different market than we normally speak to, but super important as some of our research has indicated after the initial launch.

As I explore these use cases, try to follow along with your own products, to see if there are ways that you can create new mini products from the technology you possess.

Productizing Unbounce Technology
(Click image for full-size view)

Across the top (in yellow) are the core products, their features (such as targeting, triggers, display frequency), and the different hacks, data sources, and integrations, that can be combined to produce the new products listed in green in the first column.

To recap, each mini product is labelled as either NOW/MVP/NEW depending on how easy it is to create with our current tech:

NOW: These products are possible now with our existing feature set.
MVP: These products are possible by adding some simple scripts/CSS to extend the core.
NEW: These products would require a much deeper level of product or website development to make them possible. These are the examples that came from “blue sky” ideation, and are a useful upper anchor for what could be done.

The core technology is denoted as LP (Landing Pages), POP (Popups), SB (Sticky Bars).

In the table below you’ll find 25 of the ideas we came up with — that I selected from of a total of 121.

# Product Name Product Description Where Used Core Tech Core Features Extras
NOW: Can be built with existing features
1 Microsites By using the URL targeting feature, a single Sticky Bar with links to multiple Landing Pages can effectively create a microsite. Landing Pages LP + SB Targeting: URL
Trigger: Entry
N/A
2 EU Cookie Law Bar You’ve probably seen them all over the place. “All websites owned in the EU or targeted towards EU citizens, are now expected to comply with the law.” The EU has always been very strict and this requirement is why these bars have been popping up everywhere. Good news is, they’re wasy to make with geo-targeting. Website SB Targeting: Geo
Trigger: Entry
N/A
3 Two-Step Opt-In Form Instead of showing a lead gen form, you use a button or link that shows the form in a popup when clicked. This can help remove the perceived friction that a form conveys, and applies a level of commitment when the button is clicked that makes people more likely to continue and fill out the form. Website, Landing Pages POP Trigger: Click N/A
4 Cart Abandonment Use an exit Popup on your ecommerce product/cart/checkout pages to provide an offer to encourage a purchase. Website POP Trigger: Exit N/A
5 Multi-location GEO Redirect If you have websites for multiple countries, you can present the entry Popup that uses geolocation to ask if the visitor would like to visit the site in their own country. Website POP Targeting: Geo
Trigger: Entry
N/A
6 Poll/Survey Add a form to a Popup of Sticky Bar to present poll or survey questions. Website POP or SB Trigger: Entry, Exit, Scroll Down, Scroll Up, Delay N/A
7 NPS Survey Present a Net Promoter Score in a Sticky Bar to ask your visitors and customers to rate how likely they are to recommend your product or brand to others. Website, Landing Pages SB Targeting: None, Cookie
Trigger: Exit, Scroll, Delay
N/A
8 Outage Notification Present an entry Popup or Sticky Bar when there is site maintenance happening. SB or POP Website Targeting: URL, Cookie N/A
9 Tooltips Present a popup when someone clicks to show more info/instructions. Website, Landing Pages POP Trigger: Click N/A
10 Referrer Contextual Welcome Present a contextually relevant message to people arriving from another site. Website, Landing Pages POP or SB Targeting: URL, Cookie, Geo
Trigger: Entry
N/A
11 Co-marketing Contextual Welcome Present a contextually relevant message to people arriving from a campaign run by you and a comarketing partner. This could show the relationship (both logos) and the joint offer. Website, Landing Pages POP or SB Targeting: Referrer, URL, Cookie
Trigger: Entry, Scroll Up, Scroll Down,
Exit, Delay
N/A
12 Mobile GPS: Closest Store Present a Sticky Bar when someone on a mobile site would benefit from knowing where the closest store is to them (potentially with an incentive to visit the store). Website, Landing Pages SB Trigger: Entry, Scroll Up, Scroll Down,
Exit, Delay
N/A
13 Holiday Hours Announcement Show details of changes in store hours. Could be used on exit to provide some urgency “We’re closing in 1 hour”. Website, Landing Pages SB or POP Trigger: Entry, Exit N/A
MVP: Can be built with existing features
14 Sticky Navigation By removing the standard close button [x] from a Sticky Bar and adding smooth scroll anchor links, you can create a sticky navbar which can help increase page engagement. Website, Landing Pages SB Trigger: Entry CSS: Hide close button
Javascript: Smooth scroll
15 Mobile App-Style Navigation By placing a Sticky Bar at the bottom of the page (on mobile), using icons/text, you can create a mobile experience that looks and feels like an app. Check out plated.com on your phone as an example. Adding smoothscroll Javascript lets you use the nav to scroll up and down the page. Mobile Website, Mobile Landing Pages SB Trigger: Entry CSS: Hide close button + mobile only
Javascript: Smooth scroll
16 Mobile Hamburger Menu A hamburger menu is the three lined icon that opens up a navigation menu. They typically slide in and out from the left side or top.Check out a demo in the Unbounce Community. Mobile Website SB Trigger: Click jQuery: Slide in/out
17 Progress Bar Similar to a microsite, a progress bar could be targeted to appear on several pages. Using cookie targeting and CSS the progress bar could be updated to show which pages (steps) have been completed and which steps are remaining. Website, Microsite, Landing Pages SB Targeting: URL, Cookie jQuery: Set/Read cookies
CSS: Prev/next step visual state
18 “Maybe Later” Maybe Later is a new concept for ecommerce entrance popups that I will explore in depth on day 9 of Product Marketing Month. A large number of ecommerce sites have discounts/offers that show on arrival. This can often be a major disruption to the experience, even if the offer is of interest. The way ML works is that the popup would present 3 options: Yes/No/ML. If “Maybe Later” is clicked, the Popup closes and a persistent Sticky Bar appears at the bottom of the page to act as a subtle reminder of the offer – ready for when the visitor wants it. Website POP + SB Targeting: Cookie jQuery: Set/Read cookies, Log “Maybe Later” click
19 Video Interaction Offers Having a CTA embedded in a video is great, but it’s very limited in its ability communicate more than a few words.This product idea enables you to launch a popup when the video is complete, or when it’s paused, or when you’ve watched a series of videos. It’s seriously badass. Click here to visit a demo of this concept (created by Unbouncer, Noah Matsell). Website, Landing Pages POP Targeting: Cookie jQuery
20 End-of-video Talk to Sales Present a popup to someone who completes a video such as a demo. Website, Landing Pages POP or SB Trigger: Custom script jQuery
21 Sticky Video Widget You may have seen this on news blogs, where a video at the top becomes a smaller video stuck to the side or bottom of the window as you scroll. It’s a great way to ensure higher engagement with the video. Noah made a demo of a sticky video widget in the Unbounce community. Blog SB Trigger: Scroll CSS
22 Guided Tour Show a popup that begins a guided tour of the page/product. If you close it, the tour is over. If you click a next button it closes and a new popup is opened, positioned close to the feature it’s describing. Website, In-app POP Trigger: Click jQuery
NEW: Can be built with existing features
23 Ship it Faster By setting a cookie based on the shipping method on an ecommerce site, an exit Popup or Sticky Bar could be used to suggest a different shipping method (more expensive) to get it delivered faster. A smart upsell feature. Ecommerce Website POP or SB Targeting: Cookie
Trigger: Exit
Feature: Dynamic Text Replacement
jQuery
24 Out of Stock By setting a cookie based on stock availability on an ecommerce site, an exit Popup or Sticky Bar could present an email address field to ask if the visitor would like to be notified when the item is back in stock. Ecommerce Website POP or SB Targeting: Cookie
Trigger: Exit
jQuery
CSS
25 Sold Out: You Might Like By setting a cookie based on stock availability on an ecommerce site, a Popup or Sticky Bar could be shown that presents a set of recommended products related to an out of stock item. Ecommerce Website POP or SB Targeting: Cookie
Trigger: Exit
Feature: Dynamic Text Replacement
jQuery
CSS

As you can see, there are a ton of new use cases for the products, which are useful to a completely different set of functional users. Unless we do something to specifically target these new functional users, adoption won’t be our only problem, acquisition will be too.

How can you target different functional users?

Approach 1: Product Pages for Organic & Paid Traffic

One way to start validating these use cases is to create new product pages for them to see if you can attract some organic traffic. In our case, this would allow those searching for this type of product to arrive on our website where we may be able to demo the product as part of the experience.

Approach 2: Cross-Function Advocate Email Marketing

Another approach is to explicitly connect the different team members, through suggestive email copy. For instance, we could email our customers and educate them that our product can help others on their team – getting the conversation started. This has the benefit of communicating through an established brand advocate.

Prioritizing Product Development

One of our goals with POT is to gather insights into which new product ideas are in demand. There will without question be an increase in technical support questions based on the implementation requirements of these ideas, but I consider that a good problem to have. If there’s enough call for full productization, that’s a great way to increase adoption and the stickiness of our products.

How many new products could YOU build?

I’d love to hear in the comments how you can imagine doing this with your own software/products/services. Please jump into the comments and let me know. If you’re worried about your competitors stealing your ideas (I definitely thought about that when I decided on this approach – but I’m erring on the side of our core Transparency value), you could simply mention how many you think you could come up with, which is also very cool.

Now, everybody POT!
Cheers
Oli Gardner

p.s. Tell your web/UX teammates about this blog post :D

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25 Things You Can Do With Unbounce that Your UX/Web Team Will Love

Unbounce Convertables, Now with Advanced Targeting: Show the Right Offer to the Right Visitor at the Right Time

advtarget_blogtop

Imagine you run one of those old-timey candy shops.

It’s packed wall to wall with chocolate, gummies, bubble gum, licorice and everything in between.

Unfortunately, you spent all your money opening the shop, and haven’t the funds to hire someone to help the customers while you tend the register. So when the shop gets busy, you notice many of your patrons become overwhelmed by the selection, often walking out of the shop empty handed.

Now imagine the candy shop is your website, and the patrons your visitors.

Each visitor to your website is unique — one may know exactly what they want while another requires a little more assistance. Your website, however, is simply not equipped to convert all your visitors, and you don’t have the time or resources to make changes to your website, hire a consultant to run a bunch of A/B tests or run a new campaign to attract more prospects.

What do you do?

Overlays can help

In November 2016, we launched Unbounce Convertables, a new conversion tool to help you capture more conversions on any page of your website, blog or online store.

The first type of Convertables is website overlays triggered by visitor behavior: entrance, exit, timed and on-scroll.

Overlays are modal lightboxes that launch within a webpage and focus attention on a single offer. Still fuzzy on what an overlay is? Click here.

If we’re using the candy shop analogy, overlays are the shop helpers that present your visitors with exactly what they’re looking for (or what they didn’t know they were looking for!). And the best part is they’re a fast, reliable and affordable way to add conversion opportunities to any web page, meaning you can launch them effortlessly while looking like a conversion hero.

Overlays work because, when implemented properly, they leverage psychological principles to focus the visitor’s attention on a single offer.

However, just like the rest of your marketing campaigns — be it PPC or email — the better targeted the overlay, the better results you’ll get.

Which is why we’re pleased to announce our new advanced targeting and trigger options.

Here’s what’s new:

These new features, combined with Unbounce’s core offerings — our trusted drag and drop builder, high-converting templates and marketing automation integrations — mean that you can build on-brand overlays quickly and…

Present the right offer to the right visitor at the right time

Has this ever happened to you? You’re killing time surfing the interweb when boom! — you’re presented with the most perfect-for-you offer that you wonder if your fairy godmother really does exist.

There are two possible explanations for this phenomenon: she does (lucky duck) or the offer was so perfectly targeted that it only feels like magic.

The latter is at the crux of Unbounce Convertables’ new advanced targeting: target the right person at the right time with the right offer.

Not only does this approach ensure your prospects see only the most relevant, timely and valuable offers, it ensures that you generate the best quality leads, signups and sales.

Let’s dig in.

Location targeting

Thanks to the internet, we can find what we’re looking for regardless of where we live.

For marketers, this is both a blessing and a curse — a blessing because you can cast a much wider net, and a curse because of differences in language, currency, laws, competitive landscape and preferences.

By pairing your overlay with location targeting, you can guarantee only visitors arriving from a specific country will see it. Here’s how it might look in the real world:

  • Offer region-specific ecommerce promos, like free shipping for UK visitors only
  • Abide by local data collection and age requirement laws, like the US’s CAN-SPAM or Canada’s CASL legislation
  • Promote local events to only local visitors
  • Present the same offer in different languages of origin
  • Highlight the most popular product in a country only to visitors from that country
  • And much more

Referrer targeting

Message Match is a principle we consistently preach at Unbounce. It’s about making sure your visitors see the same message from point A to point B of your funnel, which is important because strong message match increases conversions by reassuring visitors they’ve come to the right place.

With referrer targeting, you can show a Convertable to visitors who have arrived from a specified URL, creating that message match and forward momentum through your funnel. Here are just a few of the many ways referrer targeting can be used:

  • Offer organic visitors popular content, like a 101-level ebook, via a lead gen overlay
  • Present visitors navigating from an internal product page an offer to purchase
  • Show visitors who’ve viewed a technology partner page content relevant to them, like, for example, how your tool integrates with the partner tool
  • And, you guessed it, much more

Dynamic Text Replacement

Like referrer targeting, Dynamic Text Replacement (DTR) allows marketers to maintain a consistent message from referral source to overlay.

However, unlike referrer targeting where the visitor’s source triggers the presentation of a unique overlay, DTR lets you customize the actual text of your Convertable using URL parameters.

This means that the visitor sees custom copy, which increases the relevancy of your overlay for each individual user. Here’s what that could look like:

  • Create personalized incentives (e.g., “Hey Judy, how ‘bout free shipping?”)
  • Make relevant offers based on previous account activity (e.g., “You really really really like Carly Rae Jepsen — sign up for our newsletter for more on your favorite artists”)

Forget Cookie Monster, marketers love cookies. But we’re not talking about the ooey gooey chocolate chip kind (though I certainly wouldn’t scoff at one), we’re talking about cookie targeting.

Cookie targeting allows Unbounce users to specify which visitors see (or don’t see) a Convertable based on their browsing history. Here are a few examples of what cookie targeting allows you to do:

  • Hide Convertables from visitors who have already opted in
  • Show only one Convertable per visitor and hide all others (this is key if you’re running multiple Convertables, since you want to avoid bombarding your visitors)
  • Ask returning visitors who have already converted to complete a post-conversion action, like following you on Twitter

But wait, there’s more

You didn’t think that was it, did you?

On top of our advanced targeting and DTR, we’re also releasing a new type of trigger.

On-click trigger

Whereas targeting allows you to specify which visitors see your overlay, triggers determine when they’ll see it. Convertables launched with four triggers (on arrival, on exit, on scroll and after delay) and today we’re rolling out a fifth trigger: on click.

Overlays triggered on click mean you can select any element on your web page to trigger an overlay when the user clicks on it. Use it to build your newsletter subscriber list on your blog or to gather interested contacts for product updates.

Still not sure what we mean? Click here.

The secret to highly effective overlays…

The secret to highly effective overlays is really no secret at all — it’s all about presenting the right offer to the right visitor at the right time.

Using Unbounce Convertables, you can mix and match different targeting and triggers to present the most relevant, timely offers for your visitors.

And you can do it all within Unbounce’s trusted drag and drop builder, loaded with fully customizable overlay templates so you can stay on brand and still launch in mere minutes.

Convertables are available now from Unbounce. Try them for free for 30 days!

Already an Unbounce customer? Log into Unbounce and start using Convertables today at no extra cost.

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Unbounce Convertables, Now with Advanced Targeting: Show the Right Offer to the Right Visitor at the Right Time

How To Create An Affiliate Tracking Module In Magento

In this tutorial, we will create a Magento module that will capture an affiliate referral from a third-party source (e.g. an external website or newsletter) and include a HTML script on the checkout success page once this referral has been converted.
We will be covering the following topics:
Capturing URI request data, Saving to and retrieving values from cookies, Adding custom content to the checkout success page, Adding module configuration to the Magento admin panel, Creating a community module with no hard-coded settings.

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How To Create An Affiliate Tracking Module In Magento

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