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FAST UX Research: An Easier Way To Engage Stakeholders And Speed Up The Research Process




FAST UX Research: An Easier Way To Engage Stakeholders And Speed Up The Research Process

Zoe Dimov



Today, UX research has earned wide recognition as an essential part of product and service design. However, UX professionals still seem to be facing two big problems when it comes to UX research: A lack of engagement from the team and stakeholders as well as the pressure to constantly reduce the time for research.

In this article, I’ll take a closer look at each of these challenges and propose a new approach known as ‘FAST UX’ in order to solve them. This is a simple but powerful tool that you can use to speed up UX research and turn stakeholders into active champions of the process.

Contrary to what you might think, speeding up the research process (in both the short and long term) requires effective collaboration, rather than you going away and soldiering on by yourself.

The acronym FAST (Focus, Attend, Summarise, Translate) wraps up a number of techniques and ideas that make the UX process more transparent, fun, and collaborative. I also describe a 5-day project with a central UK government department that shows you how the model can be put into practice.

The article is relevant for UX professionals and the people who work with them, including product owners, engineers, business analysts, scrum masters, marketing and sales professionals.

1. Lack Of Engagement Of The Team And Stakeholders

“Stakeholders have the capacity for being your worst nightmare and your best collaborator.”

UIE (2017)

As UX researchers, we need to ensure that “everyone in our team understands the end users with the same empathy, accuracy and depth as we do.” It has been shown that there is no better alternative to increasing empathy than involving stakeholders to actually experience the whole process themselves: from the design of the study (objectives, research questions), to recruitment, set up, fieldwork, analysis and the final presentation.

Anyone who has tried to do this knows that it can be extremely difficult to organize and get stakeholders to participate in research. There are two main reasons for this:

  1. Research is somebody else’s job.
    In my experience, UX professionals are often hired to “do the UX” for a company or organization. Even though the title of “Lead UX Researcher” sounds great and very important in my head, it often leads to misconceptions during kick-off meetings. Everyone automatically assumes that research is solely MY responsibility. It’s no wonder that stakeholders don’t want to get involved in the project. They assume research is my and nobody else’s job.
  2. UX process frameworks are incomplete.
    The problem is that even when stakeholders want to engage and participate in UX, they still do not know *how* they should get involved and *what* they should do. We spend a lot of time selling a UX process and research frameworks that are useful but ultimately incomplete — they do not explain how non-researchers can get involved in the research process.

Problems associated with stakeholders involvement in UX Research.


Fig. 1. Despite our enthusiasm as researchers, stakeholders often don’t understand how to get involved with the research process.

Further, a lot of stakeholders can find words such as ‘design,’ ‘analysis’ or ‘fieldwork’ intimidating or irrelevant to what they do. In fact, “UX is rife with jargon that can be off-putting to people from other fields.” In some situations, terms are familiar but mean something completely different, e.g., research in UX versus marketing research.

2. Pressure To Constantly Reduce The Time For Research

Another issue is that there is a constantly growing pressure to speed up the UX process and reduce the time spent on research. I cannot count the number of times when a project manager asked me to shorten a study even further by skipping the analysis stage or the kick-off sessions.

While previously you could spend weeks on research, a 5-day research cycle is increasingly becoming the norm. In fact, the book Sprint describes how research can dwindle to just a day (from an overall 5-day cycle).

Considering this, there is a LOT of pressure on UX researchers to deliver fast, without compromising the quality of the study. The difficulty increases when there are multiple stakeholders, each with their own opinions, demands, views, assumptions, and priorities.

The Fast UX Approach

Contrary to what you might think, reducing the time it takes to do UX research does not mean that you need to soldier on by yourself. I have done this and it only works in the short term. It does not matter how amazing the findings are — there is not enough PowerPoint slides in the world to convince a team of the urgency to take action if they have not been on the research journey themselves.

In the long term, the more actively engaged your team and stakeholders are in the research, the more empowered they will feel and the more willing they will be to take action. Productive collaboration also means that you can move together at a quicker pace and speed up the whole research process.

The FAST UX Research framework (see Fig. 2 below) is a tool to truly engage team members and stakeholders in a way that turns them into active advocates and champions of the research process. It shows non-researchers when and how they should get involved in UX Research.


The FAST UX Research approach; FAST UX Research methodology.


Fig. 2. The FAST User Experience Research framework

In essence, stakeholders take ownership of each of the UX research stages by carrying out the four activities, each corresponding to its research stage.

Working together reduces the time it takes for UX Research. The true benefit of the approach, however, is that, in the long term, it takes less and less time for the business to take action based on research findings as people become true advocates of user-centricity and the research process.

This approach can be applied to any qualitative research method and with any team. For example, you can carry out FAST usability testing, FAST interviews, FAST ethnography, and so on. In order to be effective, you will need to explain this approach to your stakeholders from the start. Talk them through the framework, explaining each stage. Emphasize that this is what EVERYONE does, that it’s their work as much as the UX researcher’s job, and that it’s only successful if everyone is involved throughout the process.

Stage 1: Focus (Define A Common Goal)

There is a uniform consensus within UX that a research project should start by defining its purpose: why is this research done and how will the results be acted upon?


Focus in FAST UX Research; first stage in the FAST UX Research process.


Fig. 3. Focus is about defining clear objectives and goals for the research and it’s ultimately the team’s and all stakeholders’ shared responsibility to do this.

Generally, this is expressed within the research goals, objectives, research questions and/or hypotheses. Most projects start with a kick-off meeting where those are either discussed (based on an available brief) or are defined during the meeting.

The most regular problem with kick-off sessions like these is that stakeholders come up with too many things they want to learn from a study. The way to turn the situation around is to assign a specific task to your immediate team (other UX professionals you work with) and stakeholders (key decision makers): they will help focus the study from the beginning.

The way they will do that is by working together through the following steps:

  1. Identify as a group the current challenges and problems.
    Ask someone to take notes on a shared document; alternatively, ask everyone to participate and write on sticky notes which are then displayed on a “project wall” for everyone to see.
  2. Identify the potential objectives and questions for a research study.
    Do this the same way you did the previous step. You don’t need to commit to anything yet.
  3. Prioritize.
    Ask the team to order the objectives and questions, starting with the most important ones.
  4. Reword and rephrase.
    Look at the top 3 questions and objectives. Are they too broad or narrow? Could they be reworded so it’s clearer what is the focus of the study? Are they feasible? Do you need to split or merge objectives and questions?
  5. Commit to be flexible.
    Agree on the top 1-2 objectives and ensure that you have agreement from everyone that this is what you will focus on.

Here are some questions you can ask to help your stakeholders and team to get to the focus of the study faster:

  • From the objectives we have recognized, what is most important?
  • What does success look like?
  • If we only learn one thing, which one would be the most important one?

Your role during the process is to provide expertise to determine if:

  • The identified objectives and questions are feasible for a single study;
  • Help with the wording of objectives and questions;
  • Design the study (including selecting a methodology) after the focus has been identified.

At first sight, the Focus and Attend (next stages) activities might be familiar as you are already carrying out a kick-off meeting and inviting stakeholders to attend research sessions.

However, adopting a FAST approach means that your stakeholders have as much ownership as you do during the research process because work is shared and co-owned. Reiterate that the process is collaborative and at the end of the session, emphasize that agreeing on clear research objectives is not easy. Remind everybody that having a shared focus is already better than what many teams start with.

Finally, remind the team and your stakeholders what they need to do during the rest of the process.

Stage 2: Attend (Immerse The Team Deeply In The Research Process)

Seeing first hand the experience of someone using a product or service is so rich that there is no substitute for it. This is why getting stakeholders to observe user research is still considered one of the best and most powerful ways to engage the team.


Attend in FAST UX Research; second stage in FAST UX Research.


Fig. 4. Attend in FAST UX Research is about encouraging the team and stakeholders to be present at all research sessions, but also to be actively engaged with the research.

What often happens is that observers join in on the day of the research study and then they spend the time plastered to their laptops and mobile phones. What is worse, some stakeholders often talk to the note-taker and distract the rest of the design team who need to observe the sessions.

This is why it is just as important that you get the team to interact with the research. The following activities allow the team to immerse themselves in the research session. You can ask stakeholders to:

  • Ask questions during the session through a dedicated live chat (e.g. Slack, Google Hangouts, Skype);
  • Take notes on sticky notes;
  • Summarize observations for everyone (see next stage).

Assign one person per session for each of these activities. Have one “live chat manager,” one “note-taker,” and one “observer” who will sum up the session afterwards.

Rotate people for the next session.

Before the session, it’s useful to walk observers through the ‘ground rules’ very briefly. You can have a poster similar to the one GDS developed that will help you do this and remind the team of their role during the study (see Fig. 3 above).


An observation poster; user research poster.


Fig. 5. A poster can be hanged in the observation room and used to remind the team and stakeholders what their responsibilities are and the ground rules during observation.

Farrell (2017) provides more detail on effective ways for stakeholders to take notes together. When you have multiple stakeholders and it’s not feasible for them to physically attend a field visit (e.g. on the street, in an office, at the home of the participant), you could stream the session to an observation room.

Stage 3: Summarize (Analysis For Non-Researchers)

I am a strong supporter of the idea that analysis starts the moment fieldwork begins. During the very first research session, you start looking for patterns and interpretation of what the data you have means.


Summarize in FAST UX Research; the third stage in FAST UX Research.


Fig. 6. Summarize in FAST UX Research is about asking the team and your stakeholders to tell you about what they thought were the most interesting aspects of user research.

Even after the first session (but typically towards the end of fieldwork) you can carry out collaborative analysis: a fun and productive way that ensures that you have everyone participating in one of the most important stages of research.

The collaborative analysis session is an activity where you provide an opportunity for everyone to be heard and create a shared understanding of the research.

Since you’re including other experts’ perspectives, you’re increasing the chances to identify more objective and relevant insights, and also for stakeholders to act upon the results of the study.

Even though ‘analysis’ is an essential part of any research project, a lot of stakeholders get scared by the word. The activity sounds very academic and complex. This is why at the end of each research session, research day, or the study as a whole, the role of your stakeholders and immediate team is to summarize their observations. Summarizing may sound superfluous but is an important part of the analysis stage; this is essentially what we do during “Downloading” sessions.

Listening to someone’s summary provides you with an opportunity to understand:

  • What they paid attention to;
  • What is important for them;
  • Their interpretation of the event.

Summary At The End Of Each Session

You do this by reminding everyone at the beginning of the session that at the end you will enter the room and ask them to summarize their observations and recommendations.

You then end the session by asking each stakeholder the following:

  • What were their key observations (see also Fig. 3)?
    • What happened during the session?
    • Were there any major difficulties for the participant?
    • What were the things that worked well?
  • Was there anything that surprised them?

This will make the team more attentive during the session, as they know that they will need to sum it up at the end. It will also help them to internalize the observations (and later, transition more easily to findings).

This is also the time to consistently share with your team what you think stands out from the study so far. Avoid the temptation to do a ‘big reveal’ at the end. It’s better if outcomes are told to stakeholders many times.

On multiple occasions, research has given me great outcomes. Instead of sharing them regularly, I keep them to myself until the final report. It doesn’t work well. A big reveal at the end leads to bewildered stakeholders who often cannot jump from observations to insights as quickly. As a result, there is either stubborn pushback or indifferent shrugs.

Summary At The End Of The Day

A summary of the event or the day can then naturally transition into a collaborative analysis session. Your job is to moderate the session.

The job of your stakeholders is to summarize the events of the day and the final results. Ask a volunteer to talk the group through what happened during the day. Other stakeholders can then add to these observations.

Summary At The End Of The Study

After the analysis is done, ask one or two stakeholders to summarize the study. Make sure they cover why we did research, what happened during the study and what are the primary findings. They can also do this by walking through the project wall (if you have one).

It’s very difficult not to talk about your research and leave someone else to do it. But it’s worth it. No matter how much you’re itching to do this yourself — don’t! It’s a great opportunity for people to internalize research and become comfortable with the process. This is one of the key moments to turn stakeholders into active advocates of user research.

At the end of this stage, you should have 5-7 findings that capture the study.

Stage 4: Translate (Make Stakeholders Active Champions Of The Solution)

“Research doesn’t have a value unless it results in decisions and actions.”

—Lang and Howell (2017).

Even when you agree with the findings, stakeholders might still disagree about what the research means or lack commitment to take further action. This is why after summarizing, ask your stakeholders to work with you and identify the “Now what?” or what it all means for the organization, product, service, team and/or individually for each one of them.


Translate in FAST UX Research; the fourth stage in FAST UX Research.


Fig. 7. Translate in FAST UX Research is about asking the team or individual stakeholders to discuss each of the findings and articulate how it will impact the business, the service, and product or their work.

Traditionally, it was the UX researchers’ job to write clear, precise, descriptive findings, and actionable recommendations. However, if the team and stakeholders are not part of identifying actionable recommendations, they might be resistant towards change in future.

To prevent later pushback, ask stakeholders to identify the “Now what?” (also referred to as ‘actionable recommendations’). Together, you’ll be able to identify how the insights and findings will:

  • Affect the business and what needs to be done now;
  • Affect the product/service and what changes do we need to make;
  • Affect people individually and the actions they need to take;
  • Lead to potential problems and challenges and their solutions;
  • Help solve problems or identify potential solutions.

Stakeholders and the team can translate the findings at the end of a collaborative analysis session.

If you decide to separate the activities and conduct a meeting in which the only focus is on actionable recommendations, then consider the following format:

  1. Briefly talk through the 5-7 main findings from the study (as a refresher if this stage is done separately from the analysis session or with other stakeholders).
  2. Split the group into teams and ask them to work on one finding/problem at a time.
  3. Ask them to list as many ways they see the finding affecting them.
  4. Ask one person from each group to present the findings back to the team.
  5. Ask one/two final stakeholders to summarize the whole study, together with the methods, findings, and recommendations.

Later, you can have multiple similar workshops; this is how you get to engage different departments from the organization.

Fast UX In Practice

An excellent example of a FAST UX Research approach in practice is a project I was hired to carry out for a central UK government department. The ultimate goal of the project was to identify user requirements for a very complex internal system.

At first sight, this was a very challenging project because:

  • There was no time to get to know the department or the client.
    Usually, I would have at least a week or two to get to know the client, their needs, opinions, internal pressures, and challenges. For this project, I had to start work on Monday with a team I had never met; in a building I had never worked, in a domain I knew little about, and finish on Friday the same week.
  • The system was very complex and required intense research.
    The internal system and the nature of work were very complex; this required gathering data with at least a few research methods (for triangulation).
  • This was the first time the team had worked with a UX Researcher.
    The stakeholders were primarily IT specialists. However, I was lucky that they were very keen and enthusiastic to be involved in the project and get their hands dirty.
  • Stakeholder availability.
    As is the case on many other projects, all stakeholders were extremely busy as they had their own work on top of the project. Nonetheless, we made it work, even if it meant meeting over lunch, or for a 15-minute wrap up before we went home.
  • There were internal pressures and challenges.
    As with any department and huge organization, there were a number of internal pressures and challenges. Some of them I expected (e.g. legacy systems, slow pace of change) but some I had no clue about when I started.
  • We had to coordinate work with external teams.
    An additional challenge was the need to work with and coordinate efforts with external teams at another UK department.

Despite all of these challenges, this was one of the most enjoyable projects I have worked on because of the tight collaboration initiated by the FAST approach.

The project consisted of:

  • 1 day of kick-off sessions and getting to know the team
  • 2,5 days of contextual inquiries and shadowing of internal team members,
  • Half a day for a co-creation workshop, and
  • 1 day for analysis and results reporting.

In the process, I gathered data from 20+ employees, had 16+ hours of observations, 300+ photos and about 100 pages of notes. Here is a great example of cramming in 3 weeks’ worth of work into a mere 5-day research cycle. More importantly, people in the department were really excited about the process.

Here is how we did it using a FAST UX Research approach:

  • Focus
    At the beginning of the project, the two key stakeholders identified what the focus of research would be while my role was mainly to help with prioritizing the objectives, tweak the research questions and check for feasibility. In this sense, I listened and mainly asked questions, interjecting occasionally with examples from previous projects or options that helped to adjust our approach.

    While I wrote the main discussion guide for the contextual inquiries and shadowing sessions, we sat together with the primary team to discuss and design the co-creation workshop with internal users of the system.

  • Attend
    During the workshop one of the stakeholders moderated half of the session, while the other took notes and observed closely the participants. It was a huge success internally, as stakeholders felt there was better visibility for their efforts to modernize the department, while employees felt listened to and involved in the research.
  • Summarize
    Immediately after the workshop, we sat together with the stakeholders for a 30-minute meeting where I had them summarize their observations.

    As a result of the shadowing, contextual inquiries and co-creation workshop, we were able to identify 60+ issues and problems with the internal system (with regards to integration, functionality, and usability), all captured in six high-level findings.

  • Translate
    Later, we discussed with the team how each of the six major findings translated to a change or implication for the department, the internal system, as well as collaboration with other departments.

We were so perfectly aligned with the team that when we had to talk about our work in front of another UK government department, I could let the stakeholders talk about the process and our progress.

My final task (over two additional days) was to document all of the findings in a research report. This was necessary as a knowledge repository because I had to move onto other projects.

With a more traditional approach, the project could have easily spanned 3 weeks. More importantly, quickly understanding individual and team pressures and challenges were the keys to the success of the new system. This could not have happened within the allocated time without a collaborative approach.

A FAST UX approach resulted in tight collaboration, strong co-ownership and a shared sense of progress; all of those allowed to shorten the time of the project, but also to instill a feeling of excitement about the UX research process.

Have You Tried It Out Already?

While UX research becomes ever more popular, gone are the days when we could soldier on by ourselves and only consult stakeholders at the end.

Mastering our craft as UX researchers means engaging others within the process and being articulate, clear, and transparent about our work. The FAST approach is a simple model that shows how to engage non-researchers with the research process. Reducing the time it takes to do research, both in the short (i.e. the study itself) and long term (i.e. using the research results), is a strategic advantage for the researcher, team, and the business as a whole.

Would you like to improve your efficiency and turn stakeholders into user research advocates? Go and try it out. You can then share your stories and advice here.

I would love to hear your comments, suggestion and any feedback you care to share! If you have tried it out already, do you have success stories you want to share? Be as open as you can — what worked well, and what didn’t? As with all other things UX, it’s most fun if we learn together as a team.

Smashing Editorial
(cc, ra, il)


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FAST UX Research: An Easier Way To Engage Stakeholders And Speed Up The Research Process

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Working Together: How Designers And Developers Can Communicate To Create Better Projects




Working Together: How Designers And Developers Can Communicate To Create Better Projects

Rachel Andrew



Among the most popular suggestions on Smashing Magazine’s Content User Suggestions board is the need of learning more about the interaction and communication between designers and developers. There are probably several articles worth of very specific things that could be covered here, but I thought I would kick things off with a general post rounding up some experiences on the subject.

Given the wide range of skills held by the line-up at our upcoming SmashingConf Toronto — a fully live, no-slides-allowed event, I decided to solicit some feedback. I’ve wrapped those up with my own experience of 20 years working alongside designers and other developers. I hope you will add your own experiences in the comments.

Some tips work best when you can be in the same room as your team, and others are helpful for the remote worker or freelancer. What shines through all of the advice, however, is the need to respect each other, and the fact that everyone is working to try and create the best outcome for the project.

Working Remotely And Staying Connected

The nomadic lifestyle is not right for everyone, but the only way to know for sure is to try. If you can afford to take the risk, go for it. Javier Cuello shares his experience and insights from his four years of travel and work. Read article →

For many years, my own web development company operated as an outsourced web development provider for design agencies. This involved doing everything from front-end development to implementing e-commerce and custom content management solutions. Our direct client was the designer or design agency who had brought us on board to help with the development aspect of the work, however, in an ideal situation, we would be part of the team working to deliver a great end result to the end client.

Sometimes this relationship worked well. We would feel a valued part of the team, our ideas and experience would count, we would work with the designers to come up with the best solution within budgetary, time, and other constraints.

In many cases, however, no attempt was made to form a team. The design agency would throw a picture of a website as a PDF file over the fence to us, then move on to work on their next project. There was little room for collaboration, and often the designer who had created the files was busy on some other work when we came back with questions.

It was an unsatisfactory way to work for everyone. We would be frustrated because we did not have a chance to help ensure that what was designed was possible to be built in a performant and accessible way, within the time and budget agreed on. The designer of the project would be frustrated: Why were these developers asking so many questions? Can they not just build the website as I have designed? Why are the fonts not the size I wanted?

The Waterfall versus Agile argument might be raised here. The situation where a PDF is thrown over the fence is often cited as an example of how bad a Waterfall approach is. Still, working in a fully Agile way is often not possible for teams made of freelancers or separate parties doing different parts of the work. Therefore, in reading these suggestions, look at them through the lens of the projects you work on. However, try not to completely discount something as unworkable because you can’t use the full process. There are often things we can take without needing to fully adopt one methodology or another.

Setting Up A Project For Success

I came to realize that very often the success of failure of the collaboration started before we even won the project, with the way in which we proposed the working relationship. We had to explain upfront that experience had taught us that the approach of us being handed a PDF, quoting and returning a website did not give the best results.

Projects that were successful had a far more iterative approach. It might not be possible to have us work alongside the designers or in a more Agile way. However, having a number of rounds of design and development with time for feedback from each side went a long way to prevent the frustrations of a method where work was completed by each side independently.

Creating Working Relationships

Having longer-term relationships with an agency, spanning a number of projects worked well. We got to know the designers, learned how they worked, could anticipate their questions and ensure that we answered them upfront. We were able to share development knowledge, the things that made a design easier or harder to implement which would, therefore, have an impact on time and budget. They were able to communicate better with us in order to explain why a certain design element was vital, even if it was going to add complexity.

For many freelance designers and developers, and also for those people who work for a distributed company, communication can become mostly text-based. This can make it particularly hard to build relationships. There might be a lot of communication — by email, in Slack, or through messages on a project management platform such as Basecamp. However, all of these methods leave us without the visual cues we might pick up from in-person meetings. An email we see as to the point may come across to the reader as if we are angry. The quick-fire nature of tools such as Slack might leave us committing in writing something which we would not say to that person while looking into their eyes!

Freelance data scientist Nadieh Bremer will talk to us about visualizing data in Toronto. She has learned that meeting people face to face — or at least having a video call — is important. She told me:

Nadieh Bremer

“As a remote freelancer, I know that to interact well with my clients I really need to have a video call (stress on the video) I need to see their face and facial/body interactions and they need to see mine. For clients that I have within public transport distance, I used to travel there for a first ‘getting to know each other/see if we can do a project’ meeting, which would take loads of time. But I noticed for my clients abroad (that I can’t visit anyway) that a first client call (again, make sure it’s a video-call) works more than good enough.

It’s the perfect way to weed out the clients that need other skills that I can give, those that are looking for a cheap deal, and those where I just felt something wasn’t quite clicking or I’m not enthusiastic about the project after they’ve given me a better explanation. So these days I also ask my clients in the Netherlands, where I live, that might want to do a first meeting to have it online (and once we get on to an actual contract I can come by if it’s beneficial).”

Working In The Open

Working in the open (with the project frequently deployed to a staging server that everyone had access to see), helped to support an iterative approach to development. I found that it was important to support that live version with explanations and notes of what to look at and test and what was still half finished. If I just invited people to look at it without that information we would get lists of fixes to make to unfinished features, which is a waste of time for the person doing the reporting. However, a live staging version, plus notes in a collaboration tool such as Basecamp meant that we could deploy sections and post asking for feedback on specific things. This helped to keep everyone up to date and part of the project even if — as was often the case for designers in an agency — they had a number of other projects to work on.

There are collaboration tools to help designers to share their work too. Asking for recommendations on Twitter gave me suggestions for Zeplin, Invision, Figma, and Adobe XD. Showing work in progress to a developer can help them to catch things that might be tricky before they are signed off by the client. By sharing the goal behind a particular design feature within the team, a way forward can be devised that meets the goal without blowing the budget.


Screenshot of the Zeplin homepage


Zeplin is a collaboration tool for developers and designers

Scope Creep And Change Requests

The thing about working in the open is that people then start to have ideas (which should be a positive thing), however, most timescales and budgets are not infinite! This means you need to learn to deal with scope creep and change requests in a way that maintains a good working relationship.

We would often get requests for things that were trivial to implement with a message saying how sorry they were about this huge change and requests for incredibly time-consuming things with an assumption it would be quick. Someone who is not a specialist has no idea how long anything will take. Why should they? It is important to remember this rather than getting frustrated about the big changes that are being asked for. Have a conversation about the change, explain why it is more complex than it might appear, and try to work out whether this is a vital addition or change, or just a nice idea that someone has had.

If the change is not essential, then it may be enough to log it somewhere as a phase two request, demonstrating that it has been heard and won’t be forgotten. If the big change is still being requested, we would outline the time it would take and give options. This might mean dropping some other feature if a project has a fixed budget and tight deadline. If there was flexibility then we could outline the implications on both costs and end date.

With regard to costs and timescales, we learned early on to pad our project quotes in order that we could absorb some small changes without needing to increase costs or delay completion. This helped with the relationship between the agency and ourselves as they didn’t feel as if they were being constantly nickel and dimed. Small changes were expected as part of the process of development. I also never wrote these up in a quote as contingency, as a client would read that and think they should be able to get the project done without dipping into the contingency. I just added the time to the quote for the overall project. If the project ran smoothly and we didn’t need that time and money, then the client got a smaller bill. No one is ever unhappy about being invoiced for less than they expected!

This approach can work even for people working in-house. Adding some time to your estimates means that you can absorb small changes without needing to extend the timescales. It helps working relationships if you are someone who is able to say yes as often as possible.

This does require that you become adept at estimating timescales. This is a skill you can develop by logging your time to achieve your work, even if you don’t need to log your time for work purposes. While many of the things you design or develop will be unique, and seem impossible to estimate, by consistently logging your time you will generally find that your ballpark estimates become more accurate as you make yourself aware of how long things really take.

Respect

Aaron Draplin will be bringing tales from his career in design to Toronto, and responded with the thought that it comes down to respect for your colleague’s craft:

Aaron Draplin

“It all comes down to respect for your colleague’s craft, and sort of knowing your place and precisely where you fit into the project. When working with a developer, I surrender to them in a creative way, and then, defuse whatever power play they might try to make on me by leading the charges with constructive design advice, lightning-fast email replies and generally keeping the spirit upbeat. It’s an odd offense to play. I’m not down with the adversarial stuff. I’m quick to remind them we are all in the same boat, and, who’s paying their paycheck. And that’s not me. It’s the client. I’ll forever be on their team, you know? We make the stuff for the client. Not just me. Not ‘my team’. We do it together. This simple methodology has always gone a long way for me.”

I love this, it underpins everything that this article discusses. Think back to any working relationship that has gone bad, how many of those involved you feeling as if the other person just didn’t understand your point of view or the things you believe are important? Most reasonable people understand that compromise has to be made, it is when it appears that your point of view is not considered that frustration sets in.

There are sometimes situations where a decision is being made, and your experience tells you it is going to result in a bad outcome for the project, yet you are overruled. On a few occasions, decisions were made that I believed so poor; I asked for the decision and our objection to it be put in writing, in order that we could not be held accountable for any bad outcome in future. This is not something you should feel the need to do often, however, it is quite powerful and sometimes results in the decision being reversed. An example would be of a client who keeps insisting on doing something that would cause an accessibility problem for a section of their potential audience. If explaining the issue does not help, and the client insists on continuing, ask for that decision in writing in order to document your professional advice.

Learning The Language

I recently had the chance to bring my CSS Layout Workshop not to my usual groups of front-end developers but instead to a group of UX designers. Many of the attendees were there not to improve their front-end development skills, but more to understand enough of how modern CSS Layout worked that they could have better conversations with the developers who built their designs. Many of them had also spent years being told that certain things were not possible on the web, but were realizing that the possibilities in CSS were changing through things like CSS Grid. They were learning some CSS not necessarily to become proficient in shipping it to production, but so they could share a common language with developers.

There are often debates on whether “designers should learn to code.” In reality, I think we all need to learn something of the language, skills, and priorities of the other people on our teams. As Aaron reminded us, we are all on the same team, we are making stuff together. Designers should learn something about code just as developers should also learn something of design. This gives us more of a shared language and understanding.

Seb Lee-Delisle, who will speak on the subject of Hack to the Future in Toronto, agrees:

Seb Lee-Delisle

“I have basically made a career out of being both technical and creative so I strongly feel that the more crossover the better. Obviously what I do now is wonderfully free of the constraints of client work but even so, I do think that if you can blur those edges, it’s gonna be good for you. It’s why I speak at design conferences and encourage designers to play with creative coding, and I speak at tech conferences to persuade coders to improve their visual acuity. Also with creative coding. :) It’s good because not only do I get to work across both disciplines, but also I get to annoy both designers and coders in equal measure.”

I have found that introducing designers to browser DevTools (in particular the layout tools in Firefox and also to various code generators on the web) has been helpful. By being able to test ideas out without writing code, helps a designer who isn’t confident in writing code to have better conversations with their developer colleagues. Playing with tools such as gradient generators, clip-path or animation tools can also help designers see what is possible on the web today.


Screenshot of Animista


Animista has demos of different styles of animation

We are also seeing a number of tools that can help people create websites in a more visual way. Developers can sometimes turn their noses up about the code output of such tools, and it’s true they probably won’t be the best choice for the production code of a large project. However, they can be an excellent way for everyone to prototype ideas, without needing to write code. Those prototypes can then be turned into robust, permanent and scalable versions for production.

An important tip for developers is to refrain from commenting on the code quality of prototypes from members of the team who do not ship production code! Stick to what the prototype is showing as opposed to how it has been built.

A Practical Suggestion To Make Things Visual

Eva-Lotta Lamm will be speaking in Toronto about Sketching and perhaps unsurprisingly passed on practical tips for helping conversation by visualizing the problem to support a conversation.

Eva-Lotta Lamm

Creating a shared picture of a problem or a solution is a simple but powerful tool to create understanding and make sure they everybody is talking about the same thing.

Visualizing a problem can reach from quick sketches on a whiteboard to more complex diagrams, like customer journey diagrams or service blueprints.

But even just spatially distributing words on a surface adds a valuable layer of meaning. Something as simple as arranging post-its on a whiteboard in different ways can help us to see relationships, notice patterns, find gaps and spot outliers or anomalies. If we add simple structural elements (like arrows, connectors, frames, and dividers) and some sketches into the mix, the relationships become even more obvious.

Visualising a problem creates context and builds a structural frame that future information, questions, and ideas can be added to in a ‘systematic’ way.

Visuals are great to support a conversation, especially when the conversation is ‘messy’ and several people involved.

When we visualize a conversation, we create an external memory of the content, that is visible to everybody and that can easily be referred back to. We don’t have to hold everything in our mind. This frees up space in everybody’s mind to think and talk about other things without the fear of forgetting something important. Visuals also give us something concrete to hold on to and to follow along while listening to complex or abstract information.

When we have a visual map, we can point to particular pieces of content — a simple but powerful way to make sure everybody is talking about the same thing. And when referring back to something discussed earlier, the map automatically reminds us of the context and the connections to surrounding topics.

When we sketch out a problem, a solution or an idea the way we see it (literally) changes. Every time we express a thought in a different medium, we are forced to shape it in a specific way, which allows us to observe and analyze it from different angles.

Visualising forces us to make decisions about a problem that words alone don’t. We have to decide where to place each element, decide on its shape, size, its boldness, and color. We have to decide what we sketch and what we write. All these decisions require a deeper understanding of the problem and make important questions surface fairly quickly.

All in all, supporting your collaboration by making it more visual works like a catalyst for faster and better understanding.

Working in this way is obviously easier if your team is working in the same room. For distributed teams and freelancers, there are alternatives to communicate in ways other than words, e.g. by making a quick Screencast to demonstrate an issue, or even sketching and photographing a diagram can be incredibly helpful. There are collaborative tools such as Milanote, Mural, and Niice; such tools can help with the process Eva-Lotta described even if people can’t be in the same room.


Screenshot of the Niice website


Niice helps you to collect and discuss ideas

I’m very non-visual and have had to learn how useful these other methods of communication are to the people I work with. I have been guilty on many occasions of forgetting that just because I don’t personally find something useful, it is still helpful to other people. It is certainly a good idea to change how you are trying to communicate an idea if it becomes obvious that you are talking at cross-purposes.

Over To You

As with most things, there are many ways to work together. Even for remote teams, there is a range of tools which can help break down barriers to collaborating in a more visual way. However, no tool is able to fix problems caused by a lack of respect for the work of the rest of the team. A good relationship starts with the ability for all of us to take a step back from our strongly held opinions, listen to our colleagues, and learn to compromise. We can then choose tools and workflows which help to support that understanding that we are all on the same team, all trying to do a great job, and all have important viewpoints and experience to bring to the project.

I would love to hear your own experiences working together in the same room or remotely. What has worked well — or not worked at all! Tools, techniques, and lessons learned are all welcome in the comments. If you would be keen to see tutorials about specific tools or workflows mentioned here, perhaps add a suggestion to our User Suggestions board, too.

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Working Together: How Designers And Developers Can Communicate To Create Better Projects

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What You Need To Know To Increase Mobile Checkout Conversions




What You Need To Know To Increase Mobile Checkout Conversions

Suzanna Scacca



Google’s mobile-first indexing is here. Well, for some websites anyway. For the rest of us, it will be here soon enough, and our websites need to be in tip-top shape if we don’t want search rankings to be adversely affected by the change.

That said, responsive web design is nothing new. We’ve been creating custom mobile user experiences for years now, so most of our websites should be well poised to take this on… right?

Here’s the problem: Research shows that the dominant device through which users access the web, on average, is the smartphone. Granted, this might not be the case for every website, but the data indicates that this is the direction we’re headed in, and so every web designer should be prepared for it.

However, mobile checkout conversions are, to put it bluntly, not good. There are a number of reasons for this, but that doesn’t mean that m-commerce designers should take this lying down.

As more mobile users rely on their smart devices to access the web, websites need to be more adeptly designed to give them the simplified, convenient and secure checkout experience they want. In the following roundup, I’m going to explore some of the impediments to conversion in the mobile checkout and focus on what web designers can do to improve the experience.

Why Are Mobile Checkout Conversions Lagging?

According to the data, prioritizing the mobile experience in our web design strategies is a smart move for everyone involved. With people spending roughly 51% of their time with digital media through mobile devices (as opposed to only 42% on desktop), search engines and websites really do need to align with user trends.

Now, while that statistic paints a positive picture in support of designing websites with a mobile-first approach, other statistics are floating around that might make you wary of it. Here’s why I say that: Monetate’s e-commerce quarterly report issued for Q1 2017 had some really interesting data to show.

In this first table, they break down the percentage of visitors to e-commerce websites using different devices between Q1 2016 and Q1 2017. As you can see, smartphone Internet access has indeed surpassed desktop:

Website Visits by Device Q1 2016 Q2 2016 Q3 2016 Q4 2016 Q1 2017
Traditional 49.30% 47.50% 44.28% 42.83% 42.83%
Smartphone 36.46% 39.00% 43.07% 44.89% 44.89%
Other 0.62% 0.39% 0.46% 0.36% 0.36%
Tablet 13.62% 13.11% 12.19% 11.91% 11.91%

Monetate’s findings on which devices are used to access in the Internet. (Source)

In this next data set, we can see that the average conversion rate for e-commerce websites isn’t great. In fact, the number has gone down significantly since the first quarter of 2016.

Conversion Rates Q1 2016 Q2 2016 Q3 2016 Q4 2016 Q1 2017
Global 3.10% 2.81% 2.52% 2.94% 2.48%

Monetate’s findings on overall e-commerce global conversion rates (for all devices). (Source)

Even more shocking is the split between device conversion rates:

Conversion Rates by Device Q1 2016 Q2 2016 Q3 2016 Q4 2016 Q1 2017
Traditional 4.23% 3.88% 3.66% 4.25% 3.63%
Tablet 1.42% 1.31% 1.17% 1.49% 1.25%
Other 0.69% 0.35% 0.50% 0.35% 0.27%
Smartphone 3.59% 3.44% 3.21% 3.79% 3.14%

Monetate’s findings on the average conversion rates, broken down by device. (Source)

Smartphones consistently receive fewer conversions than desktop, despite being the predominant device through which users access the web.

What’s the problem here? Why are we able to get people to mobile websites, but we lose them at checkout?

In its report from 2017 named “Mobile’s Hierarchy of Needs,” comScore breaks down the top five reasons why mobile checkout conversion rates are so low:

Reasons why m-commerce doesn’t convert


The most common reasons why m-commerce shoppers don’t convert. (Image: comScore) (View large version)

Here is the breakdown for why mobile users don’t convert:

  • 20.2% — security concerns
  • 19.6% — unclear product details
  • 19.6% — inability to open multiple browser tabs to compare
  • 19.3% — difficulty navigating
  • 18.6% — difficulty inputting information.

Those are plausible reasons to move from the smartphone to the desktop to complete a purchase (if they haven’t been completely turned off by the experience by that point, that is).

In sum, we know that consumers want to access the web through their mobile devices. We also know that barriers to conversion are keeping them from staying put. So, how do we deal with this?

10 Ways to Increase Mobile Checkout Conversions In 2018

For most of the websites you’ve designed, you’re not likely to see much of a change in search ranking when Google’s mobile-first indexing becomes official.

Your mobile-friendly designs might be “good enough” to keep your websites at the top of search (to start, anyway), but what happens if visitors don’t stick around to convert? Will Google start penalizing you because your website can’t seal the deal with the majority of visitors? In all honesty, that scenario will only occur in extreme cases, where the mobile checkout is so poorly constructed that bounce rates skyrocket and people stop wanting to visit the website at all.

Let’s say that the drop-off in traffic at checkout doesn’t incur penalties from Google. That’s great… for SEO purposes. But what about for business? Your goal is to get visitors to convert without distraction and without friction. Yet, that seems to be what mobile visitors get.

Going forward, your goal needs to be two-fold:

  • to design websites with Google’s mobile-first mission and guidelines in mind,
  • to keep mobile users on the website until they complete a purchase.

Essentially, this means decreasing the amount of work users have to do and improving the visibility of your security measures. Here is what you can do to more effectively design mobile checkouts for conversions.

1. Keep the Essentials in the Thumb Zone

Research on how users hold their mobile phones is old hat by now. We know that, whether they use the single- or double-handed approach, certain parts of the mobile screen are just inconvenient for mobile users to reach. And when expediency is expected during checkout, this is something you don’t want to mess around with.

For single-handed users, the middle of the screen is the prime playing field:

The thumb zone for single-handed mobile


The good, OK and bad areas for single-handed mobile users. (Image: UX Matters) (View large version)

Although users who cradle their phones for greater stability have a couple options for which fingers to use to interact with the screen, only 28% use their index finger. So, let’s focus on the capabilities of thumb users, which, again, means giving the central part of the screen the most prominence:

The thumb and index finger zone for mobile cradling


The good, OK and bad areas for mobile users that cradle their phones. (Image: UX Matters) (View large version)

Some users hold their phones with two hands. Because the horizontal orientation is more likely to be used for video, this won’t be relevant for mobile checkout. So, pay attention to how much space of that screen is feasibly within reach of the user’s thumb:

The thumb zone for vertical and horizontal


The good, OK and bad areas for two-handed mobile users. (Image: UX Matters) (View large version)

In sum, we can use Smashing Magazine’s breakdown of where to focus content, regardless of left-hand, right-hand or two-handed holding of a smartphone:

Where the ideal thumb zone is on mobile


A summary of where the good, OK and bad zones are on mobile devices. (Image: Smashing Magazine) (View large version)

JCPenney’s website is a good example of how to do this:

JCPenney’s form is in the thumb zone


JCPenney’s contact form starts midway down the page. (Image: JCPenney) (View large version)

While information is included at the top of the checkout page, the input fields don’t start until just below the middle of it — directly in the ideal thumb zone for users of any type. This ensures that visitors holding their phones in any manner and using different fingers to engage with it will have no issue reaching the form fields.

2. Minimize Content to Maximize Speed

We’ve been taught over and over again that minimal design is best for websites. This is especially true in mobile checkout, where an already slow or frustrating experience could easily push a customer over the edge, when all they want to do is be done with the purchase.

To maximize speed during the mobile checkout process, keep the following tips in mind:

  • Only add the essentials to checkout. This is not the time to try to upsell or cross-sell, promote social media or otherwise distract from the action at hand.
  • Keep the checkout free of all images. The only eye-catching visuals that are really acceptable are trustmarks and calls to action (more on these below).
  • Any text included on the page should be instructional or descriptive in nature.
  • Avoid any special stylization of fonts. The less “wow” your checkout page has, the easier it will be for users to get through the process.

Look to Staples’ website as an example of what a highly simple single-page checkout should look like:

The single-page checkout for Staples


Staples has a single-page checkout with a minimal number of fields to fill out. (Image: Staples) (View large version)

As you can see, Staples doesn’t bog down the checkout process with product images, branding, navigation, internal links or anything else that might (1) distract from the task at hand, or (2) suck resources from the server while it attempts to process your customers’ requests.

Not only will this checkout page be easy to get through, but it will load quickly and without issue every time — something customers will remember the next time they need to make a purchase. By keeping your checkout pages light in design, you ensure a speedy experience in all aspects.

3. Put Them at Ease With Trustmarks

A trustmark is any indicator on a website that lets customers know, “Hey, there’s absolutely nothing to worry about here. We’re keeping your information safe!”

The one trustmark that every m-commerce website should have? An SSL certificate. Without one, the address bar will not display the lock sign or the green https domain name — both of which let customers know that the website has extra encryption.

You can use other trustmarks at checkout as well.

Big Chill uses a RapidSSL trust seal


Big Chill includes a RapidSSL trust seal to let customers know its data is encrypted. (Image: Big Chill) (View large version)

While you can use logos from Norton Security, PCI compliance and other security software to let customers know your website is protected, users might also be swayed by recognizable and well-trusted names. When you think about it, this isn’t much different than displaying corporate logos beside customer testimonials or in callouts that boast of your big-name connections. If you can leverage a partnership like the ones mentioned below, you can use the inherent trust there to your benefit.

Take 6pm, which uses a “Login with Amazon” option at checkout:

6pm uses an Amazon trustmark


6pm leverages the Amazon name as a trustmark. (Image: 6pm) (View large version)

This is a smart move for a brand that most definitely does not have the brand-name recognition that a company like Amazon has. By giving customers a convenient option to log in with a brand that’s synonymous with speed, reliability and trust, the company might now become known for those same checkout qualities that Amazon is celebrated for.

Then, there are mobile checkout pages like the one on Sephora:

Sephora’s PayPal trustmark


Sephora uses a trusted payment gateway provider as a trustmark. (Image: Sephora) (View large version)

Sephora also uses this technique of leveraging another brand’s good name in order to build trust at checkout time. In this case, however, it presents customers with two clear options: Check out with us right now, or hop over to PayPal, which will take care of you securely. With security being a major concern that keeps mobile customers from converting, this kind of trustmark and payment method is a good move on Sephora’s part.

4. Provide Easier Editing

In general, never take a visitor (on any device) away from whatever they’re doing on your website. There are already enough distractions online; the last thing they need is for you to point them in a direction that keeps them from converting.

At checkout, however, your customers might feel compelled to do this very thing if they decide they want a different color, size or quantity of an item in their shopping cart. Rather than let them backtrack through the website, give them an in-checkout editing option to keep them in place.

Victoria’s Secret does this well:

Victoria’s Secret edit lightbox in checkout


Victoria’s Secret doesn’t force users away from checkout to edit items. (Image: Victoria’s Secret) (View large version)

When they first get to the checkout screen, customers will see a list of items they’re about to purchase. When the large “Edit” button beside each item is clicked, a lightbox (shown above) opens with the product’s variations. It’s basically the original product page, just superimposed on top of the checkout. Users can adjust their options and save their changes without ever having to leave the checkout page.

If you find, in reviewing your website’s analytics, that users occasionally backtrack after hitting the checkout (you can see this in the sales funnel), add this built-in editing feature. By preventing this unnecessary movement backwards, you could save yourself lost conversions from confused or distracted customers.

5. Enable Express Checkout Options

When consumers check out on an e-commerce website through a desktop device, it probably isn’t a big deal if they have to input their user name, email address or payment information each time. Sure, if it can be avoided, they’ll find ways around it (like allowing the website to save their information or using a password manager such as LastPass).

But on mobile, re-entering that information is a pain, especially if contact forms aren’t optimized well (more on that below). So, to ease the log-in and checkout process for mobile users, consider ways in which you can simplify the process:

  • Allow for guest checkout.
  • Allow for one-click expedited checkout.
  • Enable one-click sign-in from a trusted source, like Facebook.
  • Enable payment on a trusted payment provider’s website, like PayPal, Google Wallet or Stripe.

One of the nice things about Sephora‘s already convenient checkout process is that customers can automate the sign-in process going forward with a simple toggle:

Sephora lets customers save sign-in information


Sephora enables return customers to stay signed in, to avoid this during checkout again. (Image: Sephora) (View large version)

When mobile customers are feeling the rush and want to get to the next stage of checkout, Sephora’s auto-sign-in feature would definitely come in handy and encourage customers to buy more frequently from the mobile website.

Many mobile websites wait until the bottom of the login page to tell customers what kinds of options they have for checking out. But rather than surprise them late, Victoria’s Secret displays this information in big bold buttons right at the very top:

Victoria’s Secret express checkout options


Victoria’s Secret simplifies and speeds up checkout by giving three attractive options. (Image: Victoria’s Secret) (View large version)

Customers have a choice of signing in with their account, checking out as a guest or going directly to PayPal. They are not surprised to discover later on that their preferred checkout or payment method isn’t offered.

I also really love how Victoria’s Secret has chosen to do this. There’s something nice about the brightly colored “Sign In” button sitting beside the more muted “Check Out as a Guest” button. For one, it adds a hint of Victoria’s Secret brand colors to the checkout, which is always a nice touch. But the way it’s colored the buttons also makes clear what it wants the primary action to be (i.e. to create an account and sign in).

6. Add Breadcrumbs

When you send mobile customers to checkout, the last thing you want is to give them unnecessary distractions. That’s why the website’s standard navigation bar (or hamburger menu) is typically removed from this page.

Nonetheless, the checkout process can be intimidating if customers don’t know what’s ahead. How many forms will they need to fill out? What sort of information is needed? Will they have a chance to review their order before submitting payment details?

If you’ve designed a multi-page checkout, allay your customers’ fears by defining each step with clearly labeled breadcrumb navigation at the top of the page. In addition, this will give your checkout a cleaner design, reducing the number of clicks and scrolling per page.

Hayneedle has a beautiful example of breadcrumb navigation in action:

Hayneedle checkout breadcrumb navigation


Hayneedle’s breadcrumbs are cleanly designed and easy to find. (Image: Hayneedle) (View large version)

You can see that three steps are broken out and clearly labeled. There’s absolutely no question here about what users will encounter in those steps either, which will help put their minds at ease. Three steps seems reasonable enough, and users will have a chance to review the order once more before completing the purchase.

Sephora has an alternative style of “breadcrumbs” in its checkout:

Sephora’s numbered breadcrumbs navigation


Sephora’s numbered breadcrumbs appear as you complete each section. (Image: Sephora) (View large version)

Instead of placing each “breadcrumb” at the top of the checkout page, Sephora’s customers can see what the next step is, as well as how many more are to come as they work their way through the form.

This is a good option to take if you’d rather not make the top navigation or the breadcrumbs sticky. Instead, you can prioritize the call to action (CTA), which you might find better motivates the customer to move down the page and complete their purchase.

I think both of these breadcrumbs designs are valid, though. So, it might be worth A/B testing them if you’re unsure of which would lead to more conversions for your visitors.

7. Format the Checkout Form Wisely

Good mobile checkout form design follows a pretty strict formula, which isn’t surprising. While there are ways to bend the rules on desktop in terms of structuring the form, the number of steps per page, the inclusion of images and so on, you really don’t have that kind of flexibility on mobile.

Instead, you will need to be meticulous when building the form:

  • Design each field of the checkout form so that it stretches the full width of the website.
  • Limit the fields to only what’s essential.
  • Clearly label each field outside of and above it.
  • Use at least a 16-point-pixel font.
  • Format each field so that it’s large enough to tap into without zooming.
  • Use a recognizable mark to indicate when something is required (like an asterisk).
  • Always let users know when an error has been made immediately after the information has been inputted in a field.
  • Place the call to action at the very bottom of the form.

Because the checkout form is the most important element that moves customers through the checkout process, you can’t afford to mess around with a tried and true formula. If users can’t seamlessly get from top to bottom, if the fields are too difficult to engage with, or if the functionality of the form itself is riddled with errors, then you might as well kiss your mobile purchases (and maybe your purchases in general) goodbye.

Crutchfield shows how to create form fields that are very user-friendly on mobile:

Large-sized form fields on the Crutchfield checkout


Form fields on the Crutchfield checkout page are large and difficult to miss. (Image: Crutchfield) (View large version)

As you can see, each field is large enough to click on (even with fat fingers). The bold outline around the currently selected field is also a nice touch. For a customer who is multitasking and or distracted by something around them, returning to the checkout form would be much easier with this type of format.

Sephora, again, handles mobile checkout the right way. In this case, I want to draw your attention to the grayed-out “Place Order” button:

Smart use of the Sephora call to action in checkout


Sephora uses the call to action as a guide for customers who haven’t finished the form. (Image: Sephora) (View large version)

The button serves as an indicator to customers that they’re not quite ready to submit their purchase information yet, which is great. Even though the form is beautifully designed — everything is well labeled, the fields are large, and the form is logically organized — mobile users could accidentally scroll too far past a field and wouldn’t know it until clicking the call-to-action button.

If you can keep users from receiving that dreaded “missing information” error, you’ll do a better job of holding onto their purchases.

8. Simplify Form Input

Digging a bit deeper into these contact forms, let’s look at how you can simplify the input of data on mobile:

  • Allow customers to user their browser’s autocomplete functionality to fill in forms.
  • Include a tabindex HTML directive to enable customers to tap an arrow up and down through the form. This keeps their thumbs within a comfortable range on the smartphone at all times, instead of constantly reaching up to tap into a new field.
  • Add a checkbox that automatically copies the billing address information over to the shipping fields.
  • Change the keyboard according to what kind of field is being typed in.

One example of this is Bass Pro Shops’ mobile website:

Bass Pro checkout form uses a smart keyboard


Each field in the Bass Pro checkout form provides users with the right keyboard type. (Image: Bass Pro Shops) (View large version)

For starters, the keyboard uses tab functionality (see the up and down arrows just above the keyboard). For customers with short fingers or who are impatient and just want to type away on the keyboard, the tabs help keep their hands in one place, thus speeding up checkout.

Also, when customers tab into a numbers-only field (like for their phone number), the keyboard automatically changes, so they don’t have to switch manually. Again, this is another way to up the convenience of making a purchase on mobile.

Amazon’s mobile checkout includes a quick checkbox that streamlines customers’ submission of billing information:

Amazon streamlines form input with address duplication


Amazon gives customers an easy way to duplicate their shipping address to billing. (Image: Amazon) (View large version)

As we’ve seen with mobile checkout form design, simpler is always better. Obviously, you will always need to collect certain details from customers each time (unless their account has saved that information). Nonetheless, if you can provide a quick toggle or checkbox that enables them to copy data over from one form to another, then do it.

9. Don’t Skimp on the CTA

When designing a desktop checkout, your main concerns with the CTA are things like strategic placement of the button and choosing an eye-catching color to draw attention to it.

On mobile, however, you have to think about size, too — and not just how much space it takes up on the screen. Remember the thumb zone and the various ways in which users hold their phone. Ensure that the button is wide enough so that any user can easily click on it without having to change their hand position.

So, your goal should be to design buttons that (1) sit at the bottom of the mobile checkout page and (2) stretch all the way from left to right, as is the case on Staples’ mobile website:

Staple’s big blue CTA button


Staple’s bright blue CTA sticks out in an otherwise plain checkout. (Image: Staples) (View large version)

No matter who is making the purchase — a left-handed, a right-handed or a two-handed cradler — that button will be easy reach.

Of all the mobile checkout enhancements we’ve covered today, the CTA is the easiest one to address. Make it big, give it a distinctive color, place it at the very bottom of the mobile screen, and make it span the full width. In other words, don’t make customers work hard to take the final step in a purchase.

10. Offer an Alternate Way Out

Finally, give customers an alternate way out.

Let’s say they’re shopping on a mobile website, adding items to their cart, but something isn’t sitting right with them, and they don’t want to make the purchase. You’ve done everything you can to assure them along the way with a clean, easy and secure checkout experience, but they just aren’t confident in making a payment on their phone.

Rather than merely hoping you don’t lose the purchase entirely, give them a chance to save it for later. That way, if they really are interested in buying your product, they can revisit on desktop and pull the trigger. It’s not ideal, because you do want to keep them in place on mobile, but the option is good for customers who just can’t be saved.

As you can see on L.L. Bean’s mobile website, there is an option at checkout to “Move to Wish List”:

L.L. Bean wish list option


L.L. Bean gives customers another chance to move items to their wish list during checkout. (Image: L.L. Bean) (View large version)

What’s nice about this is that L.L. Bean clearly doesn’t want browsing of the wish list or the removal of an item to be a primary action. If “Move to Wish List” were shown as a big bold CTA button, more customers might decide to take this seemingly safer alternative. As it’s designed now, it’s more of a, “Hey, we don’t want you to do anything you’re not comfortable with. This is here just in case.”

While fewer options are generally better in web design, this might be something to explore if your checkout has a high cart abandonment rate on mobile.

Wrapping Up

As more mobile visitors flock to your website, every step leading to conversion — including the checkout phase — needs to be optimized for convenience, speed and security. If your checkout is not adeptly designed to mobile users’ specific needs and expectations, you’re going to find that those conversion rates drop or shift back to desktop — and that’s not the direction you want things to go in, especially if Google is pushing us all towards a mobile-first world.

Smashing Editorial
(da, ra, yk, al, il)


See the original post:  

What You Need To Know To Increase Mobile Checkout Conversions

Why Geo-targeting Your Website Content Is a No-brainer (and 3 Ways to Try It This Afternoon)

We all know marketing campaigns convert best when we segment and personalize them – which is where geo-targeting can come into play. In fact, a whopping 74% of consumers get frustrated on sites where the content has nothing to do with their interests, and 86% of customers say personalization impacts their purchase decisions.

The good news is, today you can tailor almost every marketing experience to a visitor’s location and other identifiers to make offers feel more personal. So why do even the best of us continue to use blanket-style, default messaging for every visitor?

More than half of marketers struggle to execute personalized campaigns, and reasons range from not having enough data about TOFU prospects to know what to personalize—to having trouble securing the resources to execute.

But making sure everyone sees relevant, location-based offers on your website doesn’t actually need to be a huge production. In our experience, it’s way easier (and could do more for your conversion rates) than you might think.

Why geo-target website content — and the fastest way to try this

Like all forms of personalization, geo-targeting is about relevance. And I should clarify off the bat, I’m not talking about using “y’all” in your headline if you’re targeting Texans, or splitting hairs on “sneakers” vs. “tennis shoes” based on regional preference.

What I am talking about is getting way more creative and specific with your offers. If visitors see offers that feel like they’re just for them, they’re more likely to click through, and convert.

For example, imagine targeting only locals in Chicago, Philadelphia, and Seattle respectively with their own coupon codes and special hotel offers for your in-person event instead of blanketing your entire site with a generic message.

Now imagine if you didn’t need to rely on your web team to get those three offers up on the site and could do it yourself really fast?

One of the quickest ways to experiment with this type of personalization is website popups and sticky bars. The real key with these is understanding your options (and there are plenty of them!). Here are a few of my favourite examples to get you started:

Practical geo-targeting examples to try today

1. Experiment with seasonal offers by region

According to Steve Olenski of Forbes, “acknowledging [your] potential buyer’s location increases relevance, and the result is higher engagement that can translate into additional revenue.” It’s a quick win! And, with ecommerce in particular, there’s tons of opportunity to run promotions suited to specific locations.

As an example, if you sell sports equipment or apparel, you could run two or more different “winter sales” suited to the context of winter in different locations. Your ‘classic’ winter sale would appear in states like Colorado—and could feature an offer for 15% off ski gear, whereas your ‘Californian winter sale’ could showcase 15% off hiking gear.

An example of the two different “winter sale” popup offers by location.

Not only do you earn points by acknowledging your visitor’s location like this, but you also ensure each region sees an offer that makes the most sense for them. Running offers like this is wayyyy better than a single offer that’s less relevant to everyone and later wondering why it didn’t convert.

Recommended settings for this example:
Frequency: Show once per visitor
Trigger: On exit

2. Increase foot traffic with in-store promos by region

We’ve all seen the most common ecommerce discount popup on entry. You know the one — “signup for our newsletter for 15% off your first purchase”. And there’s a reason we’ve all seen it: it works. But, we can do better.

To take things a step further, you can target this type of offer by location. If you have physical stores in specific cities, you can offer an in-store discount in exchange for the newsletter sign up. Like this:

Example of a popup driving in-store visits, and potential for remarketing later

This can help you build foot traffic in different cities, and help you create location-specific mailing lists to promote more relevant in-store events, products, and sales to local shoppers.

Recommended settings for this example:
Frequency: Show once per visitor
Trigger: When a visitor scrolls 40% of the way down your page.

3. Target your event marketing to precise regions

If you’ve ever planned a party, you know how easy it is to fixate on details. Are three kinds of cheese enough? Is my Spotify Discover Weekly cool or do I need a new playlist?! None of this matters if nobody shows up. Marketing events are no different.

A well timed, geo-targeted popup or sticky bar can get your message in front of the people who will care most about your event. When you tailor event messages to your visitor’s location, you can include a more precise value prop. Targeting locals? Remind them how cost effective it is since they don’t have to travel. Targeting neighbors in a nearby state? Remind them that your conference can be a mini-vacation complete with conference-exclusive hotel discounts.

Pictured above: examples of local vs. neighbor city popup offers. *These CTAConf offers are just to help us demo. You can check out our real conference details for CTAConf 2018 here.

Recommended settings for this example:
Frequency: Show on the first visit
Trigger: Show after a 15-25 second delay on relevant URLs (you can use Google Analytics to determine the right delay for your site).

Tip: After triggering this popup on the first visit or two, set up a more subtle sticky bar for subsequent visits to keep the event top of mind, without overdoing it. You could even run the “maybe later” popup Oli Gardner’s a huge proponent of.

Hyper-personalize text on your popups

As a bonus: just as you can do with your Unbounce landing pages, you can also swap out text on your popups and sticky bars with Dynamic Text Replacement to match a prospect’s exact search terms.

This gives you a way to maintain perfect relevance between your ads and website popups in this case.

For example, you could choose to switch out the name of a product for a more relevant one in a popup. If someone searched for “House Prices in Portland”, you could automatically swap out the text in your popup to match exactly and maintain hyper relevance. You can read about a real Unbounce customer experimenting with DTR here.

Want to see how DTR helps you be extra relevant? (even on your popups?) See a preview of how it works here

How to create your own geo-targeted popups

On premium plans and above you can target Unbounce popups by country, region, and even city (which is wicked granular!). The possibilities for what you show, or how you show it, are nearly endless:

  • You can trigger: on exit, arrival, after a delay, on scroll, or on click.
  • And you can target: by location (geo-targeting), URL, referring URL, and cookie targeting.

The options you choose will come down to a few factors including your site, your buyers, ad standards you uphold for a great website experience, and testing.

Here’s how to setup popups and sticky bars on your site:

To get started:

  1. Hop into your Unbounce account , and on the All Pages Screen, click “Popups & Sticky Bars” in the left menu.
  2. In the top left, Select “+ Popup or Sticky Bar”.
  3. Then, click “Create a Popup.”
  4. Choose a Template (or start with a blank popup if you prefer), name your popup, and select “Start with this Template”.

Once you’ve created your popup, set your targeting, triggering and frequency. On your popup or sticky bar overview page:

  1. Set the domain and URL paths where you want your popup or sticky bar to appear.

  2. Choose your triggering option based on your engagement goals.
  3. Set your frequency to choose how often your visitors will see your popup or sticky bar.
  4. In the advanced triggers section, toggle location targeting on and choose which country, region or city you want to show (or not show) your popup or sticky bar.

For best results, personalize

As I hope I’ve illustrated, in the golden age of martech, it’s time to stop squandering valuable website visits on impersonal, generic experiences. You can now leverage useful information about where your visitors are coming from and, by extension, come up with creative offers that will be relevant for them. Small details significantly enhance customer experience, and I hope you can use the above three examples as a springboard for some experiments of your own.

Taken from: 

Why Geo-targeting Your Website Content Is a No-brainer (and 3 Ways to Try It This Afternoon)

Will SiriKit’s Intents Fit Your App? If So, Here’s How To Use Them




Will SiriKit’s Intents Fit Your App? If So, Here’s How To Use Them

Lou Franco



Since iOS 5, Siri has helped iPhone users send messages, set reminders and look up restaurants with Apple’s apps. Starting in iOS 10, we have been able to use Siri in some of our own apps as well.

In order to use this functionality, your app must fit within Apple’s predefined Siri “domains and intents.” In this article, we’ll learn about what those are and see whether our apps can use them. We’ll take a simple app that is a to-do list manager and learn how to add Siri support. We’ll also go through the Apple developer website’s guidelines on configuration and Swift code for a new type of extension that was introduced with SiriKit: the Intents extension.

When you get to the coding part of this article, you will need Xcode (at least version 9.x), and it would be good if you are familiar with iOS development in Swift because we’re going to add Siri to a small working app. We’ll go through the steps of setting up a extension on Apple’s developer website and of adding the Siri extension code to the app.

“Hey Siri, Why Do I Need You?”

Sometimes I use my phone while on my couch, with both hands free, and I can give the screen my full attention. Maybe I’ll text my sister to plan our mom’s birthday or reply to a question in Trello. I can see the app. I can tap the screen. I can type.

But I might be walking around my town, listening to a podcast, when a text comes in on my watch. My phone is in my pocket, and I can’t easily answer while walking.

With Siri, I can hold down my headphone’s control button and say, “Text my sister that I’ll be there by two o’clock.” Siri is great when you are on the go and can’t give full attention to your phone or when the interaction is minor, but it requires several taps and a bunch of typing.

This is fine if I want to use Apple apps for these interactions. But some categories of apps, like messaging, have very popular alternatives. Other activities, such as booking a ride or reserving a table in a restaurant, are not even possible with Apple’s built-in apps but are perfect for Siri.

Apple’s Approach To Voice Assistants

To enable Siri in third-party apps, Apple had to decide on a mechanism to take the sound from the user’s voice and somehow get it to the app in a way that it could fulfill the request. To make this possible, Apple requires the user to mention the app’s name in the request, but they had several options of what to do with the rest of the request.

  • It could have sent a sound file to the app.
    The benefit of this approach is that the app could try to handle literally any request the user might have for it. Amazon or Google might have liked this approach because they already have sophisticated voice-recognition services. But most apps would not be able to handle this very easily.
  • It could have turned the speech into text and sent that.
    Because many apps don’t have sophisticated natural-language implementations, the user would usually have to stick to very particular phrases, and non-English support would be up to the app developer to implement.
  • It could have asked you to provide a list of phrases that you understand.
    This mechanism is closer to what Amazon does with Alexa (in its “skills” framework), and it enables far more uses of Alexa than SiriKit can currently handle. In an Alexa skill, you provide phrases with placeholder variables that Alexa will fill in for you. For example, “Alexa, remind me at $TIME$ to $REMINDER$” — Alexa will run this phrase against what the user has said and tell you the values for TIME and REMINDER. As with the previous mechanism, the developer needs to do all of the translation, and there isn’t a lot of flexibility if the user says something slightly different.
  • It could define a list of requests with parameters and send the app a structured request.
    This is actually what Apple does, and the benefit is that it can support a variety of languages, and it does all of the work to try to understand all of the ways a user might phrase a request. The big downside is that you can only implement handlers for requests that Apple defines. This is great if you have, for example, a messaging app, but if you have a music-streaming service or a podcast player, you have no way to use SiriKit right now.

Similarly, there are three ways for apps to talk back to the user: with sound, with text that gets converted, or by expressing the kind of thing you want to say and letting the system figure out the exact way to express it. The last solution (which is what Apple does) puts the burden of translation on Apple, but it gives you limited ways to use your own words to describe things.

The kinds of requests you can handle are defined in SiriKit’s domains and intents. An intent is a type of request that a user might make, like texting a contact or finding a photo. Each intent has a list of parameters — for example, texting requires a contact and a message.

A domain is just a group of related intents. Reading a text and sending a text are both in the messaging domain. Booking a ride and getting a location are in the ride-booking domain. There are domains for making VoIP calls, starting workouts, searching for photos and a few more things. SiriKit’s documentation contains a full list of domains and their intents.

A common criticism of Siri is that it seems unable to handle requests as well as Google and Alexa, and that the third-party voice ecosystem enabled by Apple’s competitors is richer.

I agree with those criticisms. If your app doesn’t fit within the current intents, then you can’t use SiriKit, and there’s nothing you can do. Even if your app does fit, you can’t control all of the words Siri says or understands; so, if you have a particular way of talking about things in your app, you can’t always teach that to Siri.

The hope of iOS developers is both that Apple will greatly expand its list of intents and that its natural language processing becomes much better. If it does that, then we will have a voice assistant that works without developers having to do translation or understand all of the ways of saying the same thing. And implementing support for structured requests is actually fairly simple to do — a lot easier than building a natural language parser.

Another big benefit of the intents framework is that it is not limited to Siri and voice requests. Even now, the Maps app can generate an intents-based request of your app (for example, a restaurant reservation). It does this programmatically (not from voice or natural language). If Apple allowed apps to discover each other’s exposed intents, we’d have a much better way for apps to work together, (as opposed to x-callback style URLs).

Finally, because an intent is a structured request with parameters, there is a simple way for an app to express that parameters are missing or that it needs help distinguishing between some options. Siri can then ask follow-up questions to resolve the parameters without the app needing to conduct the conversation.

The Ride-Booking Domain

To understand domains and intents, let’s look at the ride-booking domain. This is the domain that you would use to ask Siri to get you a Lyft car.

Apple defines how to ask for a ride and how to get information about it, but there is actually no built-in Apple app that can actually handle this request. This is one of the few domains where a SiriKit-enabled app is required.

You can invoke one of the intents via voice or directly from Maps. Some of the intents for this domain are:

  • Request a ride
    Use this one to book a ride. You’ll need to provide a pick-up and drop-off location, and the app might also need to know your party’s size and what kind of ride you want. A sample phrase might be, “Book me a ride with <appname>.”
  • Get the ride’s status
    Use this intent to find out whether your request was received and to get information about the vehicle and driver, including their location. The Maps app uses this intent to show an updated image of the car as it is approaching you.
  • Cancel a ride
    Use this to cancel a ride that you have booked.

For any of this intents, Siri might need to know more information. As you’ll see when we implement an intent handler, your Intents extension can tell Siri that a required parameter is missing, and Siri will prompt the user for it.

The fact that intents can be invoked programmatically by Maps shows how intents might enable inter-app communication in the future.

Note: You can get a full list of domains and their intents on Apple’s developer website. There is also a sample Apple app with many domains and intents implemented, including ride-booking.

Adding Lists And Notes Domain Support To Your App

OK, now that we understand the basics of SiriKit, let’s look at how you would go about adding support for Siri in an app that involves a lot of configuration and a class for each intent you want to handle.

The rest of this article consists of the detailed steps to add Siri support to an app. There are five high-level things you need to do:

  1. Prepare to add a new extension to the app by creating provisioning profiles with new entitlements for it on Apple’s developer website.
  2. Configure your app (via its plist) to use the entitlements.
  3. Use Xcode’s template to get started with some sample code.
  4. Add the code to support your Siri intent.
  5. Configure Siri’s vocabulary via plists.

Don’t worry: We’ll go through each of these, explaining extensions and entitlements along the way.

To focus on just the Siri parts, I’ve prepared a simple to-do list manager, List-o-Mat.

An animated GIF showing a demo of List-o-Mat
Making lists in List-o-Mat (Large preview)

You can find the full source of the sample, List-o-Mat, on GitHub.

To create it, all I did was start with the Xcode Master-Detail app template and make both screens into a UITableView. I added a way to add and delete lists and items, and a way to check off items as done. All of the navigation is generated by the template.

To store the data, I used the Codable protocol, (introduced at WWDC 2017), which turns structs into JSON and saves it in a text file in the documents folder.

I’ve deliberately kept the code very simple. If you have any experience with Swift and making view controllers, then you should have no problem with it.

Now we can go through the steps of adding SiriKit support. The high-level steps would be the same for any app and whichever domain and intents you plan to implement. We’ll mostly be dealing with Apple’s developer website, editing plists and writing a bit of Swift.

For List-o-Mat, we’ll focus on the lists and notes domain, which is broadly applicable to things like note-taking apps and to-do lists.

In the lists and notes domain, we have the following intents that would make sense for our app.

  • Get a list of tasks.
  • Add a new task to a list.

Because the interactions with Siri actually happen outside of your app (maybe even when you app is not running), iOS uses an extension to implement this.

The Intents Extension

If you have not worked with extensions, you’ll need to know three main things:

  1. An extension is a separate process. It is delivered inside of your app’s bundle, but it runs completely on its own, with its own sandbox.
  2. Your app and extension can communicate with each other by being in the same app group. The easiest way is via the group’s shared sandbox folders (so, they can read and write to the same files if you put them there).
  3. Extensions require their own app IDs, profiles and entitlements.

To add an extension to your app, start by logging into your developer account and going to the “Certificates, Identifiers, & Profiles” section.

Updating Your Apple Developer App Account Data

In our Apple developer account, the first thing we need to do is create an app group. Go to the “App Groups” section under “Identifiers” and add one.

A screenshot of the Apple developer website dialog for registering an app group
Registering an app group (Large preview)

It must start with group, followed by your usual reverse domain-based identifier. Because it has a prefix, you can use your app’s identifier for the rest.

Then, we need to update our app’s ID to use this group and to enable Siri:

  1. Go to the “App IDs” section and click on your app’s ID;
  2. Click the “Edit” button;
  3. Enable app groups (if not enabled for another extension).
    A screenshot of Apple developer website enabling app groups for an app ID
    Enable app groups (Large preview)
  4. Then configure the app group by clicking the “Edit” button. Choose the app group from before.
    A screenshot of the Apple developer website dialog to set the app group name
    Set the name of the app group (Large preview)
  5. Enable SiriKit.
    A screenshot of SiriKit being enabled
    Enable SiriKit (Large preview)
  6. Click “Done” to save it.

Now, we need to create a new app ID for our extension:

  1. In the same “App IDs” section, add a new app ID. This will be your app’s identifier, with a suffix. Do not use just Intents as a suffix because this name will become your module’s name in Swift and would then conflict with the real Intents.
    A screenshot of the Apple developer screen to create an app ID
    Create an app ID for the Intents extension (Large preview)
  2. Enable this app ID for app groups as well (and set up the group as we did before).

Now, create a development provisioning profile for the Intents extension, and regenerate your app’s provisioning profile. Download and install them as you would normally do.

Now that our profiles are installed, we need to go to Xcode and update the app’s entitlements.

Updating Your App’s Entitlements In Xcode

Back in Xcode, choose your project’s name in the project navigator. Then, choose your app’s main target, and go to the “Capabilities” tab. In there, you will see a switch to turn on Siri support.

A screenshot of Xcode’s entitlements screen showing SiriKit is enabled
Enable SiriKit in your app’s entitlements. (Large preview)

Further down the list, you can turn on app groups and configure it.

A screenshot of Xcode's entitlements screen showing the app group is enabled and configured
Configure the app’s app group (Large preview)

If you have set it up correctly, you’ll see this in your app’s .entitlements file:

A screenshot of the App's plist showing that the entitlements are set
The plist shows the entitlements that you set (Large preview)

Now, we are finally ready to add the Intents extension target to our project.

Adding The Intents Extension

We’re finally ready to add the extension. In Xcode, choose “File” → “New Target.” This sheet will pop up:

A screenshot showing the Intents extension in the New Target dialog in Xcode
Add the Intents extension to your project (Large preview)

Choose “Intents Extension” and click the “Next” button. Fill out the following screen:

A screeenshot from Xcode showing how you configure the Intents extension
Configure the Intents extension (Large preview)

The product name needs to match whatever you made the suffix in the intents app ID on the Apple developer website.

We are choosing not to add an intents UI extension. This isn’t covered in this article, but you could add it later if you need one. Basically, it’s a way to put your own branding and display style into Siri’s visual results.

When you are done, Xcode will create an intents handler class that we can use as a starting part for our Siri implementation.

The Intents Handler: Resolve, Confirm And Handle

Xcode generated a new target that has a starting point for us.

The first thing you have to do is set up this new target to be in the same app group as the app. As before, go to the “Capabilities” tab of the target, and turn on app groups, and configure it with your group name. Remember, apps in the same group have a sandbox that they can use to share files with each other. We need this in order for Siri requests to get to our app.

List-o-Mat has a function that returns the group document folder. We should use it whenever we want to read or write to a shared file.

func documentsFolder() -> URL? 
    return FileManager.default.containerURL(forSecurityApplicationGroupIdentifier: "group.com.app-o-mat.ListOMat")

For example, when we save the lists, we use this:

func save(lists: Lists) 
    guard let docsDir = documentsFolder() else 
        fatalError("no docs dir")
    

    let url = docsDir.appendingPathComponent(fileName, isDirectory: false)

    // Encode lists as JSON and save to url
}

The Intents extension template created a file named IntentHandler.swift, with a class named IntentHandler. It also configured it to be the intents’ entry point in the extension’s plist.

A screenshot from Xcode showing how the IntentHandler is configured as an entry point
The intent extension plist configures IntentHandler as the entry point

In this same plist, you will see a section to declare the intents we support. We’re going to start with the one that allows searching for lists, which is named INSearchForNotebookItemsIntent. Add it to the array under IntentsSupported.

A screenshot in Xcode showing that the extension plist should list the intents it handles
Add the intent’s name to the intents plist (Large preview)

Now, go to IntentHandler.swift and replace its contents with this code:

import Intents

class IntentHandler: INExtension 
    override func handler(for intent: INIntent) -> Any? 
        switch intent 
        case is INSearchForNotebookItemsIntent:
            return SearchItemsIntentHandler()
        default:
            return nil
        
    }
}

The handler function is called to get an object to handle a specific intent. You can just implement all of the protocols in this class and return self, but we’ll put each intent in its own class to keep it better organized.

Because we intend to have a few different classes, let’s give them a common base class for code that we need to share between them:

class ListOMatIntentsHandler: NSObject 

The intents framework requires us to inherit from NSObject. We’ll fill in some methods later.

We start our search implementation with this:

class SearchItemsIntentHandler: ListOMatIntentsHandler,
                                                       INSearchForNotebookItemsIntentHandling 

To set an intent handler, we need to implement three basic steps

  1. Resolve the parameters.
    Make sure required parameters are given, and disambiguate any you don’t fully understand.
  2. Confirm that the request is doable.
    This is often optional, but even if you know that each parameter is good, you might still need access to an outside resource or have other requirements.
  3. Handle the request.
    Do the thing that is being requested.

INSearchForNotebookItemsIntent, the first intent we’ll implement, can be used as a task search. The kinds of requests we can handle with this are, “In List-o-Mat, show the grocery store list” or “In List-o-Mat, show the store list.”

Aside: “List-o-Mat” is actually a bad name for a SiriKit app because Siri has a hard time with hyphens in apps. Luckily, SiriKit allows us to have alternate names and to provide pronunciation. In the app’s Info.plist, add this section:

A screenshot from Xcode showing that the app plist can add alternate app names and pronunciations
Add alternate app name’s and pronunciation guides to the app plist

This allows the user to say “list oh mat” and for that to be understood as a single word (without hyphens). It doesn’t look ideal on the screen, but without it, Siri sometimes thinks “List” and “Mat” are separate words and gets very confused.

Resolve: Figuring Out The Parameters

For a search for notebook items, there are several parameters:

  1. the item type (a task, a task list, or a note),
  2. the title of the item,
  3. the content of the item,
  4. the completion status (whether the task is marked done or not),
  5. the location it is associated with,
  6. the date it is associated with.

We require only the first two, so we’ll need to write resolve functions for them. INSearchForNotebookItemsIntent has methods for us to implement.

Because we only care about showing task lists, we’ll hardcode that into the resolve for item type. In SearchItemsIntentHandler, add this:

func resolveItemType(for intent: INSearchForNotebookItemsIntent,
                         with completion: @escaping (INNotebookItemTypeResolutionResult) -> Void) 

    completion(.success(with: .taskList))

So, no matter what the user says, we’ll be searching for task lists. If we wanted to expand our search support, we’d let Siri try to figure this out from the original phrase and then just use completion(.needsValue()) if the item type was missing. Alternatively, we could try to guess from the title by seeing what matches it. In this case, we would complete with success when Siri knows what it is, and we would use completion(.notRequired()) when we are going to try multiple possibilities.

Title resolution is a little trickier. What we want is for Siri to use a list if it finds one with an exact match for what you said. If it’s unsure or if there is more than one possibility, then we want Siri to ask us for help in figuring it out. To do this, SiriKit provides a set of resolution enums that let us express what we want to happen next.

So, if you say “Grocery Store,” then Siri would have an exact match. But if you say “Store,” then Siri would present a menu of matching lists.

We’ll start with this function to give the basic structure:

func resolveTitle(for intent: INSearchForNotebookItemsIntent, with completion: @escaping (INSpeakableStringResolutionResult) -> Void) 
    guard let title = intent.title else 
        completion(.needsValue())
        return
    

    let possibleLists = getPossibleLists(for: title)
    completeResolveListName(with: possibleLists, for: title, with: completion)
}

We’ll implement getPossibleLists(for:) and completeResolveListName(with:for:with:) in the ListOMatIntentsHandler base class.

getPossibleLists(for:) needs to try to fuzzy match the title that Siri passes us with the actual list names.

public func getPossibleLists(for listName: INSpeakableString) -> [INSpeakableString] 
    var possibleLists = [INSpeakableString]()
    for l in loadLists() 
        if l.name.lowercased() == listName.spokenPhrase.lowercased() 
            return [INSpeakableString(spokenPhrase: l.name)]
        
        if l.name.lowercased().contains(listName.spokenPhrase.lowercased()) || listName.spokenPhrase.lowercased() == "all" 
            possibleLists.append(INSpeakableString(spokenPhrase: l.name))
        
    }
    return possibleLists
}

We loop through all of our lists. If we get an exact match, we’ll return it, and if not, we’ll return an array of possibilities. In this function, we’re simply checking to see whether the word the user said is contained in a list name (so, a pretty simple match). This lets “Grocery” match “Grocery Store.” A more advanced algorithm might try to match based on words that sound the same (for example, with the Soundex algorithm),

completeResolveListName(with:for:with:) is responsible for deciding what to do with this list of possibilities.

public func completeResolveListName(with possibleLists: [INSpeakableString], for listName: INSpeakableString, with completion: @escaping (INSpeakableStringResolutionResult) -> Void) 
    switch possibleLists.count 
    case 0:
        completion(.unsupported())
    case 1:
        if possibleLists[0].spokenPhrase.lowercased() == listName.spokenPhrase.lowercased() 
            completion(.success(with: possibleLists[0]))
         else 
            completion(.confirmationRequired(with: possibleLists[0]))
        
    default:
        completion(.disambiguation(with: possibleLists))
    }
}

If we got an exact match, we tell Siri that we succeeded. If we got one inexact match, we tell Siri to ask the user if we guessed it right.

If we got multiple matches, then we use completion(.disambiguation(with: possibleLists)) to tell Siri to show a list and let the user pick one.

Now that we know what the request is, we need to look at the whole thing and make sure we can handle it.

Confirm: Check All Of Your Dependencies

In this case, if we have resolved all of the parameters, we can always handle the request. Typical confirm() implementations might check the availability of external services or check authorization levels.

Because confirm() is optional, we could just do nothing, and Siri would assume we could handle any request with resolved parameters. To be explicit, we could use this:

func confirm(intent: INSearchForNotebookItemsIntent, completion: @escaping (INSearchForNotebookItemsIntentResponse) -> Void) 
    completion(INSearchForNotebookItemsIntentResponse(code: .success, userActivity: nil))

This means we can handle anything.

Handle: Do It

The final step is to handle the request.

func handle(intent: INSearchForNotebookItemsIntent, completion: @escaping (INSearchForNotebookItemsIntentResponse) -> Void) 
    guard
        let title = intent.title,
        let list = loadLists().filter( $0.name.lowercased() == title.spokenPhrase.lowercased()).first
    else 
        completion(INSearchForNotebookItemsIntentResponse(code: .failure, userActivity: nil))
        return
    

    let response = INSearchForNotebookItemsIntentResponse(code: .success, userActivity: nil)
    response.tasks = list.items.map 
        return INTask(title: INSpeakableString(spokenPhrase: $0.name),
                      status: $0.done ? INTaskStatus.completed : INTaskStatus.notCompleted,
                      taskType: INTaskType.notCompletable,
                      spatialEventTrigger: nil,
                      temporalEventTrigger: nil,
                      createdDateComponents: nil,
                      modifiedDateComponents: nil,
                      identifier: "(list.name)t($0.name)")
    
    completion(response)
}

First, we find the list based on the title. At this point, resolveTitle has already made sure that we’ll get an exact match. But if there’s an issue, we can still return a failure.

When we have a failure, we have the option of passing a user activity. If your app uses Handoff and has a way to handle this exact type of request, then Siri might try deferring to your app to try the request there. It will not do this when we are in a voice-only context (for example, you started with “Hey Siri”), and it doesn’t guarantee that it will do it in other cases, so don’t count on it.

This is now ready to test. Choose the intent extension in the target list in Xcode. But before you run it, edit the scheme.

A screenshot from Xcode showing how to edit a scheme
Edit the scheme of the the intent to add a sample phrase for debugging.

That brings up a way to provide a query directly:

A screenshot from Xcode showing the edit scheme dialog
Add the sample phrase to the Run section of the scheme. (Large preview)

Notice, I am using “ListOMat” because of the hyphens issue mentioned above. Luckily, it’s pronounced the same as my app’s name, so it should not be much of an issue.

Back in the app, I made a “Grocery Store” list and a “Hardware Store” list. If I ask Siri for the “store” list, it will go through the disambiguation path, which looks like this:

An animated GIF showing Siri handling a request to show the Store list
Siri handles the request by asking for clarification. (Large preview)

If you say “Grocery Store,” then you’ll get an exact match, which goes right to the results.

Adding Items Via Siri

Now that we know the basic concepts of resolve, confirm and handle, we can quickly add an intent to add an item to a list.

First, add INAddTasksIntent to the extension’s plist:

A screenshot in XCode showing the new intent being added to the plist
Add the INAddTasksIntent to the extension plist (Large preview)

Then, update our IntentHandler’s handle function.

override func handler(for intent: INIntent) -> Any? 
    switch intent 
    case is INSearchForNotebookItemsIntent:
        return SearchItemsIntentHandler()
    case is INAddTasksIntent:
        return AddItemsIntentHandler()
    default:
        return nil
    
}

Add a stub for the new class:

class AddItemsIntentHandler: ListOMatIntentsHandler, INAddTasksIntentHandling 

Adding an item needs a similar resolve for searching, except with a target task list instead of a title.

func resolveTargetTaskList(for intent: INAddTasksIntent, with completion: @escaping (INTaskListResolutionResult) -> Void) 

    guard let title = intent.targetTaskList?.title else 
        completion(.needsValue())
        return
    

    let possibleLists = getPossibleLists(for: title)
    completeResolveTaskList(with: possibleLists, for: title, with: completion)
}

completeResolveTaskList is just like completeResolveListName, but with slightly different types (a task list instead of the title of a task list).

public func completeResolveTaskList(with possibleLists: [INSpeakableString], for listName: INSpeakableString, with completion: @escaping (INTaskListResolutionResult) -> Void) 

    let taskLists = possibleLists.map 
        return INTaskList(title: $0, tasks: [], groupName: nil, createdDateComponents: nil, modifiedDateComponents: nil, identifier: nil)
    

    switch possibleLists.count 
    case 0:
        completion(.unsupported())
    case 1:
        if possibleLists[0].spokenPhrase.lowercased() == listName.spokenPhrase.lowercased() 
            completion(.success(with: taskLists[0]))
         else 
            completion(.confirmationRequired(with: taskLists[0]))
        
    default:
        completion(.disambiguation(with: taskLists))
    }
}

It has the same disambiguation logic and behaves in exactly the same way. Saying “Store” needs to be disambiguated, and saying “Grocery Store” would be an exact match.

We’ll leave confirm unimplemented and accept the default. For handle, we need to add an item to the list and save it.

func handle(intent: INAddTasksIntent, completion: @escaping (INAddTasksIntentResponse) -> Void) 
    var lists = loadLists()
    guard
        let taskList = intent.targetTaskList,
        let listIndex = lists.index(where:  $0.name.lowercased() == taskList.title.spokenPhrase.lowercased() ),
        let itemNames = intent.taskTitles, itemNames.count > 0
    else 
            completion(INAddTasksIntentResponse(code: .failure, userActivity: nil))
            return
    

    // Get the list
    var list = lists[listIndex]

    // Add the items
    var addedTasks = [INTask]()
    for item in itemNames 
        list.addItem(name: item.spokenPhrase, at: list.items.count)
        addedTasks.append(INTask(title: item, status: .notCompleted, taskType: .notCompletable, spatialEventTrigger: nil, temporalEventTrigger: nil, createdDateComponents: nil, modifiedDateComponents: nil, identifier: nil))
    

    // Save the new list
    lists[listIndex] = list
    save(lists: lists)

    // Respond with the added items
    let response = INAddTasksIntentResponse(code: .success, userActivity: nil)
    response.addedTasks = addedTasks
    completion(response)
}

We get a list of items and a target list. We look up the list and add the items. We also need to prepare a response for Siri to show with the added items and send it to the completion function.

This function can handle a phrase like, “In ListOMat, add apples to the grocery list.” It can also handle a list of items like, “rice, onions and olives.”

A screenshot of the simulator showing Siri adding items to the grocery store list
Siri adds a few items to the grocery store list

Almost Done, Just A Few More Settings

All of this will work in your simulator or local device, but if you want to submit this, you’ll need to add a NSSiriUsageDescription key to your app’s plist, with a string that describes what you are using Siri for. Something like “Your requests about lists will be sent to Siri” is fine.

You should also add a call to:

INPreferences.requestSiriAuthorization  (status) in 

Put this in your main view controller’s viewDidLoad to ask the user for Siri access. This will show the message you configured above and also let the user know that they could be using Siri for this app.

A screenshot of the dialog that a device pops up when you ask for Siri permission
The device will ask for permission if you try to use Siri in the app.

Finally, you’ll need to tell Siri what to tell the user if the user asks what your app can do, by providing some sample phrases:

  1. Create a plist file in your app (not the extension), named AppIntentVocabulary.plist.
  2. Fill out the intents and phrases that you support.
A screenshot of the AppIntentVocabulary.plist showing sample phrases
Add an AppIntentVocabulary.plist to list the sample phrases that will invoke the intent you handle. (Large preview)

There is no way to really know all of the phrases that Siri will use for an intent, but Apple does provide a few samples for each intent in its documentation. The sample phrases for task-list searching show us that Siri can understand “Show me all my notes on <appName>,” but I found other phrases by trial and error (for example, Siri understands what “lists” are too, not just notes).

Summary

As you can see, adding Siri support to an app has a lot of steps, with a lot of configuration. But the code needed to handle the requests was fairly simple.

There are a lot of steps, but each one is small, and you might be familiar with a few of them if you have used extensions before.

Here is what you’ll need to prepare for a new extension on Apple’s developer website:

  1. Make an app ID for an Intents extension.
  2. Make an app group if you don’t already have one.
  3. Use the app group in the app ID for the app and extension.
  4. Add Siri support to the app’s ID.
  5. Regenerate the profiles and download them.

And here are the steps in Xcode for creating Siri’s Intents extension:

  1. Add an Intents extension using the Xcode template.
  2. Update the entitlements of the app and extension to match the profiles (groups and Siri support).
  3. Add your intents to the extension’s plist.

And you’ll need to add code to do the following things:

  1. Use the app group sandbox to communicate between the app and extension.
  2. Add classes to support each intent with resolve, confirm and handle functions.
  3. Update the generated IntentHandler to use those classes.
  4. Ask for Siri access somewhere in your app.

Finally, there are some Siri-specific configuration settings:

  1. Add the Siri support security string to your app’s plist.
  2. Add sample phrases to an AppIntentVocabulary.plist file in your app.
  3. Run the intent target to test; edit the scheme to provide the phrase.

OK, that is a lot, but if your app fits one of Siri’s domains, then users will expect that they can interact with it via voice. And because the competition for voice assistants is so good, we can only expect that WWDC 2018 will bring a bunch more domains and, hopefully, much better Siri.

Further Reading

Smashing Editorial
(da, ra, al, il)


This article is from: 

Will SiriKit’s Intents Fit Your App? If So, Here’s How To Use Them

Analyzing Your Company’s Social Media Presence With IBM Watson And Node.js




Analyzing Your Company’s Social Media Presence With IBM Watson And Node.js

If you are unfamiliar with Machine Learning (ML) technology, it has existed in science fiction for many years and is finally reaching its maturity in our society. One of the first ML examples I saw as a kid was in Star Trek’s The Next Generation when Lieutenant Tasha Yar trains with her holographic opponent that learns how to fight and better defeat in future battles.

In today’s society, China has developed a “lane robot” that is a guard rail controlled by a computer system that can direct the flow of traffic into different lanes, increasing safety and improving traveling time. This is done automatically based on time of day and how much traffic is flowing in each direction.

Another example is Pittsburg unveiling AI traffic signals that automatically detect traffic patterns and alter the traffic lights on-the-fly. Each light is controlled independently to help reduce both the commuting time and the idling time of cars. According to the article, pilot tests have demonstrated a reduced travel time of 25% and idling time by over 40%. There are, of course, hundreds of other examples of ML technology that make intelligent decisions based on the content it consumes.

To accomplish today’s goal, I am going to demonstrate (using Node.js) how to perform a search with Twitter’s API to retrieve content that will be inputted into the ML algorithm to be analyzed. This way, you’ll be provided with characteristics about the users who wrote that specific content so that you can get a better understanding of your audience. The example application will be written using Node.js as the server.

It is beyond the scope of this article to demonstrate how to write an ML algorithm. Instead, to aid in the analysis, I will demonstrate how to use IBM’s Watson to help you understand the general personality of your social media audience.

What Is IBM Watson?

In 2011, Watson began as a computer system that attempted to index the (entire) Internet. It was originally programmed to answer questions posed in ordinary English. Watson competed and won on the TV show Jeopardy! claiming a $1,000,000 cash prize.

Watson was now a proven success.

With the fame of winning on Jeopardy!, IBM has continued to push Watson’s capabilities. Watson has evolved into an enterprise-level application that is focused on Artificial Intelligence (AI) which you can train to identify what you care about most allowing you to make smarter decisions automatically.

The suite of Watson’s services is divided into six high-level categories:

  1. Conversation
    The services in this category allow you to build intelligent chatbot’s or a virtual customer service agent.
  2. Knowledge
    This category is focused on teaching Watson how to interpret data to unlock hidden value and monitor trends.
  3. Vision
    This service provides the ability to tag content inside an image that is used to train Watson to be able to automatically recognize the same pattern inside of other images.
  4. Speech
    These services provide the ability to convert speech to text and the inverse, text to speech.
  5. Language
    This category is split between translating one language to another as well as interpreting the text to predict what predefined category the text belongs to.
  6. Empathy
    This category is devoted to understanding the content’s tone, personality, and emotional state. Inside this category is a service called “Personality Insights” that will be used in this article to predict the personality characteristics with the social media content we will provide it.

This article will be focusing on understanding the personality of the content that we will fetch from Twitter. However, as you can see, Watson provides many other AI features that you can explore to automate many other processes simply through training and content aggregation.

Personality Insights

Personality Insights will analyze content and help you understand the habits and preferences at an individual level and at scale. This is called the ‘personality profile.’ The profile is split into two high-level groups: Personality characteristics and Consumption preferences. These groups are further broken down into more finite components.

Note: To help understand the high-level concepts (before we deep dive into the results), the Personality Insights documentation provides this helpful summary describing how the profile is inferred from the content you provide it.


IBM Watson’s Big Five Personality Traits


Big Five Personality Traits. Image courtesy: IBM.com. (Large preview)

Personality Characteristics

The Personality Insights service infers personality characteristics based on three primary models:

  • The ‘Big Five’ personality characteristics represent the most widely used model for generally describing how a person engages with the world. The model includes five primary dimensions:
    • Agreeableness
    • Conscientiousness
    • Extraversion
    • Emotional range
    • Openness
      Note: Each dimension has six facets that further characterize an individual according to the dimension.
  • Needs describe which aspects of a product will resonate with a person. The model includes twelve characteristic needs:
    • Excitement
    • Harmony
    • Curiosity
    • Ideal
    • Closeness
    • Self-expression
    • Liberty
    • Love
    • Practicality
    • Stability
    • Challenge
    • Structure
  • Values describe motivating factors that influence a person’s decision making. The model includes five values:
    • Self-transcendence / Helping others
    • Conservation / Tradition
    • Hedonism / Taking pleasure in life
    • Self-enhancement / Achieving success
    • Open to change / Excitement

For more information, see Personality models.

Consumption preferences

Based on the personality characteristics inferred from the input text, the service can also return an indication of the author’s consumption preferences. ‘Consumption preferences’ indicate the author’s likelihood to pursue different products, services, and activities. The service groups the individual preferences into eight categories:

  • Shopping
  • Music
  • Movies
  • Reading and learning
  • Health and activity
  • Volunteering
  • Environmental concern
  • Entrepreneurship

Each category contains from one to as many as a dozen individual preferences.

Note: For more information, see Consumption preferences. For a more in-depth overview of a particular point of interest, I suggest you refer to the Personality Insights documentation.

To be effective, Watson requires a minimum of a hundred words to provide an insight into the consumer’s personality. The more words provided, the better Watson can analyze and determine the consumer’s preference.

This means, if you wish to target individuals, you will need to collect more data than one or two tweets from a specific person. However, if a user writes a product review, blog post, email, or anything else related to your company, this could be analyzed on both an individual level and at scale.

To begin, let’s start by setting up the Personality Insights service to begin analyzing a real-world example.

Configuring The Personality Insights Service

Watson is an enterprise application but they offer a free, limited service. Once you’ve created an account and are logged in, you will need to add the Personality Insight service. IBM offers a Lite plan that is free. The Lite plan is limited to 1,000 API calls per month and is automatically deleted after 30 days — perfect for our demonstration.


Create the Personality Insights Service


Create the Personality Insights Service. (Large preview)

Once the service has been added, we will need to retrieve the service’s credentials to perform API calls against it. From Watson’s Dashboard, your service should be displayed. After you’ve selected the service, you’ll find a link to view the Service credentials in the left-hand menu. You will need to create a new ‘Credential.’ A unique name is required and optional configuration parameters can be defaulted for this login. For now, we will leave the configuration options empty.

After you have created a credential, select the ‘View’ credentials link. This will display the API’s URL, your username, and password required to securely execute API calls. Save these somewhere safe as we will need them in the next step.

Testing The Personality Insights Service

To perform API calls, I am going to use Node.js. If you already have Node.js installed, you can move on to the next step; otherwise, follow the instructions to setup Node.js from the official download page.

To demonstrate how to use the Personality Insights, I am going to create a new Node.js project on my computer. With a command prompt open, navigate to the directory where your Node.js projects will be stored and create your new project:

mkdir watson-sentiments
cd watson-sentiments
npm init

To assist with making the API calls to Watson, I am going to leverage the NPM Package: Watson Developer Cloud Node.js SDK. This package can be installed via the command prompt:

npm install watson-developer-cloud --save

Before making the first call, the PersonalityInsightsV3 object needs to be instantiated with the credentials from the previous section. Begin by creating a new file called index.js that will contain the Node.js code.

Here is an example of configuring the class so it is ready to make API calls:

var PersonalityInsightsV3 = require(’watson-developer-cloud/personality-insights/v3’);
var personality_insights = new PersonalityInsightsV3(
  "url": "https://gateway.watsonplatform.net/personality-insights/api",
  "username": "**************************",
  "password": "*************",
  "version_date": "2017-12-01"
);

The personality_insights variable is what we will use to interact with the API for the Personality Insights service. Let’s review how to execute a call and return a personality profile:

var fs = require(’fs’);

personality_insights.profile(
"contentItems": [
   
         "content": "Some content that contains more than 100 words...",
         "contenttype": "text/plain",
         "created": 1447639154000,
         "id": "666073008692314113",
         "language": "en"
      
   ],
   "consumption_preferences": true
}, (err, response) => 
if (err) throw err;

fs.writeFile("results.txt", JSON.stringify(response, null, 2), function(err) 
if (err) throw err;

console.log("Results were saved!");
);
  });

The profile function accepts an array of contentItems. The ‘content’ item contains the actual content with a few additional properties identifying additional information to help Watson interpret it.

When this is executed, the results are written to a text file (the results are too large to write in the console). The result is an object that contains the following high-level properties:

  • word_count
  • The count of words interpreted
  • processed_language

The language that the content provided, e.g. (en).

  • Personality
    This is an array of the ‘Big Five’ personality characteristics (Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Emotional range). Each characteristic contains an overall percentile for that characteristic (e.g. 0.8100175318417588). To ascertain more detail, there is an array called children that provides more in-depth insight. For example, a child category under ‘Openness’ is ‘Adventurousness’ that contains its own percentile.
  • Needs
    This is an array of the twelve characteristics that define the aspects a person will resonate with a product (Excitement, Harmony, Curiosity, Ideal, Closeness, Self-expression, Liberty, Love, Practicality, Stability, Challenge, and Structure). Each characteristic contains a percentile of how the content was interpreted.
  • Values
    This is an array of the five characteristics that describe motivating factors that influence a person’s decision making (Self-transcendence / Helping others, Conservation / Tradition, Hedonism / Taking pleasure in life, Self-enhancement / Achieving success, and Open to change / Excitement). Each characteristic contains a percentile of how the content was interpreted.
  • Behavior
    This is an array that contains thirty-one elements. Each element provides a percentile of when the content was created. Seven of the elements define the days of the week (Sunday through Saturday). The remaining twenty-four elements define the hours of the day. This helps you understand when customer’s interact with your product.
  • consumption_preferences
    This is an array that contains eight different categories with as much as a twelve child categories providing a percentile of likelihood to pursue different products, services, and activities (Shopping, Music, Movies, Reading and learning, Health and activity, Volunteering, Environmental concern, and Entrepreneurship).
  • Warnings
    This is an array that provides messages if a problem was encountered interpreting the content provided.

Here is a CodePen of the formatted results:

See the Pen Example Watson Results by Jamie Munro (@endyourif) on CodePen.

Configuring Twitter

To search Twitter for relevant tweets, I am going to use the Twitter NPM package. From a console window where the application is hosted, run the following command to install:

npm install twitter --save

Before we can implement the Twitter package, you need to create a Twitter application.


Retrieving Twitter’s Access Tokens


Retrieving Twitter’s Access Tokens. (Large preview)

Once you’ve created your application, you need to retrieve the authorization keys required to perform API calls. With your application created, navigate to the ‘Keys’ and ‘Access Tokens’ page. Since we are not performing API calls against users of Twitter, OAuth integration is not required. Instead, we need only the four following keys:

  1. Consumer Key
  2. Consumer Secret
  3. Access Token
  4. Access Token Secret

The last two keys need to be generated near the bottom of the ‘Keys’ and ‘Access Tokens’ page. With the keys, here is an example of searching for Tweets about #SmashingMagazine:

var Twitter = require(’twitter’);

var client = new Twitter(
  consumer_key: ’*********************’,
  consumer_secret: ’******************’,
  access_token_key: ’******************’,
  access_token_secret: ’****************’
);

client.get(’search/tweets’,  q: ’#SmashingMagazine’ , function(error, tweets, response) 
if(error) throw error;

console.log(tweets);
);

The result of this code will log a list tweets about Smashing Magazine. For the purposes of this demonstration, the following fields are of interest to us:

  1. id
  2. created_at
  3. text
  4. metadata.iso_language_code

These are the fields we will feed Watson.

Integrating Personality Insights With Twitter

With Twitter setup and Watson setup, it’s time to integrate the two together and see the results. To make it interesting, let’s search for #DonaldTrump to see what the world thinks about the President of the United States. Here is the code example to search Twitter, feed the results into Watson, and write the results to a text file:

var fs = require(’fs’);
var Twitter = require(’twitter’);

var client = new Twitter(
  consumer_key: ’*********************’,
  consumer_secret: ’******************’,
  access_token_key: ’******************’,
  access_token_secret: ’****************’
);

var PersonalityInsightsV3 = require(’watson-developer-cloud/personality-insights/v3’);
var personality_insights = new PersonalityInsightsV3(
  "url": "https://gateway.watsonplatform.net/personality-insights/api",
  "username": "**************************",
  "password": "*************",
  "version_date": "2017-12-01"
);

client.get(’search/tweets’,  q: ’#DonaldTrump’ , function(error, tweets, response) 
if(error) throw error;

var contentItems = [];

// Loop through the tweets
for (var i = 0; i < tweets.statuses.length; i++) 
var tweet = tweets.statuses[i];

contentItems.push(
"content": tweet.text,
"contenttype": "text/plain",
"created": new Date(tweet.created_at).getTime(),
"id": tweet.id,
"language": tweet.metadata.iso_language_code
);
}

// Call Watson with the tweets
personality_insights.profile(
"contentItems": contentItems,
"consumption_preferences": true
, (err, response) => 
if (err) throw err;

// Write the results to a file
fs.writeFile("results.txt", JSON.stringify(response, null, 2), function(err) 
if (err) throw err;

console.log("Results were saved!");
);
});
});

Here is another CodePen of the formatted results that I received:

See the Pen Donald Trump Watson Results by Jamie Munro (@endyourif) on CodePen.

What Do The Results Say?

Once we’ve analyzed the ‘Openness’ trait of the ‘Big Five,’ we can infer the following:

  • Emotion is quite low at 13%
  • Imagination is average at 54%
  • Intellect is very high at 96%
  • Authority challenging is also quite high at 87%

The ‘Conscientiousness’ trait at a high-level is average at 46% compared with the ‘Openness’ high-level average of 88%. Whereas ‘Agreeableness’ is very low at only 25%. I guess people on Twitter don’t like to agree with Donald Trump.

Moving on to the ‘Needs.’ The sub-categories of ‘Curiosity’ and ‘Structure’ are in the 60 percentile compared to other categories being below the 10th percentile (Excitement, Harmony, etc.).

And finally, under ‘Values,’ the sub-category that stands out to me as interesting is the ‘Openness’ to ‘Change’ at an abysmal 6%.

Based on when you perform your search, your results may vary as the results are limited to the past seven days from executing the example.

From these results, I would determine that the average person who tweets about Donald Trump is quite intellectual, challenges authority, and is not open to change.

With these results, it would allow you to automatically alter how you would target your content towards your audience to match the results received. You will need to determine what categories are of interest and what percentiles do you wish to target. With this ammunition, you can begin automating.

What Else Can I Do With Watson?

As I mentioned at the beginning of this article, Watson offers many other different services. With these services, you could automate many different parts of common business processes. For example:

  • Building a chat bot that can intelligently answer questions based on a knowledge base of information;
  • Build an application where you dictate what you want written to Watson by using the speech to text functionality;
  • Automatically translate your content into different languages to create a multi-lingual site or knowledge base;
  • Teach Watson how to look for specific patterns in images. This could be used to determine if a logo is embedded into a photo.

This, of course, is a very small subset that my limited imagination can postulate. I’m sure you can think of many other ways to leverage Watson’s immense capabilities.

If you are looking for more examples, IBM has an entire GitHub repository dedicated to their Node.js SDK. The example folder contains over ten sample applications that convert speech to text, text to speech, tone analysis, and visual recognition to name just a few.

Conclusion

Before Watson can runaway with technological growth, resulting in the singularity where Artificial Intelligence destroys mankind, this article demonstrated how you can turn social media content into a powerful understanding of how the people creating the content think. Using the results from Watson, your application can use the categories of interest where the percentile exceeds or is less than a predetermined amount to change how you target your audience.

If you have other interesting uses of Watson or how you are using the Personality Insights, be sure to leave a comment below.

Smashing Editorial
(rb, ra, yk, il)


See more here – 

Analyzing Your Company’s Social Media Presence With IBM Watson And Node.js

The Nomadic Designer: Tips And Tricks To Work On The Road

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to travel the world while working as a designer? It might sound like a dream, but all that glitters is not gold, and it might not be the right choice for you. In this article, I’ll share some insights from my four years of travel and work that hopefully will be useful for anyone willing to try a nomadic lifestyle, too.

When I wrote the first draft of this article, I was in London, after a long trip to Asia. Now, I’m making changes to it in Mexico, before going to Argentina to visit my family. Changing countries often has become an important part of my life as a designer; and, curiously, it all happened by accident.

I once heard that, while at the office, you should stand up from your desk, stretch your legs, leave the building and never come back. That’s exactly what I did when I was living in Barcelona in March 2014. At the time, I was working for a big company on a project that I didn’t enjoy, and was participating in meetings with people I didn’t know. Sounds like fun, doesn’t it?

Looking back, I see that quitting a stable job to jump into the void of a traveling life was one of the scariest moments of my life. I was going to start a trip to South America, doing design workshops and lectures that would provide me with income to sustain my journey — but in reality, I had no idea what I was doing. Without knowing it, I was becoming a nomadic designer.


doing a lecture


Doing lectures and workshops around the world — and meeting new people because of it — is one of the things I’ve liked most about moving so much. Location: Barcelona.

When that six-month trip ended and I went back to Barcelona, I was never able to settle again. So, what did I do? Of course, I kept traveling! Four years and 60 countries later, I’m still on it.

And I am not alone. I’d like to quote Vitaly Friedman (founder and long-time editor in chief of Smashing Magazine), who once said:

“There is nothing more liberating and sentimental than the sound of a closing door that you will never open again. As memories are flowing by, you turn your back from that door, you hold your breath for just a second and you walk away. At that point you almost sense the change in the wind flowing by. You let go; and knowing and feeling this change is an incredibly empowering, intoxicating experience.”

If this sounds appealing, and you would like to try it for yourself, I hope my article will help you get started. Please note, however, that I’m not going to give you a “how to” guide, with step-by-step instructions that will work for everyone. Instead, I’ll share some insights from my personal experience.

Whatever People Think It Is, It Is Not That

When I tell someone that I’m constantly traveling, usually the person looks amazed. Most of the time, their first question is, “How can you afford to live like that?” I sometimes joke, saying I’m a millionaire with plenty of free time, but it’s not only because of this that I suspect they get the wrong idea about “working and traveling.” Perhaps, some of them imagine plenty of beaches and a lot of comfort and freedom.

Well, guess what? Working from a beach is not that fun or convenient. Or, as Preston Lee puts it, “Freelancing is not sitting on the beach, sipping margaritas, and reading books by Tim Ferriss.”


places to work


I’ve worked in all kind of places: public libraries, hostels, friends’ houses (and, of course, some of them had cats). Can you spot a beach in any of these photos?

But the part about having a lot of freedom is true. I do have a lot of freedom and flexibility — like any other freelancer — with the bonus that I get to know different places, people, cultures and cuisines. The perks of such a lifestyle outweigh the difficulties, but at the same time, not everyone would be willing to handle it.

Today, the “digital nomad” hype is all around, with a lot of people publishing e-books, videos and blog posts selling an ideal lifestyle that’s apparently perfect. Of course, some things are often left out — things like getting tired of packing again and again, being away from family and friends, and starting over often. That’s why people might have a unrealistic idea of what all this is about.

In case you are considering trying something similar, it might help to be aware of some personal characteristics that would be helpful to have.

Comfort With Being Alone

Being a solo traveler allows me to make my own decisions and be wherever I want, whenever I want. I spend a lot of time by myself (luckily, I get along well with myself). Even though it’s fine for me, I know it’s not for everybody. Loneliness is easy to solve, though. Coworking spaces, hostels, couchsurfing hangouts and Meetup are great places when you feel like you need some company and want to meet new friends.

Being Able To Adapt To New Contexts Easily

On a rough average, I move from one place to another every four days. This is very tiring, because every time I switch cities, I have to repeat the same process: book transportation and accommodation, pack my stuff, figure out how to get around, check the weather and find out about the cost of living. Ideally, you won’t be moving that often, but you should be able to grab your things quickly and move to a new place that better meets your expectations.


airport


In my travels, I’ve taken more flights than I would like to admit. That’s a problem when moving so much from one place to another. Location: São Paulo, Brazil.

In some cases, you could plan to stay three or four months in the same spot, but the reality is that you will never know how you’ll feel until you get there. So, my advice is: Go little by little, especially at the beginning.

Flexible But Organized

I think I’ve never been as organized as I’ve been since I started traveling. Apart from the tools that I normally use to generate invoices, track payments and manage projects as a freelance designer, I also have several spreadsheets to organize my flights, accommodation and daily expenses.

The spreadsheet for expenses is divided into different categories and organized by day. I put in there all the money that goes out, so that I know exactly what’s happening, and how close I am to reaching my daily budget. I know there are some apps for this, but so far I haven’t felt comfortable with any of them. The key here is not to cheat (just write down everything) and to be consistent (do it every day) — this will give you good insight into how you are spending your money on the road. Then, it will be easier for you to make decisions based on the data gathered — for example, you could stop buying expensive cocktails so much.

Before Packing: Find A Remote-Friendly Job

If you’ve decided to give it a try, then, as a minimum, plan your start, and don’t leave home without at least one or two months of contracted work. This will keep you busy for the first part of your trip, so you’ll only have to worry about settling in a new place.

When I went to South America at the very beginning of my new life, I contacted several design organizations, schools and agencies that could help me organize design workshops and lectures in different countries. I did this because, a few months before leaving, I, along with a friend (¡hola José!) self-published a book that gained some popularity among designers in Latin America, and I was willing to teach its contents and show how to put them into practice. Doing things like that provided me with at least some idea of dates and an approximate income, while leaving other things to improvisation.

In my case, I’ve always liked being a freelancer, so I give myself a bit more flexibility in managing my schedule. One of the last projects I worked on was for a team in Barcelona and in which the words “remote” and “freelance” were clear in our agreement from the very beginning. This is what allowed me to keep going from country to country, splitting my time between work and getting to know new places and people.

Just so you know how “glamorous” this way of working is, at the beginning of this project I tried to hide my background during video calls or said that I couldn’t turn video on, because I was a bit embarrassed. By the end, though, my teammates didn’t care about that, and so later on, usually the first question of a video call was to ask me for a tour of the place I was staying at, to everyone’s amusement.

Of course, freelancing is not the only way. Working at a remote-friendly company could also be a good option for you. While you’ll lose some of the freedom to move around, if you plan to stay longer in places, then this could be the way to go: Hubspot, Basecamp, Bohemian Coding (of Sketch fame) and Automattic are some examples of companies that successfully work with designers and developers remotely, and there are many more.

A few websites list remote positions for design, so be sure to check them often: We Work Remotely, Remote OK, Working Nomads and Designer News — to name just some of them.

Regardless of whether you are freelancing or working for someone else, I have to say that face to face contact with members of your team is necessary from time to time to time, especially when planning meetings at the beginning of a project, when things are not all that clear. This will partly determine the location you choose, so best to pick a place that allows you to conveniently go where your team is based when needed.

Choosing Your Next Destination

After finding work that allows you to be on the move, the next big thing is to decide where to base yourself. The good thing is that you can work from any place with a decent Internet connection and easy access to coffee (which is essential).


wi-fi sign


I always say that, to work, I need only an Internet connection and a laptop. So, this place at almost 5,000 meters up is a good place to get stuff done. Location: somewhere near Uyuni, Bolivia.

So far, I’ve been in 60 countries, more or less. Many of them were in Europe, where it is easy to move from one place to another and where you can sometimes cross countries without even noticing. (True story: I once missed a whole country because I fell asleep on the train.)

When choosing where to go next, keep in mind the following.

Reliable Access To Internet

You’ll never know how good the Internet connection is until you get there, but at least you can research which countries have the best and worst. This is important. Even if you’re tempted to spend a few days in the middle of a forest, if there is no access to Internet, it will probably be a no-go.

Time Zones

Choose a place where you’ll be in the same time zone with the rest of your team, or maybe a couple of hours ahead or behind. You’ll thank me when you have to schedule your first online meeting and it’s not 4:00 am.

Work Facilities

I’ve said that I can work from almost anywhere, but I have to make sure that my next destination at least has some good coffee shops, libraries or coworking spaces. You could also work from your hostel, hotel or rented flat, but then you’d have to make sure it’s a proper environment to work in.

Design Ecosystem

It’s always good to be surrounded by like-minded people, so many times before going somewhere, I’ll check whether there’s a designer, a design studio or a meetup where I could visit and get in touch with others. Luckily, some people are always willing to meet new pals, and they’ll give you good insight into how the local design community works. You can exchange and share tools of the trade, and you can make new friends as well.


camel


Sometimes I don’t choose my destinations right… at least for getting some work done. Being in the middle of snowy places forced me to take unplanned vacations. Location: Mongolia.

In my case, sending some emails in advance enabled me to meet such talented people as Michael Flarup in Copenhagen and Sacha Greif in Osaka. Just don’t be afraid to ask if you can drop by for a short visit!

Besides that, other factors are at play when you’re deciding where to go: affordability, transportation, safety, weather, etc. Fortunately, Nomad List rounds up the “best” cities,, which you can use as a reference when choosing where to head to next.

Of course, sooner or later, you’ll make some mistake. I’ve learned the hard way that planning where to work is indeed important. I once had to take a few unintended days off when I took the Trans-Siberian train to go from St. Petersburg to Beijing via Mongolia. At some point, the temperatures in the middle of Siberia were so low — the worst day was -50º Celsius — that my phones’ batteries suddenly drained — and being lost in the middle of a snowy small town is anything but fun. (The Russians there thought I was crazy for traveling during winter, and I now know they were right. But if you are like me and go there during wintertime anyway, always keep a paper copy of directions and important information, and bring warm boots and a pocket-sized bottle of vodka.)

Packing And Gear

If you already have a job and know where you are heading to, then you are ready to pack! Someone once said that before starting a trip, you should take half the things you plan to carry and double the money you have budgeted. While the last thing is not always an option, packing light is doable! You’ll thank me when you find your accommodation is uphill.

I started traveling with a 50-liter backpack for my personal things, and a smaller one for work-related items that I carry separately. After some time, I switched the smaller one for a daypack that I can roll up and put into the big one when I don’t need it. Everything (including the laptop) weighs 10 kilograms or so, but I keep assessing what else can I take off in order to have fewer things to carry. Similarly to when working on a design, try to get rid of the unnecessary.

For my work, I chose a MacBook Air because I knew I was going to travel a lot, and I wanted something lightweight and compact. Even though it’s a bit old now, it’s been enough for my requirements so far. I also carry two phones (iPhone and Android, with their corresponding chargers) because I do a lot of UX design for mobile and I often need to test on different devices.

I do have more gadgets and stuff, of course. I carry a remote to control my slides (for conferences and workshops), all kinds of adaptors, and noise-cancelling headphones (very useful for when you travel by train or plane.) But, in general, it is a good idea not to over-buy in advance, and pick up items only when you need them.

Where To Work

I have worked in all kinds of places: buses, trains, coffee shops, airport lounges, libraries, shared rooms in hostels, private rooms in hotels — sometimes anywhere I can set my laptop horizontally… or kind of. I’ve even gotten used to not using a mouse at all, because there is not always a place to put it next to my laptop.

Chances are the room where you stay is also going to be where you will work, so choose carefully. Airbnb is now pretty much widespread, so renting your own room with a desk should be enough — but be sure to mark “laptop friendly” in the search filters.

I try to keep a low budget, so most of the time I stay in a hostel. After a bit of training, I’ve learned to identify places that look better for work — like ones with spacious common areas — just by looking at the pictures. Of course, “party hostels” are not an option if you want to get work done, so if you see a lot of people having fun on the property’s website, that’s a red flag.


hostel room


I sleep in shared dorms in hostels most of the time, to keep my budget low and meet new people, but there’s not much privacy. Location: Sofia, Bulgaria.

One of the main problems is that you never know how good the Internet connection will be. So, if you have difficulty with the Wi-Fi at your hostel, go to a coffee shop, coworking space or even a public library. (Interestingly, public libraries are where I’m most productive, perhaps because of the silence and the fact that I cannot make calls or participate in online meetings.)

Tip: More than once, I’ve visited a coworking space and offered to give a free design lecture to members in exchange of a few days’ worth of using a desk. It’s also nice because afterwards people will know who you are and will approach you openly to share ideas! Feel free to try it yourself.

Finally, a couple of websites could be useful when you’re looking for a place to work — namely, Workfrom and Places to Work.

Things To Keep In Mind When Living On The Road

A few things are important for any traveling designer but are too complex to address completely in one article, so I’ll just briefly mention a few of them, in the hope that it will still be useful.

Please keep in mind that everybody’s situation is different. There’s no one-size-fits-all answer, so you might have to adapt the following to your case.

Taxes

What is convenient for you will depend on your case, and it’s difficult to advise on what’s best, so be aware of the legislation of your home country and of the country where you plan to work. I’ve also been exploring the possibilities that Estonia is offering with its e-citizenship. I’m already an Estonian e-resident, but I haven’t done anything practical with this as of yet.

Managing Your Finances

Besides keeping spreadsheets for expenses, one thing that I discovered (perhaps too late) is that it is normally far more convenient to create an account in an app such as Monzo or Revolut (and there are plenty of others, like N26), so that, when making withdrawals, you pay fewer fees and get better exchange rates. This is especially useful in places where credit or debit cards are not normal; this way, you can also avoid the excessive fees that traditional banks often charge.

Also, check the exchange rate of your home currency before arriving at your next destination. In some cases, I’ve arrived in a new country and bought a very expensive coffee because I didn’t do my homework beforehand. One app I use to avoid situations like this is Currency, an elegant and simple currency converter.

Visas

The situation will depend on where you’re from and where you’re going, so check well in advance regarding the requirements for the passport you are holding.

Something useful I learned when applying for a visa that requires a tentative itinerary is to book hostels and planes that you can later on cancel for free, and print out and bring those booking confirmations.

Health And Insurance

Plenty of companies offer health insurance for travel, so I cannot recommend any one of them. The only thing I can advise is not to leave home without it. An accident in a foreign country, besides being annoying, could also be very expensive. So, prepare in advance.


car in a desert


You never know where you’ll be when there’s a problem at work, so try to find ways to stay connected on the go. Location: somewhere near Jericoacoara, Brazil.

Getting Connected

What I normally do is buy a prepaid SIM card in each country I stay, with a data plan that will be enough for my stay there. I do a bit of research beforehand to see which carrier has the most widespread coverage, and I check if there’s any information in English on their website to make recharges when necessary.

A SIM card is more necessary in some countries than in others. For example, in Russia, most open Wi-Fi networks require you to fill in a phone number, to which a validation code will be sent, before you are able to use the network. Japan, on the other hand, is full of convenience stores with free internet (such as 7-Eleven), so a SIM card is not so necessary. Meanwhile, Europe now has a more convenient way to handling roaming, called “Roam like at home”, and getting a new SIM card in every country is not so necessary anymore.

In any case, before buying a SIM card, make sure it will work across the country, especially if the country is large with many different regions.
Another important thing to check beforehand: Will your current phone number work in the new country? Luckily, there’s a website where you can check that information.

Preparing To Be Offline

Moving from one place to another involves a lot of time spent on the road, and in some cases you won’t have the chance to find Wi-Fi or good data network coverage. At these times, Spotify and Netflix are my best friends, because both allow me to download music and TV shows, respectively, so I can use them without an Internet connection. This was especially useful when I had to take several connecting trains to cross Siberia, spending in some cases around 30 hours straight in a railroad car before my next stop.


Seven Rila Lakes


I still had an Internet connection in these mountains in Bulgaria! However, being offline from time to time and enjoying the natural surroundings is really advisable. Location: Seven Rila Lakes region, Bulgaria.

For the same reason, I always download a map of my next destination, using Google Maps (Maps.me has the same functionality).

If you want more information of this kind, check out another article I wrote, with more travel hacks and tips from my years of traveling.

Final Thoughts

Before I board my next train, let me tell you that becoming a nomadic freelance designer is by far one of my best decisions of my life so far. I have the flexibility that any freelancer has, but I also meet new people and see new places all the time. And it’s not as expensive as you might think. If you control your budget, traveling could be cheaper than living in a big city. So, I can afford to work four to five hours every day, and I use the rest of the time to get to know the place I’m visiting, to work on personal projects and to write articles for Smashing Magazine.

Traveling also makes it a bit hard to separate pleasure from work, because everything seems more enjoyable when you’re moving around. I’ve had to remind myself sometimes that I’m not on a vacation and to focus on getting things done. After a while, though, I’ve found a good balance. Now, I allow myself some moments to just move around, travel and enjoy the ride, doing nothing. It’s not all about work, after all!


on a train


Taking a train in Siberia. It’s not all about work. You also have to let yourself go and enjoy your ride. Location: somewhere in Russia.

Living like this is sometimes challenging and tiring, but I find it much richer than being in an office Monday to Friday, 9:00 to 5:00. And with all of the current technology, it’s easy for any designer to embrace this lifestyle. The most difficult part is finding a job to sustain your travel, but once you’ve found it, the next part is just to let it flow.

The nomadic lifestyle is not right for everyone, but the only way to know for sure is to try. Neale Donald Walsch once said that life starts where your comfort zone ends, and I completely agree. If you can afford to take the risk, go for it and enjoy a part of life that might not last long but will give you a life-changing experience, teach you new things and change the way you see the world forever.

If, for some reason, it doesn’t work, you can always go back to your previous life, right? Whether you are ready to give it a try or still have some questions about it, feel free to let me know. I’ll do my best to help you out. See you on the road!

Further Reading

Smashing Editorial
(mb, ra, al, yk, il)

Read more – 

The Nomadic Designer: Tips And Tricks To Work On The Road

The Current State Of Email Marketing Programming: What Can And Can’t Be Used

Many people want to create the best email campaigns possible, and this goal can be realized by following best practices for email design and coding and by implementing advanced techniques correctly. This comprehensive guide, for novices and pros alike, delves deep into the nitty gritty of email marketing.

Here’s what you’ll learn:

  • best practices for email design, from creating a theme to designing the footer;
  • how to add images and incorporate rich media (GIFs, cinemagraphs, video) in your emails;
  • how to design responsive emails for a better user experience;
  • email client support for responsive mobile emails;
  • finally, advanced techniques in email design.

Introduction

Emails have transformed from being an ordinary text-based personal communication tool into a future-proof marketing channel. We have moved into a world of visually attractive HTML emails that have the feel of microsites in the inbox.

Getting acquainted with the best practices of email coding is, therefore, imperative if you want to avoid a broken user experience and instead improve user engagement. Moreover, as the digital world becomes more mobile, creating responsive emails is the need of the hour.

In this article, we shall delve deeper into best practices to follow for all email clients, as well as advanced techniques you can include for email clients that support interactive elements.

Let’s start with the basic structure of an email.

Basic Email Structure

As Leonardo da Vinci said, ”Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” Accordingly, keep the design of your email simple.

Check out the email design below by Charity: Water. Simple yet engaging.

A simple yet engaging email design by Charity: Water.


View large version

Developers have been coding emails using <table> layouts for a long time now. So, it is recommended that you place your email elements in a grid-based layout, rather than arbitrarily placed. Moreover, any element that might overlap needs to be added to a different layer.

The email shown above by Charity: Water looks like this when exported to a tabular layout:

Email design by Charity: Water divided into a grid.


View large version

Email design is made up of different subelements. Let’s explore them now.

1. Email Theme

The logo is not the only element that reflects your brand’s personality. The overall theme of your email, including the fonts, color scheme and imagery, should be in sync with branding guidelines.

2. Width And Height Of Email Template

Because your subscribers use diverse email clients and devices, your email should be appropriately visible in the preview pane of all email clients. Keep in mind that the email will be displayed according to the display pane of the email service provider or client. Only certain email clients, such as Thunderbird, Apple Mail and native mobile email clients, will display email at full width.

For other email clients, the display boxes have variable sizes. Many service providers, such as MailChimp, go over the basics of HTML email, by recommending, for example, 600 to 800 pixels as a width, so that the full email gets displayed. Remember, that most subscribers never use the horizontal scroll bar in an email.

The height of your email template should usually be long enough to accommodate your copy within two scroll lengths. You can certainly have a longer email template if you have to convey a huge amount of information. However, if your email template gets too long, it might become boring for subscribers, who will be less likely to scroll to the end to check out all of the offers and promotions included.

The height of the preview pane of most email clients (which contains content commonly referred to as “above the fold”) is generally between 300 and 500 pixels. Make the best use of this space, so that the content included above the fold entices the subscriber to scroll down.

Every email developer knows that if an email’s file size exceeds 102 KB, Gmail’s app will clip the email, and they will not be able to track metrics.

Check out the screenshot below to see what an email looks like in Gmail when it is clipped:

Email message, the weight of which exceeds 102 KB, as seen in Gmail, with ‘View entire message’ at the end.


View large version

To avoid Gmail’s clip, make sure your email does not have unnecessary code and is not over-formatted. Go for a minimalist email design, without any shortened URLs. Note that images will not be embedded in the email and, so, will not increase the file’s size. That being said, removing unnecessary images will help to reduce the email size.

For marketers who use predesigned templates, the height and width will already be taken care of. If you want to use your own design, consider the ideal width and height of an email template.

3. Body Of Email

Emails usually begin with a hero image at the top, followed by the main copy, a call to action and then the footer.

Because most people read on screens positioned about 2 to 3 feet away, your h1 title should be around 16 pixels; if your title is short, it could even go up to 20 pixels. A good idea would be to render the h1 title as text, along with an attractive hero image.

Your descriptive text should not be smaller than 12 pixels. It should be easily readable across all email clients and devices. Moreover, the alignment of paragraphs and paragraph size also play an important role.

4. Call To Action

The primary objective of email marketing is to persuade customers to take action. To do that, your call to action (CTA) should have engaging, actionable verbs. Use convincing and actionable text, like “Start the free trial,” rather than drab phrases like “Click here.”

An interesting study by ContentVerve, “10 Call-to-Action Case Studies With Takeaways and Examples From Real Button Tests”,” shows that use of the first-person perspective in CTAs increase clicks by 90%, regardless of the product. For example, “Get my free copy” converts better than “Get your free copy.”

Create a sense of urgency in CTAs and get higher click-through rates by adding the word “now.”

This email from 'Alice and Olivia' has a CTA in bright pink, contrasting with the white background.


View large version

Campaign Monitor, in one of its guides, “10 Tips to Optimize Your Calls to Action,” emphasizes that a CTA button should always contrast strongly with the background color, so that it doesn’t blend in and that it grabs the subscriber’s attention. Based on your target audience, your industry and the message to be conveyed, including CTAs at regular intervals can increase email conversions and the desired subscriber action. Its height should be at least 30 pixels, and it should be easily tappable with a thumb on mobile devices.

Check out the email below from Asana. It places a CTA strategically above the first fold and also follows the CTA best practices discussed above.

Email by Asana strategically places CTA above the first fold.
Email by Asana strategically places CTA above the first fold. (View large version)

5. Images And Interactive Elements

If you are putting images or rich media in your email, add relevant alternative (alt) text, so that the purpose of the email is preserved even when the visuals are blocked by the email client. This is also greatly helpful with accessibility, because screen readers will be able to read the alternative text and convey your message.

Most email marketers tend to send emails consisting of a single image, which is first of many common HTML mistakes compiled by MailChimp. It recommends a text-to-image ratio of 80 to 20, to make sure that emails do not get trapped in spam filters. According to a recent study by MailChimp, 200 words per image yield a good click-through rate.

Using linked images in your email ensures an optimum file size. Load images from an external server using <img> tags.

The main advantage of this technique is that you can change images even after sending the email. It makes the email light and reduces the time taken to send the email. The disadvantage is that subscribers will have to download the images from the external server, which will incur download costs for those on metered connections, and the images might also get blocked by some email services.

Rich media elements, such as GIFs, cinemagraphs and video, are becoming popular in email these days.

You can add a GIF or cinemagraph in an email simply by uploading the file to the server that stores your images. Then, copy the URL and use the following HTML:

<pre class="lang:default decode:true" title="Code for adding GIFs or Cinemagraphs in Email"><img src="/wp-content/uploads/thefiletobeinserted.gif">
</pre>

Test the email to make sure that the GIF works properly.

Embedding video is a very adaptable technique of web development, but unfortunately, it’s not supported in email. Therefore, opt for HTML5 video.

To add a video in email, use the code below:

<pre class="lang:default decode:true" title="Code for including video in email"><video width="400" height="200" controls poster="http://www.art.com/images/blog_images/Imagefiles/2017/html5_video/valentinesday.jpg"><br/><source src="http://www.videofile.com/htmlfiles/movie-14thfeb.mp4" type="video/mp4"><br/><!-- fallback 1 --><br/><a href="http://www.xyz.com" ><br/><img height="200" src=" http://www.art.com/pictures/important/Imagefiles/2017/html5_video/valentinesday.jpg " width="400" /><br/></a><br/></video><br/><br/><br/>
</pre>

HTML5 primarily supports the MP4, OGG and WebM video formats.

Pro tip: Apple supports the MP4 video format in its email clients and browsers.

Some points to remember:

  • Make sure that the server configuration you use can output the right MIME type, so that the email client identifies the correct video format when retrieving the video.

  • If you are using an Apache web server, add this entry to the .htaccess file: Add Type video/mp4.mp4 m4v.

6. Number Of Email Folds

Your email should have just two folds, as mentioned earlier. The first fold should capture your brand and include the h1 title with a relevant CTA. If your email template exceeds two scrolls, then the third scroll should cross-sell your products. The idea is to change up the content and keep subscribers hooked by providing interesting information.

The footer is the most overlooked part of any email. However, it probably has information that subscribers are looking for, such as the company address, social sharing buttons and contact details. In order for your email to be CAN-SPAM compliant, the footer should have some additional elements.

An “Unsubscribe” link should allow subscribers to opt out of your mailing list easily and will reduce spam complaints.

Your contact details should link back to your company website and should include your postal and email address.

Additionally, you can have ancillary links, such as “Forward to a friend” and “View in Browser.”

As stated in “The Best Practices of Footer Design” by Bee, the fine print of your email should have the following sections:

  • Explanation of why the recipient got this email
    Your subscribers have probably subscribed to numerous mailing lists. Subtly remind recipients of the reason they received the email, to maintain your reputation as an emailer and to minimize spam complaints.
  • Copyright
    Include the copyright mark, along with the current year and your business name.
  • Privacy policy
    Link to your privacy policy, because subscribers should know where that information is stored. This is critical for e-commerce retailers.
  • Terms of use
    If you are sending out a promotional email highlighting discount offers, share the terms of use that govern the deals.

Cramming information into the footer sounds tempting, but you should determine the most important information for your business and restrict the footer to the minimum. Stuffing it with too much information could lead readers to dismiss it entirely because they will not be able to figure out which links to click.

Check out the footer below by Cotton on Body. Although it is well organized, it could be overwhelming for the subscriber who is scanning the email.

The Cotton on Body email footer, which is too lengthy.


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Have a look at the footer below by Alice and Olivia. It is simple, and it maintains a visual hierarchy according to the actions they want subscribers to take.

Alice and Olivia's email footer is concise and designed with all good practices in mind.


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The footer by HSN below is clean and makes good use of padding and white space. It is not overwhelming, yet it conveys important information that readers might be looking for.

HSN's footer is clean; padding and white space are used appropriately.


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Mobile Responsive Emails

Most subscribers will check email on their phone. Owing to this trend, your emails ought to be responsive. Responsive design includes several elements, such as media queries, fluid grids and fluid images, so that users can view the email as intended, regardless of screen size or device. The basics of responsive email design include the table element, easily stackable sections and full-width CTAs.

If your subscriber list consists of many mobile users, then avoid overlapping layouts. Hide non-primary sections, such as navigation and email advertisements, to cater to mobile subscribers. Mobile-specific email elements such as a navigation menu and image sliders can also be used.

Responsive email design is supported in these email clients:

  • iOS Mail app
  • Windows Phone 7.5
  • Android 4.x Email (OEM) app
  • BlackBerry Z10
  • BlackBerry OS7
  • iPhone Gmail app

The following email clients do not support responsive email:

  • Android Yahoo Mail app
  • iPhone Yahoo Mail app
  • BlackBerry OS 5
  • Windows Phone 7
  • iPhone Mailbox app
  • Windows Phone 8
  • Android Gmail app
  • Windows Mobile 6.1

Responsive design enables you to do the following:

  • change hierarchy,
  • modify navigation,
  • enlarge fonts,
  • change layout,
  • scale images,
  • add padding,
  • change or hide content.

Designing Responsive Email

To make their emails responsive, developers use a media query that is commonly referred to as @media. It is a special set of CSS styles, included in the header, that work as conditional statements or dynamic rules.

The point of media queries is to identify the screen size of the device being used and to execute various rules according to that screen size. The challenge is that media queries do not work in all email clients and might need detailed planning and testing compared to other design techniques.

Have a look at the media query below:

<pre class="lang:default decode:true" title="Structure of Media Query">@media only screen and (min-width:479px) and (max-width:701px) 
.em_main_table 
     width: 100% !important;


.em_hide 
     display: none !important;

}
</pre>

When this email is accessed on a device whose screen is between 479 and 701 pixels wide, the email’s width will be 100%, according to the width: 100% !important; attribute. The !important function forces this attribute in email clients such as Gmail, where it might be ignored.

The styles in the CSS rule block should specify the container or element type that the styles will dictate. Assign these rules in the HTML if you want them to work.

Here is the CSS:

<pre class="lang:default decode:true" title="Code for CSS"> td[class="body-header"] font-size: 18px !important; 

And here is the HTML:

<pre class="lang:default decode:true" title="Code for HTML"><td align="left" class="body-header">
</pre>

It is important that the element (td) and the class (body-header) added in the CSS and HTML match each other.

Advanced Techniques

With the advent of advanced email clients, such as Apple Mail, which is based on Webkit, email developers can even play around with keyframe animation, interactive elements such as carousels, and live feeds.

Conditional coding for different email clients (such as for Outlook and for Samsung and Apple devices) has also become possible.

Conditional coding for Outlook and for Samsung and Apple devices


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Wrapping Up

If you follow these simple tips, you will surely be able to create awesome email marketing campaigns that convert, whether you are a novice or pro at email programming. In the end, aim to create a good user experience and make subscribers look forward to your emails. Happy emailing!

Smashing Editorial
(da, ra, yk, al, il)

More:  

The Current State Of Email Marketing Programming: What Can And Can’t Be Used

The Future Of Mobile Web Design: Video Game Design And Storytelling

As technologies change and design techniques evolve, it’s inevitable that we’d experience massive growth in terms of design quality. There are similar parallels we can see within video game design as well. For instance:

This was CERN, the very first website back in 1991. Just some basic HTML and ample white space:

CERN was the first website created just with plain text and hyperlinks.


The very first website to appear online back in 1991. (Large preview)

This example from Smashing Magazine is how we design websites and share information online in 2018:

Smashing Magazine demonstrates how much we can do with web design in 2018.


A much more complicated and yet beautiful web design… 27 years after the advent of websites. (Large preview)

Now, if you look at the history of video game design, you’ll note a similar track; one in which early games like Pong were incredibly simplistic and devoid of any real story:

But now there are games like Grand Theft Auto that put players in the actual driver’s seat, allowing them to control the pace, direction, and outcomes of their experience:

As technologies improve and design techniques evolve, improvements in digital design are inevitable. What is truly impressive, however, is how we are now able to use design to tell a story. In other words, we no longer need to use long scrolls to set up plots or describe what a company does. This is especially great when designing for the mobile experience, which already sets pretty strict limits on how much we can “tell” versus “show.”

In this article, I want to look at three ways in which video game designers get the storytelling aspect of design right, and how web designers can use these techniques to provide users with an immersive experience and drive them more quickly and effectively to conversion.

Three Video Game Storytelling Techniques We Need More Of In Web Design

Video games have come a long way since they were introduced in the late ‘70s in terms of graphics, user controls and, of course, story development. With video game design evolving around the same time as web design, there are similar features and trends that can be found between the two. The only thing is, I don’t know if many web designers think to look to video games for design tips.

Granted, the overwhelming use of shocking colors and cheesy dialogue won’t work that well when you’re developing a professional website. However, it’s the way in which video game designers tell a story with design elements — and effectively guide players to the end by using those elements — that we need to pay attention to.

As your visitors’ attention spans shorten and demand grows for more engaging experiences, web designers can greatly benefit from using these storytelling techniques on the web and, more importantly, for mobile.

1. Make Your Visitor the Hero

Ever since the early days of video games, the goal was to put the player in the front seat and to let them be the hero of the story.

Take PAC-MAN, for instance:

The player was always the hero (i.e., PAC-MAN), and his or her mission was to work through the situation (i.e., to fight the ghosts) and get to the end.

The same holds true for modern gaming as well, though many games go the route of giving players the impression they have control over their heroic journey. A good example of this are the Telltale games.

Basically, each of their games is crafted around a well-known story. In the example above, the game is based on the events that unfold in the T.V. show Game of Thrones. Throughout the game, players are called upon to step into the world and make active choices about what happens next. Sometimes this is through dialogue (at 6:00), and sometimes it happens through action (at 11:55).

In the end, every player of the game ends up at the same place regardless of which way they turn or what line they utter. This doesn’t make the experience any less enthralling for the player as they are actively engaged throughout, and there is a reward in the end — even if it’s one they share with every other person who has played this game.

That’s exactly what websites should do for their visitors, right? They allow visitors to take full control over the experience so that they want to get to the end. For the web, this translates to conversion. And the best way to do this, as evidenced by video games, is to give visitors the ability to pick and choose how they traverse through the story.

Here are some ways in which you can do this with web design:

Create User Personas

Develop user personas before you do anything else when strategizing and planning for a website. Your personas should have a key “problem” they face. It’s then your job to establish the user’s journey in a way that helps them discover solutions to that problem.

Enable Avatar Setup

For those of you with websites that allow for users to create profiles, this is a great opportunity to enable them to define their own unique identity. Allow them to upload a photo of themselves and to personalize their profile. You can also give them different access settings which directs what kinds of content they see, what types of offers they receive, and so on.

WordPress membership websites like WPMU DEV are a good example of websites that do this. Users can create their own profiles and earn points and special statuses based on how much work they put into the community.

WPMU DEV enables users to create their own profiles.


A fun community where web design and development professionals can set up individual profiles. (Large preview)

Use Relatable Content

In video game design, there is something known as “ludonarrative dissonance.” Basically, it “is the unpleasant situation where we’re asking players to do something they don’t want to do… or prevent them from doing what they want.”

You’ve likely encountered this sort of resistance as you’ve designed websites in the past.

You review the analytics and discover high bounce rates on certain pages or even right from within the home page. You discover that there’s a visual element or a line of copy that just doesn’t sit right with your audience. That’s because it’s a disruption in what should be an otherwise immersive experience. By using content that resonates with the visitor, that makes them feel like you’re telling their story, they won’t feel disconnected and want to stray from the goal.

Spin a Fantasy

Here’s an interesting fact: people are 22 times more likely to remember data when it’s presented in a narrative form.

Let’s face it; if you’re building a website on behalf of a business or other professional entity, you don’t have some dramatic tale to spin like a video game does. And that’s fine.

Consumers aren’t visiting websites in order to get caught up in hours of epic storytelling. That said, they do still expect to be engaged by what you’re sharing with them.

So, why not depict a fantastic scenario through visual storytelling? The brain digests visual content 60% more quickly than written content, so your web designs and other visuals (like video, animation, and so on) are the keys to doing this.

The Airbnb blog always does a great job of this type of visual storytelling.

Airbnb’s blog uses images that tell a story within themselves.


The Airbnb blog is a master of visual storytelling. (Large preview)

While every story is probably told through 800 to 1,000 words, it’s also accompanied by highly attractive visuals that tell you something about what you’d experience at this specific destination.

2. Minimize Distractions by Using Symbols

Let’s talk specifically about websites viewed from mobile devices for a second, shall we? As of August 2017, 52.64% of all visits to websites were done via a smartphone. And, starting in 2017, the most popular size for a smartphone was between five and six inches and will only continue to grow in popularity as the years go on.

That’s not a lot of space to fill with content for the majority of site visitors, is it? So, how do you effectively tell a story if you have limited real estate? If we’re to take a page out of the video game design handbook, then we should turn to symbols.

Kontra makes a good point about this:

“[O]ne, often overlooked, strong point of game UX is the preference towards symbolism. The ability to transform meaning into symbols was a huge step towards visual decluttering.”

Functional minimalism is already something you’re doing in your own web design efforts, but have you thought about how it can tie into the storytelling aspect as well? When it comes to video games, symbols help clear the way so that players can focus on the story before them. You’ll see this most often in two-dimensional, side-scroller games:

Street Fighter and other fighting games place the health bar at the top:

Sonic the Hedgehog places the life counter at the bottom:

There are even ones like Virtua Racing and other geographic-dependent games that put their navigation off to the side for players to reference:

As you can see, the use of symbols keeps the gamespace clear and easy to follow along with.

Whether you’re designing mostly for desktop or mobile users, your aim is to design a space that encourages users to follow along and not get caught up in distractions. So, while you might think that full-screen, overlay navigation is a creative choice for your website or the ever-present live chat pop-up will get more engagements, you may be doing yourself a great disservice.

By employing the use of easily recognized symbols throughout your site, you can keep the design clean and clear and distraction-free. The story you’re weaving throughout is the most important thing, and you don’t want to stand in the way of visitors being able to get to it.

MSR is a beautiful example of this done well:

MSR minimizes distractions from the main content area by using symbols.


A good example of how to minimize navigation and directional cues so visitors can focus on the main content and story. (Large preview)

The website is for their architecture design firm. Rather than write volumes of text about what they’ve done and how they do it, they allow the images to speak for themselves. They’ve then employed a number of symbols to help visitors continue on to other points of interest in their journey.

Here are some ways in which you might use symbols to declutter your site:

  • Hamburger icon (for the navigation)
  • Profile photo icon (for account details)
  • Pencil icon (for an editing interface)
  • Gear icon (for settings)
  • Shopping cart icon (to checkout)
  • Magnifying glass (to expand the search bar)
  • Connector icon (to open social sharing and RSS feed options)
  • Question mark (to expand live chat, search, or help options)
  • And so on.

One thing to note here is that you don’t want to overdo it with icons. As you can see from the video game examples above, the entire interface isn’t strewn with icons. They’re simply there to hold the place of elements players are already familiar with and will refer to often. That’s the way you should handle icons for your own site. Think about how easy your icons will be to decipher as well as which ones are absolutely necessary. Decluttering doesn’t mean hiding every element under an icon; you simply want to tidy up a bit.

If you’re concerned with the potential for confusion over what your icons mean to users, then use labels, alt text, or tooltips to provide further elaboration to those who need it.

3. Be Smart About How You Use Space

One of the nice things about video games is how they use actual walls and roadblocks to prevent players from navigating into territory where they shouldn’t be. One of my favorite games that does this right now is called LittleBigPlanet. While it is similar to side-scrolling adventures like Super Mario, its design expands beyond the basic two dimensions usually experienced in these kinds of games.

As you can see, the player encounters a number of hard surfaces which then prompt him or her to move back and forth between layers, to climb up various elements, and to find a more ideal route towards the end of the game.

First-person shooter games like Halo also use physical elements to keep players confined to the main gamespace and on track to completing the mission and story.

As a web designer, you don’t have the luxury of crafting walls around the user’s journey on your site. That said, you don’t have to design a website and leave it all to chance. There are ways to steer visitors through a direct path to conversion.

Kill Screen did an interesting write-up about the art of spatial storytelling in video games. In it, writer Sharang Biswas explained the idea that “Spaces can be designed. They can be made to promote certain pathways, encourage specific behaviors, even elicit emotional reactions.”

There are a number of ways in which you can do this with design:

Use a Spotlight

In video games, you can use light and darkness to draw attention to important pathways. On websites, it’s not always easy to employ the use of lightness or darkness as too-dark of a design or too-light of text could lead to a bad user experience. What you want to do instead is create a “spotlight” of sorts. You can do this by infusing a key area of your design with a dramatic color or a boldly stylized font.

In a site that’s otherwise pretty light in color usage, Kappow does a nice job using it to highlight two key areas of the site where it’s clear visitors should visit: its case studies.

Kappow uses bright swatches of color to draw attention.


It’s more than obvious where Kappow wants visitors to focus their attention as they scroll through the home page. (Large preview)

Add Clues

If you’ve ever played a horror video game before, you know how critical the element of sound can be for it. Here’s an example of how Until Dawn uses sound (as well as visual footprints) to try to steer the player in the right direction:

In all honesty, I’m not a big fan of music on websites, even if they’re from auto-play videos that I visited the website for in the first place. I’m sure I’m not the only one who feels this way as there aren’t many websites that employ the use of background music or auto-play audio anymore.

That said, while you might not be able to direct visitors down the page with the sound of something playing down below, you can use other elements to lead them. For one, you can use interactive elements like animation to draw their attention to where it needs to go. Let’s take a game like Angry Birds, for example.

See how the little red birds are hopping up and down while they wait their turn? It’s a subtle gesture, but one that is sure to draw first-time players’ attention to the area of the screen in which they should directly interact if they want to move on to the next level. Animation on a website would work just as effectively if you’re trying to lure visitors’ eyes down to a key element like a contact form or a clickable button.

But it doesn’t just have to be animation. Other video game designers simply plant clues around the landscape to steer players through the journey. I’m not suggesting that your site start hiding Easter eggs all over the place. Instead, you may want to think about using subtle arrows or lines that define the space in which visitors should “play” and then move down through.

Employ a Mascot

For some brands, it might make sense to employ the use of an actual mascot to guide visitors through the story. If it’s an already established mascot and it won’t intrude too heavily on the experience, then why not bring it on the journey to ensure that visitors are checking in at all the right spots?

Or you can do like BarkBox and use a series of related mascots to guide visitors through different parts of the site (especially the signup and subscription process).

Black-and-white illustrated mascots on BarkBox website.


BarkBox uses a series of illustrated black-and-white mascots to guide visitors through the conversion processes. (Large preview)

Summary

As attention spans shorten and visitors just want to get to the good stuff on a website, designers have to get more creative in how they communicate their website’s “story.” Ideally, your web design will do more showing of that story instead of telling, which is how video game design tends to succeed in this matter.

Remember: Storytelling isn’t just relegated to big brands that can weave bright and shiny tales about how consumers’ lives were changed with their products. Nor is it just for video game designers that have hours of gameplay to develop for their audiences. A story simply needs to convey to the end-user how their problem can be fixed by your site’s solution. Through subtle design strategies inspired by video game storytelling techniques, you can effectively share and shape your own story.

Smashing Editorial
(da, ra, yk, il)

Continue reading here: 

The Future Of Mobile Web Design: Video Game Design And Storytelling

A Simple Guide to Understanding and Creating a Website Conversion Funnel

How many articles have you read recently about the “conversion funnel”? Probably a lot. If you regularly read marketing blogs, it can sometimes feel like you’re hearing, seeing, and having the term “conversion funnel” shoved in front of your eyeballs constantly. I personally come across conversion funnel information multiple times per day when I’m focused on research and reading. It seems like every marketer in existence wants to be sure I don’t forget about this part of my strategy. So why is this? The short is answer is that an optimized conversion funnel is critical to your online marketing success. You might be…

The post A Simple Guide to Understanding and Creating a Website Conversion Funnel appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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A Simple Guide to Understanding and Creating a Website Conversion Funnel