Tag Archives: cross

Web Development Reading List #187: Webpack 3, Assisted Writing, And Automated Chrome Testing

This week, we’ll explore some rather new concepts: What happens if we apply artificial intelligence to text software, for example? And why would a phone manufacturer want its business model to be stolen by competitors? We’ll also take a look at how we can use the new headless Chrome browser for automated testing and learn to build smarter JavaScript bundles with Webpack 3’s new scope hoisting. Sometimes it’s easy to be excited about all the improvements and new things our industry has to offer.

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Web Development Reading List #187: Webpack 3, Assisted Writing, And Automated Chrome Testing

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A/B Test Ideas for Fashion Ecommerce Websites

The face of fashion ecommerce is undergoing a change. The transition from a brick-and-mortar store to an online one is accompanied by perennial problems, leading to a high return rate of ordered items.

However, the online fashion and apparel industry continues to adapt to this change through use of new technologies and strategies. Other than adhering to prevalent industry best practices, you can also come up with innovative ideas that can help you attract, engage, and retain more visitors on your website.

Here are 6 ideas on how you can grow your online apparel business while maintaining your brand esthetics. Based on these ideas, you can create variations and run A/B tests on your website.

Cross-Selling Style-Based Combinations

Cross-sell an entire set based on season, style, festival, and others, while providing a stand-out description.

Cross-selling idea for fashion ecommerce
Source: Zalando

You plan to add sneakers with a new design, an offbeat color, and a slightly higher price compared to your current best-seller in the same category. On your website, it would show up in the Shoes and New Launches categories. Other than this, what can you do to have your visitors go for it?

Don’t leave the sneakers alone. Showcase those along with items from other categories with which these can go along well.

Look at what Zalando, UK does. Within each category such as Men, Women, and others, it has a subcategory Inspiration, which includes the Looks of the Week section.

This section showcases a new item with additional items to complete the suggested outfit. Over and above this is the vivid description, which can attract visitors to go for more than they are looking for.

The updates ensure freshness through new themes every week.

The above idea is primarily used for new launches during a particular season; but you can also A/B test and apply it for upcoming festivals, events, and other special days.

What to measure:

  • Increase in % of sales through clicks to the new upselling category link
  • Average order value (because of the new category)
  • Increase in clicks to the upselling category link
  • Increase in the revenue (with this category also contributing to the increase)

Resolving Customer Concerns through Additional Filters

Add sale discount percent and cloth material as filters along with size and other filters within a category/subcategory.

Filters for easy search on fashion ecommerce websites
Source: Lyst

At times, it becomes tricky for your customers when they find the desired apparel item, but not the desired price. The reverse is also a common sight. How do you save them from an endless search on your website pages?

Lyst has addressed this problem to an extent. There are additional, unique filters for its customers to fine-tune their search. In the above screenshot, two of these filters—sales discount and material—are used to narrow down the available options.

What to measure:

  • Pages/session
  • Average session duration
  • Number of visits to the product page as a result of these clicks
  • Total transactions
  • Total revenue due to this A/B test
  • Revenue per visit

Adding Variety to Navigation Options

Add color and designer name as filters along with size and price.

Displaying only red-colored and blue-colored apparel items
Source: Otte NY

While adding size and price filters helps your visitors shortlist and display what’s available for them, having colors as a filter helps them personalize their choices. If this, along with other filters, still leaves the visitors with a high number of displayed options, you can provide more filters, such as designers.

In the screenshot from Otte New York, selecting 2 colors and 3 designers in the New category narrows down the comprehensive product listing to a more manageable 10 products on the screen.

What to measure:

  • Increase in the number of visits to the product page as a result of clicks on new search filters
  • Increase in the number of purchases as a result of the number of visits

Interaction Analytics: Use heatmaps to see if new options are resulting in increased activity on the filters.

Offering Customer Choices through Sale

Allow products to be earmarked by visitors for a sales reminder.

Tagging specific products on a fashion website
Source: Lyst

Do you see the message between two products on the Lyst category page? While it’s good to have increased visitor engagement on your website pages, this message tells the visitors that if price is a bottleneck, then they have the option to “wait and get” what they are looking for. This can encourage them to not only indicate their choices, but also bookmark the website for a future revisit.

While you can go ahead with this idea and A/B test it; on the same lines, you can also go for similar triggers checking with the customers softly if they need any help while finalizing their current purchase.

Note: You should not test similar ideas together. It may make it difficult to attribute your results with the correct idea. Also, excessive triggers and interruptions can lead to unpredictable visitor behavior.

What to measure:

  • Change in the purchase frequency of repeat customers
  • Change in the repeat purchase rate
  • Change in the revenue for specific durations (when the earmarked products go on sale)

Providing Cross-Selling Offers on the Product Page

Share cross-selling offers on the apparel product page.

Cross-selling on a fashion product page
Source: Farfetch

Use heatmaps and past data while planning such promotions. In the screenshot from Farfetch, UK, note the brevity and clarity in the cross-sell message, and the optimum position in which it is placed, as opposed to a “Recommended products” carousel after the product details. Your offer details should not mix with the product description.

Offer similar or complementary products together. Such offers should not distract visitors away from the product page they are on. Instead, the combined value of the products should attract them to go for it.

Note: Amazon makes about 35% of its revenue from cross-selling.

What to measure:

  • Number of products purchased per order
  • Increase in the average order value

Personalizing Visitor Experience on Product Pages

1) Provide the option to view close-ups of items on fashion product pages.

Close-up of a linen coat on a fashion product page
Source: Ralph Lauren

Remember those models on your television screen posing with the latest designer suits, followed by close-ups of the suits from different angles. This idea goes on to mirror the same experience for your customers. The above image from Ralph Lauren shows how visitors on your site can get to see a zoomed-in view when they select a particular section of the product.

What to measure:

  • Pages per session and session duration for product pages providing this option
  • Add-to-cart numbers from products with the new option

Interaction Analytics: Use session replays to see engagement with the feature.

There may not be a direct correlating impact on the revenue as a result of this change. However, increased engagement could mean a better customer experience.

2) Target Categories for Specific Situations

Targeting unique categories in fashion ecommerce
Source: Old Navy

Segmentation based on multiple requirements would just make it so easy for your customers. Here, Old Navy comes up with a standout idea. On the home page itself, size comes into picture right after the gender. For example, Women and Women’s Plus are two categories differentiated on the basis of size. Maternity comes out as another unique category.

In addition, the visitors can also specify their body types to narrow down their search. For example, the Boys category has Husky and Slim as two differentiators.

The category pages continue with the practice, as they ease your search further. For example, the tagline for Women’s Petite says “Specially designer for Women 5’4” & Under.”

What to measure:

  • Time to purchase should go down, as the visitors should be able to quickly self-select.
  • Conversion rate should go up.

Interaction analytics: Engagement should be higher.

Your Turn

By now, these ideas would have created a chain reaction of sorts for you, helping you come up with more ideas to A/B test. So if there’s something that you would want to add or suggest, please share your responses in the Comments section below.

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The post A/B Test Ideas for Fashion Ecommerce Websites appeared first on VWO Blog.

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A/B Test Ideas for Fashion Ecommerce Websites

Infographic: How to Boost Ecommerce Revenue Through Upselling and Cross Selling

upselling cross selling feature image

To anyone who’s exclusively done business online, I cannot stress enough how beneficial it is to sell to humans, face-to-face. First of all, in person, you can learn what people are really looking for — and you can make suggestions accordingly. Instead of sifting through data, conducting endless customer surveys, and “guessing,” running a brick-and-mortar shop is a non-stop customer survey experience. The beauty comes when your business operates both online and offline. Your learnings from upselling and cross-selling in person can turn your online business from nice supplemental income to your bread-and-butter! Check out this infographic from Quicksprout to…

The post Infographic: How to Boost Ecommerce Revenue Through Upselling and Cross Selling appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Infographic: How to Boost Ecommerce Revenue Through Upselling and Cross Selling

How To Build A SpriteKit Game In Swift 3 (Part 1)

Have you ever wondered what it takes to create a SpriteKit game from beginning to beta? Does developing a physics-based game seem daunting? Game-making has never been easier on iOS since the introduction of SpriteKit.

How To Build A SpriteKit Game In Swift 3 (Part 1)

In this three-part series, we will explore the basics of SpriteKit. We will touch on SKPhysics, collisions, texture management, interactions, sound effects, music, buttons and SKScenes. What might seem difficult is actually pretty easy to grasp. Stick with us while we make RainCat.

The post How To Build A SpriteKit Game In Swift 3 (Part 1) appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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How To Build A SpriteKit Game In Swift 3 (Part 1)

Upsell and Cross-sell: Why It Works For eCommerce

“Buy me those chocolates.”

The kid said sternly, pointing his stubby finger at a big jar of sweets on the shop counter as they waited to check out.

The counter guy grinned. I smiled. The mother winced.

She just got cross-selled.

In 2006, Amazon reported that cross-selling and upselling contributed as much as 35% of their revenue.

Product recommendations are responsible for an average of 10-30% of eCommerce site revenues according to Forrester Research analyst Sucharita Mulpuru.

There’s no reason why upselling and cross selling shouldn’t work for you. In this post we look at:

What is Upselling and Cross-selling?

Upselling and cross-selling are cousins of well, selling.

Buy a cow from me and I’ll offer you a better one for 50 bucks more: the better cow is an upsell.

What is Upselling?

Buy a cow from me and I’ll throw in a haystack for 5 bucks: the haystack is a cross sell.

What is cross-sell?

Upselling is a strategy to sell a superior, more expensive version of a product that the customer already owns (or is buying). A superior version is:

  • a higher, better model of the product or
  • same product with value-add features that raises the perceived value of the offering

How Macy's Upsell

Upselling is the reason why we have a 54” television instead of the 48” we planned for; the reason why we go for 7 day European Sojourns instead of 5 day simple French Affairs. It’s also the reason why we have unused annual contracts thinning away under silverfish attacks.

Cross-selling is a strategy to sell related products to the one a customer already owns (or is buying). Such products generally belong to different product categories, but will be complementary in nature. Like the hay-stack for the cow, or batteries for a wall-clock.

Cross-selling is a battle ready strategy. Here’s how McD does it: McDonald’s keep their apple pie dispensers right behind the cashier, in full view of customers. A year ago, the head of the U.S. division for McDonald’s Corp., Jeff Stratton, said in an interview that he felt moving the dispensers to the back kitchen area would probably cut apple pie orders by half.

Upsell and cross-sell are the reasons we buy things ‘just in case’.

There is one more popular selling technique known as bundling. Bundling is the offspring of cross sell and upsell. You bundle together the main product and other auxiliary products for a higher price than what the single product is sold for.

What is Bundling in eCommerce?

By bundling together the camera and two very related (even essential) products, Flipkart makes a compelling offer. Notice how there are multiple combos available.

Bundling in Action - Flipkart

Bundling is also quite often used along with a discount to increase the perceived value of the offering. Here’s more on the benefits of bundling.

Pure Bundle or Mixed Bundle?

Pure Bundling is when products are made available only in bundles and cannot be bought individually. Mixed bundling is when both options (individual buy and bundle buy) are made available.

Vineet Kumar from HBS and Timothy Derdenger at Carnegie Mellon University teamed up together and studied bundling as used by Nintendo in their video game market. Revenues fell almost 20% when Nintendo switched from mixed bundling to pure bundling. In the gaming market, prices fall each day, so customers looking to buy just that one thing will choose to wait until it becomes available, likely at a cheaper price.

Similarly, a study on the effect of bundling in consumer goods market, revealed that bundling is a great way to entice high value customers of competitors to switch over. But it does not significantly help category sales; and in some ways even discourages it because different category products are bundled together.

So should you use pure bundling or mixed bundling?

The safest option is to use mixed bundling: offer products individually and as bundle

But why settle for safe when you can A/B test it?

Here’s a way you can use bundling: Specify a minimum order amount to qualify for free shipping. Customers who are looking to buy only one item are likely to switch to the bundle in order to raise order value and qualify for free shipping.

Amazon does all of this brilliantly.

How Amazon Does Upsell, Cross-sell and Bundling

Why Is Upsell and Cross-Sell Important for eCommerce?

Upselling and cross-selling is often (and mistakenly) seen as unethical practices to squeeze more out of the customer.

They’d say, ‘the wincing mother in your opening paragraph is proof that customers hate being cross-sold to’.

I disagree, as will any white-hat marketer.

The Mother Who Winced (way better than ‘the wincing mother’) wasn’t the target customer there. The kid was. The kid found value, and he demanded it. The mother didn’t (add dental insurance to the mix), and she winced.

This dilemma of whether upselling/cross-selling is ethical or not, has its roots in the means and ends discussion. The end goal of any business is more profit. It is the means that make all the difference.

Cross-selling and upselling can be used unethically, in a pushy sort of way, to try and make the customer shell out more. But such tactics don’t last long and is often to the peril of such businesses. More on this under the heading “The Fine Line Between A Friend and A Creep”

As a strategy, however, upselling and cross-selling should be used to ‘help customers win’ as illustrated beautifully in this video by Jeffrey Gittomer. Looked at it that way, upselling and cross-selling become more of friendly suggestions and a helping hand to make the ‘right’ purchase.

Remind Bob to buy some batteries along with his new wall-clock

Jack might be looking for something more powerful than an i5 processor, show him the i7, too.

So how does upselling help you?

#1 Increases Customer Retention

If you leave aside impulse buys, customers buy products/services to solve a problem. They are aware of the problem, but might not be aware of the best solution to the problem.

I don’t belong to the Steve Jobs bandwagon, but he got it right when he said ‘people don’t know what they want until you show it to them.’ Upselling or cross-selling done right helps the customer find more value than he was expecting. You become his best friend.

Best friends return and drive 43% of your revenues.

#2 Increases Average Order Value and Life-time Value

Romance your repeat customers. Do it like Jerry Maguire. And they will show you the money.

Show Me The Money

Should You Upsell or Cross-Sell in eCommerce?

Despite the many ways upsell and cross-sell are similar, there’s a clear winner in terms of numbers.

According to Predictive Intent, upsell can work upto 20 times better than cross-sell.

A little over 4% of all customers who were faced with an upsell bought it while less than 0.5% of customers took bait when shown a cross-sell.

But when it comes to the checkout page, cross-sell kills it with 3% conversions.

PRWD head of usability, Paul Rouke explains why cross-sell works best on checkout pages

Why Cross-Sell Works For Checkout Page

What and How Should You UpSell?

The data from Predictive Intent’s study show that a mere 4% of customers convert on average through upselling. It’s not much, you might think.

4% of customers will buy a better product if offered, and are ready to pay a premium for that.

They aren’t looking for ‘just enough’. They will not shy away from going the extra mile to make sure the product (solution to a problem) is just right.

One of the commonest ways to upsell is to suggest the next higher model. But when it’s just 4% that you are targeting, the margin for error is as thick as the edge of a blade.

To make the most of these unicorns, here are some suggestions on how to upsell:

  • Promote your most reviewed or most sold products
  • Give more prominent space for the upsell, display testimonials for the upsell
  • Make sure the upsells are not more than 25% costlier than the original product
  • Make add-on features like insurance pre-selected and ask customers to deselect if not required
  • If you have customer personas in place, use those to make relevant suggestions
  • Make suggestions relevant by giving context: why should I buy that instead of this?

What do I mean by that?

Don’t just shove a front-loader washing machine in my face when I’m looking at a top-loader; tell me why it’s meant for me: I’m the discerning heavy user, who likes taking extra care of clothes and saving more on electricity.

And always, always, make sure you suggest products from the same category. Don’t ask me to buy a 17 inch laptop when I’m shopping for a macbook air. They don’t satisfy the same needs.

Let’s not forget cross-sell either.

Cross-sell gets up to 3% conversions when used on the check-out page.

Use cross-sell techniques more on the check-out page to tap into impulse buying:

  • Cross-sell products should be at least 60% cheaper than the product added to cart
  • Go for products that are easily forgotten: filters for lenses, earphones for mobile phones, Lighter for a gas stove and of course, scrub for cows.. the possibilities are endless

Here’s how removing cross-sell options from the product page increased order by 5.6%.

If you are manually pushing upsell/cross-sell suggestions, it would be worthwhile to automate the system. Products should be categorized and related products should be tagged so as to enable automation.

Now comes the interesting part.

Why Does Upsell/Cross-Sell Work and How Can You Ace It?

Upsell and cross-sell works when you are able to ease the decision making process of a customer.

In 2006, a study by Bain showed that reducing complexity and narrowing choices can boost revenues by 5-40% and cut costs by 10-35%.

Upsell Smart By Narrowing Choices

Too many choices can be paralyzing. Professor Iyengar and her research assistants conducted a study on the effect of choices in the California Gourmet market. They set up booths of Wilkin and Sons Jams — one offered an assortment of 24 jams while the other had on display 6 jam varieties.

60% of the visitors stopped by the larger booth while only 40% flocked to the one with lower number of choices.

But 30% of visitors that sampled at the small booth made a buy while only 3% of the 60% visitors to the larger booth went on to make a purchase.

Our ability to make a decision reduces as number of choices increases.

Actionable Tip: Don’t bombard your customers with many choices. If they’ve already said no to an upsell product do not push for it. Think of upsell as a gentle suggestion, not an aggressive sales tactic.

Bundle To Reduce Decision Complexity

Every action the user has to take makes the decision making more complex. Think of ways to reduce the number of actions in a buying decision. We’ve a limited amount of energy to be spent on decision making.

Bundling brings together related products that are of relevance to a customer. Buying them individually involves more decision making, and more steps. Whereas through bundling, in one a customer is able to buy multiple products together.

It’s also important to understand how we make decisions. How rational are we at decision making?

Turns out, not so much.

Customers Make Irrational Decisions

Dan Ariely does a brilliant break down of the irrationality of decision making and explains how we are not always in control of the decisions we make.

Let’s talk organ donations. Bear with me, thank Dan later.

The graph below shows the percentage of people of different countries that agreed for organ donation.

Irrationality of Decision Making - Dan Ariely

It seems the people represented in Gold don’t seem to care about others all that much, while the ones in blue care infinitely. Is that a cultural difference at play here?

But these guys are neighbours: Sweden and Denmark , Netherlands and Belgium, Germany and France. So what’s happening here.

They were presented two widely different consent forms.

Difference in the opt-in forms used

In the countries on the left, people were presented with an ‘opt-in’ form. People had to check the box to opt-in for the organ donation program.

In the countries on the right, people were presented with an ‘opt-out’ form, which meant unless they unchecked the box, they would be opted-in by default.

Surprisingly, people everywhere behaved the same way. They did not take any action and let the default choice be.

Dan Ariely explains our behavior was based on the complexity of the decision.

  • We don’t have complete information on the subject
  • We can’t differentiate sufficiently between the two options
  • We can’t decide
  • We do nothing

Buridan’s Ass: An ass that is equally hungry and thirsty is placed precisely midway between a stack of hay and a pail of water. It will die of both hunger and thirst since it cannot make any rational decision to choose one over the other.

Actionable Tip: So in your purchase funnel, make those little extra features checked by default, and give customers the option to deselect. Make it clearly visible, and never attempt to do it on the sly.

Unsure customers will go with the default selection.

Use Price Anchoring: The Surprising Power of Dummy Choices

A few years back The Economist ran an ad that looked like this

Price Anchoring in The Economist Ad

You get a web-only subscription for $59, a print-only subscription for $125 or both, again, for $125! Needless to say, the print-only option is a dummy choice. Who in their right minds would ever choose an inferior option when the price is the same?

Dan took the ad and took it to a 100 MIT students to see what they would choose.

Price Anchoring At Play - with the dummy choice

An overwhelming majority chose what seemed the ‘best’ option – both print and web subscription at $125. 16% chose the web-only subscription. Nobody chose the print-only subscription at $125.

Dan then took off the middle choice — the print-only one. And ran the test again on 100 people. This is how the opt-in rates looked now.

No Price Anchoring - without the dummy choice

Surprisingly, the majority (68%) people chose the cheaper option when the dummy choice was removed. The print and web subscription that saw 84% subscription in the presence of the dummy choice now got a significantly low 32% subscription rate.

An inferior choice makes a similar but superior choice look better even when other options are cheaper.

Actionable Tip: consider a customer looking at a top-tier entry level DSLR. Show him a mid-level DSLR without add-ons for a marginally higher price and the same mid-level DSLR with add-ons at the same higher price.

Upsell it with the proper communication — how does the mid-level DSLR help the customer win? — and you have a good probability of making the upsell.

The Fine Line Between Being A Friend and A Creep

In 2009, Graham Charlton at eConsultancy tore apart VistaPrint’s and GoDaddy’s checkout process in this post. GoDaddy’s process at the time contained almost 10 steps from selecting a domain name to finally completing the order – most of which were forced cross-sell attempts.

VistaPrint seems to have taken the critique well, and in a post published 5 years later, eConsultancy looks at how VistaPrint revamped their checkout process, making it much more pleasant and much less in-your-face in the process.

Here’s what you shouldn’t do:

  1. Suggest upsells and cross-sells before a customer picks a product
  2. Bombard customers with many cross-sell and upsell products
  3. Sly tactics like hiding pre-selected add-ons in the hope customers don’t notice it

If there’s one thing that is your takeaway from this post, it has to be this:

Upsell and cross-sell techniques should be used as strategies to help customers make better decisions, faster.

The post Upsell and Cross-sell: Why It Works For eCommerce appeared first on VWO Blog.

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Upsell and Cross-sell: Why It Works For eCommerce

How To Keep Framework Development Simple And Bug-Free

It’s just like that for your product, too: people rely on our products to work. Bugs erode trust, which in turn loses customers. So when we began updating Foundation, a responsive CSS framework, we wanted to ensure everything worked. Thoroughly. We know that many people rely on our software for their work, and maintaining that trust is paramount.
In this article you’ll learn our methodology for testing responsively, not just on a case by case, page-from-PSD comp.

Original article:

How To Keep Framework Development Simple And Bug-Free

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How Removing Cross-Selling Options on Product Page Resulted in a 5.6% Increase in Orders

The Company

Drukwerkdeal is an online printing shop based out of the Netherlands. They deal in a variety of photo products ranging from clothing, corporate gifts, presentations and cutlery to a whole new variety of Christmas-theme gifts like cards, posters and calendars.

The website has a nice warm feel to it owing to all the colorful products they have for offer.

To push more sales from their product pages, Paul at Drukwerkdeal decided to optimize them using Visual Website Optimizer. He went through a number of product pages and realized that the cross-selling message on the pages was not very convincing. And it could just be doing them more harm than good.

This is how one of their product pages looked like (notice the links given in green under product description with an intent to cross sell):

ab_testing_control

The Test

Paul decided to test removing them and see what effect this change would have on their sales. Since this was going to be a big move, he decided to first test this change on only a few product categories. To implement this, he used pattern matching to include some URLs on which they wanted to test.

After removing the cross-selling links, this is how the new product page looked:

ab_testing_variation

More than 14,000 visitors became a part of this test and it was run for 2 weeks. The metrics on which this test was judged were average order value (AOV), number of products purchased per order, add-to-cart conversions and transactions. They pushed all the test data into GA (with a single click while setting up the test) and were able to take out holistic insights from the test on a range of parameters apart from absolute conversions. They also realized that the new page performed better for both the new and returning visitors and all traffic sources, particularly for organic and direct.

The Result

The variation page recorded 5.6% improvement in orders completed. Bolstered by this success, Drukwerkdeal implemented the variation style on all their product pages.

Quoting Paul, “We do a reasonable amount of testing on our website and try to be very curious about all the things we add to our site. I had a sense that it would distract visitors and would have a negative impact on conversions. Now we know that it did.

Why didn’t cross-selling work for Drukwerkdeal?

Marketers, around the globe, swear by cross-selling and up-selling. And why not? Amazon in 2006 was reported to have earned a whopping 35% of their revenue from cross-selling. Do we conclude the days of cross-selling are over? Certainly not!

In case of Drukwerkdeal, here are the things that might not have worked in favor of them:

  1. A few months back, I blogged about how colors can affect the conversions of your website. If you give a 10 sec quick look to the control page, you’ll notice that the orange buttons get the most attention and the next thing striking on the page is the green bar in which they have added the links to other related products. Imagine finding these on every product page and getting distracted from the main goal. The main focus on a product page, just second to CTA button, is to get visitors to notice the product — the product images and its description. The related products links, in the control design, are merging with the product description and thus can lead to distasteful visitor experience.
  2. As rightly mentioned in this excellent article at the-future-of-commerce, the question is not whether to offer cross-sells and up-sells. Rather, it’s how to do it. The way cross-selling was implemented on the original page was not really enticing and neither was it positioned correctly.
    Some ways you can offer cross-sells that will actually sell:

  • Show related products at the shopping cart pages or within the email alert confirming the order. Those are the easiest places to start. See how amazon does the same:
    amazon-screenshot
  • Products should be very relevant to customers’ current order. There is an excellent study which has been done by Altman Dedicated Direct which shows that, as long as you show relevant cross-selling products, customers are ready to buy even if they are slightly on the expensive side. This opposes the marketing myth which says that cross-selling options should typically be 25-35% of the value of the current purchase.
  • Try bundling: phone cases with phone, mascara with eye-liner, assorted seasonings with sauces and so on.

Let’s Talk!

Being a die-hard shopaholic, I have to confess that many times I have bought many more items than I intended. Only because I kept following a loop of “you may like this too”.

What has your experience with cross-selling and up-selling been like? I would love to know your views, both from a customer perspective as well as a seller perspective. Let’s talk in the comments section below.

The post How Removing Cross-Selling Options on Product Page Resulted in a 5.6% Increase in Orders appeared first on VWO Blog.

Read this article -  How Removing Cross-Selling Options on Product Page Resulted in a 5.6% Increase in Orders

Introducing New iOS6 Features In Mobile Safari

If you’ve had half an eye on the tech press over the last few weeks, you’ll be aware of the update to iOS, or at least of its replacement of Google maps with the new iOS Maps app.
Stories of parks appearing where once there were roads, seas disappearing and more, abound. I’m not going to wade into the debate about whether or not Apple should have done this or whether the new app is an improvement or not, but instead I’m going to focus on the update to mobile Safari — and specifically, what it means for Web developers.

This article: 

Introducing New iOS6 Features In Mobile Safari

Help The Community! Report Browser Bugs!

You’re developing a new website and have decided to use some CSS3 and HTML5, now that many of the new specifications are gaining widespread support. As you’re coding the theme and thinking of how much easier these new technologies are making your job, you decide to stop for a while and test in other browsers, feeling a bit guilty for getting carried away and having forgotten to do so for a while.

Link:  

Help The Community! Report Browser Bugs!

Review Of Cross-Browser Testing Tools

At some point in the future, the way that all major browsers render Web code will likely be standardized, which will make testing across multiple browsers no longer necessary as long as the website is coded according to Web standards. But because that day is still a way off (if it will really come at all), testing your design the advanced browsers as well as legacy browsers is a necessary part of any project.

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Review Of Cross-Browser Testing Tools