Tag Archives: cta

Your Author Bio Is a Conversion Goldmine

gold mine

Are you treating your author bio as an afterthought? If you’re like most online marketers, the answer is probably yes. Don’t believe me? Just Google ‘author bio optimization’ and see what your search turns up. Not much. Just one or two dated guides. Clearly, digital marketing experts are not seeing the business potential of an optimized author bio. Well, I’ve got news for you. By ignoring your bio, you’re missing out on a lot of business. Your author bio has a lot of marketing potential. It’s an untapped goldmine that can do so much for your business. Would you like…

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Your Author Bio Is a Conversion Goldmine

Why are You Neglecting the Highest-Traffic Lowest-Converting Page on Your Website?

I’m not talking about your home page. Sure that gets the most traffic, but notice the qualifier in the post title; highest-traffic “lowest-converting”.

But why would you care about a low converting page? Because chances are, it’s not converting because you forgot to add a call to action (CTA).

I’m sure you know about some pages like this on your website, but you’re using one of the following excuses to do nothing about it:

  1. I don’t have the bandwidth to deal with it.
  2. It’s not my responsibility.
  3. I don’t know what to do with it.
  4. I’ll get to it later.

The last excuse is the absolute worst. Because you never will “get to it”.

It’s 2018 – Stop Wasting Time Ignoring This Page

Don’t start this year with yet another failed attempt to go to the gym. Commit one day to optimizing just one page.

For Unbounce, that page is “What is a landing page?“. We’ve held the #1 spot in Google for this term since early 2010, and guess what? We haven’t updated it since early 2010.

Every time we look at Google Analytics, we see this:

10,000 unique visitors every month to that page. And 84.15% of them are NEW visitors. That’s an incredible amount of value.

What does the page look like?

It was embarrassing, to say the least. Spoiler alert I updated it last night. But here’s a screenshot of the abomination that was our previous 8 years of letting visitors down.

A few observations

  • The content is ancient, and has a lot of useless information. Some of which is fundamentally wrong.
  • The CSS is all broken making the layout and reading experience terrible.
  • It links to a bad blog post I wrote in 2010 that has a photo of Miley Cyrus wearing a carrot costume.

You read that right. Miley Cyrus in a carrot costume is the call to action on the highest traffic page on our website (aside from our homepage). #facepalm

How to Convert Top-of-Funnel (TOFU) Traffic

“What is a Landing Page?” is the most TOFU page on our website, which means we need to choose carefully when we ask people to do something.

I decided to go with three options in a choose-your-own-adventure format, as a learning exercise so we can study what these visitors are actually looking for.

Option 1: “I’m new to landing pages, and want to learn more.”
CTA >> [ Watch The Landing Page Sessions Video Series ]

Option 2: “I have a landing page, but I’m not sure how good it is.”
CTA >> [ Grade Your Page With The Landing Page Analyzer ]

Option 3: “I need to build a landing page.”
CTA >> [ Try The Unbounce Builder in Preview Mode ]

The New “What is a…” Page

(Click to see the full-length page in a scrolling lightbox.)

High-Traffic, Yes. High-Converting? We’ll see.

I’ll be looking at the analytics (Hotjar click and scroll heatmaps), Google Analytics (changes in basic behavior), KISS Metrics (changes in signups), and I’ll report back with the results later in Product Awareness Month.

Find your highest-traffic lowest-converting page, now

Do it.

Oli Gardner


Originally posted here: 

Why are You Neglecting the Highest-Traffic Lowest-Converting Page on Your Website?

A Comprehensive Guide To Web Design

(This is a sponsored post). Web design is tricky. Designers and developers have to take a lot of things into account when designing a website, from visual appearance (how the website looks) to functional design (how the website works). To simplify the task, we’ve prepared this little guide.
In this article, I’ll focus on the main principles, heuristics, and approaches that will help you to create a great user experience for your website.

Original article: 

A Comprehensive Guide To Web Design

The Fine Art of Landing Page Design: Using F & Z Patterns to Increase Conversions

In a saturated online world with an abundance of information, marketers are constantly battling for attention. You’ve likely read that online users have an attention span less than that of a goldfish. Therefore, the more organized and straightforward your strategy is for converting a lead, the better. Over the last couple decades, eye-tracking studies have been performed to ascertain where consumer’s eyes move when they land on a web page. Jakob Nielsen even authored a book Eyetracking Web Usability which analyzes “1.5 million instances where users look at Web sites to understand how the human eyes interact with design.” Landing…

The post The Fine Art of Landing Page Design: Using F & Z Patterns to Increase Conversions appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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The Fine Art of Landing Page Design: Using F & Z Patterns to Increase Conversions

Do You Believe in… Conversion Magic?

conversion elixir
Do you believe in… conversion magic? Image via Shutterstock.

Like any potions master would attest, the secret to a great elixir lies in the measured combination of its ingredients.

Over the years, Titan PPC, a full-service pay-per-click advertising agency based in Vancouver, has developed a “magic formula” for designing lead generation landing pages that convert at average of 15% or higher.

The secret ingredient? For company founder, Patrick Schrodt, it doesn’t boil down to just one.

Read on to find out what key ingredients make Patrick’s lead gen landing pages so powerful. Then test them yourself with the new, kick-ass Hyperion template in the Unbounce app.

1. Make your landing pages relevant

Any smart marketer knows that when visitors reach a landing page, they won’t all have the same intentions for being there. Some may have clicked an ad looking for a plumber in West Seattle where others may have clicked one looking for a plumber in Capitol Hill.

But if your client is a plumbing company that serves the entire Seattle metropolitan area, your landing page should show both the visitors from West Seattle and Capitol Hill that you’ve got the service they need in the location they want it.

In other words, you want to use geo-targeting to make your landing pages especially relevant to your prospects. As Patrick explains:

There’s always been geo-based searches and there always will be. For our own campaigns, we’ve gone as targeted as including a map on every landing page. We highlight a visitors location on the map depending on the where their search is coming from — people go crazy for it!

And the conversion rates don’t lie.

Watch this clip to hear how Titan PPC used geo-targeting to increase a client’s on-page conversion rates from 6% to 33%, practically overnight.

Interview with Patrick Schrodt, founder of Titan PPC.

2. Use (awesome) images to break up your body copy

Never judge a book by its cover… right?

Well, fact is, when a prospect reaches your lead gen landing page, the first thing they’ll do is judge your offer or product by the way you’ve presented it to them. And they’ll do it within seconds.

That’s why you want to make sure it looks so good they won’t want to leave.

The key to keeping prospects interested? Great photography. According to Patrick:

Images help prospects get a clear picture of your client’s product or offer, and it shows them you’re a professional.

Titan PPC adds full-page horizontal image galleries throughout their lead gen landing pages.

It helps break up a visitor’s attention as they scroll by giving them something nice to look at.

But you can’t just slap a bunch of images into a gallery and hope that it all comes together.

If you’re going to source images for clients, you have to make sure you grab photos from a series. I’ve seen landing pages where it’s obvious that each image belongs to a different suite and it’s not coherent or nice to look at.

Check out this example of cohesive image galleries on one of Titan PPC’s lead gen landing pages for a lawn mowing client in Philadelphia:


Screenshot of cohesive image galleries, landing page designed by Titan PPC.

3. Remind visitors why they are on your page

Remember that bit about making sure your landing pages were super relevant to your visitors? Well, that sometimes means reminding them exactly why they are on your landing page.

For Titan PPC, the best way to do that is by adding a smooth scroll call-to-action (CTA) bar right below the horizontal image gallery.

Why? Because it brings a prospect right back to where you want them: the form.

It works because every time a visitor sees something visual and eye catching [like the image galleries], they’re then prompted to fill out the form.

4. Make the form match the offer

Speaking of taking prospects back to where you want them, the design of a form on your landing page should never be an afterthought. That means weighing, measuring and sifting every item from the questions to the CTA so it’s fully optimized to ensure a conversion.

It’s so key that the form matches the offer. Otherwise a prospect will just be turned off.

So if your client is offering a 100% free quote on plumbing services, then the form on your landing page should reiterate, loud and clear, that the offer comes at no price.

Sounds pretty straight-forward, doesn’t it?

But matching a form to an offer also means making sure you have a solid understanding of your target audience. As Patrick explains:

For real-estate clients, the CTA is always to download a free floor plan. But for clients that are service based, like plumbers or roofers, the CTA is always to get a free quote.

It all comes back to personalization: different types of prospects want to see different kinds of offers. According to Patrick, real-estate prospects want the feeling of exclusivity, whereas service-seeking prospects are probably just looking for the cheapest way to fix a runny faucet or leaky roof.

Titan PPC’s last tip for optimizing the form? Make the form catch your prospect’s attention.

We always put a starburst or icon in the corner of the form. It’s usually something like ‘100% free’ so it pulls a visitor in and reminds them why they want to fill it out!”

Here’s an example of what Patrick means:

Screen Shot 2016-08-30 at 2.28.41 PM
Screenshot of a high-converting landing page form, designed by Titan PPC.

From showing your visitors ultra-relevant content to making sure that content has awesome design and flow, the landing page magic formula is all about giving prospects exactly what they’re looking for and expecting to see when they land on your page.

Care to try some of Patrick’s tricks yourself?

Sign up for a free 30-day trial of Unbounce and try the Hyperion template, a design inspired by Titan PPC’s powerful elixir for high-converting landing pages.

More here: 

Do You Believe in… Conversion Magic?

Simple Recipes for No-Fail Landing Page Copy [+ Free Downloadable Worksheet]

cake ingredients
Who knew landing pages and cake had so much in common? Image via Shutterstock.

In some ways, building a landing page is like baking a cake. Certain people prefer chocolate, and others like cream fillings, but there are some fundamental formulas (for both cakes and landing pages) that are tried and tested, and proven to produce positive results.

This post is a recipe for a solid vanilla sponge landing page. For advice on design (a.k.a. the buttercream frosting), check out these posts on user experience and essential design principles.

Here are the formulas we’ll cover in this post, using examples from great landing pages:

  • Action words + Product reference = Winning headline
  • Your exact offering + Promise of ease = Winning subheader
  • Your best offerings + Worded in the form of benefit statements + Appropriate sectioning = Winning body content
  • Active words + ‘I want to…’ + A/B testing = Winning call to action

Want to test the formulas out for yourself?

Download our FREE worksheet for creating no-fail landing page copy.
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The header is always active — it wants you to do something. The header almost always directly references the product or service, as well. As Kurt Vonnegut said,

To hell with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

What are active words?

In the same way that active voice makes a sentence stronger by shifting focus onto the subject, active words help to promote action and create urgency. Active words in headers are usually verbs like build, get, launch, unlock, pledge, invest and give.

Here are a few examples of effective, action-led landing page headlines.

Codecademy winning headline
Codecademy’s headline is about as close to perfect as it gets.
Lyft winning headline
Lyft doesn’t use the “Get started” CTA we’ll talk about, but that headline is a winner.
Pro tip: To maximize your conversion efforts, ensure there’s message match between your click-through ad and headline.

Your exact offering + Promise of ease = Winning subheader

Your header is an active statement, introducing your product. Your subheader is the second wave, there to support the header and give visitors a reason to continue reading. In the subheader, you tell your audience exactly what you have to offer, and highlight how incredibly easy the whole process will be.

Easy as pie

Online, all it takes is a few taps and a few clicks to make a potentially big decision, but if it’s not easy, a lot of us won’t bother doing it. That’s especially true of a landing page, which is essentially a 24/7 elevator pitch for your business.

As a visitor to your landing page, I need to know if what you’re offering is going to benefit me, and that by handing over my details, you’re going to do most of the heavy lifting for me (at least to begin with.)

In our model for the no-fail landing page copy, the relationship between header and subheader looks like this:

Header: Introduces the idea or service in an active way (inspire your audience to do something).

Subheader: Backs up the header by giving a reason for your visitor to read on.

Outbrain winning subheader
Ooo, easy setup — just what we all love to see.

This example from Outbrain might not have the prettiest header or subheader, but both illustrate exactly what we’ve been talking about. The header is active, and so is the subheader, which tells you exactly what the main benefits of using Outbrain are, along with the promise of an easy setup.

Your best offerings + worded in the form of benefit statements + appropriate sectioning = Winning body content

The bulk of your landing page copy does the same job as the header and the subheader: it presents the benefits of your product to the user, and encourages them to act.

It’s tempting to go off-piste in the body content, to talk about your values and how you donate half of your profits to charity, but hold off. You need to make sure that your product is one your audience wants first. Stick to the benefits, and expand on those.

Break up your content

You’ll probably have more than one point to make on your landing page, but even if you don’t, breaking content up with headers and bullet points increases the chances of something catching your reader’s eye. It’s the equivalent of a supermarket arranging its products into categories and shelves, rather than bundling everything together in a big bargain bin.

With your body content, just like with your subheader, focus on what you have to offer, why it’s better than the competition’s and how you’ll do most of the heavy lifting should your prospect hand over their valuable email address. Let’s take a look at how MuleSoft connects header, subheader and body content.

Mulesoft body copy

The header: In this case, the header is just what the product is, which is likely the most appropriate approach for this audience.

The subheader: The subheader — or supporting header — focuses on the main benefit of the handbook. Clearly, MuleSoft knows its audience, and is giving it to them straight.

The body: It’s still laser-focused on those main benefits, giving visitors ample opportunity to become engaged.

Pro tip: A landing page is a pitch, and like any pitch, your job is to put forward your best offerings and do your best to secure a follow-up. If you’re struggling to prioritize your offerings, consider the following:

  • What does your product do, and how does it make your prospect’s life easier?
  • What are your product’s most ground-breaking or useful features?
  • Who does your product help?
  • How easy it is to get started?
  • Who else uses your product?

Here’s a great example from Startup Weekend. The body content answers all of the main questions, with no BS:

Startup Weekend landing page copy

Active words + “I want to…” + A/B testing = Winning CTA

Since we’re talking about no-fail copy, like blueprints for you to riff from, we’ll tell you straight up that the most common call to action phrase that makes it to live landing pages, is “Get started”. That’s followed closely by anything with the word “get” in it.

Why does ‘Get started’ work?

It needs to be clear that your call to action is where the next step happens. If you want serious leads, then the call to action button is not the place to test out your funniest one-liners. Just like the header and subheader, the call to action is active, it’s job is to create momentum.

“Get started” suggests a journey, it suggests self-improvement, which is probably why it works better than “Submit” or “Subscribe.” It could also be that “Get started” works because it finishes the sentence we’re thinking when a sign-up is close: “I want to… get started.”

Pro-tip: Best practices are best practices for a reason, but don’t use a “Get” CTA just because I suggested it. Do some research, craft a sound hypothesis and A/B test your button copy for maximum conversions.
Fluidsurveys CTA copy
FluidSurveys‘s button copy is active and timely.
Cheez burger CTA copy
Cheezburger pairs tried and true button copy with another one of our favorite words: free.
blab cake CTA copy
BlabCake uses a slightly different version of the “Get” formula for their coming soon page.


Let’s look at all of the formulas together:

  • Action words + Product reference = Winning headline
  • Your exact offering + Promise of ease = Winning subheader
  • Your best offerings + Worded in the form of benefit statements + Appropriate sectioning = Winning body content
  • Active words + ‘I want to…’ + A/B testing = Winning call to action

What you’ve got in these formulas, is the recipe for a basic vanilla sponge — the foundations of a successful landing page. Put them together and then — like any good marketer — your job becomes testing that landing page to see what works best for your audience.

What are your favorite copywriting formulas? Share ’em in the comments!

Original article – 

Simple Recipes for No-Fail Landing Page Copy [+ Free Downloadable Worksheet]

The Silent Landing Page Conversion Killer (And How to Stop It)

When creating a landing page, you’ve likely wondered, “How much copy should I include?” — a question to which copywriters usually reply, “Well, that depends…”

And it really does depend on the complexity of your offer and about a billion other factors.

Crafting concise copy is tough, so it’s only natural that many landing pages contain too many details.

You might be thinking, “Don’t added details help build a persuasive case for your landing page offer?” (Hey, sometimes you have a high-commitment offer on the table and y’gotta include what’cha gotta include.)

Well, yes… and no.

Including too much irrelevant info on your landing pages is dangerous because it dilutes your message, overwhelms visitors and hurts your conversion rate. If your visitors are slammed with excess copy, they can’t quickly determine what you’re offering, identify whether they want your offer or convert with your (buried) CTA.

Don’t stand by and watch your landing page conversions get murdered by excess copy. Image via Shutterstock.

You can often recognize a page suffering from information overload because it’ll use external links to direct visitors to even more info (oof!). Using links this way directs your visitors away from your page and, once visitors navigate elsewhere, you’ve lost a conversion opportunity.

Because excess copy is such a common problem, in this post we’ll explore:

  • How to tell if your landing page suffers from info overload
  • How to distinguish between need-to-know and nice-to-know information, and
  • How to start including nice-to-know info on your landing pages without the visual clutter that hurts conversion rates

But first…

Why your pages might suffer from information overload

Typically, people err on the side of too much copy on their landing pages for the following reasons:

  • The page is trying to be everything to everybody. Imagine if Adobe made a landing page for Photoshop and used just one page to appeal to designers, publishing houses, design schools and potential employees. This would result in including too many benefits. If you want your page to convert, you need to be clear on your persona and their specific needs.
  • You’re not clear on your target audience’s stage in the buyer journey. Is your copy trying to appeal to customers in the discovery phase (those who are encountering your product or service for the very first time), or leads in the evaluation stage (determining if they want to purchase from you or a competitor)? Your audience’s level of familiarity with you will inform the amount of detail you should include.
  • There’s confusion around how much info visitors need to convert. Sometimes offers are complex or high-commitment (like a conference ticket purchase) and you need to include fine details. Ask yourself (and test) which details are absolutely essential to persuade prospects to convert.
  • You’re disregarding web writing best practices. Large paragraphs of text are overwhelming and people don’t read web pages like they do books. Everybody scans text online, so break up your copy into easily digestible pieces.
  • The page contains more than one offer — meaning it’s not really operating as a true landing page with only one CTA). Stick to one single landing page (and a singular goal) for each offer you pitch.

An example of info overload in real life

To help illustrate how a good page and good intentions can become a victim to excess copy, let’s take a look at a real example. Art & Victus, an online monthly food subscription box, set up an Unbounce lead gen landing page to collect subscribers for their service:


The page’s CTA prompts visitors for their email address in exchange for an access code to the invite-only food service.

Great, right?

But this page has limited conversion potential because it includes so much unnecessary info. Just look at those two massive paragraphs!

Moreover, the curators of the service are featured on the page using external links to their social profiles. If visitors click these links, they leave the page and the opportunity to convert is gone. We’re lookin’ at a classic case of info overload, folks.

The large paragraphs of text are signs that Art & Victus haven’t clearly defined need-to-know info versus nice-to-know info for the target audience of this landing page. Decluttering the page to display absolutely needed info more prominently would help this brand prompt a desire for their subscription service and hopefully increase this page’s conversion rate.

Pro tip: Info overload is often a result of skipping the copy development phase in a rush to build a page. Always write your copy first, then start your design in the your page builder.

Introducing a helpful hierarchy

High-converting landing pages often follow a logical sequence of info that’s designed to persuade. The hierarchy is based on answers your target audience need to know to evaluate the offer on a base level, and these answers are provided in order of their importance (or relevance to the call to action).

While the Art & Victus’ example landing page is packed with seemingly random details on the monthly food themes, their food charity and even their reward points, these details don’t directly contribute to a visitor’s decision to want to sign up to receive a subscription box. The audience of the page needs to see other info first.

When creating copy for your pages, consider the questions your potential customers will ask and the order they might ask those questions in.

If a piece of info is directly relevant to your CTA – explaining the offer, or how to claim your offer – it’s need-to-know info. If it’s info describing an extra of any kind (like Art & Victus’ food themes, a charity your company takes part in, or your loyalty points), it’s likely nice-to-know info that you’ll want to include after your key points are covered.

It’s helpful to rank each piece of copy’s direct relevance to your CTA (like we’ve done below) as a means of deciding where it should be placed in the visual design of your page.

The more relevant something is to your CTA, the closer it should appear to the top of the linear design of your landing page.

For Art & Victus’ offer, the hierarchy might look something like this:

information hierarchy
* Including price is tricky and at your discretion for your industry/offer. You can choose to include it on your pages if you believe visitors need pricing information to convert.

But what about all those nice-to-know details?

On the example page shown above, Art & Victus had a lot of nice-to-know info they wanted to convey, like their reward points, the custom guide included in the box to help you learn about the food, profiles of the individuals preparing the boxes and more.

Luckily, there’s an easy way to strategically sprinkle in nice-to-know info on your landing pages without the visual clutter associated with information overload…

Lightboxes: A remedy for excess copy

Lightboxes are modal windows that open over a landing page, filling the screen and dimming the content behind. They allow you to prominently display content requested by your page visitor (your visitors click a button to prompt them). You can see an example lightbox for a speaker bio below:

lightbox bio

Lightboxes help you add nice-to-know details onto your landing pages (like speaker bios, featured products, your privacy policy or terms of service), all the while keeping your audience’s focus on your CTA. By designing your page with these in mind, you can include information a visitor would otherwise have to navigate away from your page to find.

Art & Victus could make their landing page offer more clear by using lightboxes to feature their nice-to-know information. After addressing all of their must-have info prominently, they could add lightboxes like:

  • “Reward Points”
  • “Also included in your box”
  • “Who curates our boxes?”

They could also use lightboxes to:

  • Outline the three different types of boxes available in their service (i.e. “Intro box,” “Amateur box” and “Expert Box”)
  • Feature the curators’ profiles for those interested (instead of linking out to external profiles and losing potential subscribers).

Each lightbox would be triggered by visitors who want or need extra info before they convert (some will, some won’t), and would help to break up the massive paragraphs on the page.

Start using lightboxes to unclutter your pages

You too can use lightboxes to combat info overload and tidy up your copy.

Here are some examples of nice-to-have content that fits nicely in lightboxes:

  • Speaker bios: Include details about your keynotes or location in a lightbox so visitors don’t navigate away from a potential ticket purchase.
  • Extras and fine details: Extra product features, limitations, terms and contest rules
  • Privacy policies: Every landing page collecting lead info should link to a privacy policy, but you don’t want to link away from your page. Include your policy in a lightbox so visitors don’t veer off-course.
  • leadgenform
  • Lead gen forms – It’s a fairly popular marketing trend to include your contact form for a call to action in a lightbox. This tactic takes advantage of buyer psychology by empowering your visitor to decide when they’re ready to fill out your form. Check out this post to learn more about why you’d want to include a form in a lightbox.

Examine your own pages for potential lightbox opportunities

Start by reviewing your existing landing pages to see where they might be suffering from info overload.

Remember to check if you’re linking out to external pages — this is a sure sign that you’re confusing need-to-know and nice-to-know information.

Start making the distinction between these two info types for your audience, organizing your page with a better information hierarchy, and you’ll have a more streamlined message and more conversions in no time.

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The Silent Landing Page Conversion Killer (And How to Stop It)

6 Landing Page Video Worst Practices to Avoid (And What to Do Instead)

Landing page video
Get fewer conversions now with garbage landing page videos. We’ll show you how! Image by Georgejmclittle via Shutterstock.
Psst! Aaron Orendorff will be speaking at our upcoming Call to Action Conference in June. Get your tickets here!

Not all landing page videos are created equal.

Some are nausea inducing. Others, “heartbreaking works of staggering genius.” (A.k.a. they convert like wildfire.)

Consider the facts:

And given how powerful video is in the online conversion process, “best practice” articles are everywhere…

But this is not one of them.

Instead, here is a list of worst practices. So you know what to avoid.


Because it’s easy to screw up your conversions with video and waste enormous amounts of time and money in the process.

With that in mind, let’s dive into six ways to make landing page videos that suck… and exactly what you should be doing instead.

1. Don’t educate

As stressed above, videos are one of the most effective tools to propel people toward that conversion.

But there’s a catch.

When Wyzowl surveyed over 230 companies for their State of Video Marketing 2016 study, 72% of respondents reported that video “improved the conversion rate of their website.” That’s up from 57% last year.

However, when those same companies were asked, “What is the primary reason you use video?” a mere 23% actually answered to “increase conversions.”

By a landslide, the number one reason was to “educate customers.” And though this finding applies to websites in general and not just landing pages, it does provide a key insight: A high-converting video is one that’s focused on meeting people’s real needs (i.e., educating them)… not on converting them.

The difference is subtle, but has huge implications. If your goal is to simply “get the click,” your video will reflect that. It’ll inevitably be about you and your product, you and your service, you and your email list, you and your social media account, you and your…

You get the idea.

If you want your landing page video to suck, then don’t educate your audience.

If you want it to shine, then teach your audience something valuable.

Sticker Mule, for instance, takes an educational approach with its video:

Sticker Mule video

In less than a minute, Sticker Mule subtly creates demand by presenting its “transfer” stickers — also known as “vinyl-cut stickers or vinyl lettering” — as a medium for your most intricate designs.

Namely, Sticker Mule educates its audience about how “after one year of research and testing [its] developed a one-of-a-kind process” that not only reduces cost but makes application easy. As pointed out, you “Simply remove the backing, set it on the surface, rub it, and then slowly pull the transfer tape off to reveal your design.”

In other words, Sticker Mule teaches its audience exactly how to use the product, with an emphasis on simplicity and durability. And as Sticker Mule CEO Anthony Thomas told me, “After adding this video to our website, we saw our conversion rate go up by 17%.”

This same fundamental principle lies behind Unbounce’s new series, The Landing Page Sessions.

Landing Page Sessions page

The videos are about how to use landing pages to capture leads… and not only is there a call to action on the page itself (“Send me new episodes”) but also the videos capture leads using Wistia’s Turnstile email collector. (I’ll say more about CTAs in point four.)

For now, here’s a snapshot of the latest numbers for The Landing Page Sessions:

LPS stats

Even more impressive than views, however, are the conversions. When the first video was less than a month old, Wistia reported, “Thus far, with three released episodes, [the] campaign’s videos have received over 3,000 views and captured over 600 email addresses.

2. Don’t make it simple

If you want your landing videos to suck, then go for complexity.

Complexity can take many shapes: technical complexity, messaging complexity, production complexity…

Consider telaFirm, the now out-of-business telephone verification service:

Notice the jargon-heavy language in response to the question, “How do I get started?”: “Verification is easy for you and your customer. telaFirm’s service is integrated into your existing website via a convenient, platform-independent API.”

In addition, instead of focusing on a single problem, a single solution and therefore a single call to action, the video attempts to pack an explanation of all telaFirm’s services into 2:22. For instance, at 1:28 they introduce “PhoneTrace,” and again rely on unnecessarily complex and technical language: “Another telaFirm advantage is the optional ability to detect and block VOIP numbers through our PhoneTrace solution …”

While initially seductive — especially if you’re going for depth — complexity is a conversion killer. It confuses, overwhelms, dilutes value and doesn’t give your audience a compelling reason to act.

The antidote is simplicity.

And this is true across the board. After surveying more than 7,000 consumers and interviewing hundreds of marketing executives and other experts globally, Harvard Business Review discovered that what makes consumers sticky — “that is, likely to follow through on an intended purchase, buy the product repeatedly, and recommend it to others” — is one common characteristic:

We looked at the impact on stickiness of more than 40 variables, including price, customers’ perceptions of a brand, and how often consumers interacted with the brand. The single biggest driver of stickiness, by far, was “decision simplicity” — the ease with which consumers can gather trustworthy information about a product and confidently and efficiently weigh their purchase options. What consumers want from marketers is, simply, simplicity.

The king of video simplicity is Dropbox. Here’s exactly what its first landing page looked like:

Dropbox video
Taking it back. Way back. Image via Wayback Machine.

What’s more, the original explainer video used wasn’t fancy at all:

As TechCruch drove home back in 2011:

The video is banal, a simple three-minute demonstration of the technology as it is meant to work, but it was targeted at a community of technology early adopters … If you’re paying attention, you start to notice that the files he’s moving around are full of in-jokes and humorous references that were appreciated by this community of early adopters.

Drew [Houston, founder and CEO of Dropbox] recounted, “It drove hundreds of thousands of people to the website. Our beta waiting list went from 5,000 people to 75,000 people literally overnight. It totally blew us away.”

Fast forward to today and DropBox’s videos are still just as simple — if not more. Now its videos focus more on the customers and how the product itself can simplify their lives with organization, connectivity and storage.

In other words, where telaFirm focuses on the features, Dropbox zeroes in on the benefits.

But what if you have a particularly complex industry or product?

Don’t fret. Even complex ideas can be put into simple terms, especially if you use video.

Take Choozle’s video for example, whose advanced digital advertising tool is explained using simple imagery, focusing on the main benefits and — of course — starting with the pain point and addressing how the company resolves it.

To ensure your video keeps it simple, ask yourself:

  • Am I zeroing in on the benefits rather than the features?
  • If I do include features, is the language easy to understand for a complete outsider?
  • Are there any technical terms that I need to explain… or cut entirely?
  • Does my video center on one problem, one solution and one call to action?

3. Don’t tell a story

The worst thing to do is build your video around your product.

This is profoundly counterintuitive, especially when you consider the videos featured above. But, as Drew Houston explained regarding Dropbox:

To the casual observer, the Dropbox demo video looked like a normal product demonstration, but we put in about a dozen Easter eggs that were tailored for the Digg audience. References to Tay Zonday and ‘Chocolate Rain’ and allusions to Office Space and XKCD. It was a tongue-in-cheek nod to that crowd, and it kicked off a chain reaction. Within 24 hours, the video had more than 10,000 Diggs.

The point is that Dropbox’s landing page video had a host of connection points that resonated with the story its target audience already identified with. This is exactly why the Easter eggs worked. The references and allusions were tailored to reach the company’s target audience by calling subtle attention to the message: “Dropbox is just like you. We love the same things you love. Our story is your story.”

But, how do you create a compelling story when time is of the essence?

To create a compelling story, you need four ingredients: a goal, a hero, a problem and a supporter. The following graphic is a simplified version of what’s known as the Hero’s Journey or the Fairy Tale Model from Storytelling: Branding in Practice:


But what does this look like in an actual landing page video?

Take a look at GetResponse’s introduction to email marketing:

First, the goal or mission: In order to grow, online business need to “build and maintain relationships with people interested in its product or service.”

Second, the hero: The business owners themselves.

Third, the obstacle: Spending money to get visitors only to have them “scroll, click, leave, and never come back.” The video also includes two other common obstacles: lack of time and lack of expertise. However, every obstacle is framed as an obstacle to the original mission.

Fourth, the supporter: Notice that GetResponse is not the hero. Instead, the business owner is the protagonist (at the risk of sounding like a freshman English professor). GetResponse’s only role is to help guide the hero toward the solution, and that’s exactly how each feature is presented — not as an abstract function, but as a key benefit to move the hero toward the original goal.

4. Don’t have a compelling CTA

Compelling CTAs are the holy grail of landing pages… the same is true for video.

The truth is you can have the most educational, story-driven and downright enjoyable landing page video, but without a click-worthy CTA, it’s all for nothing.

To start, your video’s CTA should align not only with the content of the video itself, but also with the landing page. This doesn’t just mean being consistent. More importantly, it means being singular. Naturally, you can have more than one button. But make sure every button has the same driving outcome, and make it incredibly clear what you want the user to do is also at the top of the list.

This is where design principles come in, namely what Oli calls the attention ratio. He explains that an effective landing page should have one goal and just one way to get there. This increases the chances of your lead taking your desired action.

So, what’s this mean for your landing page video? Only give your audience one option. Eliminate all else.

You can use your videos as creative calls to action that promote your best content, guide leads along the buyer’s journey, gain subscribers, bring viewers to your website and even gather their contact information.

To do this, there are essentially two approaches available: off-video CTA and in-video CTA.

Off-video CTA

For the first approach, take a look at Wistia’s landing page. The central goal is to drive leads to request a demo. The team uses their landing page video as a supportive resource to provide educational information, as well as to offer a push toward their goal of getting those demo requests. However, be wary of not using a contrasting color for your CTA, like the one below.

Wistia video
Watch the video. Request a demo. Image via Wistia.

Here’s another great example that includes using a full form right next to the video as a way to unlock it:

Unwebinar landing page
Check out that sexy directional cue. Image via Unbounce.

In-video CTA

For the second approach, you can experiment with adding CTAs within your videos as gates.

Gating your video before it starts will pre-screen leads. Are they actually interested in viewing your video? Or are they just meandering around the web? Using a gate in the middle of your video is like giving them a teaser and then asking, “Want more?” Gating at the end of video will mean you’ve already qualified a viewer’s interest, so you have the opportunity to push them deeper into the sales funnel with more force.

While the video itself isn’t on a landing page but rather a microsite, Unbounce took this approach by adding a gate to its first Landing Page Sessions video at the two-minute mark using Wistia’s Turnstile:

LPS gate
Excuse me, do you want more? Image via Unbounce.

As for landing pages, Wistia employed this method and tested an off-video CTA (A) against an in-video CTA (B):

Wistia A
Off-Video CTA (A). Image via Wistia.
Wistia B
In-Video CTA (B). Image via Wistia.

Who won?

The off-video version (A) converted at 6%, which is pretty impressive. However, the in-video version (B) dominated, yielding an 11% conversion rate for “the same sample traffic.” That’s an 83.3% increase.

Whatever method you choose, in the end, your CTA is the golden lever to your conversions. It’s what ultimately prompts your visitor to deliver themselves unto the heaven that is your product. So make sure you make it clear, easy and relevant.

5. Don’t pay attention to the page design

Another huge conversion killer is investing all your time and energy in one amazing video… but ignoring how it appears and functions on the page.

So how do you build an effective video landing page and not just an effective landing page video?

First, keep the design simple and consistent. Do this by matching the font, color scheme and overall feel of the page to the video itself.

Next, make the video the hero by using size as its dominating factor. Size is perceived as relative to importance, so naturally, if you want your audience to watch the video, make it the most prominent element on the landing page.

As Oli Gardner puts it in his ebook on attention-driven design:

Simply stated: The bigger something is, the more noticeable it is. Size is related to Dominance, but the difference is that Size is relative to everything on the page — or page section, as opposed to its proximal relatives. Hence, the largest thing on the page can be perceived as the most important.

CrazyEgg’s previous landing page is a phenomenal example of this principle in action:

Crazy Egg page

What’s more, Neil Patel reported that video drove “an extra $21,000 a month in new income.”

6. Don’t disable autoplay

Enabling autoplay is like forcing your way into your visitors’ world… without their permission.

It’s no secret that video-marketing experts Maneesh Garg, Sarah Nochimowski and Maneesh Garg all hate autoplay. And when Ask Your Target Market posed the question, “What do you think about videos that play automatically on sites like Facebook and Instagram?” the results were clear:

So much hate for autoplay. Image via AYTM.

Admittedly, those number apply more directly to social media. But the sentiments behind them are nearly universal.

Full-stack marketing agency KlientBoost has a whole list of landing page video commandments, the first being “Do. Not. Autoplay. (Or Thou Shalt Be Smited).”

Autoplay is intrusive. It’s pushy. And nobody likes to have to unexpectedly scramble for the volume knob. Resist the urge to overwhelm your audience with the video that you’re excited about showing. Disable autoplay and instead make your play button obvious and prominent.

Make your landing page video suck…

There you have it.

Six surefire ways to make sure your landing page video sucks:

  1. Don’t educate.
  2. Don’t make it simple.
  3. Don’t tell a story.
  4. Don’t have a compelling CTA.
  5. Don’t pay attention to the page design.
  6. Don’t disable auto-play

Of course, if you would like to make landing page videos that convert like wildfire… might I suggesting doing the exact opposite.

If you have your own examples of landing page videos that suck (or some that don’t), be sure to share them in the comments.

Landing Page Video Webinar

See original article: 

6 Landing Page Video Worst Practices to Avoid (And What to Do Instead)

9 Facebook Ad Campaign Examples Critiqued for Conversion

So you’re running a Facebook ad campaign.

You’ve created the best Facebook ad your client or company has ever seen: eye-catching photos, the world’s best copy, click-worthy headlines and on-point targeting.

Now, you sit and wait.

But as time goes by, you notice that you’re getting a high number of clicks but only a small number of conversions.

These aren’t the results you expected. Your Facebook ad’s potential has gone up in smoke.

GiF of GOB failing at magic
Don’t let all that hard work go up in smoke.

There are many factors that can increase Facebook ad conversion rates, but at the end of the day, running a successful Facebook ad campaign is not just about creating click-worthy ads. It’s about guaranteeing that leads follow a seamless path from beginning to end

Running a successful Facebook ad campaign is about creating a seamless path from begining to end.
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After the click, leads need to land on a dedicated landing page that clearly outlines what your ad promised. Otherwise, you leave them feeling as though they’ve made a “bad click” and have wound up in the wrong place.

Not sure what we mean?

Let’s learn from the mistakes of others. We’ve trawled the internet and looked at over 50 different Facebook ad campaign examples, from the ad to their corresponding landing pages. We picked out 9 of our favorites to demonstrate what great Facebook ad campaigns do (and don’t) look like.

Each critique will offer you a few basic tips that can help drive down Facebook ad costs all while giving leads the confidence they need to convert. Let’s dig in.

1. Skillshare

Skillshare offers you a plethora of videos to learn new creative skills.

Their ad is colorful and contrasts with the blue and white of the Facebook news feed. Coupled with a clear value proposition (“Unlock your potential with hundreds of online classes”), this ad is super noticeable and click-worthy:

skillshare facebook ad example critique

And the use of the word “free” doesn’t hurt. Let’s see where I land when I click.

Skillshare landing page example and critique

At first glance, the page I landed on has nothing to do with the ad I clicked. The design and copy are drastically different, leading me to believe that I made a “bad” click.

Things that are not working:

  1. The ad mentioned a free Adobe Illustrator class, but it took some time for me to notice that the video at the top is about the class in question. That’s poor message match — a headline reassuring me that I’m in the right place (by borrowing copy from the ad) would go a long way.
  2. The eye-catching image used in the ad isn’t represented on the page I landed on — not even in the video still. Better design match — the measure of how closely the design of a landing page matches the ad that brought visitors there —  would create a better experience for prospects and probably increase conversions down the line, too.
  3. At first glance, it seems that there is no call to action button or banner that shows people can they sign up for the limited time offer from the ad. A closer looks shows a soft call to action above the video: “Learn the Ins and Outs of Illustrator.” Make it easy for people to convert with a big, clear CTA that matches the offer from your ad.
  4. This Facebook ad leads to a webpage with lots of video, tabs and reviews — in other words, there is no dedicated landing page with a single goal. As our own Oli Gardner says: “One page. One purpose. Period.” Your leads click on your ad to cash in on your offer. Don’t distract them with other noise.

2. CoPromote

CoPromote provides content creators with a way to grow their audience by cross-promoting each other’s work.

And as connoisseurs of content, they sure know how to attract attention with their Facebook ads. Their clever ads — a self-assured cow riding shotgun with a dolphin and a photo of Pitbull superimposed with an impressive stat — are sure to stand out from the usual news feed noise.

CoPromote Cow and Dolphin facebook ad example critique
CoPromote Pitbull facebook ad example critique

But after the click, does CoPromote deliver on the landing page front? Both ads lead to the same in-app landing page:

CoPromote landing page example and critique
Page I landed on after clicking CoPromote’s ad.

There are so many questions going through my mind. Am I still in Facebook? Where did Pitbull go? Is this just a fashion brand’s landing page?

Things that are not working:

  1. Both ads lead to a single, generic in-app page. Every ad — with its unique copy and design — should have its own dedicated landing page. Generic pages like this one cause anxiety because they don’t continue the conversation you started in your ad.
  2. The in-app Facebook landing page could work, if only it elaborated on the messaging from the ad. Ads have limited real estate and require you to be concise — but the corresponding landing page has extra space and should be used to clarify the offer, elaborate on benefits and squash doubts leads might have about joining.
  3. There is nothing about the landing page that matches visually with the ad that brought you there. In fact, their choice of such different imagery is jarring. Is this a fashion app?
  4. While the in-app Facebook landing page keeps people on the same page and has a singular goal, there are still so many places people can click to distract them from the main goal of “Join Now.” Especially if they are simultaneously being retargeted in the sidebar by other brands. That makes for pretty poor attention ratio.

3. Visa meets Pizza Hut

In this ad, Visa has joined forces with Pizza Hut to offer some sweet discounts. This ad, specifically, offers 50% off your next order when you use your Visa card at the checkout. What a cheesy deal:

Visa and Pizza Hut facebook ad example critique

Especially if you haven’t eaten recently, the crisp image of the pizza is the first thing to grab your attention. The other frame shows a phone with the Pizza Hut phone app — pretty sweet context of use. You can just picture yourself using the app to get your hands on the pizza on the left.

So how does their landing page fare?

 Visa and Pizza Hut landing page example and critique

This landing page has a clear offer that is front and center: “50% off your order if you use Visa Checkout.” All in all, pretty decent message and design match. It’s a smooth trajectory: you’ve clicked on a pizza deal and ended up on with a pizza deal.

Things that are not working:

  1. The ad copy could be a little more specific and much more delightful. The main offer is subtly buried in a wall of text or on the photo when it should be front and center in a headline.
  2. Though the CTA is bold and clear, there are a few clickable URLs on the page that could serve as conversion leaks.
  3. The “Visa Checkout” logo looks like a button but isn’t. This creates confusion and friction.

4. Target

As the second largest discount retailer, Target shares weekly deals on Facebook to entice you to buy.

The ad below advertises a lovely “buy one, get one 50% off” discount.

Target facebook ad example critique

The ad design is minimalist, with hero shots of nice-looking people who are smiling (I’m assuming) because they’re loving those comfy sweaters. But what happens when you click on ‘em?

Target landing page example and critique

Is it throwback Thursday? I’ve haven’t seen a website that looked like a brochure in ages.

Things that are not working:

  1. The beautiful minimalism of the ad is lost in a sea of options on the landing page. Although the weekly deals may apply to more items than the sweaters, I really did expect to see more sweaters since it’s what the Facebook ad alluded to. A landing page with a singular campaign goal or even a curated list of items might be more effective here.
  2. The various font sizes sprawled across the page make for confusing information hierarchy. What is the headline? Which copy should the lead be focusing on when they land on this brochure-style page? It’s hard to keep focused and that can cause prospects to bounce.
  3. There are so many numbers detailing different price points that it’s easy to forgot about the 50% deal. One page, one purpose, please.
  4. There are so many places for me to click on this brochure-page I don’t know where to start. With a 12:1 attention ratio, I could spend hours clicking — but I’m much more likely to get overwhelmed and bounce.

5. MetLife

Metlife is one of the largest insurance and benefits providers in the world. This Facebook ad is selling car insurance as a work benefit option:

Metlife landing page example and critique

MetLife has used Peanuts characters as part of their marketing for many years, whether in television or printed ads. Here we see the team “getting ahead” on their tandem bicycle.

But where does this cute ad lead?

Metlife landing page example and critique]

… To this landing page with a photo of a woman sitting in her car.

Things that are not working:

  1. While the image of the car certainly relates to the auto insurance mentioned in the ad, the drastically different imagery creates a jarring experience for visitors. This landing page feels cold in comparison to the warm, friendly Facebook ad.  Where’d Snoopy go?
  2. The ad copy isn’t mirrored in the landing page. Subtle differences like “car insurance” instead of “auto insurance” create cognitive dissonance and create doubt in the mind of prospects.
  3. The landing page design leaves a lot of blank spaces on the righthand side. It’s distracting and makes the page seem broken. Especially for a service like insurance where prospects need to give up a lot of personal information, you need to do everything you can to make your operation seem trustworthy.

6. Glassdoor

Glassdoor provides employer reviews that help guide people hunting for a job.

This Facebook ad is meant to attract recruiters and HR professionals to Glassdoor’s Annual Employer Branding Summit in San Francisco. It shows a diligent man working on his laptop.

Glassdoor facebook ad example critique

So where do leads go once they click on this nice image?

 Glassdoor landing page example critique

Oh boy. Where should I start? There are obvious design and message match issues, but what else is awry here?

Things that are not working:

  1. For starters, the ad itself has room for improvement. The two hashtags (#EmployerBranding and #GDsummit) really only serve as a distraction from the main goal of the ad: get people to click on the CTA. Hashtags can help bring awareness to your event, but are probably better served in a piece of content rather than an ad that you’re spending dollars on.
  2. While the event registration page does a great job of incorporating social proof by flaunting their speakers, it falls short on selling the benefits of attending the conference. Especially for such a large ticket item, an agenda overview isn’t enough to communicate to prospects why they should attend. A trailer video could go a long way in creating hype and showing potential attendees what value the conference will bring them.

7. Growth Geeks

Growth Geeks is a marketplace for gaining access to professionals services in topics such as growth hacking, performance marketing, social media and more.

Their ad below flaunts one of their professionals: a “growth geek” named Vincent who can be hired on the site for help with Facebook ads. The call to action invites you to “Click here to meet Vincent:”

Growth Geeks facebook ad example critique

So what happens when you enthusiastically click?

Growth Geeks landing page example and critique

Vincent? :(

Things that are not working:

  1. Once you click through, you’re taken to a catch-all page where you won’t learn more about Vincent or even other Facebook ad experts. Instead, you get a promo video and a massive, overwhelming list of other professionals providing different services. It’s great that they’re created specific ads for specific types of professionals, but their landing pages should be just as specific. If a lead clicked to meet Vincent, they should be taken to a page where they can do just that!That’s not to say that you need to work overtime creating 50 corresponding landing pages for each of your ads. Tools like dynamic text replacement can help you leverage a single page to be customized for each unique ad you create. Because at the end of the day, more specificity = better Facebook ad conversion rates.

8. Udemy

Udemy is an online educational marketplace that provides over 30,000 courses on a variety of topics from coding to productivity.

The copy for Udemy’s ad below is a bit of a mouthful, with a lot of technical information packed into a single ad. It might be worth testing a contrasting color — this blue is similar enough to Facebook blue that it could potentially blend into the newsfeed.

Udemy facebook ad example critique

Let’s see what’s beyond the click.

Udemy landing page example and critique

Things that are not working:

  1. The sheer amount of copy on this page is overwhelming. While they do a good job of speaking to benefits and setting expectations, it might be worth testing against a shorter page with a selection of chapters. If the long landing page works best, it might be a good idea to include another CTA button near the bottom, to capture diligent prospects who read the entire page.
  2. Similarly, the social proof gets buried under the massive course breakdown. It might be worth testing placing some ratings up top, closer to the CTA, for prospects who will never scroll all the way down.
  3. The color palette and imagery from the ad aren’t reflected in the landing page. Using a similar still in the video on the landing page could be a smart way to recall the Facebook ad.
  4. The “Take this course” CTA button is off to the right and easy to miss, especially next to the large video still. This would be a great thing to test.

So what does a delightful Facebook ad campaign look like?

So we’ve seen a ton of facebook ad campaign examples that leave much to be desired — but what does a successful Facebook ad campaign look like? Let’s have a look at a company that is leading with clarity in their ads and landing pages.

9. Hired

One of the best examples out of the 50 plus examples I looked at was from Hired: a job marketplace for sales professionals.

Their ads use an eye-catching green that contrasts well will Facebook’s classic blue and white. Better yet, their copy is short and sweet and drives straight to the pain point their lead may be experiencing:

Hired facebook ad example critique

And the corresponding landing page?

Hired landing page example and critique


Things that are working:

  1. The landing page expands on their value proposition by offering specific benefits: “5-10 Job Interviews with one application.”
  2. They use much of the same language from their ad on their landing page, though they may want to test matching their headline from their ad exactly with that of their landing page.
  3. The color palette from their ad carries across to their landing page, with an eye-popping CTA button in that familiar bright green.
  4. Hired’s landing page has a CTA button at the top and two at the bottom. Some offers are more complex or higher commitment, and may require longer landing pages to really make the sale. If that’s the case, you want to be sure to have multiple CTAs so that people have one in reach to click when they’re sufficiently persuaded.
  5. All of the call to action buttons on their landing page have one goal: to get leads to sign up. That said, there are a few hyperlinks on this page and Hired may want to test removing them to see if that helps focus attention.

All in all, an awesome effort. Way to go, Hired!

The bottom line

We don’t have access to these companies’ stats or conversion rate data — these ad campaigns may have actually produced significant results. But at what cost?

When your Facebook ad is disconnected from the corresponding landing page, you create poor experiences for them. And that’s bad news for everyone.

So don’t cut any corners with your Facebook ad campaigns. Continue the conversation from your ad to your landing page, and keep prospects focused on the singular goal of your campaign. No distractions.

Read article here:  

9 Facebook Ad Campaign Examples Critiqued for Conversion