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So You Want to Persuade Users? Make Things Simple!




So You Want to Persuade Users? Make Things Simple!

Lyndon Cerejo



(This article is kindly sponsored by Adobe.) The persuasive design toolbox is filled with powerful tools based on psychology. These tools range from Cialdini’s set of six principles of persuasion to ten times that number of Persuasive Patterns. Presented with all these methods, it can be tempting to use all of them to cover all possible bases, using a shotgun approach, hoping that one will resonate with your target users.

However, applying persuasion principles and patterns in a haphazard manner just ends up being persuasive design clutter. Like user experience design, designing for everyone is designing for no one. Randomly thrown together persuasive techniques will also make users feel manipulated, not in control, making them abandon the site or experience. The key to persuading your users is to keep it simple: using focused persuasive techniques and tactics that will work for your users.

Persuasion Funnel

AIDA is an acronym used in marketing and advertising to describe the stages that a customer goes through in the purchase process. The stages of Attention, Interest, Desire and Action, generically follow a series of cognitive (thinking) and affective (feeling) stages culminating in a behavioral (doing e.g. purchase or trial) stage. This should sound familiar since this is what we do through design, especially persuasive design.

When it comes to persuasive design, users go through a few stages between Awareness and Action, and the design should guide them from one stage to the next. I don’t have a clever acronym for it (yet), but the stages the design has to take the users through are:

  • Awareness
  • Relevant
  • Credible
  • Usable
  • Desirable
  • Persuasive
  • Action



(Large preview)

When users are contemplating an action (like booking a hotel room), they have to be aware of your site, app, or experience. Once they begin their journey on your site, they quickly evaluate the experience and either proceed to the next step or leave and go elsewhere. With fewer users continuing to subsequent stages, the number of users at each stage begins to resemble the shape of a funnel as shown above.

Let’s peek inside what could be going on in hypothetical users’ minds as they go through the experience of booking a hotel room for New Year’s Eve in Times Square, and some of the reasons they may drop off in each stage.

Awareness

“Hmmm… Where do I start? Hotel chains promise the lowest rate if we book directly with them, but I won’t be able to see other hotel options around Times Square. Hotel… Maybe I should try an online travel agency like Trivago (looks like the Trivago guy / Trivago girl advertising works!) to find a wider range of hotels. I’m going to also quickly Google it to see if there are other options.”

Users have to be aware of your site, app or experience to use it — Duh!

Relevant

“I found HotelTonight on Google. It looks like a great way to get rooms last minute, but not this far in advance — it’s not relevant to me.”

If your experience is not relevant to the task they are trying to accomplish, users will leave and try elsewhere. If your products or services are relevant, but not findable by the user, work on your navigation, search, and content layout to ensure your products and services are visible. Everything does not have to be one click away, but if the user gets the scent of information, or cues that make them think they are on the right path, they will follow the trail to that information.

Credible

“This design looks like it hasn’t been updated since the [GeoCities era](http://www.arngren.net/).

— Warning bells go off in head —

I’m out of here.”

Users are aware of many of the risks available online and look for trust indicators including a known brand and domain, secure site, professional design, real-world contact information and third-party certificates or badges. Incorporate these elements to create a comfort level for the user.

Usable

“I can’t figure out where things are in the navigation, and the search results had hundreds of unhelpful results. The homepage has nice big images, but that meant I had to scroll before I could see any real content.”

Usability is surprisingly still an issue with many sites. Follow User Experience best practices during design, and test with users to validate that the design is usable.

Desirable

“This reminds me of Craigslist — it is usable, but the design does not make me want to stay and use it. I’ll try that other hotel website that provides an immersive, interactive experience as I search for hotels.”

As much as we like to believe it, users’ decisions are not always rational, and very often driven by emotion, and we can address that through design. Usability is about making it work well; this is about making it beautiful as well.

In his book Emotional Design, Don Norman explains: “Attractive things do work better — their attractiveness produces positive emotions, causing mental processes to be more creative, more tolerant of minor difficulties.” Don talks about the three different aspects of design: visceral, behavioral, and reflective. Visceral design is about appearance, behavioral about the pleasure and effectiveness of use, and reflective design involves the rationalization and intellectualization of a product.

Persuasive

“Oh, Wow! That’s a long list of hotels, with plenty of availability for New Year’s Eve. There’s no real reason to book now. I’ll just come back to book after Thanksgiving…”

The user was interested, able, and willing, but the design did not motivate him to take intended action. Use relevant persuasion techniques that apply to your user to move them toward the desired action.


Examples of persuasive methods while shopping on Travelocity for a hotel room for New Year’s Eve.


Examples of persuasive methods while shopping on Travelocity for a hotel room for New Year’s Eve. (Large preview)

Action

“Oh, Wow! 65% of hotels are already booked in this area for New Year’s Eve. I better make a reservation now. . This looks like a nice hotel, and it also offers free cancellation – I’m reserving it now!”

The user who made it to this stage was interested, able, and willing, and the design nudged him to take intended action of making a reservation before leaving the site.

Persuasion is not about applying all available principles and patterns to your designs, but systematically identifying how you can address users’ barriers and motivators during each step of the journey, and guiding your users through the funnel to take the desired action.

The KISS Approach

Most of us are familiar with the acronym KISS: “Keep It Simple, Stupid,” a principle advocating simplicity as a key goal in design by avoiding unnecessary complexity. Let’s borrow that acronym for a 4-step approach to persuasive design.

Know The Right Behavior To Target

The first step is knowing the behavior you would like to target, and identifying the simplest action that can lead to that behavior change. Take the example of term life insurance companies who, to put it very bluntly, stand to benefit if their policyholders are healthy and don’t die while the policy is active. While those companies have a long-term ambitious goal of helping their policyholders lead healthy lives (mutually beneficial), that could be broken down into a simpler target behavior of walking 10,000 steps daily. This behavior is simple to understand, achieve, measure, and contributes to the long-term goal of healthier policyholders.

One such insurance company is offering new policyholders the latest Apple Watch for a low initial down payment ($25). The ongoing monthly payments can be waived each month that the policyholder leads an active lifestyle and exercises regularly (e.g. walks about 10,000 steps a day). About half the people who participated have achieved monthly goals, despite potential privacy implications.


John Hancock Term Life Insurance Apple Watch offer targets walking about 10,000 steps a day.


John Hancock Term Life Insurance Apple Watch offer targets walking about 10,000 steps a day. (Large preview)

Identify Barriers And Motivators

User research for persuasive design digs below the surface thinking level to the feeling level, and moves beyond the rational to the emotional level, as shown below. Getting to know your users at a deeper level will help you use psychology to focus your design to get users to engage in the target behavior identified above. User interviews that focus on users’ feelings and emotions are used to uncover barriers and motivators they consciously or subconsciously face while trying to achieve the target behavior. This helps us identify which blocks we need to weaken, and which motivators we should strengthen, through persuasive design techniques and tactics.


Tip of the iceberg user research diagram


(Large preview)

Simplify The Experience

Simplify the design experience of the first stages of the funnel, as users go through the mental verifications of relevancy, credibility, and usability of the experience. This includes making it easy for the user to find what they are looking for, credibility indicators like professional design, contact information, and third-party certificates or badges, as well as addressing usability issues. As Steve Krug put it very succinctly: “Don’t Make Me Think”.

Select Appropriate Triggers

Users who have made it this far in the process are interested in something you have to offer. As a designer, you have to nudge them to take the desired action. A good starting point is Robert Cialdini’s, six key principles of persuasion:

  1. Reciprocity
    People are obliged to give something back in exchange for receiving something.
  2. Scarcity
    People want more of those things they can have less of.
  3. Authority
    People follow the lead of credible, knowledgeable experts.
  4. Consistency
    People like to be consistent with the things they have previously said or done.
  5. Liking
    People prefer to say yes to those that they like.
  6. Consensus (Social Proof)
    Especially when they are uncertain, people will look to the actions and behaviors of others to determine their own.

These principles can be applied through dozens of different persuasive design patterns and methods, some of which have been previously published on Smashing Magazine (patterns, triggers), or in the books listed in the resources at the end. As you may notice, many persuasive patterns are related to UI patterns, because part of persuasion is reducing friction and simplifying what the user needs to do at any given point in time. For example, the persuasive pattern of Limited Choice can be realized through UI Pattern of Progressive Disclosure.

Given that there are dozens of patterns and methods (depending on where you look), it is important to selectively use methods that will resonate with your users. Applying all design patterns in the hope of some working will result in persuasion clutter and overwhelm the user, possibly driving them away from your site.

Examining Persuasion

Let’s take a closer look at the earlier example of the term life insurance through the eyes of someone who is motivated (shopping for life insurance) and has the ability (to pay monthly life insurance cost). Like me, let’s assume that this user was made aware of this through a sponsored post on Facebook. During the stages of awareness and relevance, there are a few persuasive triggers as shown below that make the user click “Learn More”.


facebook


(Large preview)

Clicking the “Learn More” button takes the user to a landing page that we will examine in sections for a persuasive flow:




(Large preview)

The user’s primary motivation in shopping for term life insurance is: “Protect Family,” and a big barrier is “High Cost.”

  1. Reputable Name (Credibility)
    Even if you’ve not heard of this company, John Hancock is a famous person and the term used as a synonym in the United States for one’s signature. The company reinforces it’s longevity later on the page.
  2. Toll-free Number (Credibility)
    Established and legitimate organization.
  3. Message Framing
    Live healthy, is also reinforced by the image of a family enjoying outdoors.
    “This life insurance product will help me live longer, lead a happy life like them, and protect my family in case something happens, and won’t cost much.”

  4. People Like Me & Association
    This family looks like mine (or the family next door) — I can see myself in this wide-open field (visceral and reflective triggers).
  5. Extrinsic Reward
    An Apple watch for $25 — that’s a bonus here!
  6. Visual Cueing
    The person in focus (stereotypical breadwinner) has his gaze directly focused at the form below, leading the user to the next step.
  7. Foot In The Door
    This quote won’t cost anything — zip, nada.
  8. Computer As A Social Actor
    The information takes a conversational tone and format, not the usual form in rows and columns. The information seems reasonable to generate a quote.
  9. Commitment & Consistency
    By filling this quick, easy, and free form, chances are that the user will act consistently and proceed when it comes to the next step (application), unless there’s another barrier (price, benefits, etc.)



    (Large preview)

  10. Control
    The user has a choice of devices.
  11. Extrinsic Rewards
    More rewards to be earned.
  12. Control
    The user controls how much they pay (the more active, the less you’ll pay). Also, in case the user does is not active, the cost is framed as just $13 (for a month).
  13. Credibility
    The company reinforces longevity and protector of America.
  14. Authority
    Licensed Coverage Coach (not just a sales agent).
  15. Flow
    One way to keep users in the flow and not get distracted is by disabling the social media links (which could raise the question: why display them?).

That took longer to dissect and read than it does in real life, where most of this is processed consciously and subconsciously in a few seconds, often with a glance or two.

Apart from the methods establishing credibility, the persuasive methods are used to strengthen the primary motivator of “Protect Family” (get insurance, extrinsic reward will help me live longer for my family), and weaken the barrier of “High Cost” (low monthly cost, additional savings, no ongoing watch payments). Note how they work together and don’t conflict or clutter the experience.

Conclusion

Persuasion is all around us, in our everyday lives. As designers, we can use ethical persuasive design methods to get users to take some action. With plenty of persuasive methods available, we have to be selective about what we use. We can use the KISS approach to keep it simple:

  • Know the right behavior to target
  • Identify barriers and motivators
  • Simplify the experience
  • Select appropriate triggers

KISS also reminds us to Keep It Simple & Straightforward, by selecting a simple target behavior, simplifying the experience for the user, and by applying persuasive techniques that will lead to the target behavior without overwhelming the user.

Further Reading

This article is part of the UX design series sponsored by Adobe. Adobe XD tool is made for a fast and fluid UX design process, as it lets you go from idea to prototype faster. Design, prototype, and share — all in one app. You can check out more inspiring projects created with Adobe XD on Behance, and also sign up for the Adobe experience design newsletter to stay updated and informed on the latest trends and insights for UX/UI design.

Smashing Editorial
(yk, il)


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So You Want to Persuade Users? Make Things Simple!

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8 Website Redesign Tips, Examples and Best Practices

website redesign tips

Every website redesign is different. I’ve worked on a ton of them, so I should know. What’s important, though, is that you take a strategic approach to your website redesign. Know what isn’t working, what does currently work, and what goals you wish to achieve. Let’s look at some of my favorite techniques for creating a website redesign strategy and implementing it for maximum ROI. If you’d like to skip around, here are the topics I’ll address: How Do You Know If Your Website Needs a Redesign? How to Start the Website Redesign Process 8 Website Redesign Tips and Best…

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8 Website Redesign Tips, Examples and Best Practices

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Poor Sales? Maybe You Need a Website Redesign: Here’s How

website redesign

Did you know that poor web design can hurt conversions and sales? An unattractive site deserves a website redesign. No matter what your company size or industry is, though, it’s crucial that you take a strategic approach to your website redesign. Know what isn’t working, what does currently work, and what goals you wish to achieve. Otherwise, how will you take advantage of your existing web traffic? Worse, what happens if your web design is causing people to avoid visiting your site at all? Let’s look at some of my favorite techniques for creating a website redesign strategy and implementing…

The post Poor Sales? Maybe You Need a Website Redesign: Here’s How appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Poor Sales? Maybe You Need a Website Redesign: Here’s How

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A Simple Guide to Improve User Experience and Boost Conversion Rates

improve user experience

I’ve written a lot about user experience over the years: how to improve user experience, when to implement it, and how to test for it. There’s a reason I cover it so widely. It touches every aspect of your business, from SEO to customer service. If you owned a brick-and-mortar store, you would worry about things like end cap displays, signage, aisle navigation, and sales support. Those things matter online, too, except they’re more difficult to observe and track without specialized tools. You can’t enter your customers’ homes and look over their shoulders while they check out your social media…

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A Simple Guide to Improve User Experience and Boost Conversion Rates

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The Definitive Guide to Improve User Experience and Boost Conversion Rates

improve user experience

I’ve written a lot about user experience over the years: how to improve user experience, when to implement it, and how to test for it. There’s a reason I cover it so widely, though. It touches every aspect of your business, from SEO to customer service. If you owned a brick-and-mortar store, you would worry about things like end cap displays, signage, aisle navigation, and sales support. Those things matter online, too, except they’re more difficult to observe and track without specialized tools. You can’t enter your customers’ homes and look over their shoulders while they check out your social…

The post The Definitive Guide to Improve User Experience and Boost Conversion Rates appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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The Definitive Guide to Improve User Experience and Boost Conversion Rates

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How Mobile Optimization Can Affect your Conversions in 2018

mobile optimization

For a long time, responsive design dominated the web as the format of choice for business and personal sites. Now, however, mobile optimization has begun to gain credence as a potentially preferable strategy. Mobile optimization refers to optimizing a website specifically for mobile devices. Instead of simply compressing and slightly rearranging the content on the screen, you design the entire experience for smaller screens. You’ve probably heard the term “mobile-friendly.” It’s a bit outdated, so even though it sounds like a good thing, it’s not enough. People are using their mobile devices more and more, as I’ll explain in a…

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How Mobile Optimization Can Affect your Conversions in 2018

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UX Your Life: Applying The User-Centered Process To Your Life (And Stuff)




UX Your Life: Applying The User-Centered Process To Your Life (And Stuff)

JD Jordan



Everything is designed, whether we make time for it or not. Our smartphones and TVs, our cars and houses, even our pets and our kids are the products of purposeful creativity.

So why not our lives?

A great many of us are, currently, in a position where we might look at our jobs — or even our relationships — and wonder, “Why have I stayed here so long? Is this really where I want or even need to be. Am I in a position where I can do something about it?”

The simple — and sometimes harsh — the answer is that we don’t often make intentional decisions about our lives and our careers like we do in our work for clients and bosses. Instead, having once made the decision to accept a position or enter a relationship, inertia takes over. We become reactive rather than active participants in our own lives and, like legacy products, are gradually less and less in touch with the choices and the opportunities that put us there in the first place.

Or, in UX terms: We stop doing user research, we stop iterating, and we stop meeting our own needs. And our lives and careers come less usable and enjoyable as a result of this negligence.

Thankfully, all the research, design, and testing tools we need to intentionally design our lives are easily acquired and learned. And you don’t need special training or a trust fund to do it. All you need is the willingness to ask yourself difficult questions and risk change.

You might just end up doing the work you want, having the life-work balance you need, and both of those with the time you need for what’s most important to you.

I’d be remiss if I didn’t admit, the idea of applying UX tools to my life didn’t come quickly. UX design principles are applicable to a much wider range of projects than the discipline typically concerns itself, but it was only through some dramatic personal trials that I was finally compelled to test these methods against my own life and those of my family. That is to say, though, I’m not just an evangelist for these methods, I also use them.


Palo Duro on a weekday


What does your office look like? This was a Tuesday — a workday! — after my wife and I redesigned our lives and careers and became business partners. (Large preview)

So how do you UX your life?

Below, I’m going to introduce you to four tools and techniques you can use to get started:

  1. Your Life In Weeks
    A current state audit of your past.
  2. Eisenhower Charts
    A usability assessment for your present and your priorities.
  3. Affinity Mapping
    A qualitative method for identifying — and later retrospecting on — your success metrics (KPIs).
  4. Prototyping Life
    Because you’ve got to try it before you live it.

But first…

Business As Usual: The User-Centered Design Process

Design thinking and its deliberate creative and experimental process provides an excellent blueprint for how to perform user research on yourself, create the life you need, and test the results.

This user-centered design process is nothing new. In many ways, people have been practicing this iterative process since our ancestors first talked to each other and sketched on cave walls. Call it design thinking, UX, or simply problem-solving — it’s much the same from agency to agency, department to department, regardless of the proprietary frame.

Design process
Look familiar? The design process in its simplest form.
Credit: Christopher Holm-Hansen, thenounproject.com
. (Large preview)

The user-centered design process is, most simply:

  1. Phase 1: Research
    The first step to finding any design solution is to talk to users and stakeholders and validate the problem (and not just respond to the reported symptoms). This research is also used to align user and business needs with what’s technically and economically feasible. This first step in the process is tremendously freeing — you don’t need to toil in isolation. Your user knows what they need, and this research will help you infer it.
  2. Phase 2: Design
    Don’t just make things beautiful — though beauty is joyful! Focus on creating solutions for the specific needs, pain-points, and opportunities your research phase identified. And remember, design is both a noun and a verb. Yes, you deliver designs for your clients, but design is — first and foremost — a process of insight, trial, and error. And once you have a solution in mind…
  3. Phase 3: Testing
    Test early and test often. When your solutions are still low-fi (before they go to development) and absolutely before they go to market, put them in front of real users to make sure you’re solving the right problems. Become an expert in making mistakes and iterating on the lessons those mistakes teach you. It’s key to producing the best solutions.
  4. Repeat

Most design-thinking literature illustrates how the design process is applied to products, software, apps, or web design. At our agency, J+E Creative, we also apply this process to graphic design, content creation, education, and filmmaking. And it’s for that reason we don’t call it the UX design process. We drop the abbreviated adjective because, in our experience, the process works just as well for presentations and parenting as it does for enterprise software.

The process is about problem-solving. We just have to turn the process on ourselves.

Expanding The Scope: User-Centered Parenting

As creatives and as the parents of five elementary-aged kiddos, one of the first places we tried to apply the design process to our lives was to the problems of parenting.


A rare picture of a shark stepping on a Lego


Talk about a pain point. Using UX basics to solve a parenting problem opened the door to a wider application of the process and — mercifully — saved our tender feet. (Large preview)

In our case, the kids didn’t clean up their Legos. Like, ever. And stepping on a Lego might just be the most painful thing that can happen to you in your own home. They’re all right angles, unshatterable plastic, and invariably in places where you otherwise feel safe, like the kitchen or the bathroom.

But how can you research, design, and test a parenting issue — such as getting kids to pick up their Legos — using the user-centered design process?

Research

We’re far from the first parents to struggle with the painful reality of stepping on little plastic knives. And like most parents, we’d learned threats and consequences were inadequate to the task of changing our kids’ behavior.

So we started with a current-state contextual analysis: The kid’s legos were kept in square canvas boxes in square Ikea bookcases in a room with a carpeted floor. Typically, the kids would pour the Legos out on the carpet — for the benefit of sorting through the small pieces while simultaneously incurring the pain-point that Legos are notoriously hard to clean up off the carpet.


Lego slippers


For reals. If your product requires me to protect myself against it in my own home, the problem might be the product. Credit: BRAND STATION/LEGO/Piwee. (Large preview)

We also did a competitive analysis and were surprised to learn that, back in 2015, Lego appeared to acknowledge this problem and teamed up Brand Station to create some Lego-safe slippers. But, sadly, this was both a limited run and an impractical solution.


Five kids, five users


All users, great and small. It’s tempting to think users are paying customer or website visitors. But once you widen your perspective, users are everywhere. Even in your own home. (Large preview)

Lastly, we conducted user interviews. We knew the stakeholder perspective: We wanted the Legos to stay in their bins or — failing that — for the kids to pick them up after they were played with. But we didn’t assume we knew what the users wanted. So we talked to each of them in turn (no focus groups!) and what we found was eye opening. Of course, the kids didn’t want to pick up their Legos. It was inconvenient for play and difficult because of the carpet. But we were surprised to learn that the kids had also considered the Lego problem — they didn’t like discipline, after all — and they already had a solution in mind. If anything, like good users, they were frustrated we hadn’t asked sooner.

Design

Remember when I said, your user knows what they need?

One of our users asked us, “What about the train table with the big flat top and the large flat drawer underneath.”

Eureka.


Ikea boxes and train tables


Repurposing affordances. What works for one interaction often works for another. And with a little creativity and flexibility, some solutions present themselves. (Large preview)

By swapping the contents of the Lego bins with the train table, we solved nearly all stakeholder and user pain points in one change of platform:

  • Legos of all sizes were easy to find in the broad flat drawer.
  • The large flat surface of the train table was a better surface for assembling and cleaning up Legos than was the carpet.
  • Clean up was easy — just roll the drawer closed!
  • Opportunity bonus: It painlessly let us retire the train toys the kids had already outgrown.

Testing

No solution is ever perfect, and this was no exception. Despite its simplicity, iteration was quickly necessary. For instance, each kid claimed the entire surface of the top deck. And the lower drawer was rarely pushed in without a reminder.

But you know what? We haven’t stepped on a Lego in years. #TrustTheProcess.

The Ultimate Experience: User-Centered Living

Knowing how to apply the design process to our professional work, and emboldened from UXing our kids, we began to apply the process to something bigger — perhaps the biggest something of all.

Our lives.


Don’t do yoga on a mountaintop


This is not a plan. This is bullsh*t. (Large preview)

The Internet is full of advice on this topic. And it’s easy to confuse its ubiquitous inspirational messages for a path to self-improvement and a mindful life. But I’d argue such messages — effective, perhaps for short-term encouragement — are damaging. Why?

They feature:

  • Vague phrases or platitudes.
  • Disingenuous speakers, often without examples.
  • The implication of attainable or achieved perfection.
  • Calls for sudden, uninformed optimism.

But most damning, these messages are often too-high-level, include privileged and entitled narratives masquerading as lessons, or present life as a zero-sum pursuit reminiscent of Cortés burning his ships.

In short, they’re bullsh!t.

What we need are practical tools we can learn from and apply to our own experiences. People don’t want to find the thing they’re most passionate about, then do it on nights and weekends for the rest of their lives. They want an intentional life they’re in control of. Full time. And still make rent.

So let’s take deliberate control of our lives using the same tools and techniques we use for client work or for getting the kids to pick up their damn legos.

Content Auditing Your Past: Your Life In Weeks

The best way I’ve found to get started designing your life is to take a look back at how you’ve lived your life so far. It’s the ultimate content audit, and it’s one of the most eye-opening acts of introspection you can do.

Tim Urban introduced the concept of looking at your life in weeks on his occasional blog, Wait But Why. It’s a reflective audit of your past reduced to a graph featuring 52 boxes per row, with each box representing a week and each row, a year. And combined with a Social Security Administration death estimate, it presents a total look at the life you’ve lived and the time you have left.

You can get started right now by downloading a Your Life In Weeks template and by following along with my historical audit.


Life in weeks


My life, circa Spring Break. Grey is unstructured time, green in education, and blue is my career (each color in tints to represent changes in schools or employers). White dots represent positive events, black dots represent negative ones. Orange dots are opportunities I can predict. Empty dots are weeks yet lived. (Large preview)

Your Life In Weeks maps the high points and low points in your life. How it’s been spent so far and what lies ahead.

  • What were the big events in your life?
  • How have you spent your time so far?
  • What events can you forecast?
  • How do you want to spend your time left?

This audit is an analog for quantifiable user and usability research techniques such as website analytics, conversion rates, or behavior surveys. The result is a snapshot of one user’s unique life and career. Yours.

Start by looking back…
  • Where and when did you go to school?
  • When did you turn 18, 21, 40?
  • When did you get your first job? When did your career begin?
  • When and where were your favorite trips?
  • When and where did you move?
  • When were your major career changes or professional events?
  • What about relationships, weddings, or breakups?
  • When were your kids born?
  • And don’t forget major personal events: health issues, traumas, success, or other impactful life changes.

Life in weeks, education


Youth is wasted on the young. I spent the first few years of my life with mostly unstructured time (grey) before attending a variety of schools (shades of green) in North Carolina, Georgia, Virginia, France, and Scotland. I also moved a few times (white circles). Annotations are in the margins. (Large preview)


Life in weeks, career


Adulting is hard. My first summer and salaried jobs led to founding my first company and the inevitable quarter-life crisis. After graduate school, life got more complicated: I closed my company, got divorced, and dealt with a few health crises (black dots) but also had kids, got remarried, and published my first novel (white dots). (Large preview)

What can you look forward to…
  • Where do you want your career to go and by when?
  • What are your personal goals?
  • Got kids? When is your last Spring Break with them? When do they move out?
  • When might you retire?
  • When might you die?

Life in weeks, forecast


Maximize the future. Looking forward, I can forecast four remaining Spring Breaks with all my kids (as a divorcee, they’re with me every other year). I also know when the last summer vacation with all them is and when they’ll start moving out to college. (Large preview)


Life in weeks, death


How full is your progress bar? Social Security Administration helps forecast your death date. But don’t worry. The older you already are, the longer you’ll make it. (Large preview)

The perspective this audit reveals can be humbling but it’s better than keeping your head in the sand. Or in the cubicle. Realizing your 40th really is your midlife might be the incentive you need for real change, knowing your kids will move out in a few years might help you re-prioritize, or seeing how much time you spent working on someone else’s dream might give you the motivation to start working for your own.

When I audited myself, I was shocked by how much time I’d spent at jobs that were poor fits for me. And at how little time I had left to do something else. I was also shocked to see how little time I had left with my kids at home, even as young as they are. Suddenly, the pain of sitting in traffic or spending an evening away at work took on new meaning. I didn’t resent my past — what’s done is done and there’s no way to change it — but I did let it color how I saw my present and my future.

Usability Testing The Present: Eisenhower Charts

Once you’ve looked back at your past, it’s time to look at how you’re spending your present.

An Eisenhower chart — cleverly named for the US president and general that saved the world — is a simple quadrant graph that juxtaposes urgency (typically, the Y-axis) with importance (typically the X-axis). It helps to identify your priorities to help you focus on using your time well, not just filling it.

Put simply, this tool helps you:

  1. Figure out what’s important to you.
  2. Prioritize it.

Most of us struggle every day (or in even smaller units of time) to figure out the most important thing we need to do right now. We take inventories of what people expect from us, of what we’ve promised to do for others, or of what feels like needs tackling right away. Then we prioritize our schedules around these needs.


Eisenhower chart


What’s important to you? It’s easy to get caught up in urgency — or perceived urgency — and disregard what’s important. But I often find that the most important things aren’t particularly urgent and, therefore, must be consciously prioritized. (Large preview)

Like a feature prioritization exercise for a piece of software, this analytical tool helps separate the must-haves and should-haves from the could- and would-haves. It does this by challenging inertia and assumption — by making us validate the activities that eat up the only commodity we’ll never get more of — time.

You can download a blank Eisenhower matrix and start sorting your present as I take you through my own.

Start by listing everything you do — and everything you wish you were doing — on Post-Its and honestly measure how urgent and important those activities are to you right now. Then take a moment. Look at it. This might be the first time you’ve let yourself acknowledge the fruitless things that keep you busy or the priorities unfulfilled inside you.

What’s important and urgent?
  • Deadlines
  • Health crises
  • Taxes (at the end of each quarter or around April 15)
  • Rent (at least once a month)
What’s important but not urgent?
  • Something you’re passionate about but which doesn’t have a deadline
  • A long-term project — can you delegate parts of it?
  • Telling your loved ones that you love them
  • Family time
  • Planning
  • Self-care
What’s urgent but not important?
  • Phone calls
  • Texts and Slacks
  • Most emails
  • Unscheduled favors
Neither important or urgent
  • TV (yes, even Netflix)
  • Social media
  • Video games

Eisenhower chart, sorted


Do it once. Do it often. We regularly include Eisenhower charts in our weekly business and family planning. The busier you are, the more valuable it becomes. (Large preview)

The goal is to identify what’s important, not just what’s urgent. To identify your priorities. And as you repeat this activity over the course of weeks or even years, it makes you conscious of how you spend your time and can have a tremendous impact on how well that time is spent. Because the humbling fact is, no one else is going to prioritize what’s important to you. Your loving partner, your supportive family, your boss and your clients — they all have their own priorities. They each have something that’s most important to them. And those priorities don’t necessarily align with yours.

Because the things that are important to each of us — not necessarily urgent — need time in our schedules if they’re going to provide us with genuine and lasting self-actualization. These are our priorities. And you know what you’re supposed to do with priorities.

Prioritize them.


Schedule your priorities


Get sh!t done. “The key is not to prioritize your schedule but to schedule your priorities.” — Stephen Covey, Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. (Large preview)

Identifying what your priorities are is critical to getting them into your schedule. Because, if you want to paint or travel or spend time with the kids or start a business, no one else is going to put that first. You have to. It is up to you to identify what’s important and then find time for it. And if time isn’t found for your priorities, you only have one person to blame.

We do these charts regularly, both for family and business planning. And one of the things I often take away from this exercise is the reminder to schedule blocks of time for the kids. And to schedule time for the thing I’m most passionate about — writing. I am a designer who writes but I aspire to become a writer who designs. And I’ll only get there if I prioritize it.

Success Metrics For The Future: Affinity Mapping

If you’ve ever seen a police procedural, you’ve seen an affinity map.

Affinity maps are a simple way to find patterns in qualitative data. UXers often use them to make sense of user interviews and survey data, to find patterns that inform personae or user requirements, and to tease out that most elusive gap.

In regards to designing your life, an affinity map is a powerful technique for individuals, partners, and teams to determine what they want and need out of their lives, to synthesize that information into actionable and measurable requirements, and to create a vision of what their life might look like in the future.


Affinity map


Great minds think alike. Team affinity mapping can help you and your family, or you and your business partners, align your priorities. My wife and I did this activity when we started our business to make sure we were on the same page. And we’ve looked back at it, regularly, to measure if we’re staying on target. (Large preview)

You don’t need a template to get started affinity mapping. Just a lot of Post-It notes and a nice big wall, window, or table.

How to affinity map your life (alone or with your life/business partners)
  • Write down any important goal you want to achieve on its own Post-it.
  • Write down important values or activities you want to prioritize on its own Post-it.
  • Categorize the insights under “I” statements to keep the analysis from the user’s (your!) point of view.
  • Organize that data by the insights it suggests. For instance, notes reading “I want to spend more time with my kids” and “I don’t want to commute for an hour each way” might fall under the heading “I want to work close to home.”
  • Timebox the exercise. You can easily spend all day on this one. Set a timer to make sure you don’t spend it overthinking (technical term: navel gazing).

This is a shockingly quick and easy technique to synthesize the insights from Your Life In Weeks and your Eisenhower chart. And by framing the results in “I” statements, your aggregate research begins speaking back to you — as a pseudo personae of yourself or of your partnership with others.

Insights such as “I want to work close to home” and “I want to work with important causes” become your life’s requirements and the success metrics (KPIs). They’ll form the basis for testing and retrospectives.

Speaking of testing…

Prototype Or Dive Right In

Now that you’ve audited, validated, and created a vision for the life you want to live, what do you do with this information?

Design a solution!

Maybe you only need to change one thing. Maybe you need to change everything! Maybe you need to save up some runway money if the change impacts your income or your expenses. Maybe you need to dramatically cut your expenses. No change is without consequence, and your life’s requirements are different from anyone else’s.

When my wife sat down and did these activities, we determined we wanted to:

  • Work together
  • Work from home, so we don’t have to commute
  • Start our work day early, so we’re done by the time the kids come home from school
  • Not check email or slack after hours or on weekends
  • Make time for our priorities and our passion projects.

J+E services


All about the pies. Aligning our priorities helped define the services or business offers and the delicious return on the investment our clients can expect. (Large preview)

Central to this vision of the life we wanted was a new business — one that met the functional and reliability needs of income, insurance, and career while also satisfying the usability and joy requirements of interest, collaboration, and self-actualization. And, in the process, these activities also helped us identify what services that business would offer. Design, content, education, and friendship became the verticals we wanted to give our time to and take fulfillment from.

But we didn’t just jump in, heedless or without regard to the impact a shift in employment and income might have on our family. Instead, we prototyped what this new business might look like before committing it to the market.


Prototyping life and business


Prototyping is serious business. We took advantage of a local hackathon to test working together and with a team before quitting our day jobs. (Large preview)

Using after-hours freelance client work and hackathons, we tested various workstyles, teams, and tools while also assessing more abstract but critical business and lifestyle concerns like hourly rates, remote collaboration, and shifted office hours. And with each successive prototype, we:

  1. Observed (research)
  2. Iterated (design)
  3. Retrospected (testing).

Some of the solutions that emerged from this were:

  • A remote-work team model based on analogue synchronous communication and digital statuses (eg. phone calls and Slack stand-ups).
  • No dedicated task management system — everyone has their preferred accountability method. My wife and I, for instance, prefer pen and paper lists and talking to each other instead of process automation tools (we learned we really hate Trello!).
  • Our URL — importantshit.co — is a screener to filter clients for personality and humor compatibility.
  • Google Friday-style passion project time, built into our schedules to help us prioritize what’s important to each of us.

And some of the problems we identified:

  • We both hate bookkeeping — there’s a lot to learn.
  • Scaling a remote team requires much more deliberate management.
  • New business development is hard — we might need to hire someone to help with that.

So when we finally launched J+E Creative full time, we already had a sense of what worked for us and what challenges required further learning and iteration. And because we prototyped, first, we had the confidence and a few clients in place so that we didn’t have to save too much money before making the change.

The ROI For Designing Your Life

Superficially, we designed a new business for ourselves. More deeply, though, we took control of variables and circumstances that let us meet our self-identified lifestyle goals: spending more time with the kids, prioritizing our marriage and our family above work, giving ourselves time to practice and grow our passions, and better control our financial futures.

The return on investment for designing your life is about as straightforward as design solutions get. As Bill Burnett and Dave Evans put it, “A well-designed life is a life that is generative — it is constantly creative, productive, changing, evolving, and there is always the possibility of surprise. You get out of it more than you put in.”

Hopefully you’ll see how a Your Life In Weeks audit can help you learn from your past, how an Eisenhower chart can help you prioritize the present, and how a simple affinity mapping exercise for your wants and needs can help you see beyond money-based decisions and assess if you’re making the right decisions regarding family, clients, and project.


Life-Career balance


Live and work, by design. Mindfully designing our lives and our careers allowed us to pursue our own business (J+E Creative) and our separate passions (elliedecker.com and o-jd.com) (Large preview)

It’s always a give and a take. We frequently have to go back to our affinity map results to make sure we’re still on target. Or re-prioritize with an Eisenhower chart — especially in a challenging week. And, sometimes, the urgent trumps the important. It’s life, after all. But always with the understanding that we are each on the hook when our lives aren’t working out the way we want. And that we have the tools and the insights necessary to fix it.

So schedule a kickoff and set a deadline. You’ve got a new project.

Down For More?

Ready to start designing a more mindful life and career? Here are a couple links to help you get started:

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UX Your Life: Applying The User-Centered Process To Your Life (And Stuff)

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The Ethics Of Persuasion




The Ethics Of Persuasion

Lyndon Cerejo



(This article is kindly sponsored by Adobe.) A few months ago, the world was shocked to learn that Cambridge Analytica had improperly used data from a harmless looking personality quiz on Facebook to profile and target the wider audience on the platform with advertisements to persuade them to vote a certain way. Only part of the data was obtained with consent (!), the data was stored by the app creator (!!), and it was sold to Cambridge Analytica in violation of terms of use (!!!). This was an example of black hat design, a deceptive use of persuasion tactics, combined with unethical use of personal information.

On the other hand, the last time you shopped on eBay, you may have noticed the use of multiple design elements encouraging you to buy an item (“last item”, “3 watched in the past day”). While these design techniques are used to persuade users, they are usually not deceptive and are considered white hat techniques.

A third example comes from Google I/O 2018 last month when the world heard Google Duplex make a call to a salon for an appointment and carry out a fluent conversation mimicking human mannerisms so well that the person at the other end did not realize she was talking to a machine. The machine did not misrepresent itself as human, nor did it identify itself as a machine, which, in my book, puts it in a gray area. What’s stopping this from being used in black hat design in the near future?


examples of persuasive tactics


Large preview

As you see from the three examples above, the use of persuasive tactics can fall anywhere on a spectrum from black hat at one extreme to white hat at the other, with a large fuzzy gray area separating the two. In today’s world of online and email scams, phishing attacks, and data breaches, users are increasingly cautious of persuasive tactics being used that are not in their best interest. Experience designers, developers, and creators are responsible for making decisions around the ethical nature of the tactics we use in our designs.

This article will present a brief history of persuasion, look at how persuasion is used with technology and new media, and present food for thought for designers and developers to avoid crossing the ethical line to the dark side of persuasion.

History Of Persuasion

Persuasion tactics and techniques are hardly new — they have been used for ages. Aristotle’s Rhetoric, over 2000 years ago, is one of the earliest documents on the art of persuasion. The modes of persuasion Aristotle presented were ethos (credibility), logos (reason), and pathos (emotion). He also discussed how kairos (opportune time) is important for the modes of persuasion.

Fast forward to today, and we see persuasion methods used in advertising, marketing, and communication all around us. When we try to convince someone of a point of view or win that next design client or project, chances are we are using persuasion: a process by which a person’s attitudes or behavior are, without duress, influenced by communications from other people (Encyclopedia Britannica).

While Aristotle first documented persuasion, Robert Cialdini’s Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion is more commonly referenced when talking about modern persuasion. According to Cialdini, there are six key principles of persuasion:

  1. Reciprocity
    People are obliged to give something back in exchange for receiving something.
  2. Scarcity
    People want more of those things they can have less of.
  3. Authority
    People follow the lead of credible, knowledgeable experts.
  4. Consistency
    People like to be consistent with the things they have previously said or done.
  5. Liking
    People prefer to say yes to those that they like.
  6. Consensus (Social Proof)
    Especially when they are uncertain, people will look to the actions and behaviors of others to determine their own.

We have all been exposed to one or more of these principles, and may recognize them in advertising or when interacting with others. While that has been around for ages, what is relatively new is the application of persuasion techniques to new technology and media. This started off with personal computers, became more prominent with the Internet, and is now pervasive with mobile devices.

Persuasion Through Technology And New Media

Behavior scientist B.J. Fogg is a pioneer when it comes to the role of technology in persuasion. Over two decades ago, he started exploring the overlap between persuasion and computing technology. This included interactive technologies like websites, software, and devices created for the purpose of changing people’s attitudes or behaviors. He referred to this field as captology, an acronym based on computers as persuasive technologies, and wrote the book on it, Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do.


Captology describes the shaded area where computing technology and persuasion overlap


Captology describes the shaded area where computing technology and persuasion overlap (recreated from BJ Fogg’s CHI 98 paper, Persuasive Computers). (Large preview)

Interactive technologies have many advantages over traditional media because they are interactive. They also have advantages over humans because they can be more persistent (e.g. software update reminders), offer anonymity (great for sensitive topics), can access and manipulate large amounts of data (e.g. Amazon recommendations), can use many styles and modes (text, graphics, audio, video, animation, simulations), can easily scale, and are pervasive.

This last advantage is even more pronounced today, with mobile phones being an extension of our arms, and increased proliferation of smart devices, embedded computing, IoT, wearable technology, Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, and virtual assistants powered by AI being embedded in anything and everything around us. In addition, today’s technological advances allow us to time and target moments of persuasion for high impact, since it is easy to know a user’s location, context, time, routine, and give them the ability to take action. This could be a reminder from your smartwatch to stand or move, or an offer from the coffee shop while you are a few blocks away.

Ethics And New Technology And Interactive Media

The use of persuasion in traditional media over the past decades has raised questions about the ethical use of persuasion. With new media and pervasive technology, there are more questions about the ethical use of persuasion, some of which are due to the advantages pervasive technology has over traditional media and humans. Anyone using persuasive methods to change people’s minds or behavior should have a thorough understanding of the ethical implications and impact of their work.

One of the key responsibilities of a designer during any design process is to be an advocate for the user. This role becomes even more crucial when persuasion techniques are intentionally used in design, since users may be unaware of the persuasion tactics. Even worse, some users may not be capable to detect these tactics, as may be the case with children, seniors or other vulnerable users.

BJ Fogg provides six factors that give interactive technologies an advantage over users when it comes to persuasion:

  1. Persuasive intent is masked by novelty
    The web and email are no longer novel, and most of us have wizened up to deceptive web practices and the promises of Nigerian Princes, but we still find novelty in new mobile apps, voice interfaces, AR, VR. Not too long ago, the craze with Pokémon Go raised many ethical questions.
  2. Positive reputation of new technology
    While “It must be true — I saw it on the Internet” is now a punchline, users are still being persuaded to like, comment, share, retweet, spread challenges, and make fake news or bot generated content viral.
  3. Unlimited persistence
    Would you like a used car salesman following you around after your first visit, continually trying to sell you a car? While that thankfully does not happen in real life, your apps and devices are with you all the time, and the ding and glowing screen have the ability to persistently persuade us, even in places and times that may be otherwise inappropriate. This past Lent, my son took a break from his mobile device. When he started it after Easter, he had hundreds of past notifications and alerts from one mobile game offering all sorts of reminders and incentives to come back and use it.
  4. Control over how the interaction unfolds
    Unlike human persuasion, where the person being persuaded has the ability to react and change course, technology has predefined options, controlled by the creators, designers and developers. When designing voice interfaces, creators have to define what their skill will be able to do, and for everything else come back with a “Sorry I can’t help with that”. Just last month, a social network blocked access to their mobile website, asking me to install their app to access their content, without an escape or dismiss option.
  5. Can affect emotion while still being emotionless
    New technology doesn’t have emotion. Even with the recent advances in Artificial Intelligence, machines do not feel emotion like humans do. Back to the Google Duplex assistant call mentioned at the beginning, issues can arise when people are not aware that the voice at the other end is just an emotionless machine, and treat it as another person just like them.
  6. Cannot take responsibility for negative outcomes of persuasion
    What happens when something goes wrong, and the app or the technology cannot take responsibility? Do the creators shoulder that responsibility, even if their persuasion strategies have unintended outcomes, or if misused by their partners? Mark Zuckerberg accepted responsibility for the Cambridge Analytica scandal before and during the congress hearings.

With these unfair advantages at our disposal, how do we, as creators, designers, and developers make ethical choices in our designs and solutions? For one, take a step back and consider the ethical implication and impact of our work, and then take a stand for our users.

Many designers are pushing back and being vocal about some of the ethically questionable nature of tech products and designs. There’s Tristan Harris, a former Google Design Ethicist, who has spoken out about how tech companies’ products hijack users’ minds. Sean Parker, Napster founder and former president of Facebook, described how Facebook was designed to exploit human “vulnerability”. And Basecamp’s Jonas Downey ruminates on how most software products are owned and operated by corporations, whose business interests often contradict their users’ interests.

Design Code Of Conduct

AIGA, the largest professional membership organization for design, has a series on Design Business and Ethics. Design Professionalism author Andy Rutledge also created a Professional Code of Conduct. Both are very detailed and cover the business of design, but not specifically ethics related to design that impacts or influences human behavior.

Other professionals who impact the human mind have ethical principles and codes of conduct, like those published by the American Psychological Association and the British Psychological Society. The purpose of these codes of conduct is to protect participants as well as the reputation of psychology and psychologists themselves. When using psychology in our designs, we could examine how the ethical principles of psychologists are applicable to our work as creators, designers, and developers.

Principles And Questions

Using the Ethical Principles of Psychologists as a framework, I defined how each principle applies to persuasive design and listed questions related to ethical implications of design. These are by no means exhaustive but are intended to be food for thought in each of these areas. Note: When you see ‘design’ in the questions below, it refers to persuasive techniques used in your design, app, product or solution.

Principle A: Beneficence And Nonmaleficence

Do no harm. Your decisions may affect the minds, behavior, and lives of your users and others around them, so be alert and guard against misusing the influence of your designs.

  • Does your design change the way people interact for the better?
  • Does the design aim to keep users spending time they didn’t intend to?
  • Does the design make it easy to access socially unacceptable or illegal items that your users would not have easy access to otherwise?
  • How may your partners (including third-party tools and SDKs) or “bad guys” misuse your design, unknown to you?
  • Would you be comfortable with someone else using your design on you?
  • Would you like someone else to use this design to persuade your mother or your child?

Principle B: Fidelity And Responsibility

Be aware of your responsibility to your intended users, unintended users and society at large. Accept appropriate responsibility for the outcomes of your design.

  • During design, follow up answers to “How might we…?” with “At what cost?”
  • What is the impact of your design/product/solution? Who or what does it replace or impact?
  • If your design was used opposite from your intended use, what could the impact be?
  • Does your design change social norms, etiquette or traditions for the better?
  • Will the design put users in harm’s way or make them vulnerable, intentionally or unintentionally (Study Estimates That Pokémon GO Has Caused More Than 100,000 Traffic Accidents)? How can it be prevented?

Principle C: Integrity

Promote accuracy, honesty, and truthfulness in your designs. Do not cheat, misrepresent or engage in fraud. When deception may be ethically justifiable to maximize benefits and minimize harm, carefully consider the need for, the possible consequences of, and be responsible for correcting any resulting mistrust or other harmful effects that arise from the use of such techniques.

  • Do you need users’ consent? When asking for their consent, are they aware of what exactly they are consenting to?
  • What’s the intent of the design? Is it in the best interest of the user or the creator? Are you open and transparent about your intentions?
  • Does your design use deception, manipulation, misrepresentation, threats, coercion or other dishonest techniques?
  • Are users aware or informed if they are being monitored, or is it covert?
  • Is your design benefiting you or the creators at the expense of your users?
  • What would a future whistleblower say about you and your design?

Principle D: Justice

Exercise reasonable judgment and take precautions to ensure that your potential biases, the limitations of your expertise does not lead to, or condone unjust practices. Your design should benefit both the creators and users.

  • Does your design contain any designer biases built in (gender, political, or other)?
  • Does your design advocate hate, violence, crime, propaganda?
  • If you did this in person, without technology, would it be considered ethical?
  • What are the benefits to the creators/business? What are the benefits to the users? Are the benefits stacked in favor of the business?
  • Do you make it easy for users to disconnect? Do users have control and the ability to stop, without being subject to further persuasion through other channels?

Principle E: Respect For People’s Rights And Dignity

Respect the dignity and worth of all people, and the rights of individuals to privacy, and confidentiality. Special safeguards may be necessary to protect the rights and welfare of vulnerable users.

  • Are your designs using persuasion with vulnerable users (children, seniors, poor)?
  • Does your design protect users’ privacy and give them control over their settings?
  • Does the design require unnecessary permissions to work?
  • Can your design use a less in-your-face technique to get the same outcome? (e.g. speed monitors on roads instead of surveillance)
  • Does your design make your users a nuisance to others? How can you prevent that?

Conclusion

If you have been designing with white hat techniques, you may appreciate the ethical issues discussed here. However, if you have been designing in the grey or black area, thank you for making it all the way to the end. Ethics in persuasive design are important because they don’t prey on the disadvantages users have when it comes to interactive technology. As creators, designers, and developers, we have a responsibility to stand up for our users.

Do good. Do no harm. Design ethically.

Resources

Books

This article is part of the UX design series sponsored by Adobe. Adobe XD tool is made for a fast and fluid UX design process, as it lets you go from idea to prototype faster. Design, prototype and share — all in one app. You can check out more inspiring projects created with Adobe XD on Behance, and also sign up for the Adobe experience design newsletter to stay updated and informed on the latest trends and insights for UX/UI design.

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The Ethics Of Persuasion

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5 Super Simple Ways To Increase About Page Conversions

You’ve heard the marketing mantra a bazillion times: people do business with people they know, like, and trust. Nowhere is this truer than on your About Page. When people click on your About Page, they want to get to know you. It’s a golden chance, and possibly your only chance, to impress them. You must strive to woo them so they fall in love with you and your brand. And, once they do, like and trust you enough to do business with you. But that’s easier said than done. The plain truth is most About Pages suck. They’re so bland and…

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5 Super Simple Ways To Increase About Page Conversions

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19 Form Design Best Practices to Get More Conversions (+ Examples)

form design best practices 2018

Form design matters more than you might think. A poorly designed form can turn off prospects, whether you’re asking them to sign up for your email list or buy your latest product. Web forms are used on nearly every website on the Internet, but some feature extremely poor design. If you don’t want to fall into that trap, this article will teach you how to design forms that boost conversion rates. Feel free to jump around if you’re interested in a single a particular topic covered in this article: What’s a web form? Why do you need a web form?…

The post 19 Form Design Best Practices to Get More Conversions (+ Examples) appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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19 Form Design Best Practices to Get More Conversions (+ Examples)