Tag Archives: designers

Using Gradients In User Experience Design

(This is a sponsored article.) Color has the potential to make or break product. Today you’ll learn how to use gradients for a website in Adobe XD through a very useful tutorial. In the last Adobe XD release, radial gradients were added so that designers can easily create unique color effects by simulating a light source or applying a circular pattern. Designers can add, remove and manipulate color stops with the same intuitive interface as linear gradients.

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Using Gradients In User Experience Design

Web Development Reading List #164: Enjoy The End Of 2016, It Wasn’t The Worst

Welcome to the last reading list of the year. I’m happy to still have you as a reader and very grateful to all the people who value and support my work. I hope you’ll be on vacation for the upcoming days or can relax a bit from your daily work. Remind to take care of yourself, and see you next year!
Further Reading on SmashingMag: Getting Ready For HTTP/2: A Guide For Web Designers And Developers How To Prepare For A Front-End Job Interview How Functional Animation Helps Improve User Experience The @Font-Face Rule And Useful Web Font Tricks Concept & Design Sarah Drasner on why it’s important to properly describe and document animations in a design system.

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Web Development Reading List #164: Enjoy The End Of 2016, It Wasn’t The Worst

How To Contribute To WordPress

WordPress is built by volunteers. People from all over the world collaborate to create the core software, write the documentation, provide support, translate WordPress, organize events and generally keep the project running. Individuals work on WordPress in their free time, and companies ask their employees to get involved.
Part of WordPress’ success is that the community consists not only of developers, but of designers, user experience experts, support volunteers, writers, users, accessibility experts and enthusiasts.

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How To Contribute To WordPress

9 Conversation Techniques For Designers

Designers are visually literate creatures. We use visuals to express our ideas, whether by building wireframes, sketching interfaces or pushing pixels. As a result, the majority of knowledge captured when we design a product is some form of “corporate memory”: a combination of assets and documentation. This creation of visual artifact is widely regarded as our most effective means of communicating thought through a product. However, creating a product takes more than just documentation, and much of it is communicated not visually, but verbally.

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9 Conversation Techniques For Designers

The Lost Art Of Design Etiquette

Endless layers in Photoshop. Overstuffed image folders. That jQuery plug-in that has 12 files associated with it. Hundreds or thousands of individual pieces go into making a website. No wonder we go off the deep end when we can’t find a closing div — er, section tag. We work with a ridiculously large number of things, and how we organize them (or choose not to) is often left to personal preference.

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The Lost Art Of Design Etiquette

Designers And Developers Playing Nice

The differences between designers and developers often erupt in pointed jabs on the Web or at conferences. Jokes or not, the jabs create friction whose consequences are real.
I am a designer, and by no elaborate means of job-title-rejigging do I consider myself a developer, but I see the cruelty of designer and developer egos going both ways. So, what happens if someone throws a pair into a sack to hash it out?

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Designers And Developers Playing Nice

I Want To Be A Web Designer When I Grow Up

Editor’s Note This article is a rebuttal of “Does The Future Of The Internet Have Room For Web Designers?,” published in our “Opinion Column” section a couple of days ago. In that section, we give people in the Web design community a platform to present their opinions on issues of importance to them. Please note that the content in this series is not in any way influenced by the Smashing Magazine team.

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I Want To Be A Web Designer When I Grow Up

Insights Into the Running of a Design Business

When I left my job almost 2 years ago to start my own graphic design business, there were a few, let’s say, surprises. The biggest of which was that the majority of my time was being spent running the business, and not actually designing. It is quite difficult to put a number to it, but as a rough guess, I spend around 30% of my time designing. The remaining 70% is spent on other activities such as; advertising, sending emails, tracking expenses, invoicing clients, having phone conversations, writing articles, solving problems, etc.

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Insights Into the Running of a Design Business

Women In Web Design: Group Interview

A couple of weeks ago we published the article Expert Advice for Students and Young Web Designers, in which we presented a group interview with professional designers and developers. We tried to find answers to questions that are particularly useful and interesting for those just starting to design websites for a living or considering diving into the Web design industry.
In the comments to that article, many readers wished we’d invited more female designers on the panel — in particular because, “There is no way of discerning how the experience of a female designer might differ, simply because there is a complete lack of representation.

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Women In Web Design: Group Interview

The Dying Art Of Design

Progress is good, but we need to make sure that we’re progressing in the right direction. Our fundamental skills and the craft of design have started to take a back seat. Using the right tools and techniques is certainly an important part of design. But do our tools and resources make us better designers?
Taking a close look at the current state of design, we can see that sometimes modern design tools and processes do more harm than good.

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The Dying Art Of Design