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Are Mobile Pop-Ups Dying? Are They Even Worth Saving?




Are Mobile Pop-Ups Dying? Are They Even Worth Saving?

The pop-up has an interesting (and somewhat risqué) origin. Were you aware of this? The creator of the original pop-up ad, Ethan Zuckerman, explained how it came into being:

Specifically, we came up with it when a major car company freaked out that they’d bought a banner ad on a page that celebrated anal intercourse. I wrote the code to launch the window and run an ad in it. I’m sorry. Our intentions were good.

Basically, the client was dissatisfied with having their ad placed beside an article discussing this less-than-savory subject. Rather than lose the ad revenue or, worse, the client, Zuckerman and his team came up with a solution: The car company’s ad would still run on the website, but this time would pop out into a new window. Thus, the pop-up gave the advertiser an opportunity to share their offer without the risk of sitting next to a competitor or unsuitable blog content.

Origin story aside, does Zuckerman have anything to apologize for? Is the pop-up in its current state such a bad thing for the user experience? With a few simple searches around the web, you might very well begin to believe that.

For instance, a search of the term “pop-up ads” in Answer the Public comes up with this disheartening response:

Answer the Public questions about pop-ups


Users clearly just want pop-ups to go away. (Image: Answer the Public) (View large version)

A search for “I hate pop-ups” on Google results in over 3 million pages and responses like this:

Google search for 'I hate pop-ups'


You can bet that a search for ‘I love pop-ups’ doesn’t have quite the same results. (Image: Google) (View large version)

With the seemingly abundant negative responses to pop-ups, does this mean the pop-up is dead? Google’s 2017 algorithmic update penalizing certain types of mobile pop-ups could very well spell their doom — though I’m not ready to throw in the towel yet.

So, today, I want to see what the research says.

Are mobile pop-ups dying? Or will they simply undergo another adaptation?

If they continue to remain effective, how should designers make use of them, especially in mobile web design?

Finally, are there alternatives web designers can start using now to prepare for Google’s vision of a more mobile-friendly digital world?

Is The Mobile Pop-Up Dead? What The Experts Say

Pop-ups have come a long way since their founding by Zuckerman in the ’90s.

For the most part, pop-ups don’t force users out of the browser, nor do they surprise them with a desktop cluttered with ads once the browser is closed altogether. It’s a neater and more controlled experience overall. And we’ve seen them in a variety of forms, too:

  • full-page interstitials,
  • partial modal pop-ups,
  • top- or bottom-aligned bars,
  • pop-out modules tucked in the corner of the page,
  • push notifications,
  • inline banners found within the actual content of the page.

Pop-ups can also now appear at various points throughout the journey, thanks in part to big data and AI:

  • appearing as soon as the web page loads;
  • appearing once the user scrolls down the page;
  • appearing once the user moves the cursor to the close button in the browser tab;
  • ever-present, sitting off to the side, waiting for engagement.

But this type of pop-up technology doesn’t work all that well with the mobile experience, does it?

Take Macy’s website. Upon entering it, you’ll encounter this pop-up ad within a few seconds:

Example of Macy’s modal pop-up on desktop


Macy’s displays this offer within a few seconds of your arrival on the website. (Image: Macy’s) (View large version)

When you open the website on mobile, however, you won’t find any trace of that pop-up. Instead, you’ll see a small bar built into the space just below the navigation bar:

Macy’s inserts desktop pop-up into mobile on-page content


Macy’s ditches the pop-up on mobile and integrates it in the content. (Image: Macy’s) (View large version)

The offer is similar, but with no request for an email address and no pop-up functionality. This is likely because of the change to Google’s algorithm in 2017.

Which brings me to what the experts say about pop-ups. While most are focused on the life expectancy of pop-ups in general, Google has been leading the charge against mobile pop-ups (sort of) for almost a year now:

Google

Let’s start by looking at Google’s announcement regarding mobile-first indexing. This originally came to light in 2016, but it was just talk at the time. It is now over a year later, and Google has begun rolling out this indexing initiative.

Basically, what it does is change how Google’s bots crawl and index a website. Google no longer views the desktop version of a website as the primary experience for users. Going forward, the mobile website will be the primary version indexed.

With Google users increasingly starting on a mobile device instead of desktop, this move makes sense. It’s also why the algorithm change in 2017 that penalizes certain types of mobile pop-ups was another logical move in Google’s mission to make the web a more mobile-friendly place.

Google diagram of penalty pop-up designs


Google provides examples of the kinds of interstitial pop-ups to avoid. (Image: Google) (View large version)

In laying out the details of this change, Google explained that mobile pop-ups deemed disruptive to the user experience would result in ranking penalties for those websites. These kinds of pop-ups fall into three categories:

  • interstitial pop-ups that cover the entire screen upon entering the website and that require users to “X” out in order see the actual website;
  • pop-ups that cover the entire screen upon entering the website but that require users to know that scrolling past them is the way to bypass the pop-up and see the main content;
  • any pop-up that hides the majority of content on the page behind it.

In other words, Google doesn’t believe that traditional pop-ups have any place on mobile because the limited screen space would make the experience too disruptive. That’s likely the reason why you’re seeing popular websites like Macy’s do away with mobile pop-ups altogether. Though there are some traditional modal pop-ups Google doesn’t mind, it’s probably safer to avoid modals and interstitials on mobile in order to avoid the chance of a penalty.

As you can see, pop-ups for legal requirements are still OK, although most of the time you’re going to see publishers relegate them to small bars, as MailChimp has done here:

Example of an acceptable cookies disclaimer on mobile


MailChimp adheres to Google’s new guidelines in providing a cookies disclaimer. (Image: MailChimp) (View large version)

Nielsen Norman Group

In 2017, Nielsen Norman Group conducted a survey on the most hated advertising techniques. This study encompassed all kinds of website advertising (including video ads, on-page banner ads, etc.), but there was special mention of pop-up ads that make the findings relevant here.

Out of a total score of 7, with 1 being “strongly like” and 7 being “strongly dislike,” respondents gave mobile ads a score of 5.45. Desktop ads weren’t far behind, with 5.09, although the survey results did consistently show that mobile ads were more despised than their desktop counterparts.

Comparison of desktop and mobile ad hatred


Users might despise ads, in general, but they really don’t like them on mobile. (Image: Nielsen Norman Group) (View large version)

Drilling down, Nielsen Norman Group also found modals (i.e. partially covering pop-ups) to be the most hated type of ad that mobile users encounter:

: Chart that shows mobile ad dislike ratings


Oof! Users really don’t like modal pop-ups, do they? (Image: Nielsen Norman Group) (View large version)

Why does Nielsen Norman Group believe this to be the case? Well, there’s the aforementioned real estate issue. Mobile phones just don’t have enough room to accommodate modal pop-ups without overwhelming users. According to the authors, though, there may be another reason:

Additionally, the context of mobile use tends to be “on-the-go” — that is, users are more likely to be distracted by competing stimuli, and the need for efficiency is drastically increased.

Having reviewed Nielsen Norman Group’s research, I do agree that many users will very likely be put off upon encountering a pop-up on a mobile website. That being said, plenty of research provides a valid counter-argument.

While users might be likely to describe their annoyance with pop-ups as high when surveyed about it, some evidence suggests it is short-lived for many of them. As we’ll see in a moment, pop-ups are actually quite effective in driving conversions.

Sumo

Sumo declared in 2018 that pop-ups aren’t dead. While that opinion might be seen as biased, considering it’s in the business of creating and selling list-builder tools such as pop-ups, welcome mats and smart bars, it does have evidence to suggest that pop-ups are still worthwhile if generating leads and conversions is your top priority.

Sumo used data from nearly 2 billion customer pop-ups to make this argument. Sadly, the data doesn’t directly break out anything related to mobile pop-ups and their conversion rates, but I found this particular statistic to be relevant:

Of the top 10% of pop-ups, only 8% had pop-ups appear in the 0-4 second mark. And the majority of those 8% were on pages where the pop-up was expected to appear quickly — as in sending someone to a download page.

In other words, users don’t want to be rushed into seeing your pop-ups — which is one of the major points Google is trying to make with its algorithm update. (Tests conducted by Crazy Egg mirror this point about delaying pop-ups.) Mobile websites that jump the gun and present visitors with a pop-up message before giving them an opportunity to scroll through the website are just creating an unnecessary disruption.

Another point that Sumo stresses is that pop-ups need to be valuable and presented within context. This is especially important on mobile, where you can’t afford to test visitors’ patience with a video pop-up completely unrelated to the blog post they were trying to read beneath it.

In other words, always think about how a pop-up will add value to the experience that you are (partially) blocking.

Justinmind

Justinmind calls modal pop-ups “complicated,” and for good reason. Even though there was nearly an even split between how users felt about pop-ups (21% said they liked them, while 23% said they didn’t), the research shows that pop-ups have proven to be quite helpful in the conversion process.

That being said, what a lot of this comes down to is how a website uses the pop-up. The University of Alberta, for example, was able to get 12% to 15% more email subscribers by using a pop-up on its website. On the other hand, you have Search Engine Land claiming that the main reason people block websites is because of pop-up ads.

Another thing to think about, according to Justinmind, is the mobile UI. It suggests that even if you do everything else right — deliver a valuable and well-timed offer and compromise an unobtrusive amount of space — there’s still the thumb zone to think about.

While it’s great that designers have built the ever-trusty “X” button into the top-right corner of pop-ups, that’s not the easiest stretch for the mobile user’s thumb. If you want to design ads for the mobile UX, consider another placement of that exit button.

30 Lines

Digital marketing agency 30 Lines claims:

Our clients who run targeted lead capture pop-ups on their websites typically convert anywhere from 75-250% more leads from their sites than clients who don’t.

Unlike other experts who have shied away from the subject of mobile pop-ups (because it might end in them admitting defeat), 30 Lines took on the topic head on. And this was the point they sought to make:

  • Google is not saying that mobile pop-ups are all bad.
  • Google, in fact, does want you to generate more conversions on your website — and it acknowledges that pop-ups might play a role in that.
  • It’s simply up to you to determine what will lead to the most unobtrusive experience for your visitors.

30 Lines gives a lot of great tips on how to adhere to Google’s principles without doing away with mobile pop-ups altogether. As we move on to discuss ways in which designers can use mobile pop-ups in the future, I’ll be sure to include them for consideration.

What Do Web Designers Do With Mobile Pop-Ups Now?

I’m not going to lie: This is a tough one, because while it would be so easy to just kill pop-ups on mobile websites altogether — and many consumers would be thrilled with that decision — they do still have incredible value in generating conversions. So, what do we do?

Clearly, this is a complicated matter, because you could equally argue both sides and are left choosing between two evils:

  • Do you want to run mobile pop-ups in the hope of gaining more subscribers (especially considering that mobile users tend to have lower conversion rates to begin with)?
  • Or do you want to put more resources into writing high-converting landing pages and on-page banners to sell and convert mobile visitors?

Do you even know which option mobile visitors would be more receptive to?

Below are questions to think about as you evaluate whether pop-ups make sense for your mobile website now and in the future.

Is It Necessary?

Ask yourself whether a particular message even needs to be in a pop-up format. If it could work just as well integrated in a page, then you might want to skip it entirely (as in the Macy’s example from earlier).

Fast Company uses pop-ups on its mobile website (shown below), but it also integrates its contact forms into on-page banners, like this one:

Example of a subscriber form that could be in a pop-up but isn’t


Fast Company inserts a subscriber form inline with the content. (Image: Fast Company) (View large version)

Different Designs

Create different pop-up designs for desktop and for mobile. So long as the message and offer are still relevant and valuable to mobile users, there’s no reason not to completely start from the ground up when building mobile pop-ups. Just be sure to think about the design, message and trigger rules when reshaping desktop pop-ups for mobile.

Gap is a good example of this. You can see how its offer is displayed on desktop as an on-page banner with expanded details:


Gap desktop pop-up ad


This is how Gap displays this offer on desktop.

Then, on mobile, it is shown as a bottom bar element:

Gap mobile pop-up ad


This is how Gap displays this offer on mobile. (Image: Gap) (View large version)

Go Small

Keep pop-ups small on mobile. In general, it’s recommended they take up no more than 15% of the screen. This means staying away from full-page interstitials, even if you’re trying to sneak them in on a second or third page.

Inc has a small and succinct message for mobile users:

Example of bottom bar pop-up


Inc keeps its pop-up message bold but brief. (Image: Inc) (View large version)

Target Mobile Context

Use mobile-targeted messaging. This means be very light on text, and don’t include images or icons that force the pop-up to be larger than it needs to be. You can also create targeted messages for consumers who use your website for research while out and about or even while shopping in house.

Stick To The Bottom

To play it safe, display pop-ups only at the very bottom of a page. This could mean one of two things. First, you could align the pop-up to the bottom of the mobile screen (this could be a traditional modal pop-up or a hello bar). Here’s an example of how Fast Company does it:

Example of how a modal pop-up works on mobile


Fast Company doesn’t shy away from modals with this mobile pop-up example. (Image: Fast Company) (View large version)

The second option is to open the pop-up once the visitor has scrolled all the way to the bottom of the web page.

Delay

Try not to show a pop-up on the first page a visitor sees. By this, I mean the first page that a user is directed to by search or a referral website (which is not necessarily the home page). Also, don’t forget about timing. In general, try not to load a pop-up within the first four seconds of a visitor arriving on a page.

Intuit does this really well:

Example of delayed mobile pop-up


This Intuit pop-up only appears after you’ve navigated inwards on the website. (Image: Intuit) (View large version)

Visit the first page of the website and you won’t encounter any kind of pop-up messaging. Click through to learn more about pricing, and then you’ll see a relevant and value-adding message pop up at the bottom of the screen.

Easy Exit

If you still want to use a modal pop-up design, make sure it’s easy to exit out of. This means putting an “X” in the bottom-right corner or an exit message beneath the CTA.

Or you could stick with the bottom bar design that many mobile web designers seem to favor right now, like Zumiez:

Example of hello bar pop-up on mobile


A bottom-aligned hello bar pop-up from Zumiez. (Image: Zumiez) (View large version)

The New Yorker also does this:

Example of bottom bar pop-up content on mobile


A bottom-aligned hello bar pop-up from The New Yorker. (Image: The New Yorker) (View large version)

Make It Optional

Create a special CTA or other interactive element on your website that, only when clicked, opens a pop-up. Basically, let mobile users decide whether and when they want to interrupt the on-site experience.

Basic Outfitters does this after you’ve added your first item to the cart:

Example of a user-triggered mobile pop-up


The Basic Outfitters pop-up shows only after the user actively triggers it on the website. (Image: Basic-Outfitters) (View large version)

Consider Alternatives

If you’re nervous about designing a traditional pop-up on your website, fear not. There are alternatives.

Consider push notifications and SMS notifications. They allow you to reach mobile users without having to intrude in the browser or in the mobile device experience without their express permission.

Gated content is another way to collect leads on a mobile website without having to force users into a pop-up to submit their contact information.

Track Preference

You will more likely annoy a mobile user with a repeat pop-up ad than a desktop user. So, if you can use cookies to prevent mobile visitors from being interrupted by the same pop-up message after they’ve dismissed it, that would be ideal.

Remember: You’re not just playing by Google’s rules here. If mobile visitor numbers drop off and Google spots a change in your bounce rate and time-on-site statistics, then your website’s rank will suffer as a result, since Google now prioritizes the mobile website experience over desktop.

The Mobile Pop-Up Doesn’t Need To Die

For now, the best plan is to heed the experts. And what they’re saying is that mobile pop-ups aren’t dying. In fact, they can still play a vital role in signing up more email subscribers and converting more customers from mobile devices. But, as with anything else, you need to play by Google’s rules and always think about how your decisions will affect your users’ experience.

So, use your mobile pop-ups wisely.

Smashing Editorial
(da, ra, yk, il, al)


Source:  

Are Mobile Pop-Ups Dying? Are They Even Worth Saving?

Optimizing Sketch Files: Lessons Learned In Creating The Reduce App (Case Study)

Sketch had brought totally new standards for file sizes. You no longer see 10 GB Photoshop files all over the place. Nevertheless, huge Sketch files exist, and they slow down Sketch. As a result, your productivity slows down as well.
Let’s be honest: It’s not the design files that become bigger by magic. It’s designers who fill their files with unused, unoptimized and hidden elements that take unnecessary space. We have faced this problem in our startup, Flawless App.

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Optimizing Sketch Files: Lessons Learned In Creating The Reduce App (Case Study)

How to Turn a Long Landing Page Into a Microsite – In 6 Easy Steps

Landing pages can get really long, which is totally fine, especially if you use a sticky anchor navigation to scroll people up and down to different page sections. It’s a great conversion experience and should be embraced.

However, there are times when having a small multi-page site, known as a microsite (or mini-site) can offer significant advantages.

This is not a conversation about your website (which is purely for organic traffic), I’m still talking about creating dedicated marketing-campaign-specific experiences. That’s what landing pages were designed for, and a microsite is very similar. It’s like a landing page in that it’s a standalone, controlled experience, but with a different architecture.

The sketch below shows the difference between a landing page and a microsite.

The landing page is a single page with six sections. The microsite has a homepage and 5 or 6 child pages, each with a persistent global navigation to conect the pages.

They are both “landing experiences”, just architected differently. I’ve noticed that many higher education landing experiences are four-page microsites. The pharmaceutical industry tends to create microsites for every new product campaign – especially those driven by TV ads.

What are the benefits of a microsite over a long landing page?

To reiterate, for most marketing campaign use cases, a single landing page – long or short – is your absolute best option. But there are some scenarios where you can really benefit from a microsite.

Some of the benefits of a microsite include:

  1. It allows more pages to be indexed by Google
  2. You can craft a controlled experience on each page (vs. a section where people can move up and down to other sections)
  3. You can add a lot more content to a certain page, without making your landing page a giant.
  4. You can get more advanced with your analytics research as there are many different click-pathways within a microsite that aren’t possible to track or design for on a single page.
  5. The technique I’m going to show you takes an Unbounce landing page, turns it into a 5-page microsite.

How to Create a Microsite from a Long Landing Page

The connective tissue of a microsite is the navigation. It links the pages together and defines the available options for a visitor. I’ll be using an Unbounce Sticky Bar as the shared global navigation to connect five Unbounce landing pages that we’ll create from the single long landing page. It’s really easy.

First, Choose a Landing Page to Work With

I’ve created a dummy landing page to work with. You can see from the zoomed-out thumbnail on the right-hand side how long it is: 10 page-sections long to be specific. (Click the image to view the whole page in a scrolling lightbox.)

The five-step process is then as follows:

I’ll explain it in more detail with screenshots and a quick video.

  1. Create the microsite pages, by duplicate your landing page 5 times
  2. Delete the page sections you don’t want on each microsite page
  3. Create a Sticky Bar and add five navigation buttons
  4. Set the URL targeting of the Sticky Bar to appear on the microsite pages
  5. Add the Unbounce global script to your site
  6. Click “Publish” << hardly a step.

Step 1: Create Your Microsite Pages

Choose “Duplicate Page” from the cog menu on your original landing page to create a new page (5 times). Then name each page and set the URL of each accordingly. In the screenshot below you can see I have the original landing page, and five microsite pages Home|About|Features|FAQ|Sign Up.

Step 2: Delete Page Sections on Each Microsite Page

Open each page in the Unbounce builder and click the background of any page section you don’t want and hit delete. It’s really quick. Do this for each page until they only have the content you want to be left in them. Watch the 30 sec video below to see how.

Pro Tip: Copy/Paste Between Pages

There is another way to do it. Instead of deleting sections, you can start with blank pages for the microsite, and copy/paste the sections you want from the landing page into the blank pages. This is one of the least-known and most powerful features of Unbounce.

The best way is to have a few browser tabs open at once (like one for each page), then just copy and paste between browser tabs. It’s epic! Watch…

Step 3: Create the Navigation With a Sticky Bar

Create a new Sticky Bar in Unbounce (it’s the same builder for landing pages and popups). Add buttons or links for each of your microsite pages, and set the “Target” of the link to be “Parent Frame” as shown in the lower-right of this screenshot.

Step 4: Set URL Targeting

This is where the connective tissue of the shared Sticky Bar comes together. On the Sticky Bar dashboard, you can enter any URLs on your domain that you want the bar to appear on. You can enter them one-by-one if you like, or to make it much faster, just use the same naming convention (unique to this microsite/campaign) on each of the microsite page URLS.

I used these URLs for my pages:

unbounce.com/pam-micro-home/
unbounce.com/pam-micro-about/
unbounce.com/pam-micro-features/
unbounce.com/pam-micro-faq/
unbounce.com/pam-micro-signup/

For the URL Targeting, I simply set one rule, that URLs need to contain “pmm-micro”.
For the Trigger, I selected “When a visitor arrives on the page.”
for the frequency, I selected “Show on every visit.” because the nav needs to be there always.

Step 5: Add the Unbounce Script

We have a one-line Javascript that needs to be added to your website to make the Sticky Bars work. If you use Google Tag Manager on your site, then it’s super easy, just give the code snippet to your dev to paste into GTM.

Note: As this microsite solution was 100% within Unbounce (Landing Pages and Sticky Bar), you don’t actually have to add the script to your website, you can just add it to the each of the landing pages individually. But it’s best to get it set up on your website, which will show it on your Unbounce landing pages on that domain, by default.

Ste 6: Hide the Sticky Bar Close Button

As this is a navigation bar, and not a promo, we need to make sure it’s always there and can’t be hidden. It’s not a native feature in the app right now, so you need to add this CSS to each of the microsite pages.

 .ub-emb-iframe-wrapper .ub-emb-close 
  visibility: hidden;
 

Click Publish on #AllTheThings!

And that’s that!


You can see the final microsite here.
(Desktop only right now I’m afraid. I’ll set up mobile responsive soon but it’s 2am and this blogging schedule is killing me :D).


I’ve also written a little script that uses cookies to change the visual state of each navigation button to show which pages you’ve visited. I’ll be sharing that in the future for another concept to illustrate how you can craft a progress bar style navigation flow to direct people where you want them to go next!

A Few Wee Caveats

  • This use of a Sticky Bar isn’t a native feature of Unbounce at this point, it’s just a cool thing you can do. As such, it’s not technically supported, although our community loves this type of thing.
  • As it’s using a shared Sticky Bar for the nav, you’ll see it re-appear on each new page load. Not perfect, but it’s not a big deal and the tradeoff is worth it if the other benefits mentioned earlier work for you.

Aall in all, this type of MacGyvering is great for generating new ways of thinking about your marketing experiences, and how you can guide people to a conversion.

I’ve found that thinking about a microsite from a conversion standpoint is a fantastic mental exercise.

Have fun making a microsite, and never stop experimenting – and MacGyvering!
Cheers
Oli

p.s. Don’t forget to subscribe to the weekly updates for the rest of Product Awareness Month.

From – 

How to Turn a Long Landing Page Into a Microsite – In 6 Easy Steps

6 Reasons Your Mobile Ranking on Google Sucks

drinking straws

2017 will forever be known as the year Google adopted a mobile-first strategy. Some people will think of that way, at least. Probably not too many, actually, but that doesn’t lessen the significance of the shift. Your mobile web strategy is now, simply, your web strategy. Why is this so important? By late 2016, more than half of all Google searches were conducted from mobile devices, and over 77% of web searches are through Google. So when the company announced this year it would prioritize mobile sites over desktop to determine relevance and ranking, it was kind of a big…

The post 6 Reasons Your Mobile Ranking on Google Sucks appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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6 Reasons Your Mobile Ranking on Google Sucks

Designing The Perfect Accordion

Design patterns. An almost mythical phrase that often inspires either awe or resentment. As designers, we tend to think of design patterns as generic off-the-shelf solutions that can be applied to various contexts almost mechanically, often without proper consideration. Navigation? Off-canvas! Deals of the day? Carousel! You get the idea.
Sometimes we use these patterns without even thinking about them, and there is a good reason for it: Coming up with a brand new solution every time we encounter an interface problem is time-consuming and risky, because we just don’t know how much time will be needed to implement a new solution and whether it will gracefully succeed or miserably fail in usability tests.

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Designing The Perfect Accordion

Hibernation Time Is Over! Inspiring Desktop Wallpapers To Fuel Your Creativity (March 2017)

Sometimes all we need is a little inspiration kick to get our creative juices flowing. Maybe your secret is to go for a short walk, have a little chat with a colleague, or scroll through your favorite eye candy resources. Whatever it might be that helps you get new ideas, we, too, have something for you that could work just as good: desktop wallpapers.

Hibernation Time Is Over! Inspiring Desktop Wallpapers To Fuel Your Creativity

To bring you a regular dose of unique and inspiring wallpapers, we embarked on our monthly wallpapers mission eight years ago. Each month, artists and designers from across the globe diligently contribute their works to it. And well, it wasn’t any different this time around. This post features their artwork for March 2017. The wallpapers all come in versions with and without a calendar. Time to freshen up your desktop!

The post Hibernation Time Is Over! Inspiring Desktop Wallpapers To Fuel Your Creativity (March 2017) appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Hibernation Time Is Over! Inspiring Desktop Wallpapers To Fuel Your Creativity (March 2017)

☑️ The Ultimate Digital Clean-Up Checklist: Are You Prepared For The New Year?

With a couple of days left until New Year’s Eve, it’s just about time to set aside 60 minutes to clean up, sort out and back up your digital footprint, to ensure a good smooth start to 2017. So many little details tend to get forgotten or overlooked every single time, only to get fixed hastily later — but doesn’t it just feel right when everything is in the right place, neatly organized, even if you aren’t a compulsory cleaner or an obsessed perfectionist?

Link to article:

☑️ The Ultimate Digital Clean-Up Checklist: Are You Prepared For The New Year?

Desktop Wallpaper Calendars: October 2016

A new month means new wallpapers! This journey has been going on for eight years now, and each time anew artists and designers from across the globe challenge their artistic skills to cater for some fresh inspiration on your desktop. And, well, it wasn’t any different this time around.

Desktop Wallpaper Calendars: October 2016

This post features their designs for October 2016. The collection is a mix of ideas and styles, of wallpapers that are a little more distinctive than the usual crowd. All wallpapers come in versions with and without a calendar and can be downloaded for free — just choose your favorite. A big thank-you to everyone who shared their ideas with us! Happy October!

The post Desktop Wallpaper Calendars: October 2016 appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Desktop Wallpaper Calendars: October 2016

How “Your Tea” Boosted Revenue by 28% Through Structured Conversion Optimization

An increasing number of companies and agencies are following a structured approach to Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO). Presently, we will be looking at how a tea eCommerce website increased revenue using conversion optimization.

About the Company

Your Tea is an online tea eCommerce site serving health and lifestyle-focused consumers. Tiny Tea Teatox is one of their largest sellers in their diversifying everyday tea product ranges.

Your Tea signed on We Are Visionists (WAV), a digital agency that partners with eCommerce agencies and startups, to help solve their clients’ digital problems ranging from paid advertising to conversion rate optimization.

We got in touch with Joel Hauer, founder at WAV, to know all about their successful optimization exercise that resulted in a 28% improvement in revenue.

Onboarding Your Tea

WAV pitched CRO as part of a raft of complementary services, including SEO and PPC, to improve Your Tea’s online presence.

Joel says, “It made business sense and so it was a straightforward decision for Your Tea. If you can create an uplift in your revenue by improving your product page, why wouldn’t you? We were able to make projections based on anticipated improvements to the site, and those projections were what got us over the line. We are lucky to have such a pragmatic client!

Process of Optimization

What WAV wanted to do was to insulate Your Tea’s revenue stream against any potential declines in traffic and maximize revenues in the periods of high traffic.

While doing so, they decided to follow a formalized approach to CRO, that is, researching their website data and visitors’ behavior intently to create hypothesis and running A/B tests that would impact revenues the most.

The Research Phase

To begin with, they analyzed their website data using Google Analytics (GA) to understand the journey of the visitors. They detected a large number of drop-offs on the product pages of the website, that is, a lot of people were landing on the product pages but not adding anything to the cart. They discovered that the Tiny Tea Teatox product page in particular was attracting the largest amount of traffic, and decided to optimize it first.

On further research on that page, they found that more than 50% of visitors were browsing through mobile. This information compelled WAV to closely analyze the mobile version of Tiny Tea Teatox. They found multiple optimization opportunities. For instance, the CTA was not prominent, there was no detailed description of the products, and more.

Here’s how the original page looked:

A/B test Control

Hypothesis Creation

Since a majority of traffic was coming from mobile in particular, WAV decided to optimize both the desktop and mobile versions of the Your Tea website. They hypothesized that adding a more prominent CTA, along with a detailed description of the product and user reviews would increase add-to-cart from the product page.

Using Visitor Behavior Analysis, they were able to develop their hypotheses further. For instance, by looking into heatmap analysis, they realized that visitors mostly browsed the product description and its benefits.

A large number of visitors also visited the reviews section, thereby making it clear that they were looking for trust elements. WAV decided to add more product information and benefits, along with credible “before and after” images and testimonials to the page. WAV also conducted website surveys and user testing sessions, which confirmed their hypothesis of adding more “credibility proofs” to the page.

The Test

WAV concluded that a full redesign of the product pages could yield better results than a series of incremental improvements from smaller tests. Such a massive redesign required heavy technical work, and WAV used VWO’s Ideact service to create a variation. Below is the screenshot of the control and variation:

Your Tea Control Variation Here’s how the Before And After section in the variation looked like:

Here’s the Why Buy From Us section in the variation that aimed to improve the website’s credibility :

Credibility Proof in the VariationResults

With the tests, they tracked two goals, that is, the add to cart conversion rate and the revenue.

The improvement in add-to-cart actions led to an impressive 28% increase in the revenue. In terms of add-to-cart conversions, control of the test was yielding a conversion rate of 11.3% in contrast to the variation which emerged to be the winner with a conversion rate of 14.5%.

Road Ahead

To capitalize on these higher conversions, an optimized checkout experience is required.

The agency could identify that the checkout pages were receiving multiple views from the same visitors. Users were getting stuck in loops around the checkout page. After they identified what to look for, the data from analytics supported it. Currently, they are testing to optimize the mobile experience on parameters such as anxiety and trust signals.

When asked about his biggest learning of the test, Joel responded: “One thing that came out of this test was learning more about the checkout experience—particularly on mobile.”

Experience Using VWO

Joel remarks, “The work of VWO’s Ideact team in setting up the tests on the technical front to help us record users through the checkout experience was invaluable.”

“We loved working with Rauhan and Harinder from VWO. The willingness to go the extra mile and help us get the maximum insight from our tests was fantastic. Having spoken about the features in the pipeline, we’re excited to see what’s to come.”

What Do You Think?

Do you have any similar experiments to share? Tell us in the comments below.

cta

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How “Your Tea” Boosted Revenue by 28% Through Structured Conversion Optimization

Desktop Wallpaper Calendars: September 2016

We all love a good wallpaper to polish up our desktops. So to provide you with fresh artwork on a regular basis, we embarked on our desktop wallpapers mission eight years ago. Each month we challenge you, the design community, to get your creative juices flowing and produce some inspirational and unique desktop wallpapers.
And, well, also this time designers and artists from across the globe challenged their artistic abilities and contributed their designs for September.

Link to article: 

Desktop Wallpaper Calendars: September 2016