Tag Archives: development

Creating A UX Strategy

(This is a sponsored article.) As designers working primarily on screen, we often think of user experience design as being primarily a screen-focused activity. In fact, user experience affects the entirety of what we build and that often includes activities that are undertaken off-screen.

To design truly memorable experiences, we need to widen our frame of reference to include all of the brand touchpoints that our users come into contact with along their customer journey. Doing so has the potential to materially impact upon business outcomes, recognizing the role that design — and user experience — can play at the heart of a wider business strategy.

Whether you’re building a website or an application, at heart you are designing for users and, as such, it’s important to consider these users at the center of a customer-focused ecosystem. Great brands are more than just logos or marques, and websites or applications, they’re about the totality of the user experience, wherever a customer comes into contact with the brand.

This expanded design focus — considering touchpoints both on- and off-screen — becomes particularly important as our role as designers widens out to design the entirety of the experience considering multiple points of contact. It’s not uncommon for the websites and apps we build to be a part of a wider, design-focused ecosystem — and that’s where UX strategy comes in.

Over the last few years, we have seen designers move up the chain of command and, thankfully, we are starting to see designers occupy senior roles within organizations. The emergence of designers as part of the C-Suite in companies is a welcome development and, with it, we are seeing the emergence of CDOs, Chief Design Officers.

As James Pallister put it in “The Secrets of the Chief Design Officer,” an article exploring the CDO phenomenon written for the UK’s Design Council:

“As Apple’s valuation shot higher and higher in recent years, a flurry of major corporations — Philips, PepsiCo, Hyundai &mdahs; announced the appointments of Chief Design Officers to their boards.

This was no mere coincidence. Seeking to emulate the stellar success of design-led businesses like Apple, global companies are pouring investment into design.”

This investment in, and appreciation of, design has been long overdue and is beginning to impact upon our day-to-day role as designers.

Forward-thinking companies are elevating the role of designers within their hierarchies and, equally importantly, stressing the importance of design thinking as a core, strategic business driver. As a result, we are seeing design driving company-wide business innovation, creating better products and more engaged relationships with customers.

As this trend continues, giving designers a seat at the top table, it’s important to widen our scope and consider UX strategy in a holistic manner. In this article, the eighth in my ongoing series exploring user experience design, I’ll open the aperture a little to consider how design impacts beyond the world of screens as part of a wider strategy.

Considering Customer Journeys

Before users come into contact with a website or an app, they will likely have been in contact with a brand in other ways — often off-screen. When considering design in the widest sense, it’s important to focus on the entirety of the customer journey, designing every point of contact between a user and a brand.

Forrester, the market research company, defines the customer journey as follows:

“The customer journey spans a variety of touchpoints by which the customer moves from awareness to engagement and purchase. Successful brands focus on developing a seamless experience that ensures each touchpoint interconnects and contributes to the overall journey.”

This idea — of a seamless and well-designed experience and a journey through a brand — should lie at the heart of a considered UX strategy. To design truly memorable experiences, we need to focus not just on websites or apps, but on all of the touchpoints a user might come into contact with.

Consider the Apple Store and its role acting as a beacon for Apple and all of its products. The Apple Store is, of course, an offline destination, but that doesn’t mean that the user experience of the store hasn’t been designed down to the last detail. The store is just one part of Apple’s wider engagement strategy, driving awareness of the business.

The Apple Store is an entry point into Apple’s ecosystem and, as such, it’s important that it’s considered in a holistic manner: Every aspect of it is designed.

Jesse James Garrett, the founder of Adaptive Path which is an end-to-end experience design company, considers this all-embracing approach in an excellent article, “Six Design Lessons From the Apple Store,” identifying a series of lessons we can learn from and apply to our designs. As Garrett notes:

“Apple wants to sell products, but their first priority is to make you want the products. And that desire has to begin with your experience of the products in the store.”

Seen through this lens, it becomes clear that the products we design are often just one aspect of a larger system, every aspect of which needs to be designed. As our industry has matured, we’ve started to draw lessons from other disciplines, including service design, considering every point as part of a broader service journey, helping us to situate our products within a wider context.

If service design is new to you, Nielsen Norman Group (helpful as ever), have an excellent primer on the discipline named “Service Design 101” which is well worth reading to gain an understanding of how a focus on service design can map over to other disciplines.

When designing a website or an app, it’s important to consider the totality of the customer journey and focus on all of the touchpoints a user will come into contact with. Do so, and we can deliver better and more memorable user experiences.

Designing Touchpoints

As our industry has evolved, we’ve begun to see our products less as standalone experiences, but as part of a wider network of experiences comprised of ‘touchpoints’ — all of which need to be designed.

Touchpoints are all the points at which a user comes into contact with a brand. As designers, our role is expanding to encompass a consideration of these touchpoints, as a part of a broader, connected UX strategy.

With the emergence of smartphones, tablets, wearables and connected products our scope has expanded, widening out to consider multiple points at which users come into contact with the brands we are designing.

When considering a UX strategy, it helps to spend some time listing all of the points at which a user will come into contact with the brand. These include:

  • Websites,
  • Apps and mobile experiences,
  • Email,
  • Support services,
  • Social media.

In addition to these digital points of contact, it’s important to consider >non-digital points of contact, too. These off-screen points of contact include everything, from how someone answers the phone to the packaging of physical products.

To aid with this, it helps to develop a ‘touchpoints matrix’ — a visual framework that allows a designer to join the dots of the overall user experience. This matrix helps you to visually map out all of the different devices and contexts in which a user will come into contact with your brand.

The idea of a touchpoints matrix was conceived by Gianluca Brugnoli — a teacher at Politecnico di Milano and designer at Frog Design — as a tool that fuses customer journey mapping with system mapping, which can be used as the basis for considering how different user personas come into contact with and move through a brand.

Roberta Tassi, as part of her excellent website Service Design Tools — “an open collection of communication tools used in design processes that deal with complex systems” — provides an excellent primer on how a touchpoints matrix can be used as part of a holistic design strategy. Tassi provides a helpful overview, and I’d recommend bookmarking and exploring the website — it’s a comprehensive resource.

As she summarises:

“The matrix brings a deeper comprehension of interactions and facilitates further development of the opportunities given by the system — of the possible entry points and paths — shifting the focus of the design activities to connections.”

This shift — from stand-alone to connected experiences — is critically important in the development of a ‘joined up’ UX strategy.

When you embark upon developing and mapping a broader UX strategy, a touchpoints matrix helps you to see how the different nodes of a design join up to become part of an integrated and connected experience or an ‘ecosystem.’

Building Ecosystems

When we holistically consider our role as designers, we can start to explore the design of the whole experience: from initial contact with a brand offline, through engaging with that brand digitally. Collectively, these amount to designing a brand ecosystem.

Ecosystems aren’t just for big brands — like Facebook, Instagram or Twitter — they are increasingly for everything we design. In a world that is ever more connected, what we design doesn’t stand in isolation. As such, we need to consider both context and scope as part of an integrated strategy.

In addition to considering the design of products, we also need to consider the wider ecosystem that these products sit within. For example, when considering the design of applications — whether web-based or native — we also need to consider: the user’s first point of contact and how we drive discovery; the experience while using the application itself; and addressing wider issues (such as offering users support).

All of the aspects of an ecosystem need to be designed so that we deliver great user experiences at every point in the process. This includes:

  • The process of discovery, through social and other channels;
  • The design of a company or application’s website, so that the story that’s told is consistent and engaging;
  • The content of email campaigns to ensure they’re equally considered, especially if there are multiple email campaigns targeted at different audiences;
  • The packaging, when we’re designing physical, connected products; and
  • The support we offer, ensuring that customers are looked after at every point of the journey, especially when issues arise.

This list is just the tip of the proverbial iceberg, but it clearly shows that there are multiple points on a customer’s journey that need to be designed. A considered UX strategy helps us to deliver on all of these aspects of an ecosystem and become increasingly important as the ecosystems we design become richer and more complex.

In Closing

The opportunities ahead are fantastic for designers working in this industry. The landscape we are designing for is evolving rapidly and, if we’re to stay ahead of the game, it’s important that we turn our attention towards the design of systems in addition to products. This involves an understanding of UX strategy in the broadest sense.

When embarking upon the design of a new website or product, or undertaking a redesign, it’s important to widen the frame of reference. Taking a step back and considering the entirety of the user experience leads to better and more memorable experiences.

By considering the entirety of the customer journey and all the touchpoints along the way we can create more robust, connected experiences. By focusing on the design of holistic experiences, we can delight users, ensuring they’re happy with the entire experience we have crafted.

This article is part of the UX design series sponsored by Adobe. Adobe XD is made for a fast and fluid UX design process, as it lets you go from idea to prototype faster. Design, prototype, and share — all in one app. You can check out more inspiring projects created with Adobe XD on Behance, and also sign up for the Adobe experience design newsletter to stay updated and informed on the latest trends and insights for UX/UI design.

Smashing Editorial
(ra, yk, il)

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Creating A UX Strategy

Monthly Web Development Update 3/2018: Service Workers, Building A CDN, And Cheating At Design

Service Worker is probably one of the most misrepresented technologies we currently have. When I hear people talking about it, the topic almost always revolves around serving an app when a user is offline. However, Service Worker can do so much more than that, and every week I come across new articles that show how powerful the technology really is.

This month, for example, we can learn how to use Service Worker for cross-tab messaging and to load off requests into the background with the Background Sync API. I think the toolset we now have in our browsers already allows us to build great experiences regardless of the network state. Now it’s up to us to make the experiences so great that users truly love them. And that’s probably the hardest part.


Sketch 49
Sketch 49 has arrived, and with it comes the new Prototyping in Sketch feature which lets you see the entire flow in action. (Image credit)


  • Ed Ellson examined Chrome’s Background Sync API and the retry strategy it uses to perform a request. By allowing synchronization in the background after a first attempt has failed, the API helps us improve the browsing experience for users who go offline or are on unstable connections.


Cheating At Design
Use color and weight to create visual hierarchy instead of size is only one of the seven practical tips for cheating at design that Adam Wathan and Steve Schoger share. (Image credit)


  • With GraphQL you can query exactly what you want whenever you want. This is amazing for working with an API but also has complex security implications. Instead of asking for legitimate, useful data, a malicious actor could submit an expensive, nested query to overload your server, database, network, or all of these. To prevent this from happening, Max Stoiber shows us how we can secure the GraphQL API in our projects.


  • WebKit is introducing the Storage Access API. The new API targets one of the major issues with Safari’s Intelligent Tracking Protection (ITP): Identifying users who are logged in to a first-party service but view content of it embedded on a third party (YouTube videos on a blog, for example). The Storage Access API allows third-party embeds to request access to their first-party cookies when the user interacts with them. A good solution to protect user privacy by default and allow exceptions on request.

Web Performance

  • Janos Pasztor built his own Content Delivery Network because he thinks it can be a better solution than using existing third parties. The code for the CDN of his personal website is now available on Github. A nice web performance article that looks at common solutions from a different angle.
  • A year after Facebook’s announcement to broadly use Cache-Control: Immutable, Paul Calvano examined how widespread its usage is on the web — apart from the few big players. Interesting research and it’s still sad to see that this useful performance tool is used so little. At Colloq, we use it quite a lot, which saves us a lot of traffic and load on our servers and enables us to serve a lot of pages nearly instantly to recurring users.
Global stats of a self-built CDN
Global stats for the custom CDN that Janos Pasztor built. (Image credit)





Accessibility Checklist
The Accessibility Checklist helps build accessibility into your process no matter your role or stage in a project. (Image credit)

Work & Life

  • This week I read an article by Alex Duloz, and his words still stick with me: “When we develop a new application, when we post content on the Internet, whatever we do that people will have access to, we should consider just for a minute if our contribution adds up to the level of dumbness kids/teenagers are exposed to. If it does, we should refrain from going live.” The truth is, most of us, including me, don’t consider this before posting on the Internet. We create funny things, share funny pictures and try to get fame with silly posts. But in reality, we shape society with this. Let’s try to provide more useful resources and make the consumption of this more enjoyable so young people can profit from our knowledge and not only view things we think are funny. “We should always consider how teenagers will use what we release.”
  • The MIT OpenCourseWare released a lot of free audio and video lectures. This is amazing news and makes great content available to broader masses.
  • Jake Knapp says great work requires idealism and cynicism and has strong arguments to back up this theory. An article worth reading.
  • There’s an important article on how unhappiness has grown in America’s population since around the year 2000. It reveals that while income inequality might play a role, the more important aspect is that young people who use a lot of digital media are unhappier than those who use it only up to an hour a day. Interestingly, people who don’t use digital media at all, are unhappy, too, so the outcome of this could be that we should try to use digital media only moderately — at least in our private lives. I bet it’ll make a big difference.
  • Following the theory of Michael Bradley, projects don’t necessarily need a roadmap for success. Instead, he suggests to create a moral compass that points out why the project exists and what its purpose is.

Going Beyond…

We hope you enjoyed this Web Development Update. The next one is scheduled for April 13th. Stay tuned.

Excerpt from – 

Monthly Web Development Update 3/2018: Service Workers, Building A CDN, And Cheating At Design

How GDPR Will Change The Way You Develop

Europe’s imminent privacy overhaul means that we all have to become more diligent about what data we collect, how we collect it, and what we do with it. In our turbulent times, these privacy obligations are about ethics as well as law.
Web developers have a major role to play here. After all, healthy data protection practice is as much about the development side — code, data, and security — as it is about the business side of process, information, and strategy.

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How GDPR Will Change The Way You Develop

A Comprehensive Website Planning Guide (Part 1)

As a veteran designer, developer and project manager on more sites than I can count, I’ve identified a common problem with many web projects: failure to plan. As the same issues come up repeatedly in my work, I’ve written this guide in order to help our clients, other designers, businesses and organizations plan and realize successful websites.
Who This Guide Is For Written in relatively non-technical language, this guide provides a broad overview of the process of developing a website, from the initial needs assessment through site launch, maintenance and follow up.


A Comprehensive Website Planning Guide (Part 1)

Monthly Web Development Update 1/2018: Browser Diversity, Ethical Design, And CSS Alignment

I hope you had a great start into the new year. And while it’s quite an arbitrary date, many of us take the start of the year as an opportunity to try to change something in their lives. I think it’s well worth doing so, and I wish you the best of luck for accomplishing your realistic goals. I for my part want to start working on my mindfulness, on being able to focus, and on pursuing my dream of building an ethically correct, human company with Colloq that provides real value to users and is profitable by its users.

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Monthly Web Development Update 1/2018: Browser Diversity, Ethical Design, And CSS Alignment

Building Better UI Designs With Layout Grids

Designers of all types constantly face issues with the structure of their designs. One of the easiest ways to control the structure of a layout and to achieve a consistent and organized design is to apply a grid system.
A grid is like invisible glue that holds a design together. Even when elements are physically separated from each other, something invisible connects them together.
While grids and layout systems are a part of the heritage of design, they’re still relevant in this multiscreen world we live in.

Link to article – 

Building Better UI Designs With Layout Grids

Breaking The Rules: Using SQLite To Demo Web Apps

Most potential users will want to try out the software or service before committing any time and money. Some products work great by just giving users a free trial, while other apps are best experienced with sample data already in place. Often this is where the age-old demo account comes into play.
However, anyone who has ever implemented a demo account can attest to the problems associated. You know how things run on the Internet: Anyone can enter data (whether it makes sense or not to the product) and there is a good chance that the content added by anonymous users or bots could be offensive to others.

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Breaking The Rules: Using SQLite To Demo Web Apps

10,000 Hours of Practice Won’t Increase Conversions (But This Will)

It’s a maxim we’ve all heard and one we’re likely just as sick of. A saying which, if you spend any time on LinkedIn or other self-promotional platforms, you’ll find adorning countless updates, “motivational” images, and influencing all kinds of statuses. A belief so ingrained in the modern business psyche that it’s become almost synonymous with success. What’s the belief I’m referring to? Malcolm Gladwell’s idea that with 10,000 hours of practice, you can become an expert at anything. It’s an approach almost every successful person recommends. Countless hours of hustle will have you mastering your craft and reaching some…

The post 10,000 Hours of Practice Won’t Increase Conversions (But This Will) appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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10,000 Hours of Practice Won’t Increase Conversions (But This Will)

Welcome To The Next Level Of Mobile App Development

(This is a sponsored article.) As users spend 89% of their mobile time inside apps — and 56% of all traffic is now mobile — creating a mobile app has become a top priority for many businesses. Statistics show that the average American spends more than two hours a day on their mobile device. Having a mobile app can be beneficial for your company for a number of reasons. But we all know that building an app from scratch is difficult — the gap between a concept and solution is wide and requires a lot of time, effort and money.


Welcome To The Next Level Of Mobile App Development

Django Developer

We’re looking for developers to join us in our office in central Bristol, developing websites, tools and apps for huge audiences. Our clients include Google, YouTube and Tate. We are proud to be a part of the AKQA network.
This role will see you working as part of a friendly, expert team. The workload will sometimes be hectic, but the atmosphere is cheerful and proactive. We want to put you in a position to write and deploy the best code that you can.

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Django Developer