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2019 Is the Year of Page Speed. Are You Ready?

2019 is the Year of Page Speed

Page speed matters.

We’ve been hearing it for years, though any one of us would be forgiven for letting it slide.

There are other priorities, after all. Marketers have been busy ensuring content is GDPR compliant. We’ve installed SSL certificates, made sure that our pages are mobile-responsive, and conducted conversion optimization experiments.

Some of us have had kids to raise. (And others, dogs.)

But Google has been sending some serious signals lately that suggest sluggish loading is a problem you can no longer sleep on.

In fact, if we look at Google’s actions, it’s undeniable that 2019 will be the year of page speed, the year of the lightning bolt. It’s the year when the difference between fast and slow content becomes the difference between showing up in the search results (whether paid or organic) or disappearing completely.

If you’ve been putting off improvements to your landing page performance until now, chances are that slow content is already killing your conversions. But in 2019, slow content will kill your conversions… to death.

Not convinced? Let’s explore the evidence together.

Google has been saying speed matters since forever

One of the reasons marketers aren’t taking Google’s latest messaging about page speed as seriously as they should is that the company has been asking us to speed up for at least a decade.

Way back in June of 2009, Google launched its “Let’s make the web faster” initiative, which sought to realize co-founder Larry Page’s vision of “browsing the web as fast as turning the pages of a magazine.”

Let's make the web faster
“Let’s make the web faster” video posted on June 22, 2009 (via YouTube)

As part of this initiative, Google made a number of commitments, but they stressed that better speed wasn’t something they could achieve alone. On the same day, a post called “Speed Matters” on the Google AI blog contained a similar message:

Because the cost of slower performance increases over time and persists, we encourage site designers to think twice about adding a feature that hurts performance if the benefit of the feature is unproven.

These weren’t just empty words. The publication of the “Let’s make the web faster” and “Speed Matters” posts signaled a burst of activity from Google. This included:

  • making speed a ranking factor for desktop searches (2010)
  • releasing PageSpeed tools for Firefox (2009) and Chrome (2011)
  • adding the capacity to preload the first search result to Chrome (2011)

But that was nearly ten years ago, and Google followed it with… almost nothing.

Digital marketers and web devs thought they were safe to focus on other things.

Then, in February of 2017, Google returned to the subject of speed in a big way, publishing an industry benchmark report that’s been widely shared ever since.

You may have seen some of the results:

Mobile Page Speed Benchmark
Google’s benchmark revealed that as load times get longer, the probability of bounce increases significantly (via Think with Google).

The first version of the benchmark found that the average mobile landing page was taking 22 seconds to load. This average came down to 15.3 seconds in 2018, but it’s still a significant concern.

(If you’d like a visceral reminder of why a 15-second average wait is still a major problem, hold your breath for that long.)

While the core message that “speed matters” was the same in 2009, in the report Google was now warning that “consumers are more demanding than ever before. And marketers who are able to deliver fast, frictionless experiences will reap the benefits.”

The benchmark report sounded an alarm. And the 2018 update dialed up the volume: “Today it’s critical that marketers design fast web experiences across all industry sectors.”

Google and Page Speed: A Timeline

Much like “Let’s make the web faster,” the 2017 benchmark preceded a flurry of activity from Google, this time laser-focused on mobile page speeds. Here are a few of the more significant moments that should concern you:

May 2017:
Google introduces AMP landing pages to AdWords

This update to AdWords (now Google Ads) makes it possible for advertisers to point their mobile search ads to Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP), an ultra-light standard for web pages that is designed to load in less than a second on a mobile device. It’s the strongest indicator yet that Google wants you to get behind AMP in a big way.


June 2017 to February 2018:
Google makes its tools more insistent

In this period, performance tools like PageSpeed Insights and “Test My Site” began making more forceful claims about speed improvements. In February, Google even announced two new tools. The Mobile Speed Scorecard lets you measure your domain’s load time against up to ten of your competitors. And the Impact Calculator produces an estimate of the revenue impact you’d see by speeding up your site. (They’re done with being subtle.)


July 2018:
Google’s “Speed Update” drops

While speed has been a ranking factor in desktop search results since 2010, the “Speed Update” applies stronger standards to mobile searches. Alongside mobile-first indexing, this places renewed pressure on site creators to ensure their mobile landing page experiences are speedy and engaging.


July 2018:
Mobile Speed Score is added to Google Ads

Though Mobile Speed Score doesn’t (yet) have a direct impact on your cost-per-click (CPC), loading times already factor into your Quality Score because they determine landing page experience. By isolating mobile load times, Google Ads now makes it “easier to diagnose and improve your mobile site speed.” Hint, hint.

Google is making mobile page speed mandatory…

It’s not a drip, it’s a monsoon. Looking at the full timeline of announcements, launches, and product updates reveals that Google has been more active than in 2009—and that this initiative is ongoing. Take a look:

Google Page Speed Timeline
Want a better view of this timeline? Click above to open a larger version.

Since 2009, one of the ongoing arguments that Google has been making—through releasing tools and metrics like PageSpeed Insights, Lighthouse, “Test My Site,” the Speed Scorecard, Impact Calculator, and Mobile Speed Score—is that speed matters.

Since 2017, though, that argument has gotten much louder. And while no single action or announcement on this timeline should send you into a tizzy just yet, it’s worth remembering that Google’s gentle reminders tend to become more or less mandatory.

The search engine’s previous drips about mobile responsiveness or, say, web security both manifested in concrete changes to their browser and search engine that forced marketers to prioritize.

In 2016, for instance, you could have safely put SSL certification on your “nice-to-have” list because all Google promised was a small boost to encrypted sites in the search rankings. Nice, to have, but not critical. In 2018, Google Chrome began actively flagging non-HTTPS sites as “Not Secure.”

That’s how Google encourages change: first a carrot, then the stick.

…but what are marketers doing about it?

Unbounce wanted to know what, if anything, digital marketers are doing to meet Google’s new performance standards. So in the “Inside Unbounce” tent at this year’s Call to Action conference, we conducted an informal survey of attendees.

Participants could choose any landing page they wanted. (A majority of these participants weren’t Unbounce customers, but we were happy to measure pages created with our own builder as well.)

Together, we’d run the selected page through Google’s “Test My Site” tool and record the results.

An Inside Unbounce Attendee
An attendee uses “Test My Site” at CTAConf 2018. Unbounce wanted to know, how fast are you?

Our numbers beat the benchmark by a significant margin. That’s not shocking considering CTAConf is a digital marketing conference. The average load time was 10.27 seconds, five seconds faster than Google’s 2018 benchmark.

But it wasn’t all good news, and just how bad it got surprised us:

Only 1.6% of the 188 attendee landing pages we tested at CTAConf loaded in three seconds. Not a single one we tested loaded faster than that.

Ooof. That hurts, especially since Google says 53% of visitors bounce after three seconds.

This means even savvy marketers are not getting the opportunity to convert because a majority of prospects bounce before the content ever loads. Imagine stressing over the color of a button or the length of your headline copy only to discover most people who click on your ad will never even see the resulting landing page.

It’s no wonder, then, that Google is putting increased pressure on marketers to meet their standards in 2019. They can’t afford to be serving up a heaping spoonful of frustration with each search results. And neither can you.

Major players are already sprinting ahead

Even if Google weren’t forcing our hands, it’s hard to imagine a business that wouldn’t benefit from allocating resources to ensuring their website loads like lightning. Major web brands like Etsy and eBay have long been transparent about the importance of speed to their business, and many more companies are waking up to it.

TELUS, one of Canada’s largest telecommunication companies, committed to improving user experience across their web properties in a series of recent blog posts. According to the blog, this initiative to improve performance and speed is “aligned with what Google was really saying: Improving the customer experience is paramount.”

We reached out to Josh Arndt, Senior Technology Architect and Performance Program Lead at TELUS Digital, who explained why this move made a lot of sense:

Customers expect to be able to do what they want in a way that fits their life. While users come to our website for the content, speed – or lack of – may be the first point of friction in their digital journey. Our goal is to remove friction and make their experience effortless and rewarding. As such, performance and other web quality characteristics will always be on our roadmap.

TELUS recognizes that speed—or a lack of it—serves as the unofficial gatekeeper to their content. In this context, page speed is a natural priority, even if it’s one many of us have been collectively ignoring.

Our manifesto, or what page speed means to Unbounce

As the market leader in landing pages, Unbounce recognizes that being capable of extremely fast speeds represents a significant advantage for our clients. Turbo-charged landing pages result in more traffic and higher engagement, boosting conversions and helping PPC campaigns win increased ad impressions for less.

We’ve been happy to make it our priority into 2019. At the same time, though, we also want to remove some of the obstacles to building faster landing pages.

Technical challenges

Over the past few months, our developers have been optimizing Unbounce pages for the recommendations made by Google’s PageSpeed Insights. This bundle of technical improvements (we call it Speed Boost) automatically takes care of many of the technical details that can be a hurdle to improving performance, especially if development hours are tight or (let’s be realistic here) non-existent.

Speed versus beauty

Another sticking point when it comes to speeding up is that few marketers feel comfortable sacrificing visuals for faster load times. Image file sizes have increased to match the larger display resolutions and higher pixel density of modern mobile devices, one reason the average page size has doubled in the past three years.

With the addition of support for ultra-light SVG images and the recent integration of the free Unsplash image galleries right within the Unbounce builder, we’re helping marketers keep things looking slick without weighing down the landing page.

And we’re working toward creating even more optimization opportunities in the near future, including the Auto Image Optimizer, which automatically compresses the images on your landing pages. (You can decide how much or little compression you want.)

The result will be Cheetah speeds—no, scratch that, cheetah-with-a-rocket-strapped-to-its-back speeds—but without the need to sacrifice either visual allure or creative control.

We’ve taken the pressure off. Check out our plans and pricing for desktop and mobile landing pages that are always optimized with speed in mind. It guarantees a better user experience and less ad spend wasted on ads that don’t convert.

Unbounce + AMP Landing Pages

When it comes to improving page speeds on mobile devices, accelerated mobile pages (AMP) set the gold standard by offering load times that are typically much quicker on a 3G connection—and under a second on 4G.

AMP implementation also has a democratizing effect, which Facebook advertising expert Mari Smith points out:

If you wait too long to ensure speedy landing pages, your competitors will zoom right past you…It’s a total race right now. Specifically, with the pending issues around net neutrality, page speed could become far more important than it already is.

Considering that 70% of the world uses a 3G or slower connection—and that the repeal of net neutrality means more internet users in the US might find themselves in the slow lane—designing for older devices and slower connection speeds means connecting to more potential customers. AMP is a big plus in this regard, and that’s one reason publishers were among the first to adopt it.

But AMP can also be hard. As Unbounce’s Larissa Hildebrandt put it in a recent post, “the reason the AMP framework creates a fast page is because it is so restrictive.”

Implementing AMP typically involves learning the nuances of AMP’s specialized markup, including a restrictive version of HTML and a truncated JavaScript library. Pages are delivered the Google AMP Cache, a proxy-based CDN which helps them load even faster. And, all-in-all, to be validated requires closely following the strict design principles laid out by the AMP Project.

If all this sounds like a killer headache in the making, you’re right.

While Unbounce has been greatly interested in supporting AMP, we wanted to make sure it’s fast and easy for our customers to implement. So when Unbounce launches support for AMP landing pages in early 2019, you’ll be able to use our drag-and-drop builder to create AMP landing pages in no time.

We also didn’t want you to sacrifice creative control, so Unbounce allows the inclusion of AMP-compatible custom CSS, JavaScript, and HTML. As long as it passes validation, you can include it. Go nuts. We love how our community innovates on our platform.

Build an AMP page in Unbounce in our beta
Interested in seeing for yourself how AMP landing pages can accelerate your conversion rate? Join the waitlist for access to the private beta here. Explore how the builder makes creating AMP-ready pages quick and easy.

Speed up or disappear

No marketer can afford to ignore page speed in 2019. Mobile speeds can have a dramatic effect on paid advertising spend and your conversion rates, and Google’s actions so far show that the search engine is cracking down on the slow-to-load across all devices.

What does the future hold? I don’t pretend to have a crystal ball, but here are a few educated guesses:

  1. If mobile loading times don’t get much faster, then we can expect more pressure from Google. This could take the form of further changes to indexing or Google Ads, another round of benchmarks, or the addition of new features and tools.
  2. There’s a growing sense of urgency among marketers, and the major players are already moving to improve their loading times. Even if you’re in the small business space, these things tend to have a trickle-down effect. If you don’t work to improve your performance, chances are your competitors will.
  3. As development on AMP continues, the standard will gain new flexibility while maintaining optimal speeds. It’s already overcome early limitations, and it’s likely we’ll see adoption rates accelerate across all industries.

Since 2009, we’ve seen some remarkable developments in mobile technology, including widespread adoption of touchscreens, the rollout of 4G cellular capabilities, and voice-based search. But the web itself hasn’t always evolved to match—instead, it’s gotten slower and heavier. (Haven’t we all?)

In 2019, though, that will begin to change, for all of the reasons discussed above. The web will speed up and slim down, and those who don’t match the new paradigm will be left behind.

Thankfully, if 2019 is The Year of Page Speed, then you’ve still got opportunities to start speeding up in advance. Let us know your plans in the comments below.

Continue at source – 

2019 Is the Year of Page Speed. Are You Ready?

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Business evolution happens in experimentation sprints: Insights from André Morys, GO Group Digital

But transformative change really happens in sprints. That’s because experimentation is the agile approach to business evolution. When it comes…Read blog postabout:Business evolution happens in experimentation sprints: Insights from André Morys, GO Group Digital

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Business evolution happens in experimentation sprints: Insights from André Morys, GO Group Digital

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A Simple Guide to Increase Online Sales in 2018

how to increase online sales

In just the final quarter of 2017, consumers spent nearly $100 billion dollars in the retail e-commerce market alone. No wonder you want to learn how to increase online sales. You want a chunk of that $100 billion pie. U.S. e-commerce sales aren’t stagnant, either. They continue to grow year over year. Writing for Digital Commerce 360 about U.S. e-commerce retail growth, director of research and consumer insights Stefany Zaroban reveals that “e-commerce represented roughly 49.4% of all retail sales growth in 2017 (versus 41.6% in 2016).”  Clearly, there are customers who want to spend money online. So, how do…

The post A Simple Guide to Increase Online Sales in 2018 appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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A Simple Guide to Increase Online Sales in 2018

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How To Turn Your Users Into Advocates




How To Turn Your Users Into Advocates

Nick Babich



(This article is kindly sponsored by Adobe.) As businesses become more consumer-oriented, competition grows fiercer. Thousands of companies worldwide are struggling each day to gain more market share and to win over new consumers. A significant number of companies concentrate only on acquiring new customers — they allocate enormous marketing budgets trying to strengthen their customer base. But acquiring new customers only becomes harder and more expensive. According to the 2017 Digital Advertising Report by Adobe, ad costs are seeing growth five times faster than US inflation rates.


Cost of advertising increase from 2014 to 2016 in the US.


Cost of advertising increase from 2014 to 2016 in the US. (Image source)

In an attempt to find new customers, companies often forget to think of ways to engage with existing users. However, acquiring a new customer is anywhere from 5 to 25 times more expensive than retaining an existing one.

To succeed in the modern market, companies need to do more than produce an excellent product or provide reliable service: They need to turn their faithful users into advocates.

In this article, I’m going to discuss:

  • who are product advocates,
  • actionable ways to turn your customers into brand advocates,
  • what to consider when creating a strategy for advocacy.

Who Are Product Advocates?

Brand advocates are people who feel so positively about a brand that they want to recommend it to others. They’re often called volunteer marketers because they pass on positive word-of-mouth messages about the brand to other people (both offline and online). Advocates do it organically — money is not the primary reason why they promote a brand or product; they promote it because they truly believe in the brand.

Why Advocacy Is Great

Who sells your products or services? You might think it the sole responsibility of the sales and marketing team. Yes, for a long time, sales and marketing was the team responsible for product growth, but the situation has changed. Your customers have quickly become the most critical people to sell what you’re offering. More specifically, your customers have become keen advocates for your product or service. Advocates can be a key part of growing your customer base:

  • Organic promotion
    Brand advocacy is the modern form of traditional word-of-mouth marketing. And word of mouth about a product or service is one of the most powerful forms of advertising; when regular people recommend a product, their message carries more weight than a paid advertisement. According to a McKinsey study, word of mouth can generate more than double the sales of paid advertising.
  • Authentic reviews and testimonials
    Social proof plays a vital part in the process of product selection. Reading reviews and testimonials is the first step potential users make when researching a product; reviews and testimonials play a role in the wisdom of the crowd. And advocates can be excellent sources of reviews and testimonials. According to Google, 19% of brand advocates share their experiences online in their networks — twice as many as non-brand advocates.
  • Brand awareness
    Advocates use the power of social channels to amplify a brand’s exposure. As a result, they can reach out to people you might not have considered.
  • Valuable customer feedback loops
    Advocates can provide valuable customer insights. Their insights can help you formulate more focused, customer-centric product road maps.

Loyalty And Advocacy Are Not The Same Thing

Many people confuse loyalists and brand advocates. Brand loyalists and advocates aren’t the same groups of customers. Loyal customers are people who stay with your brand. For example, if you run an e-commerce store, loyal customers will be your return buyers. But they might not actively promote your brand to others (i.e. they might not be comfortable with sharing information about your brand publicly).

Advocates, on the other hand, are people who not only are loyal to your brand, but also proactively talk up and advocate for your company to their own networks. The word “proactive” is key here. Advocates invest in the success of your brand heavily. The goal is to turn brand loyalists into brand advocates.

Who Has The Potential To Become A Brand Advocate?

Your existing customers are the most apparent advocates for your brand. Let’s define the groups of existing users who likely to be interested in a brand advocacy program:

  • Promoters
    Promoters are people who participate in an NPS survey, a single-question survey that sounds like, “On a scale of 0 to 10, how likely are you to recommend us to your friends, family, or colleagues?”, and who answers 9 or 10.
  • Referrers
    These are existing customers who refer new users to your product.
  • Repeat visitors
    Repeat visitors are highly engaged and interested in the content you provide.
  • Social sharers
    These are people who share your content on social media on a regular basis.
  • Critics
    Critics leave feedback about your product or service.

However, your customers are not your only advocates. The best brand advocates are people who work with you: your employees. Communications marketing firm Edelman found that 52% of consumers view employees as very credible sources of information about a brand.

How To Encourage Advocacy

Getting customers to advocate for a brand is a lot different from getting them to buy products or services. Users don’t become advocates without reason. To acquire a brand ambassador, companies need to create the conditions that generate not only happy customers, but true customer advocates.

Don’t Try To Force It

Pushing people towards a particular type of action typically results in them doing the opposite. Don’t try to force advocacy; it should be completely natural.

Create A Delightful UX

Designing for the user experience has a lot more to it than making a product usable. It’s also important to generate a certain positive emotional effect while people are using a product. After all, user experience is about how users feel when they interact with a product. As humans, we establish some sort of an emotional connection with all of the products we use. It’s possible to establish a deeper connection with a product by adding elements that generate positive emotions at multiple points along that journey.


Pleasure is at the top of Aaron Walter’s pyramid of emotional design. Designers should have a goal to please their users and make them feel happy when they use the product.


Pleasure is at the top of Aaron Walter’s pyramid of emotional design. Designers should have a goal to please their users and make them feel happy when they use the product.

The reward for brands that connect with customers’ emotions in a positive way can be substantial. People love to talk about products that make them happy.

Duolingo is an excellent example of incorporating delight in UX. What makes Duolingo thrive is its smooth functionality wrapped in a friendly design with elements of gamification. Each lesson is presented as a challenge to the user. When users accomplish a task, Duolingo celebrates this progress with the users by rewarding them with a badge. By presenting the learning process as a challenge, the service creates a sense of development and accomplishment. The latter has a significant impact on delight.


Evoking a positive emotional response in users is key to creating a delightful UX. Duolingo transforms the task of learning a new language into an inviting experience. This motivates users to level up and achieve mastery in the discipline.


Evoking a positive emotional response in users is key to creating a delightful UX. Duolingo transforms the task of learning a new language into an inviting experience. This motivates users to level up and achieve mastery in the discipline.

Focus On Building Trust

Advocacy is always a risky business. When discussing a company, advocates are putting their reputation on the line. They know that if something goes wrong, people will blame them for it. But one thing can alleviate those fears: trust. The more they trust you, the more easily they will recommend your product.

Below are a few things that play a significant role in building trust.

Stand By What You Offer

Deliver what you promise, and promptly solve problems when something goes wrong. That’s the obvious starting point, but you’d be surprised at how many fail to execute well on this simple principle.

Casper, an e-commerce company that sells sleep products online, is an excellent example of a company that exemplifies trust. Ordering a mattress on the Internet isn’t a simple thing. A customer might try a product and find that it’s not good for them. The company understands this and offers an extended trial period (customers can test a product for 100 nights) and an incredibly lenient return policy. By making returns as simple as possible, Casper makes the process of ordering a mattress as comfortable as possible. Casper not only stands by its products, but also trusts its customers to be honest when requesting a refund.

Make It Easy To Reach You

When customers interact with a brand, they expect to have a dialog, not a monologue. They want you to listen to them and demonstrate that you care about them as individuals. This is especially important when users face problems. Users should be able to reach a company through whichever channel is most convenient to them at the time. Whether they prefer face-to-face communication, email, a phone call or a message in a social network, make sure you’re available by all those means.

Ask For Feedback

Asking users for feedback not only is one of the best ways to gain insight into your business, but is also a great way to build relationships. When you ask users for feedback, they understand that you actually care about them and want to make their experience better.

However, the way you ask for feedback plays a vital role in how users react to it. Generic surveys with questions like, “Are you happy with our service? Answer yes or no” won’t deliver many insights. You need to research users problems first, get to know what is bothering them, and only after that ask questions that your users will be happy to answer.


DigitalOcean makes users feel that their opinions carry weight.


DigitalOcean makes users feel that their opinions carry weight.

Encourage Your Customers To Talk About You

Despite the digital world constantly changing, one trend remains the same: When it comes to evaluating a new product or service, potential clients trust the advice and expertise of existing clients. To build trust, you need to encourage users to talk about you. Here are a few things to remember when asking users for a review:

  • Find the right time to ask for a review. The request for a review should be a natural part of the customer journey.

Booking.com makes asking for feedback a natural part of the user journey. When Booking.com users check out at a hotel, the service asks them to review their stay.


Booking.com makes asking for feedback a natural part of the user journey. When Booking.com users check out at a hotel, the service asks them to review their stay.

  • Focus on quality, not quantity. Stay away from reviews and testimonials that praise the product. “Amazing product, highly recommended” doesn’t say much to potential customers. Prioritize testimonials that have context and that tell a story. This testimonial from Amazon illustrates exactly what I mean:

Product reviews can act as social proof and encourage prospects to convert. The best reviews not only describe the pros and cons of a product, but tell a story of how the product benefits the user.


Product reviews can act as social proof and encourage prospects to convert. The best reviews not only describe the pros and cons of a product, but tell a story of how the product benefits the user.

Offer A Loyalty Program

A loyalty program is a tried-and-true technique to show users your gratitude. As mentioned above, loyalty and advocacy aren’t the same thing. Still, a loyalty program can be used to increase the number of brand advocates:

  • Beat negative experience.
    A loyalty program might come in handy when users face a problem and complain about it. Of course, it’s essential to respond to the user request and provide a solution to the problem as fast as you can. But once the issue has been resolved, you can offer the customer loyalty points as an apology. This might help you to win back frustrated users, and maybe they can even advocate for your brand.
  • Encourage social activity.
    Motivate users to participate in social activities. For example, reward users by awarding loyalty points every time they tweet or post to Facebook, write a review, or refer their friends.

Offer A Referral Program

Running a referral program is a great way to encourage existing users to share information about your business. A successful referral program can help you achieve two key goals:

  • acquire new customers,
  • turn existing customers into brand advocates.

Moreover, studies confirm that referred customers are more valuable than customers acquired by other methods; they tend to yield higher profit margins and stay longer (they have a 16% higher lifetime value than non-referred customers), resulting in an overall higher customer lifetime value.

The critical point with a referral strategy is to find out the right incentive to make users spread the word about your product. Dropbox’s referral program is possibly one of the most famous cases of referral marketing done right. The service grew 3900% in 15 months with a simple referral program. When existing Dropbox users referred Dropbox to someone and the person signed up, both got extra free space. Apparently, Dropbox’s tremendous rise is not all due to the referral program; the service provides an excellent user experience, and the team continually improves its product. But the referral program was a great accelerator of the process of promotion.


Dropbox offered a two-sides referral program. Both advocate and referrer are rewarded for completing the desired task.


Dropbox offered a two-sides referral program. Both advocate and referrer are rewarded for completing the desired task.

Uber is an excellent example of how a referral program baked into the service from day one can boost adoption. When Uber launched, it was quite a revolutionary service that brought the sharing economy to the transportation industry. People had to adapt to this new format of ridesharing — many potential users had doubts that stopped them from trying the new experience. The referral program was an excellent tool to alleviate fears. The incentive for participation in the program is straightforward: The service offers a free ride to both the referrer and the new rider upon a successful referral. A free ride is an excellent opportunity to get to know the service. This way, Uber gives new customers the perfect introduction to the service.


Uber’s referral program


Uber’s referral program

Both Dropbox and Uber integrated the referral program very naturally into the product experience. For Dropbox users, the referral program is presented as the final step of the onboarding process — at the point when users already know what benefits the product brings to them and when they’ll be most likely to participate in the program. As for Uber, the referral program has its own option in app’s main menu.

Personalize Customer Experiences

Personalization allows brands to build deeper connections with their customers. It feels great when a product offers an experience that feels tailored especially to us. A personalized experience is what often drives a customer to say, “This is the brand for me.”

It’s possible to make the experience more personal by gathering information on customers and using it to deliver more relevant content. For example, you could have an intuitive interface that adjusts exactly the way the user expects. Netflix is an excellent example of earning loyalty based on providing a personalized experience. The service offers content suggestions based on the user’s viewing history. Netflix also notifies users when new seasons of their favorite TV shows are released.


Netflix does a great job of personalizing its mobile push notifications.


Netflix does a great job of personalizing its mobile push notifications.

Leverage The Power Of Social Media

The power of word of mouth created by brand advocates is amplified through social media. In fact, if there’s one place your company should look for brand advocates, it’s on your social media channels. Today, 70% of Americans use social media channels to engage with friends, family and the people they know. Thus, it’s essential to practice social listening — listen to what your current customers and advocates are saying about your brand — and respond to their comments accordingly.

Choose The Social Networks Most Effective To Your Business

It’s extremely important to know where your audience lives on social media and where potential advocates could have the most influence.

Carefully Choose Content To Publish

Before posting anything on social media, ask yourself two simple questions, “Does it benefit our company?” and “Does it meet our audience’s needs?” Ideally, you should post content that both reflects your business’ goals and satisfies the needs of your target audience.

Respond To User Feedback

Recognizing and responding to positive feedback is particularly important over social media. Reward the people who stand out in your community. If you have a customer who wants to engage with you, engage with them. Give them as much love as they’re giving you.


Users giving positive feedback about your brand is by far the best brand promotion. MailChimp responds to positive customer feedback on Twitter.


Users giving positive feedback about your brand is by far the best brand promotion. MailChimp responds to positive customer feedback on Twitter.

Share User-Generated Content

One of the best ways to push customer advocacy is through user-generated content.

It’s great for brands because one piece of user-generated content can reach thousands of people within hours. And it’s great for users: Being mentioned or having content shared by a brand is really exciting for many consumers.

Airbnb is an excellent example of how user-generated content can be a vital part of a brand’s content. In the company’s Instagram account, Airbnb shares stunning photos captured by its customers. The photos include exotic locations, and this kind of content is highly attractive to prospective customers.


Sharing user content helps you get to that user’s audience. Airbnb uses such content to show off its users’ talents behind the camera.


Sharing user content helps you get to that user’s audience. Airbnb uses such content to show off its users’ talents behind the camera.

Solve User Problems

When users have a problem with a product, they often post questions or complaints on social networks in the hope of getting a quick response. It’s tremendously important to address every concern users have about your brand. By solving their problems, you clearly demonstrate that your brand is genuinely addressing customer concerns. Just imagine the effect when you resolve an issue on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram, and the happy user shares the whole conversation with their friends and family. The benefits will be priceless. Thus, the more you interact with people and solve their issues on social media, the more value you will provide to them, and the more they will like you.


MailChimp deals with user problems on Twitter.


MailChimp deals with user problems on Twitter.

Encourage Your Followers To Share Content

Social media are great places to run promotional campaigns. Next time you run a promotion, ask your followers to share special moments using the hash tag assigned to the campaign. Track the hash tag, and choose the most inspiring contributions. This type of sharing has three significant benefits:

  • It builds brand loyalty.
  • It brings a community together.
  • It helps you create great content relevant to your brand.

In Adobe XD’s promotional campaign on Twitter, designers share their work with Adobe XD using the hash tag #AdobeXDUIKit.


In Adobe XD’s promotional campaign on Twitter, designers share their work with Adobe XD using the hash tag #AdobeXDUIKit.

Provide Social Reward

Monitor your social media channels to identify people who are frequently mentioning your brand, and reward them with personal messages or gifts.


Reward users for connecting and interacting with your brand on social media. Starbucks sent a personalized, reusable Starbucks cup to one of its loyal customers to thank her for promoting Starbucks’ products in her Instagram posts.


Reward users for connecting and interacting with your brand on social media. Starbucks sent a personalized, reusable Starbucks cup to one of its loyal customers to thank her for promoting Starbucks’ products in her Instagram posts.

Make Social Engagement A Natural Part Of The User Journey

Encourage your users to share their achievements in the app on social media. Every once in a while, give users a shout out by sharing their posts on your page as well. Such encouragement can play a key role in making other people do the same. Just make sure the spotlight is on their accomplishments, not your product.

Runtastic (an app that tracks the number of kilometers a user runs every day) is a great example. The app encourages users to share their run with friends on social networks. Users love to share their progress with their network because it makes them look good.


Encourage your followers to share special moments. Runtastic encourages its users to share their accomplishments on social media.


Encourage your followers to share special moments. Runtastic encourages its users to share their accomplishments on social media.

Boost Employee Advocacy

Your employees can help you amplify the brand’s message. According to Weber Shandwick research, 30% of employees are deeply engaged and have a high potential to be employer advocates. Moreover, the leads generated by an employee through social networking convert 7 times more often than other leads.

Your employees know the product inside out; they are capable of providing support and answering detailed questions about the product. It’s possible to boost employee advocacy by following a few simple rules:

  • Train your employees on social sharing activities. Organize seminars to educate your employees on the importance of social sharing and how they can participate in this activity.
  • Incentivize participation in social activities. Provide benefits to frequent sharers and referrers, and acknowledge them in company events.
  • Practice co-creating content with your employees. Give your employees more opportunities to be involved with your brand by sharing their own messages that reinforce business goals.
  • Help them build their personal brand. When your employees gain enough credibility to market your company, the impact of promotion will be much higher.

Help Customers Reach Their Professional Goals

Every brand should help customers to become more experienced in what they do. One way to help your customers with their professional advancement is to provide educational opportunities. Today, many big companies are focused on creating content that will help their users. For example, Adobe offers a magnificent suite of products for designers, but it isn’t only the products that make the company recognizable; it’s the content it publishes. Adobe runs a blog that offers free in-depth educational content that helps thousands of designers create better products.


Hundreds of thousands of designers return to Adobe’s blog every month to learn more about design. Readers recognize and love the brand because the blog posts help them in what they do.


Hundreds of thousands of designers return to Adobe’s blog every month to learn more about design. Readers recognize and love the brand because the blog posts help them in what they do.

Create “Wow” Moments For Your Users

One of the most effective ways to make your users happy (and turn them into brand advocates) is to surprise them — for example, with an unexpected gift. A gift doesn’t mean something expensive. It could be as simple as a handwritten note. Most users would be delighted to receive such a gift because they understand that it takes time to write a personal message. Give your customers such a surprise and they’ll want to talk about it and about, more importantly, its sender.


In today’s world of digital communication, a handwritten note stands out. Sending thank-you notes is a fantastic, and very personal, way to surprise your customers.


In today’s world of digital communication, a handwritten note stands out. Sending thank-you notes is a fantastic, and very personal, way to surprise your customers. (Image source)

Things To Remember When Creating A Brand Advocacy Program

We’ve just reviewed a great list of methods to boost brand advocacy. But which methods should be applied in your case? Unfortunately, when it comes to creating a brand advocacy program, there’s no silver bullet that turns customers into enthusiastic advocates. Each company has its own unique set of requirements, and it’s impossible to provide a one-size-fits-all solution. But it is still possible to provide a few general recommendations on how to create an advocacy program.

Set A Goal

Without clear goals, your chances to engage advocates decrease significantly. Before you get started, know what you want to achieve from your advocate marketing program. What do you want advocates to do?

Choose advocacy goals that align with your overall business objectives. For example, if your top business goal is to increase conversions, then one of your top advocacy goals could be to get more high-quality referrals.

Here are a few common goals:

  • Higher brand engagement
    The number of comments, likes and mentions on your channels is a signifier of success.
  • Higher conversion rates
    Get more high-quality referrals that result in increased sales.
  • Better brand awareness
    By tracking keywords associated with your brand, you’ll know how often people mention your brand and in what context.

Quick tip: Use the S.M.A.R.T. goal-setting program to set the most effective goals possible. The goals you define should be specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and timely.

Measure The Outcome

When it comes to measuring the outcome of an advocacy program, many teams use NPS (Net Promoter Score) as a key metric. NPS is computed by asking users to answer, “How likely are you to recommend this product to a friend or relative? Rate it on a scale from 0 to 10.” The answers are then grouped into three categories:

  • Detractors: responses of 0 to 6, which indicate dissatisfaction.
  • Passives: responses of 7 or 8, which indicate moderate satisfaction.
  • Promoters: responses of 9 or 10, which indicate high satisfaction and a strong likelihood of recommendation.

The NPS is then calculated by subtracting the percentage of detractors from the percentage of promoters. The NPS can range from -100% (only detractors) to +100% (only promoters).


The Net Promoter Score (NPS) is an index ranging from -100 to 100 that measures the willingness of customers to recommend a company’s products to others.


The Net Promoter Score (NPS) is an index ranging from -100 to 100 that measures the willingness of customers to recommend a company’s products to others.

While NPS is an excellent base level for measuring customer satisfaction and loyalty, don’t use NPS as a key performance indicator. Jared Spool provides a few valid arguments on why NPS can be considered harmful to business. Figure out the more reliable and actionable ways to measure how customers feel about your brand and its offerings.

Also, when it comes to evaluating your advocacy program, focus on measuring retention, not conversion. Customer retention refers to a business’ ability to keep a customer over a specified period of time. Your retention rate can tell you a lot about your user base.

Here are three metrics that can help you measure it:

  • Customer retention rate
    The customer retention rate indicates what percentage of customers have stayed with you over a given period of time. While there’s no standard formula for calculating a customer retention rate, Jeff Haden shares a simple way to measure it. Customer retention rate = ((CE – CN) / CS)) x 100, where CE is the number of customers at the end of a period, CN is the number of new customers acquired during a period of time, and CS is the number of customers at the start of a period of time. A business with a low customer retention rate is like a bucket of water with holes in it.
  • Customer lifetime value
    The customer lifetime value is a projection of revenue a business can expect from a customer relationship. Knowing the lifetime value of a customer will help you determine how much money you can spend on customer acquisition; it also enables you to calculate your return on investment (ROI). A customer’s acquisition costs being higher than their lifetime value will often cause problems.

Customer lifetime value


Customer lifetime value (Image source)

  • Referral rate
    If a business runs a referral program, customer referrals are the ultimate proof of your advocacy program. Referral rate = number of coupons redeemed / number of coupons issued. If any user has a personal coupon they can share with friends and family, the formula can be even more straightforward: referral rate = number of coupons redeemed / total number of users.

Conclusion

Think of brand advocates as your new sales team. They have tremendous brand value, they drive awareness, and they are capable of persuading people to consider your product. By focusing your efforts on developing brand advocates, you will see an increase in your company’s growth.

This article is part of the UX design series sponsored by Adobe. Adobe XD tool is made for a fast and fluid UX design process, as it lets you go from idea to prototype faster. Design, prototype and share — all in one app. You can check out more inspiring projects created with Adobe XD on Behance, and also sign up for the Adobe experience design newsletter to stay updated and informed on the latest trends and insights for UX/UI design.

Smashing Editorial
(ms, al, il)


Original article: 

How To Turn Your Users Into Advocates

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Getting Started With The Web MIDI API

As the web continues to evolve and new browser technologies continue to emerge, the line between native and web development becomes more and more blurred. New APIs are unlocking the ability to code entirely new categories of software in the browser.

Until recently, the ability to interact with digital musical instruments has been limited to native, desktop applications. The Web MIDI API is here to change that.

In this article, we’ll cover the basics of MIDI and the Web MIDI API to see how simple it can be to create a web app that responds to musical input using JavaScript.

What Is MIDI?

MIDI has been around for a long time but has only recently made its debut in the browser. MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) is a technical standard that was first published in 1983 and created the means for digital instruments, synthesizers, computers, and various audio devices to communicate with each other. MIDI messages relay musical and time-based information back and forth between devices.

A typical MIDI setup might consist of a digital piano keyboard which can send messages relaying information such as pitch, velocity (how loudly or softly a note is played), vibrato, volume, panning, modulation, and more to a sound synthesizer which converts that into audible sound. The keyboard could also send its signals to desktop music scoring software or a digital audio workstation (DAW) which could then convert the signals into written notation, save them as a sound file, and more.

MIDI is a fairly versatile protocol, too. In addition to playing and recording music, it has become a standard protocol in stage and theater applications, as well, where it is often used to relay cue information or control lighting equipment.


A performer plays a digital piano onstage


MIDI lets digital instruments, synthesizers, and software talk to each other and is frequently used in live shows and theatrical productions. Photo by Puk Khantho on Unsplash.

MIDI In The Browser

The WebMIDI API brings all the utility of MIDI to the browser with some pretty simple JavaScript. We only need to learn about a few new methods and objects.

Introduction

First, there’s the navigator.requestMIDIAccess() method. It does exactly what it sounds like—it will request access to any MIDI devices (inputs or outputs) connected to your computer. You can confirm the browser supports the API by checking for the existence of this method.

if (navigator.requestMIDIAccess) 
    console.log('This browser supports WebMIDI!');
 else 
    console.log('WebMIDI is not supported in this browser.');

Second, there’s the MIDIAccess object which contains references to all available inputs (such as piano keyboards) and outputs (such as synthesizers). The requestMIDIAccess() method returns a promise, so we need to establish success and failure callbacks. And if the browser is successful in connecting to your MIDI devices, it will return a MIDIAccess object as an argument to the success callback.

navigator.requestMIDIAccess()
    .then(onMIDISuccess, onMIDIFailure);

function onMIDISuccess(midiAccess) 
    console.log(midiAccess);

    var inputs = midi.inputs;
    var outputs = midi.outputs;


function onMIDIFailure() 
    console.log('Could not access your MIDI devices.');

Third, MIDI messages are conveyed back and forth between inputs and outputs with a MIDIMessageEvent object. These messages contain information about the MIDI event such as pitch, velocity (how softly or loudly a note is played), timing, and more. We can start collecting these messages by adding simple callback functions (listeners) to our inputs and outputs.

Going Deeper

Let’s dig in. To send MIDI messages from our MIDI devices to the browser, we’ll start by adding an onmidimessage listener to each input. This callback will be triggered whenever a message is sent by the input device, such as the press of a key on the piano.

We can loop through our inputs and assign the listener like this:

function onMIDISuccess(midiAccess) 
    for (var input of midiAccess.inputs.values())
        input.onmidimessage = getMIDIMessage;
    
}

function getMIDIMessage(midiMessage) 
    console.log(midiMessage);

The MIDIMessageEvent object we get back contains a lot of information, but what we’re most interested in is the data array. This array typically contains three values (e.g. [144, 72, 64]). The first value tells us what type of command was sent, the second is the note value, and the third is velocity. The command type could be either “note on,” “note off,” controller (such as pitch bend or piano pedal), or some other kind of system exclusive (“sysex”) event unique to that device/manufacturer.

For the purposes of this article, we’ll just focus on properly identifying “note on” and “note off” messages. Here are the basics:

  • A command value of 144 signifies a “note on” event, and 128 typically signifies a “note off” event.
  • Note values are on a range from 0–127, lowest to highest. For example, the lowest note on an 88-key piano has a value of 21, and the highest note is 108. A “middle C” is 60.
  • Velocity values are also given on a range from 0–127 (softest to loudest). The softest possible “note on” velocity is 1.
  • A velocity of 0 is sometimes used in conjunction with a command value of 144 (which typically represents “note on”) to indicate a “note off” message, so it’s helpful to check if the given velocity is 0 as an alternate way of interpreting a “note off” message.

Given this knowledge, we can expand our getMIDIMessage handler example above by intelligently parsing our MIDI messages coming from our inputs and passing them along to additional handler functions.

function getMIDIMessage(message) 
    var command = message.data[0];
    var note = message.data[1];
    var velocity = (message.data.length > 2) ? message.data[2] : 0; // a velocity value might not be included with a noteOff command

    switch (command) 
        case 144: // noteOn
            if (velocity > 0) 
                noteOn(note, velocity);
             else 
                noteOff(note);
            
            break;
        case 128: // noteOff
            noteOff(note);
            break;
        // we could easily expand this switch statement to cover other types of commands such as controllers or sysex
    }
}

Browser Compatibility And Polyfill

As of the writing of this article, the Web MIDI API is only available natively in Chrome, Opera, and Android WebView.


Browser support for Web MIDI API from caniuse.com


The Web MIDI API is only available natively in Chrome, Opera, and Android WebView.

For all other browsers that don’t support it natively, Chris Wilson’s WebMIDIAPIShim library is a polyfill for the Web MIDI API, of which Chris is a co-author. Simply including the shim script on your page will enable everything we’ve covered so far.

<script src="WebMIDIAPI.min.js"></script>    
<script>
if (navigator.requestMIDIAccess)  //... returns true
</script>

This shim also requires Jazz-Soft.net’s Jazz-Plugin to work, unfortunately, which means it’s an OK option for developers who want the flexibility to work in multiple browsers, but an extra barrier to mainstream adoption. Hopefully, within time, other browsers will adopt the Web MIDI API natively.

Making Our Job Easier With WebMIDI.js

We’ve only really scratched the surface of what’s possible with the WebMIDI API. Adding support for additional functionality besides basic “note on” and “note off” messages starts to get much more complex.

If you’re looking for a great JavaScript library to radically simplify your code, check out WebMidi.js by Jean-Philippe Côté on Github. This library does a great job of abstracting all the parsing of MIDIAccess and MIDIMessageEvent objects and lets you listen for specific events and add or remove listeners in a much simpler way.

WebMidi.enable(function () 

    // Viewing available inputs and outputs
    console.log(WebMidi.inputs);
    console.log(WebMidi.outputs);

    // Retrieve an input by name, id or index
    var input = WebMidi.getInputByName("My Awesome Keyboard");
    // OR...
    // input = WebMidi.getInputById("1809568182");
    // input = WebMidi.inputs[0];

    // Listen for a 'note on' message on all channels
    input.addListener('noteon', 'all',
        function (e) 
            console.log("Received 'noteon' message (" + e.note.name + e.note.octave + ").");
        
    );

    // Listen to pitch bend message on channel 3
    input.addListener('pitchbend', 3,
        function (e) 
            console.log("Received 'pitchbend' message.", e);
        
    );

    // Listen to control change message on all channels
    input.addListener('controlchange', "all",
        function (e) 
            console.log("Received 'controlchange' message.", e);
        
    );

    // Remove all listeners for 'noteoff' on all channels
    input.removeListener('noteoff');

    // Remove all listeners on the input
    input.removeListener();

});

Real-World Scenario: Building A Breakout Room Controlled By A Piano Keyboard

A few months ago, my wife and I decided to build a “breakout room” experience in our house to entertain our friends and family. We wanted the game to include some kind of special effect to help elevate the experience. Unfortunately, neither of us have mad engineering skills, so building complex locks or special effects with magnets, lasers, or electrical wiring was outside the realm of our expertise. I do, however, know my way around the browser pretty well. And we have a digital piano.

Thus, an idea was born. We decided that the centerpiece of the game would be a series of passcode locks on a computer that players would have to “unlock” by playing certain note sequences on our piano, a la Willy Wonka.

This is a musical lock
This is a musical lock

Sound cool? Here’s how I did it.

Setup

We’ll begin by requesting WebMIDI access, identifying our keyboard, attaching the appropriate event listeners, and creating a few variables and functions to help us step through the various stages of the game.

// Variable which tell us what step of the game we're on. 
// We'll use this later when we parse noteOn/Off messages
var currentStep = 0;

// Request MIDI access
if (navigator.requestMIDIAccess) 
    console.log('This browser supports WebMIDI!');

    navigator.requestMIDIAccess().then(onMIDISuccess, onMIDIFailure);

 else 
    console.log('WebMIDI is not supported in this browser.');


// Function to run when requestMIDIAccess is successful
function onMIDISuccess(midiAccess) 
    var inputs = midiAccess.inputs;
    var outputs = midiAccess.outputs;

    // Attach MIDI event "listeners" to each input
    for (var input of midiAccess.inputs.values()) 
        input.onmidimessage = getMIDIMessage;
    
}

// Function to run when requestMIDIAccess fails
function onMIDIFailure() 
    console.log('Error: Could not access MIDI devices.');


// Function to parse the MIDI messages we receive
// For this app, we're only concerned with the actual note value,
// but we can parse for other information, as well
function getMIDIMessage(message) 
    var command = message.data[0];
    var note = message.data[1];
    var velocity = (message.data.length > 2) ? message.data[2] : 0; // a velocity value might not be included with a noteOff command

    switch (command) 
        case 144: // note on
            if (velocity > 0) 
                noteOn(note);
             else 
                noteOff(note);
            
            break;
        case 128: // note off
            noteOffCallback(note);
            break;
        // we could easily expand this switch statement to cover other types of commands such as controllers or sysex
    }
}

// Function to handle noteOn messages (ie. key is pressed)
// Think of this like an 'onkeydown' event
function noteOn(note) 
    //...


// Function to handle noteOff messages (ie. key is released)
// Think of this like an 'onkeyup' event
function noteOff(note) 
    //...


// This function will trigger certain animations and advance gameplay 
// when certain criterion are identified by the noteOn/noteOff listeners
// For instance, a lock is unlocked, the timer expires, etc.
function runSequence(sequence) 
    //...

Step 1: Press Any Key To Begin

To kick off the game, let’s have the players press any key to begin. This is an easy first step which will clue them into how the game works and also start a countdown timer.

function noteOn(note) 
    switch(currentStep) 
        // If the game hasn't started yet.
        // The first noteOn message we get will run the first sequence
        case 0: 
            // Run our start up sequence
            runSequence('gamestart');

            // Increment the currentStep so this is only triggered once
            currentStep++;
            
            break;
    
}

function runSequence(sequence) 
    switch(sequence) 
        case 'gamestart':            
            // Now we'll start a countdown timer...
            startTimer();
            
            // code to trigger animations, give a clue for the first lock
            break;
    
}

Step 2: Play The Correct Note Sequence

For the first lock, the players must play a particular sequence of notes in the right order. I’ve actually seen this done in a real breakout room, only it was with an acoustic upright piano rigged to a lock box. Let’s re-create the effect with MIDI.

For every “note on” message received, we’ll append the numeric note value to an array and then check to see if that array matches a predefined array of note values.

We’ll assume some clues in the breakout room have told the players which notes to play. For this example, it will be the beginning of the tune to “Amazing Grace” in the key of F major. That note sequence would look like this.


A visual representation of the first nine notes of “Amazing Grace” on a piano


This is the correct sequence of notes that we’ll be listening for as the solution to the first lock.

The MIDI note values in array form would be: [60, 65, 69, 65, 69, 67, 65, 62, 60].

var correctNoteSequence = [60, 65, 69, 65, 69, 67, 65, 62, 60]; // Amazing Grace in F
var activeNoteSequence = [];

function noteOn(note) 
    switch(currentStep) 
        // ... (case 0)

        // The first lock - playing a correct sequence
        case 1:
            activeNoteSequence.push(note);

            // when the array is the same length as the correct sequence, compare the two
            if (activeNoteSequence.length == correctNoteSequence.length) 
                var match = true;
                for (var index = 0; index < activeNoteSequence.length; index++) 
                    if (activeNoteSequence[index] != correctNoteSequence[index]) 
                        match = false;
                        break;
                    
                }

                if (match) 
                    // Run the next sequence and increment the current step
                    runSequence('lock1');
                    currentStep++;
                 else 
                    // Clear the array and start over
                    activeNoteSequence = [];
                
            }
            break;
    }
}

function runSequence(sequence) 
    switch(sequence) 
        // ...

        case 'lock1':
            // code to trigger animations and give clue for the next lock
            break;
    
}

Step 3: Play The Correct Chord

The next lock requires the players to play a combination of notes at the same time. This is where our “note off” listener comes in. For every “note on” message received, we’ll add that note value to an array; for every “note off” message received, we’ll remove that note value from the array. Therefore, this array will reflect which notes are currently being pressed at any time. Then, it’s a matter of checking that array every time a note value is added to see if it matches a master array with the correct values.

For this clue, we’ll make the correct answer a C7 chord in root position starting on middle C. That looks like this.


A visual representation of a C7 chord on a piano


These are the four notes that we’ll be listening for as the solution to the second lock.

The correct MIDI note values for this chord are: [60, 64, 67, 70].

var correctChord = [60, 64, 67, 70]; // C7 chord starting on middle C
var activeChord = [];

function noteOn(note) 
    switch(currentStep) 
        // ... (case 0, 1)

        case 2:
            // add the note to the active chord array
            activeChord.push(note);

            // If the array is the same length as the correct chord, compare
            if (activeChord.length == correctChord.length) 
                var match = true;
                for (var index = 0; index < activeChord.length; index++) 
                    if (correctChord.indexOf(activeChord[index]) < 0) 
                        match = false;
                        break;
                    
                }

                if (match) 
                    runSequence('lock2');
                    currentStep++;
                
            }
            break;
    }

function noteOff(note) 
    switch(currentStep) 
        case 2:
            // Remove the note value from the active chord array
            activeChord.splice(activeChord.indexOf(note), 1);
            break;
    
}

function runSequence(sequence) 
    switch(sequence) 
        // ...

        case 'lock2':
            // code to trigger animations, stop clock, end game
            stopTimer();

            break;
    
}

Now all that’s left to do is to add some additional UI elements and animations and we have ourselves a working game!

Here’s a video of the entire gameplay sequence from start to finish. This is running in Google Chrome. Also shown is a virtual MIDI keyboard to help visualize which notes are currently being played. For a normal breakout room scenario, this can run in full-screen mode and with no other inputs in the room (such as a mouse or computer keyboard) to prevent users from closing the window.

WebMIDI Breakout Game Demo (watch in Youtube)

If you don’t have a physical MIDI device laying around and you still want to try it out, there are a number of virtual MIDI keyboard apps out there that will let you use your computer keyboard as a musical input, such as VMPK. Also, if you’d like to further dissect everything that’s going on here, check out the complete prototype on CodePen.

See the Pen WebMIDI Breakout Room Demo by Peter Anglea (@peteranglea) on CodePen.

Conclusion

MIDI.org says that “Web MIDI has the potential to be one of the most disruptive music [technologies] in a long time, maybe as disruptive as MIDI was originally back in 1983.” That’s a tall order and some seriously high praise.

I hope this article and sample app has gotten you excited about the potential that this API has to spur the development of new and exciting kinds of browser-based music applications. In the coming years, hopefully, we’ll start to see more online music notation software, digital audio workstations, audio visualizers, instrument tutorials, and more.

If you want to read more about Web MIDI and its capabilities, I recommend the following:

And for further inspiration, here are some other examples of the Web MIDI API in action:

Smashing Editorial
(rb, ra, hj, il)

Read More:

Getting Started With The Web MIDI API

A Comprehensive Guide To Product Design

(This is a sponsored article.) What is a product? Until recently, the term was used only in relation to something material and often found in a retail store. Nowadays, it is coming to mean digital products as well. Apps and websites are modern products.
When it comes to building great products, design is the most important “feature.” We’ve moved into the stage where product design dominates — it’s what sets companies apart and gives a real edge over competitors.

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A Comprehensive Guide To Product Design

Free Online Event On Building And Maintaining Design Systems

(This is a sponsored article.) Everybody’s talking about design systems, but they are more than just a trend. They are a best practice for design consistency and efficiency between designers and developers.
Back in the day, only large companies could afford the effort of building and maintaining a design system. Nowadays, with the growth of new tools and processes, they have become much more feasible for companies of all sizes.

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Free Online Event On Building And Maintaining Design Systems