Tag Archives: ecommerce

Thumbnail

12 Conversion Optimization Tricks That Boost Cart Abandonment Results

Note: This is a guest article written by Brett Thoreson , the CEO at CartStack. Any and all opinions expressed in the post are Brett’s.

When selling online, cart abandonment is a fact of ecommerce life. Humans have a limited attention span (just 8 seconds long), as we are filled with deliberation, choices, distractions, and doubts. However, there are lots of tools out there to help you minimize cart abandonment, but we can’t eradicate it completely.

However, all is not lost. Customers who have abandoned their carts can still be reengaged. And we’re here to help you with top conversion rate optimization tips that will turn those faltering customers into paying ones.

cart abandonment solution in ecommerce

The Basics

Cart abandonment is when someone visits your website, adds items to their baskets, but for one reason or another, fails to finalize the purchase and leaves the transaction incomplete.

Conversion rate optimization (CRO) is a set of practices that helps you to convert visitors into paying customers and avoid, or turn around, cart abandonment.

Two impactful CRO practices that help with cart abandonment avoidance are:

  • Cart abandonment software: Software that tracks a visitor’s journey on your website to: capture emails and track shoppers while they are on your site, watch for them to abandon a cart, and email them following their abandonment, enticing them back.
  • A/B split testing: Running two versions of your website or page that are identical in intent (such as the checkout page) but different in style, allowing you to compare and contrast conversion rates between the two.

Power of Cart Abandonment Software and A/B Testing on Customer Conversions

Alone, these tools are impactful but together they can work in conjunction to produce much powerful results that will make your conversion rates soar and here’s how:

Cart abandonment software relies on shoppers (website visitors) entering their email addresses on your website form, while A/B testing provides you with the insight to optimize your website to ensure that shoppers (website visitors) input their email addresses.

Simply put, A/B testing converts visitors into leads and cart abandonment software converts leads into paying customers.

How to Use A/B Testing and Cart Abandonment Software to Get Email Addresses

There are lot of CRO tips for use when you are A/B testing to see what changes result in increased email conversions. We’ve put together our favorite tips here:

Where

Where you ask people for their email address, is hugely important and impactful. You can have a banner asking people to sign up. It can be part of a registration form, or you can use your cart abandonment software to produce exit intent pop-ups (displayed when visitors look as if they are about to leave). It is estimated that 35% of lost shoppers can be saved by using exit intent pop-ups, but test this for yourself to see if this is true for your customers.

Opt-In Changes

  1. Location

Visual tracking research shows that we browse websites following an F-shaped pattern, favoring the top and left-hand sides. Test your email address opt-ins at both these instances to see which captures more attention.

visual behaviour of visitors in e-commerce

  1. Color and Font

Choosing the right color and font optimization for your call-to-action button is imperative. We’ll discuss color in a little more detail below. Testing background colors and contrasting text that can make your banner stand out, easy to read, and compelling to complete is a significant use of split testing.

  1. Lead Magnets

Lead magnets offer your customers something valuable in exchange of their email addresses. It can be a downloadable guide on this season’s fashions or a report on the top-rated headphones of the year. Test whether lead magnets work or not; and if they do, test many types. Opt-ins of this nature can see up to a 10% conversion rate.

lead magnets as a solution for cart abandonment

Form-Based Changes

  1. Page Layout

As mentioned earlier, humans are easily distracted not only by outside sources but also by items on your website. For a particular VWO customer, removing the navigation menu resulted in a 100% increase in conversions. Try removing your navigation menu from the form page, to reduce distraction, and removing the option to leave the form, and see if these increase your conversions.

  1. Form Layout

Over 70% of online shoppers abandon their cart halfway through the checkout process, meaning that they are also halfway through filling out your form. Some cart abandonment software applications capture email addresses in real time, even if the visitor doesn’t hit Submit. Therefore, test moving the email address field higher up on your shopping cart and checkout pages, to capture the email address before the visitors abandon the page so that you can send them a follow-up email reminder.

  1. Copy

Words are powerful and emotive: They can make people comply, offer, or turn away. Consider how you are asking for shopper’s email addresses and then test different methods, such as explaining why, using personable language, emotive words, or by using less number of words.

pop ups to stop ecommerce abandonment

  1. Field Population

Do visitors respond better to form fields that are pre-populated with example text (such as example@example.com), blank fields, or fields compatible with Google Autocomplete. Understanding what makes your form easiest to complete should help  enable you to tailor it accordingly.

Exit Intent Pop-Up Changes

  1. Color

A pop-up needs to grab visitor attention, and the best way to do this is with color. Split test different colors that contrast with your website brand colors and “pop out.” You may also want take into account well-known color connotations, which differ across countries, cultures, and genders, such as:

Blue: Security

Purple: Luxury

Red: Urgency

Yellow: Caution

While you can’t adapt your website for everyone, you can adapt it to your customer base by seeing what works best for them.

  1. Offers

A great A/B testing idea can be of using different offers to see which offers appeal to your customers more. Research shows trends such as 90% of online shoppers being influenced by the cost of delivery and discount days such as Black Friday, leading to billions of dollars worth of online sales. Test percentage discounts, free delivery, and money off to see what works best for your target audience.

  1. Wording

Your exit intent pop-up wording is crucial. When issuing a pop-up window, you are walking a fine line between frustrating and enticing your customer. If you are interrupting them, test your wording to make sure it demonstrates a good reason.

  1. Fields

Another useful test for pop-up windows is to include the email address field in the exit intent pop-up itself.  This will enable you to capture user email addresses in real time before they exit the pop-up screen.

pop ups as a cart abandonment solution.

  1. Size

Size matters when designing your exit intent pop-up screen. Should it take up the whole page or just the center? Should it be easy to click or difficult?

Results

A/B split testing is a great way to increase your email address conversion rates. It can be then directly used to fuel your cart abandonment software, with the ultimate aim of re-engaging customers who have abandoned their shopping carts.

There are many other tests that you can try for capturing email addresses before cart abandonment occurs. However, the following 12 are our favorites, because they work. Increasing the number of email addresses you capture before cart abandonment and using these addresses in your follow-up cart abandonment email campaign, you can convert over 20% of lost online sales.

The post 12 Conversion Optimization Tricks That Boost Cart Abandonment Results appeared first on Blog.

This article is from: 

12 Conversion Optimization Tricks That Boost Cart Abandonment Results

Real-World Examples of Show-Stopping Case Studies That Capture Attention and Close Sales

A compelling case study can be an extremely useful sales tool. Buyers love them. In fact, 78 percent of B2B buyers read case studies when researching an upcoming purchase. Why then, do so many companies fail to create compelling case studies? Well, creating a convincing case study is hard. There’s a reason why experienced copywriters charge thousands of dollars for a single case study. Case studies put your biggest benefits on display, using convincing language that connects with the core concerns of your ideal prospects. There are some common roadblocks you might run into when creating case studies. Asking something…

The post Real-World Examples of Show-Stopping Case Studies That Capture Attention and Close Sales appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Visit site:  

Real-World Examples of Show-Stopping Case Studies That Capture Attention and Close Sales

Thumbnail

[Mobile] How to Turn Your Blog Posts Into a Mobile App Experience – Using Sticky Bars

With so much of your traffic coming from people’s phones, it’s essential that we start to craft exceptional mobile experiences. This means going beyond simple responsive design if you’re going to create a superior mobile UX (user experience) that stands out from your competition.

IMPORTANT: Use your phone to read this post – it’s designed as a mobile experience.

***Click here to show a mobile nav bar***. The concept here is to use a nav bar with icons, to turn this blog post into an app-like mobile user experience. Click the nav buttons to move up and down the blog post on your phone and you’ll get a sense of how the experience has changed from a regular blog post reading experience.

You can use this technique with landing pages, blog posts, or anywhere you want to create a mobile app experience.

For those reading on desktop, this is what you’ll see at the bottom of your mobile browser.


Why Do Landing Pages (and Your Blog) Need Good Mobile UX?

When a landing page or blog post is long, there will most likely be a small percentage of visitors who will actually read the whole thing. You can increase engagement, and make a better experience if you guide people to the most important chapters or segments of the content.

***Click here to show the mobile nav bar***.

To achieve this you can use a navigation bar with clearly labeled sections that are not only helpful but and also feels like you’re inside an app native to your phone.


Turning Your Landing Page into an App-Like Mobile Experience with Unbounce Sticky Bars – in 4 Simple Steps

I’ve set it up so there are 4 main sections in the blog post that you can navigate to using the sticky app nav. So go ahead and click the nav icons to jump to each of the four steps you can follow to add this experience to your own landing pages and blog posts.


Step #1 – Create a Sticky Bar With Retina-Grade Icons

I created a sticky bar with four icons. To make them retina I made them with a width of 160px and a height of 130px, and shrank them to 80×65 in the Unbounce builder. To do this, I added 4 boxes and set the background style to be “Image” and “Background to fit container”. Then I added a fully transparent button above each of the images (because boxes don’t have a link action) to link to each of the 4 page sections.


Step #2 – Add Anchor Links and Sections

You can do this by setting the link action of the icons to point to a page element ID. For instance, the horizontal rule (line) that appears above step #2, has an ID of “section2”. In Unbounce this looks like the settings below. Note that the target of the link is set to “Parent Frame” as the Sticky Bar is set in an iframe above the page.


Step #3 – Hide the Close Button with CSS

As with many hacks that I’ve come up with for Product Awareness Month, this one requires that we hide the “Close” button that is part of the Sticky Bar functionality. When your Sticky Bar is used for promotional purposes it’s important that people can close it. But when you’re creating a navigational experience, the bar becomes part of the interface, and we need it to be always present.

To do this, you need to add a line of CSS to the landing page or blog that you want it to appear on. Note: this is not an official Unbounce feature, so your best bet for geeking out with functionality will be in the Unbounce community.

.ub-emb-iframe-wrapper .ub-emb-close visibility: hidden;

Step #4 – Look at Your Phone and Say Hells Yeah!

I can’t state enough how much I think this is a better mobile experience, so please give it a try and join the conversation in the comments (or ping me on Twitter).

Cheers
Oli

Taken from – 

[Mobile] How to Turn Your Blog Posts Into a Mobile App Experience – Using Sticky Bars

How a Two-Step Opt-In Beat an Exit Popup by 1169% [by Using a Psychology Principle]

I’ve no idea how to actually do the two-step. Apparently it looks a little something like this:

It’s way too complex for me. Fortunately, when it comes to marketing, the two-step opt-in form is much simpler.

What is a Two-Step Opt-In Form?

Well for starters it’s a two-time hyphenated term that’s really annoying to type. Functionally though, instead of including a form on your landing page, blog, or website, you use a link, button, or graphic to launch a popup that contains your form.

Why are Two-Step Opt-In Forms Good For Conversion?

There are two reasons why this approach is good for conversion rates, both of which have an element of behavioural psychology.

  • Foot in the Door (FITD): The FITD technique is an example of compliance psychology. By design, it’s good because the form is launched after a user-driven request. They clicked the link to subscribe with the intent to do exactly that, subscribe (or whatever the form’s conversion goal is). The click demonstrates the reaction to a modest request, creating a level of commitment that makes the visitor more likely to complete the form (the larger request) when it’s presented.
  • Perceived friction: Because there is no visible form, the idea of filling out a form is not really top of mind. This reduces the amount of effort required in your visitor’s mind.

What Does a Two-Step Opt-In Form Look Like?

They look a little like this aetful sketch I did last night.

Let’s try a demo. You can subscribe to follow along with Product Awareness Month here.
Clicking that link uses the two-step concept to launch a popup containing the subscribe form.

Pretty simple, right?

You could also click on any of the images below to do the same thing.

I configured all of these with Unbounce Popups by targeting this blog post URL and using the “On Click” trigger option set to function when an element with the ID #pam-two-step-v1 is clicked.

This trigger option is awesome because you can apply it to any element on your pages. And as you’ve just seen, you can have as many different popups as you like, all attached to different page elements.


You Can Also Use a Sticky Bar for a Two-Step Opt-In Form

The functionality is exactly the same if you want to use a Sticky Bar. Click the image below to show a Sticky Bar with a form, at the top of the page.


How Do Two-Step Opt-In Forms Perform?

Great question! I’m glad you asked.

Throughout Product Awareness Month I’ve sprinkled a few two-step opt-in popup links like this one: Subscribe Now. I’m also using the exact same popup using the exit trigger, so visitors see it when they are leaving the page.

To compare the data, the exit popup obviously gets seen a lot more as it triggers once for everyone. Conversely, the “On Click” popup gets fewer views because it’s a subtle CTA that only appears in a few places.

You can see some initial conversion rates below from the Unbounce dashboard.

Not huge sample sizes just yet (I’ll report on this again at the end of the month), but the difference is staggering.

The “On Click” triggered popup conversion rate is 1169% better than the exit popup.


Convinced yet? I hope so. Now I’d like to challenge you to try your own experiments with popup triggers and the awesome two-step opt-in form.

Sign up for a 30-day trial and build some Popups today. You also get the Sticky Bar and Landing Page products included in your account.

Cheers
Oli

p.s. Come back tomorrow to see a video interview I did with the awesome Head of Marketing at Shopify Plus, Hana Abaza.

Visit site:

How a Two-Step Opt-In Beat an Exit Popup by 1169% [by Using a Psychology Principle]

5 Ways to Find the Best Products to Sell on Amazon

With the advent of the internet in the 90’s, Ecommerce has spread like wildfire. Consumers have moved from traditional shopping to ecommerce. All this started when Jeff Bezos introduced us to the world of Amazon. Nowadays, Amazon has become synonymous with ecommerce. Apart from being a great online store, it is known for its user personalization feature. A study by Internet Retailer states that in 2016, Amazon accounted for 43% of all online sales in the US. That alone is a good reason for you to consider selling on Amazon. In fact, people have been known to make as much…

The post 5 Ways to Find the Best Products to Sell on Amazon appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Link: 

5 Ways to Find the Best Products to Sell on Amazon

Thumbnail

25 Things You Can Do With Unbounce that Your UX/Web Team Will Love

It’s Day 3 of Product Marketing Month. Today’s post is about discovering new use-cases for your products that can be useful for different functional users in your customer’s company. — Unbounce co-founder Oli Gardner

If you read the opening post of Product Marketing Month, you would have read about the concept of Productizing Our Technology (POT).

Productizing Our Technology
By taking our core tech, combining the available features, with new jQuery scripts, CSS, and some 3rd-party integrations, it’s possible to create a plethora of new “mini-products” that if embraced by the community, could inform future product direction.

When we created an initial list of product ideas, expanding upon what the base product can already do, I realized that — as we’ve moved from a single product to multiple — we’d not changed our perception of who the functional buyer persona is.

If you look at the table below, notice how product #1 is a standalone landing page used primarily for paid ad campaigns, but products #2 and #3 are designed to be used primarily on your website.

PRODUCT
#1 Landing Pages #2 Popups #3 Sticky Bars
Primary Use Case Use standalone landing pages to convert more of paid (AdWords) traffic. Use on website pages to convert more organic traffic. Use on website pages to convert more organic traffic.
Primary Persona Campaign Strategist Website Owner Website Owner
Secondary Persona Designer Campaign Strategist Campaign Strategist
Tertiary Persona Copywriter Web Designer / Developer Web Designer / Developer

Note: that for the personas listed, these are intentionally general, as it’s still part of our discovery. My goal is simply to show that they are most likely different.

We didn’t immediately realize that the teams using these products may not even be in the same department (marketing vs. web team vs. software development), for example. Or if they are in the same department (marketing), they might not work together on a daily basis.

This is a huge problem because it assumes that someone who runs paid campaigns is also going to be optimizing the organic traffic to a website, and is no doubt one of the reasons for low adoption of product #2 and #3.

A WTF Moment – How Could We Be So Blind?

When we talked to our customers and community members, we uncovered a startling fact: most people thought that the new products could only be used on Unbounce landing pages.

WUUUUTTTT! Not true.

Yes, you can, if you want. But the primary use case for the new products is for your website. We really didn’t see this misconception coming, which shows how important it is to always talk to your customers.

Who uses your products?

If you have more than one product, or if the users of your single product have different job roles, are you targeting and communicating with them in different ways? Or have you assumed that everyone will understand the same messaging?

Web developers are not very likely to be downloading an ebook about marketing, and thus will not be on our mailing list to hear about new products that could, in fact, make their job easier and more productive.

So, today, I’m going to share some of the functional use cases of popups and sticky bars that would be used by the UX and web teams that work on and manage your website. This is a very different market than we normally speak to, but super important as some of our research has indicated after the initial launch.

As I explore these use cases, try to follow along with your own products, to see if there are ways that you can create new mini products from the technology you possess.

Productizing Unbounce Technology
(Click image for full-size view)

Across the top (in yellow) are the core products, their features (such as targeting, triggers, display frequency), and the different hacks, data sources, and integrations, that can be combined to produce the new products listed in green in the first column.

To recap, each mini product is labelled as either NOW/MVP/NEW depending on how easy it is to create with our current tech:

NOW: These products are possible now with our existing feature set.
MVP: These products are possible by adding some simple scripts/CSS to extend the core.
NEW: These products would require a much deeper level of product or website development to make them possible. These are the examples that came from “blue sky” ideation, and are a useful upper anchor for what could be done.

The core technology is denoted as LP (Landing Pages), POP (Popups), SB (Sticky Bars).

In the table below you’ll find 25 of the ideas we came up with — that I selected from of a total of 121.

# Product Name Product Description Where Used Core Tech Core Features Extras
NOW: Can be built with existing features
1 Microsites By using the URL targeting feature, a single Sticky Bar with links to multiple Landing Pages can effectively create a microsite. Landing Pages LP + SB Targeting: URL
Trigger: Entry
N/A
2 EU Cookie Law Bar You’ve probably seen them all over the place. “All websites owned in the EU or targeted towards EU citizens, are now expected to comply with the law.” The EU has always been very strict and this requirement is why these bars have been popping up everywhere. Good news is, they’re wasy to make with geo-targeting. Website SB Targeting: Geo
Trigger: Entry
N/A
3 Two-Step Opt-In Form Instead of showing a lead gen form, you use a button or link that shows the form in a popup when clicked. This can help remove the perceived friction that a form conveys, and applies a level of commitment when the button is clicked that makes people more likely to continue and fill out the form. Website, Landing Pages POP Trigger: Click N/A
4 Cart Abandonment Use an exit Popup on your ecommerce product/cart/checkout pages to provide an offer to encourage a purchase. Website POP Trigger: Exit N/A
5 Multi-location GEO Redirect If you have websites for multiple countries, you can present the entry Popup that uses geolocation to ask if the visitor would like to visit the site in their own country. Website POP Targeting: Geo
Trigger: Entry
N/A
6 Poll/Survey Add a form to a Popup of Sticky Bar to present poll or survey questions. Website POP or SB Trigger: Entry, Exit, Scroll Down, Scroll Up, Delay N/A
7 NPS Survey Present a Net Promoter Score in a Sticky Bar to ask your visitors and customers to rate how likely they are to recommend your product or brand to others. Website, Landing Pages SB Targeting: None, Cookie
Trigger: Exit, Scroll, Delay
N/A
8 Outage Notification Present an entry Popup or Sticky Bar when there is site maintenance happening. SB or POP Website Targeting: URL, Cookie N/A
9 Tooltips Present a popup when someone clicks to show more info/instructions. Website, Landing Pages POP Trigger: Click N/A
10 Referrer Contextual Welcome Present a contextually relevant message to people arriving from another site. Website, Landing Pages POP or SB Targeting: URL, Cookie, Geo
Trigger: Entry
N/A
11 Co-marketing Contextual Welcome Present a contextually relevant message to people arriving from a campaign run by you and a comarketing partner. This could show the relationship (both logos) and the joint offer. Website, Landing Pages POP or SB Targeting: Referrer, URL, Cookie
Trigger: Entry, Scroll Up, Scroll Down,
Exit, Delay
N/A
12 Mobile GPS: Closest Store Present a Sticky Bar when someone on a mobile site would benefit from knowing where the closest store is to them (potentially with an incentive to visit the store). Website, Landing Pages SB Trigger: Entry, Scroll Up, Scroll Down,
Exit, Delay
N/A
13 Holiday Hours Announcement Show details of changes in store hours. Could be used on exit to provide some urgency “We’re closing in 1 hour”. Website, Landing Pages SB or POP Trigger: Entry, Exit N/A
MVP: Can be built with existing features
14 Sticky Navigation By removing the standard close button [x] from a Sticky Bar and adding smooth scroll anchor links, you can create a sticky navbar which can help increase page engagement. Website, Landing Pages SB Trigger: Entry CSS: Hide close button
Javascript: Smooth scroll
15 Mobile App-Style Navigation By placing a Sticky Bar at the bottom of the page (on mobile), using icons/text, you can create a mobile experience that looks and feels like an app. Check out plated.com on your phone as an example. Adding smoothscroll Javascript lets you use the nav to scroll up and down the page. Mobile Website, Mobile Landing Pages SB Trigger: Entry CSS: Hide close button + mobile only
Javascript: Smooth scroll
16 Mobile Hamburger Menu A hamburger menu is the three lined icon that opens up a navigation menu. They typically slide in and out from the left side or top.Check out a demo in the Unbounce Community. Mobile Website SB Trigger: Click jQuery: Slide in/out
17 Progress Bar Similar to a microsite, a progress bar could be targeted to appear on several pages. Using cookie targeting and CSS the progress bar could be updated to show which pages (steps) have been completed and which steps are remaining. Website, Microsite, Landing Pages SB Targeting: URL, Cookie jQuery: Set/Read cookies
CSS: Prev/next step visual state
18 “Maybe Later” Maybe Later is a new concept for ecommerce entrance popups that I will explore in depth on day 9 of Product Marketing Month. A large number of ecommerce sites have discounts/offers that show on arrival. This can often be a major disruption to the experience, even if the offer is of interest. The way ML works is that the popup would present 3 options: Yes/No/ML. If “Maybe Later” is clicked, the Popup closes and a persistent Sticky Bar appears at the bottom of the page to act as a subtle reminder of the offer – ready for when the visitor wants it. Website POP + SB Targeting: Cookie jQuery: Set/Read cookies, Log “Maybe Later” click
19 Video Interaction Offers Having a CTA embedded in a video is great, but it’s very limited in its ability communicate more than a few words.This product idea enables you to launch a popup when the video is complete, or when it’s paused, or when you’ve watched a series of videos. It’s seriously badass. Click here to visit a demo of this concept (created by Unbouncer, Noah Matsell). Website, Landing Pages POP Targeting: Cookie jQuery
20 End-of-video Talk to Sales Present a popup to someone who completes a video such as a demo. Website, Landing Pages POP or SB Trigger: Custom script jQuery
21 Sticky Video Widget You may have seen this on news blogs, where a video at the top becomes a smaller video stuck to the side or bottom of the window as you scroll. It’s a great way to ensure higher engagement with the video. Noah made a demo of a sticky video widget in the Unbounce community. Blog SB Trigger: Scroll CSS
22 Guided Tour Show a popup that begins a guided tour of the page/product. If you close it, the tour is over. If you click a next button it closes and a new popup is opened, positioned close to the feature it’s describing. Website, In-app POP Trigger: Click jQuery
NEW: Can be built with existing features
23 Ship it Faster By setting a cookie based on the shipping method on an ecommerce site, an exit Popup or Sticky Bar could be used to suggest a different shipping method (more expensive) to get it delivered faster. A smart upsell feature. Ecommerce Website POP or SB Targeting: Cookie
Trigger: Exit
Feature: Dynamic Text Replacement
jQuery
24 Out of Stock By setting a cookie based on stock availability on an ecommerce site, an exit Popup or Sticky Bar could present an email address field to ask if the visitor would like to be notified when the item is back in stock. Ecommerce Website POP or SB Targeting: Cookie
Trigger: Exit
jQuery
CSS
25 Sold Out: You Might Like By setting a cookie based on stock availability on an ecommerce site, a Popup or Sticky Bar could be shown that presents a set of recommended products related to an out of stock item. Ecommerce Website POP or SB Targeting: Cookie
Trigger: Exit
Feature: Dynamic Text Replacement
jQuery
CSS

As you can see, there are a ton of new use cases for the products, which are useful to a completely different set of functional users. Unless we do something to specifically target these new functional users, adoption won’t be our only problem, acquisition will be too.

How can you target different functional users?

Approach 1: Product Pages for Organic & Paid Traffic

One way to start validating these use cases is to create new product pages for them to see if you can attract some organic traffic. In our case, this would allow those searching for this type of product to arrive on our website where we may be able to demo the product as part of the experience.

Approach 2: Cross-Function Advocate Email Marketing

Another approach is to explicitly connect the different team members, through suggestive email copy. For instance, we could email our customers and educate them that our product can help others on their team – getting the conversation started. This has the benefit of communicating through an established brand advocate.

Prioritizing Product Development

One of our goals with POT is to gather insights into which new product ideas are in demand. There will without question be an increase in technical support questions based on the implementation requirements of these ideas, but I consider that a good problem to have. If there’s enough call for full productization, that’s a great way to increase adoption and the stickiness of our products.

How many new products could YOU build?

I’d love to hear in the comments how you can imagine doing this with your own software/products/services. Please jump into the comments and let me know. If you’re worried about your competitors stealing your ideas (I definitely thought about that when I decided on this approach – but I’m erring on the side of our core Transparency value), you could simply mention how many you think you could come up with, which is also very cool.

Now, everybody POT!
Cheers
Oli Gardner

p.s. Tell your web/UX teammates about this blog post :D

View original: 

25 Things You Can Do With Unbounce that Your UX/Web Team Will Love

Profiting With Instagram Stories Ads: What You Need To Know

instagram story ads

When it comes to social media marketing, Facebook and Instagram are probably the most important two players on the market in these days. There are more than 2.7 billion monthly active users on Facebook and 700 million Instagram users. Almost four times the audience of Instagram however, does not make Facebook better. In many ways, for marketing and advertising purposes, Instagram may deliver better results. Let’s see why: At its core, Instagram is a mobile app focused on visual information. Why is this relevant? According to Marketing Land, nearly 80% of social media time spent in today’s context is spent…

The post Profiting With Instagram Stories Ads: What You Need To Know appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Credit – 

Profiting With Instagram Stories Ads: What You Need To Know

How to Generate Email Signups Using Instagram

instagram email

An email list is one of the best assets that you can build for your business. No change in the Google Algorithm or advertising account ban can take your email list away from you. Whatever happens in the online marketing world, your email list will always be able to give you a direct line of communication with people who want to hear from you — and will be interested in buying from you. 80% of retail professionals suggest that email is their greatest driver of customer retention, and 59% of B2B marketers say that email is their most effective revenue…

The post How to Generate Email Signups Using Instagram appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Read this article:  

How to Generate Email Signups Using Instagram

8 Ways to Make Brilliant, Captivating Product Photos

Having product photos that stand out is more important than any other piece of content on your product page. One study found that 67% of people rate the quality of product images to be “very important,” more than product information, detailed descriptions or even reviews! Source Knowing this, what can you do to make sure your product photos stand out and are the best they can be? The tips in this post will help you ensure the quality of your images and make sure your product photos stand out amongst your competition. 1. Start by using a Tripod and Lightbox…

The post 8 Ways to Make Brilliant, Captivating Product Photos appeared first on The Daily Egg.

View article:  

8 Ways to Make Brilliant, Captivating Product Photos

Thumbnail

4 Ways Your eCommerce Store Can Leverage Video (and Why It’s So Crazy Effective)

video for ecommerce

We’ve gone beyond the point of video being an up-and-coming trend. It’s here, and marketers should be using it to attract audiences and keep them engaged. That goes for eCommerce as much as any other industry. Data shows that video isn’t just effective when it comes to marketing. There’s also a continuously growing demand for content in video form. And while some 43% of consumers want to see brands produce more video, it’s not just the consumers who want more visual media. More than half of marketers worldwide say video delivers the best ROI. Additional data from HubSpot’s State of…

The post 4 Ways Your eCommerce Store Can Leverage Video (and Why It’s So Crazy Effective) appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Visit link:

4 Ways Your eCommerce Store Can Leverage Video (and Why It’s So Crazy Effective)