Tag Archives: editor

How To Avoid Web Analytics ‘Analysis Paralysis’ & Spend More Time Making Optimization Wins

Visualizations are the best place to start It’s much easier to start your website optimization journey from a visual perspective than a strictly numerical one. When you can immediately see where visitors and users are clicking and where they’re not, you’re instantly clued into obvious bottlenecks, blockers, and regions that are completely ignored. Take this Google Analytics data for example… When you start digging through your typical analytics packages, you’ll end up several pages deep, looking at listed data like what is shown above. Not always helpful, right? What happens when I look at visual website analytics? This is a…

The post How To Avoid Web Analytics ‘Analysis Paralysis’ & Spend More Time Making Optimization Wins appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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How To Avoid Web Analytics ‘Analysis Paralysis’ & Spend More Time Making Optimization Wins

How to Avoid Web Analytics “Analysis Paralysis” and Spend More Time Making Optimization Wins

It’s much easier to start your website optimization journey from a visual perspective than a strictly numerical one. When you can immediately see where visitors and users are clicking and where they’re not, you’re instantly clued into obvious bottlenecks, blockers, and regions that are completely ignored. Take this Google Analytics data for example… When you start digging through your typical analytics package, you’ll end up several pages deep, looking at listed data such as that shown above. Not always helpful, right? Visualizations are the best place to start What happens when I look at visual website analytics? This is a…

The post How to Avoid Web Analytics “Analysis Paralysis” and Spend More Time Making Optimization Wins appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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How to Avoid Web Analytics “Analysis Paralysis” and Spend More Time Making Optimization Wins

Monthly Web Development Update 11/2017: Browser News, KRACK and Vary Header Caching

Editor’s Note: Our dear friend Anselm Hannemann summarizes what happened in the web community in the past few weeks in one handy list, so that you can catch up on everything new and important. Enjoy!
Welcome back to our monthly reading list. Before we dive right into all the amazing content I stumbled upon — admittedly, this one is going to be quite a long update — I want to make a personal announcement.

Original link: 

Monthly Web Development Update 11/2017: Browser News, KRACK and Vary Header Caching

The Road To Resilient Web Design

Editor’s Note: In the world of web design, we tend to become preoccupied with the here and now. In “Resilient Web Design“, Jeremy Keith emphasizes the importance of learning from the past in order to better prepare ourselves for the future. So, perhaps we should stop and think more beyond our present moment? The following is an excerpt from Jeremy’s web book.

Design adds clarity. Using colour, typography, hierarchy, contrast, and all the other tools at their disposal, designers can take an unordered jumble of information and turn it into something that’s easy to use and pleasurable to behold. Like life itself, design can win a small victory against the entropy of the universe, creating pockets of order from the raw materials of chaos.

The Road To Resilient Web Design

The Book of Kells is a beautifully illustrated manuscript created over 1200 years ago. It’s tempting to call it a work of art, but it is a work of design. The purpose of the book is to communicate a message; the gospels of the Christian religion. Through the use of illustration and calligraphy, that message is conveyed in an inviting context, making it pleasing to behold.

The post The Road To Resilient Web Design appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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The Road To Resilient Web Design

The Crazy Egg Guide to Facebook Marketing

The Crazy Egg Guide to Facebook Marketing

If you’re only going to use one social media site for marketing, the chances are it’s going to be Facebook. The now-ubiquitous social networking site has come a long way since its Harvard University origins and has been open to the public since September 2006. Over the years, it has added features that have become synonymous with social media as a whole, including photo sharing, video sharing, messaging and live video. It has also become a platform for other apps and games, has acquired other popular social and messaging networks (most notably Instagram and WhatsApp) and includes advertising. Facebook by…

The post The Crazy Egg Guide to Facebook Marketing appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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The Crazy Egg Guide to Facebook Marketing

If It’s Painful, It’s Broken: Unbounce Blog Team Takeaways from 2016

Since I joined the Unbounce family three years ago, our marketing team has grown from seven to 35. The content team alone has grown from two to 12.

That kind of growth comes with a lot of potential to do exciting things.

But scaling a team quickly also uncovers inefficiencies, and results in a helluvalotta growing pains.

Which is fine, really. I’m not much of a jock, but I know that without pain there is no gain.

giphy

2016 in particular was a really productive year for the content team at Unbounce. We were able to fix a lot of inefficiencies in our processes, and experiment with things that we just didn’t have the bandwidth for before.

In short, we pulled the plug on what wasn’t working and doubled down on what was working.

If you’ll allow me to, I want to share some of our biggest takeaways with you. In part because I wanna show off our gains (#humblebrag), but also because I wanna prevent your pains.

(P.S. Much of this progress can be attributed to an improvement methodology we started using called the Improvement Kata, which could be the subject of its own 10,000-word post. …But you can learn all about it in this 60-minute webinar.)

Process improvements: If something is painful, it’s because it’s broken

When I began work at Unbounce in 2014, I was the main person dedicated to the blog. I spent my days writing, editing and making sure that we maintained our historically high editorial standards.

But I was doing this in a silo, so when we began onboarding more team members who were to contribute to the blog, things started to feel a little painful.

Suddenly, it was evident that we needed new processes. And the only way to fix inefficiencies was to first diagnose them:

  • I was spending too much of my time working with external contributors and responding to queries that I couldn’t focus on content that contributed to big picture business objectives
  • I was used to being a lone wolf, but now my team members needed visibility into which posts were in the pipeline (and at what stage)
  • With more team members, prioritization of content pieces was becoming more difficult

After listing all the pains, we started looking for solutions as a team.

What did the doctor(s) order? You can read about all our process improvements in this post, but here are some of my personal favorites:

  • We killed our “Write For Us” page.
  • We refused to take on any post that didn’t first have a fully fleshed-out pitch (you can steal the template for it below).

Produce better content by getting off on the right foot

Download Unbounce’s blog pitch framework and ensure all your content is 10x content.
By entering your email you’ll receive weekly Unbounce Blog updates and other resources to help you become a marketing genius.

But my favorite change was one that alleviated a ton of pain…

Treat blog posts like campaigns

When I started blogging in 2008, the #1 piece of advice I was given was to establish a posting frequency and then stick to it.

But last year, at marketing conferences and across the web, I began to hear whispers of something different: publish less, but publish deeper.

This suggestion was attractive to me because I’d been working hard for two years to make sure that our editorial calendar was filled with back-to-back actionable articles. I was able to maintain a frequent publishing schedule, but this resulted in me neglecting something far more important: a sound distribution strategy.

We were working hard to create awesome content, but weren’t making the time to be sure that people would take notice.

So in 2016, we started experimenting with treating blog posts like campaigns.

What do I mean by this? Taking the time to plan, write and promote epic posts — the kind of stuff that makes your CMO drop their work and share the post in a department-wide email — even if it means dialing back on publishing frequency.

More specifically, “campaign” posts go through five phases (read about them in detail in this post):

  1. Determine the goal of your post so you can determine later whether or not it was successful (and guide the content of the post).
  2. Do keyword research if appropriate so your post will continue to get organic traffic.
  3. Loop in influencers who can help you amplify your content after you hit publish. Include quotes — as Andy Crestodina said in his keynote at Content Marketing World, “An ally in content production is an ally in content distribution.” Beyond that, start thinking about distribution strategy before you write a single word.
  4. Create custom blog assets that you’d like to see in your own social media feeds. Think of how you can create a consistent design experience across all channels.
  5. Distribute according to a predetermined plan. Milk all your channels for everything they’re worth.

We get so much more out of posts when we take this well-rounded approach — we feel happier and more strategic (instead of feeling like we’re on a content farm). It feels less painful and it actually feels like less work. Here’s another great bit I heard at Content Marketing World:

More of a spirit of experimentation

Optimization is such a core part of our business — we preach it in our webinars, on our podcast, on the blog. “Always be testing” echoes through the hallways to the extent that it’s become a bit of a cliché.

Yet, when it came to actually conducting tests on our blog and other content, we were quicker to make excuses than make time for optimization. Not because we were slackers — quite the opposite — but because we were too focused on furiously pumping out content to take a step back and take a look at the bigger picture.

Until we decided to just do it ✔️️ and were inspired to launch a two week optimization experiment. For the experiment, we halted publishing and focused entirely on optimizing evergreen content. In a nutshell we:

  1. Researched top traffic posts
  2. Freshened up the content of the post to keep them evergreen
  3. Optimized those posts for lead generation (this part was key)

You can read all about our experiment (and how it resulted in 700 new leads for us) in this post. Or just grab the checklist below and get started.

Ready to optimize your high-traffic posts for lead gen?

Steal the exact process that Unbounce used during their two week optimization experiment.
By entering your email you’ll receive weekly Unbounce Blog updates and other resources to help you become a marketing genius.

Our main takeaway? Optimization isn’t just for conversion rate optimizers and performance marketers. Content marketers stand to gain a lot by taking a step back, too. Even if it means temporarily forgetting about your editorial calendar.

More accountability

Everyone is aware of certain inefficiencies and pains within their organization or on their team, but seldom do we make the time to take ownership of these and actually resolve to fix them.

I’d encourage you to take a step back and think about what hurts and what bandaids you have at your disposal. It may seem daunting or like a lot of work at first, but I think you’ll find that it pays off in the long run.

Read this article: 

If It’s Painful, It’s Broken: Unbounce Blog Team Takeaways from 2016

16 Overlay Examples Critiqued for Conversion

overlay-teardown-650
When it comes to overlays, everyone’s a critic — especially your prospects. Image via Shutterstock.

These days, cyberspace is about as cluttered as my closet.

And in that deep sea of endless streams and notifications and other dopamine-releasing distractions, getting your offer seen can be challenging to say the least.

Luckily, overlays can help mute some of that background noise by focusing your visitor’s attention on one (hopefully) compelling offer.

But your job doesn’t end there.

Once you get your prospect’s attention with an overlay, it’s your job to use design and copywriting best practices to keep their interest.

What are these best practices I speak of? Let’s take a look at some overlay examples we spotted in the wild for some concrete examples of what you should — and shouldn’t — do.

Be immediately clear on the value of your offer

I have to admit that when I first saw this overlay, I found the tongue-in-cheek copywriting delightful.

The headline was clever and had me nodding my head:

1-copy

And while the self-aware overlay is a cute idea, you know what’s less cute? Just how quickly your prospect will look for that “x” button if the value of the offer isn’t abundantly clear.

Don’t make readers work to find out what your offer is. It’s fine to be cutesy, as long as you’re explaining what’s in it for them. See how Groove clearly explains the benefit of signing up for their newsletter?

2-copy

The transparency of this offer makes it appealing, and the specificity of Groove’s current monthly revenue adds credibility.

Pro tip: When you’re pushing a subscription, your copy has to do a lot of work because there’s no immediate value. Test including a tangible offer like a free ebook.

It’s not about you!

This overlay by the Chive has personality, but not much persuasive power:

3-copy

The headline – “the best newsletter in the world”  – is playful (if a little cocky), but it fails to communicate what makes the newsletter great and why readers should care.

They’re so caught up in self-praise that they forget to explain what’s in it for the reader. How will signing up for this newsletter impact the reader’s life?

This overlay by GetResponse is guilty of a similar infraction, and to be frank, the tone is a little despie:

4-copy

This overlay uses “I” and “us” language without ever explaining the benefits of the offering — not to mention it never really explains what GetResponse is.

This is problematic, because the overlay appears on a page giving away an ebook only marginally related to their core offering — so it’s safe to assume that not everyone will know what GetResponse is.

I’d test an overlay that includes a compelling, customer-focused unique value proposition and a clear hero shot so people can quickly understand what they’re dealing with at a glance.

Want more overlay best practices?

Download Unbounce’s free guide: Best Practices for Creating High-Converting Overlays
By entering your email you’ll receive weekly Unbounce Blog updates and other resources to help you become a marketing genius.

Lead with what’s in it for them

So what does customer-focused copy look like? Preneur Marketing’s overlay leads with a headline that explains in detail what the reader will get when they sign up:

5-copy
So much specificity!

But Preneur Marketing doesn’t stop there. They lay the persuasion on thick using a number of trusted devices, such as a UVP, a hero shot, a list of benefits, social proof and a single conversion goal (do these elements sound familiar?).

A great thing to test would be a hero shot representative of the actual offering, like the one in this overlay by Acquire Convert:

6-copy

Use overlays to counter objections

No matter which stage of the buyer journey your prospect is at, their inner monologue will include some objections to your offer. Overlays are a great way to counter them.

For example, have a look at this overlay by Gr8fires, which appeared for visitors to their ecommerce store. They knew visitors to that page were likely shopping around for the best deals and were likely already thinking, “I don’t know how much stove installation is going to cost.”

To counter that objection, Gr8fires created an overlay with an “installation calculator” that detailed the costs associated with installing their product. See how the headline mirrors the conversation in the prospect’s head?

7-copy
The results of Gr8fires’ overlay campaign were incredible: 300% increase in monthly sales leads and a 48.54% lift in sales. Image source.

This example is particularly wonderful because it accomplishes something for both the marketer and the prospect. On the prospect’s end, it delivers great value in exchange for a very small commitment (entering name and email). On the marketer’s end, it helps to educate prospects on a larger-ticket item that typically requires more convincing.

A real win-win scenario. Beautiful, isn’t it?

Don’t be a negative Nelly

If you’ve seen overlays across the web, you’ve likely noticed that “yes” button text is often juxtaposed with “no” hyperlink text in close proximity. And you’ve likely noticed that the “no” hyperlink text is often sassy.

I see this everywhere online — marketers resorting to language like:

8-copy
Nobody thinks this.

Or this one:

9-copy
Come on.

Don’t forget this one:

10-copy
Really?

Or finally, this example, which borders on offensive:

11-copy
This is getting out of hand.

It should go without saying, but you should never talk down to prospects simply because they might not want your offering.

Not only does that create friction to completing the form, it can also damage your brand’s image and credibility.

This example by Narcity misses the mark for a different reason:

12-copy

This overlay forces a lie in order to opt-out: “I’m already subscribed.”

This is problematic for two reasons:

  1. If people are subscribed then they shouldn’t be seeing this to begin with
  2. It creates cognitive dissonance, forcing prospects to stop and think.

In short, it creates a jarring experience that doesn’t make you wanna fill in the form.

So what should you be doing?

Mirror the voice in your prospect’s head

Don’t talk down to your visitors with “I can’t stand exclusive offers” opt-out copy.

Stop and reflect on what they’re likely thinking when they click that “no” button. The folks at TVLiftCabinet.com keep it classy:

13-copy

When at a loss, stick with a straightforward, “No thanks, I’m not interested.”

Make it easy to say yes

There are tons of other things you can test to make your overlay offers irresistible to visitors.

  • Test fewer form fields to reduce perceived friction on your forms:
14-copy
Adding too many form fields can have a negative impact on conversion rates.
  • Make visitors feel like they’re being offered something exclusive:
15-copy
16-copy

Whatever you do, never forget that your prospect’s attention is a valuable commodity.

And once you have it, you should respect it by doing everything you can to deliver meaningful value.

Taken from:

16 Overlay Examples Critiqued for Conversion

12 Proven Ways to Convert With Overlays [FREE EBOOK]

90-97% of visitors to your website won’t convert.

I know… a little piece of my soul dies every time I think about it, too.

[Queue Morgan Freeman narrator voice] But not all hope is lost.

Marketers everywhere are using overlays to get more conversions from their existing website traffic — without running more campaigns, increasing their budget or redesigning their site.

And in our latest ebook, 12 Proven Ways to Convert With Overlays, we spill all their juicy secrets. (Okay, maybe not the one about what happened in Vegas.)

Get more conversions from your website traffic

This ebook will teach you how real companies are using overlays to score more subscribers, sales leads and sales — and how you can start planning your own overlay campaigns today.
By entering your email you’ll receive weekly Unbounce Blog updates and other resources to help you become a marketing genius.

In 12 Proven Ways to Convert with Overlays by Angus Lynch and Amanda Durepos (oh hi), you’ll learn:

  • What overlays are and why you should care
  • Real-world examples and case studies of companies using overlays to score more subscribers, sales leads and sales
  • Tried-and-true best practices to help you plan your own overlay campaigns

In short, it’s 40 pages of overlay inspiration and guidance to help you score more conversions from your existing traffic. Ya dig?

Original post: 

12 Proven Ways to Convert With Overlays [FREE EBOOK]

Need Another Set of Eyes on Your Landing Page? [Free Pre-Publish Worksheet]

second-set-of-eyes-650
Need another set of eyes on your landing page before you show it to the world? Image source.

It’s hard for us to critique our own work objectively.

A second set of eyes can reveal things you didn’t even realize were there: a vague unique value proposition, typos or just plain boring copy.

But maybe your co-workers are tied up and don’t have a sec to look over your work. And your boss has bigger fish to fry.

Well, you’re not entirely on your own, because we have an 11-page checklist for you to help you better evaluate your landing pages and catch common conversion killers. The worksheet will help you:

  • Ask the right questions when evaluating your landing pages.
  • Identify weaknesses and potential conversion leaks.
  • Make sure you have all five key elements of a high-converting landing.

Want to gut check your landing pages before you hit publish?

This 11-page checklist for you will help you better evaluate your landing pages and catch common conversion killers.
By entering your email you’ll receive weekly Unbounce Blog updates and other resources to help you become a marketing genius.

Check out the video below to hear Princess (yes, her real name), Marketing Educator at Unbounce, break down the worksheet for you and explain how you can put it to use today.

See more here:  

Need Another Set of Eyes on Your Landing Page? [Free Pre-Publish Worksheet]

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How VWO Affects your Site Speed

A recent post published on the ConversionXL blog highlighted a study conducted to find out how different A/B testing tools affect site speed. VWO was among the tools compared and we feel the results of the study are not an accurate reflection of our technology.

In this post, we are going to highlight some aspects of the study that had a large impact on the results and also elaborate on how the VWO code affects your page load time.

Sub-optimal Test Configuration with ‘DOM Ready’ Event Conditions

In the research conducted by OrangeValley, the test campaign was configured with sub-optimal settings within VWO. This means that rather than using the recommended WYSIWYG Visual Editor to change background image and text, a custom JavaScript code was used to make the changes. In addition, the code was configured to fire after the page had loaded (in JavaScript this is called a ‘DOM ready’ event). This impacted the result in two ways:

  1. The inclusion of the ‘DOM ready’ event made the VWO code wait for the entire page to load before it could display the changes made in the variation. The web page used in the study had a page load time of around 2.7 seconds.
    Here’s a snapshot of the campaign code from VWO settings (while the code waits for ‘DOM ready’):Sub-optimal way, waiting for DOM ready
    Here’s another snapshot of the campaign code (using the optimal way, without ‘DOM ready’): Optimal way, without waiting for DOM ready
    Executing after the DOM ready event will invariably increase the experienced loading time. Here’s the general case for it.
  2. To counter flicker and ensure a smooth loading experience for visitors, VWO hides all the relevant elements before they start loading on the page and only unhides them once the VWO code has swapped them with the variation changes. All this happens within a span of 110 milliseconds on average. If the campaign had been configured using the optimal manner, the flicker effect would have automatically been taken care of by our SmartCode.

Asynchronous v/s Synchronous Code

As clearly noted in the blog post, “Most A/B testing software create an additional step in loading and rendering a web page”. This happens because many A/B testing tools use synchronous code. VWO, with its asynchronous SmartCode is an exception to this.

With its unique asynchronous code, VWO ensures there is no delay in the load time of the page. VWO’s asynchronous code does not block the rendering of parts of the page and does not impact the page load time.

Asynchronous V/S synchronous Code Comparison

What is asynchronous code and why does VWO recommend it?

Simply put, asynchronous means that the code will contact VWO’s servers in the background, download and process the test package while the rest of your page continues to load and render in the browser normally.

With synchronous code, the browser has to wait for the package to download and then process it before loading the rest of the page. If for any reason the tracking code can’t contact its servers then the browser will wait, usually for 30 to 60 seconds, until the request times out. If your tracking code is in the tag, then your entire page won’t load and your visitor will be stuck with a blank page. Asynchronous code does not have this critical problem. If for any reason, the asynchronous VWO SmartCode can’t contact our servers your page will still download and render properly.

Private and Dynamic Content Delivery Network (CDN)

VWO has invested years of engineering effort to ensure that we build the best-in-class technology and infrastructure for our customers. An important part of this is setting up our own private CDN which uses Bare Metal Servers from IBM SoftLayer’s state-of-the-art global data centers. This ensures that we always have a server close to your visitor’s location and there is minimum latency, reducing critical download time.

VWO CDN Map

VWO’s CDN is also dynamic which caches not just the static code required to run tests but also generates dynamic test variation data. This has an edge over regular CDNs since they only cache static data. By dynamically generating test packages only the relevant variation data is sent to each visitor depending on the URL they are on.

Small Size of VWO’s Test Packages

Another factor that significantly impacts page load time is the size of test packages, which determines how long it will take for the browser to download it. VWO ensures small package sizes through two methods: by intelligently understanding and recording only the precise changes that you make to your page, and individually packaging tests for a visitor to deliver only the relevant content for the URL they are on.

Let us suppose you edit the HTML of your product page template to make two changes; increase the font-size of your text and insert a ‘recommended’ icon. VWO compares your changes to the original code and detects the precise edits – the change made to the CSS property “font-size” and the insertion of a new graphic. Other systems will save the entire block of code which will also convert the dynamic content into static content and will end up showing the same description across all product pages.

Small size of VWO’s test packages

VWO’s CDN is custom built for optimal A/B testing performance. It unbundles the payload to make smaller packages for each individual test and URL. Some A/B testing tools bundle all the data for all tests running on a domain into one large package. We’ve seen package sizes of up to 3MB when a website is running many tests, which obviously increases page load time. VWO, on the other hand, only sends the data required for the test running on a particular URL to make a small, tidy payload which downloads quickly. This is especially advantageous when you’re a power-testing team running multiple tests on different parts of your domain.

VWO - Small size of test files

Having said all this, we are confident that VWO’s best-in-class technology coupled with optimal campaign settings will ensure that your website never slows down. We would also like to invite OrangeValley to work with us on setting up their campaign correctly so that they can present a true comparison of all the tools in their study.

As always, if you still have any doubts or clarifications to seek in this regard, please feel free to reach out to me directly at sparsh@wingify.com.

Happy Optimizing!

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How VWO Affects your Site Speed