Tag Archives: element

What Science Can Teach Us About How to Create Viral Content

Think about the last thing you shared on the internet. Maybe it was an insightful video on the political turmoil in a far away country, or maybe it was a funny picture of a cat wearing a bow tie. Either way – you saw it, had an emotional reaction to it and decided to share it with others. But in the process of sharing the latest video, picture or article to your social media feeds – did you ever stop to think about why you shared it? What was your emotional response to the content? What about that response made…

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What Science Can Teach Us About How to Create Viral Content

Generating SVG With React


React is one of today’s most popular ways to create a component-based UI. It helps to organize an application into small, human-digestible chunks. With its “re-render the whole world” approach, you can avoid any complex internal interactions between small components, while your application continues to be blazingly fast due to the DOM-diffing that React does under the hood (i.e. updating only the parts of the DOM that need to be updated).

Generating SVG With React

But can we apply the same techniques to web graphics — SVG in particular? Yes! I don’t know about you, but for me SVG code becomes messy pretty fast. Trying to grasp what’s wrong with a graph or visualization just by looking at SVG generator templates (or the SVG source itself) is often overwhelming, and attempts to maintain internal structure or separation of concerns are often complex and tedious.

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Generating SVG With React

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15 Essential Elements of an Effective eCommerce Product Page

Product pages are the doorways that lead to conversions and revenue for an eCommerce store. A good product page plays a pivotal role in taking a customer from just browsing to actually adding the product to the cart. Most eCommerce websites, therefore, invest a significant portion of their time and money in making their product pages more attractive and persuasive.

But then, how do you do this?

Essentially, it comes down to creating a great User Experience for your customer. An effective User Experience (UX) requires relevant and useful information designed in a manner which takes the customer seamlessly through the buying process. In this blog post, we are going to talk about 15 product page elements that add to the UX for your product pages and makes them high-converting. You will be familiar with most, if not all, of these. My intention here is to create a short checklist for every element that you can use to optimize that element. There’s also a surprise for you at the end of this post, so hold on!

1) Product Name

  •  Product Name should be descriptive. This gives more clarity to the customer as well as boosts SEO for that page. For example, ’24 Carat Gold Ring’ is much more descriptive and SEO-friendly than ‘Gold Ring’
  • The name should be unique. This sounds like common sense but you’ll be surprised by how often eCommerce websites give similar names to their products which makes finding them through search really difficult. Needless to say, this also negatively affects the SEO for the products.

2) Call to Action (CTA) Button

  • This is the most important element on any product page. The CTA affects the decision – making of the customer through its size, color and text. Thus, marketers should pay significant attention to optimizing all these aspects.
  • Different colors denote different things across different cultures. When deciding on color, keep in mind two things. Firstly, whether that color triggers the emotion in your target audience that you are hoping for. And secondly, how does it contrast with the color scheme of the rest of the page. Ideally, you want the CTA to stand out so that it grabs customer attention.
  • When deciding on the text, keep in mind that certain words mean different things in different countries. For example, see how Amazon changes the CTA text on its US and UK websites to adhere to the local flavor.

Amazon US Page
Amazon US page with CTA text as 'Add to Cart'

Amazon UK Page
Amazon UK page with CTA text as 'Add to Basket'

3) Product Price

  • Understandably, this is the least controllable of the page elements. As a marketer, your main focus should be the appearance of the price tag.
  • The price should be placed close to the Buy button. In fact, the product name, price and CTA should form a kind of visual hierarchy so that the act of buying flows seamlessly in the mind of the customer.

4) Product Image

  • Photos have a huge impact on the usability and overall UX of the website as well as increasing conversions and sales. For product page images, you should be mindful of download times. You need to keep in mind that not everyone has a super-fast
    internet connection, and that high load time can negatively affect the bottom line.
  • Use multiple images clicked from different angles to give the overall look of the product.
  • Use inspirational product images (product image used in a setting; for example, a customer wearing the dress that is displayed on the product page). These images add social proof as well as make the product more desirable.

5) Product Description

  • Keep product descriptions short and make sure to include important keywords so that the page ranks well in search engine rankings

6) Quantity Option

  • Quantity option takes a very small amount of screen real estate but can lead to a bigger sale. For example, if I want to buy 5 copies of a book, I shouldn’t be forced to go to the page and click 5 times on the ‘Buy’ button. Not having this element means you are potentially leaving a lot of money on the table.
  • It should be placed near the CTA.

7) Product Reviews & Testimonials

  • According to an iPerceptions study, 61% of customers read online reviews before making a purchase decision, while 63% of customers are more likely to make a purchase from a site which has user reviews.
  • The problem with having reviews on your product pages is that so many pages just have so few reviews. This can result in negative social proof. To combat this, follow the eBay model of buyer/seller feedback. That means, as soon as someone purchases a product, send them an email asking for feedback about the product. Many customers feel that such feedback request is part of the buying process and they are more likely to fill in the feedback form. This will ensure that your review section is filled.
  • Ask people to rate reviews. This ensures that the most helpful reviews rise to the top.

8) ‘Add to Wish List’

  • This option is particularly helpful in case of indecisive customers who are evaluating your product. Also, while browsing, some customers may stumble upon a product which they like but are not yet ready to buy. This option gives them the flexibility to ‘bookmark’ the product to which they can return later.

9) Cost Savings

  • Many times, if a product has been discounted, the product page shows the original price along with the discounted price. This is a smart trick used by marketers to cash in on the loss aversion tendency of people.
  • Show both the percentage saving as well as the actual saving made on the product. Different customers are induced by different messages.

10) Cross-selling & Up-selling Options

  • As a business owner, you want the user to purchase add-ons, related products and accessories of the products they buy. One way to achieve this is to provide good options for up-selling and cross-selling on the product pages.
  • Good suggestions for similar and related products not only improve the browsing experience but also aid in product exploration.

11) Social Media Integration

  • Social media buttons provides the friends/followers with social proof, which may result in increased purchases of the same item.
  • It helps to spread brand awareness.
  • It may also increase traffic on your website which will help in increase in overall sales, quite apart from the particular product which has been shared.
  • Keep in mind, however, that if the number of likes and share are too few in number, it may result in negative social proof.

12) Delivery & Returns Information

  • Nothing is more irritating to a customer than selecting a product, making a purchase and reaching the checkout section only to discover the addition of unexpectedly high delivery charges and hidden taxes.
  • Posting the total cost on the product page eliminates the surprise of a high shipping cost and also lets the customer factor in the total cost before adding the product to the cart.

13) Live Chat Widget

  •  According to an Econsultancy reportLive chat has the highest satisfaction levels for any customer service channel, with 73%, compared with 61% for email and 44% for phone.
  • Often times people have questions that may not have been answered in the product description or in the customer reviews. If you force them to guess, or leave them wondering, they are going to leave and find the answer to their question elsewhere.

14) Product Videos

  • Visuals work much better than text when it comes to conveying a message. Many eCommerce sites are using videos in different ways to improve customer understanding
    of their products as well as make their content more engaging and intimate. SixPackAbsExercises.com, a VWO customer, A/B tested videos on the sales page which resulted in increased conversions by 46%.
  • Videos also help the customers to gain a more intimate understanding of product look as well as functionality.
  • If you decide to have videos on your website, you may also look at having transcripts for the
    videos. These not only ensure that viewers with hearing disability can access your video content, it also improves the SEO for that video.

15) Breadcrumb Navigation

Flipkart's Breadcrumb Navigation

  • Breadcrumb navigation helps the user to understand the product hierarchy as well as navigate to other areas of interest. They are also known to reduce bounce rates.

That’s it! One last piece of advice: keep testing. One thing that we at VWO have learned over the years is never to trust experts. The best way to improve product page performance is to keep testing out new ideas and concepts with A/B testing and keep optimizing your product pages.

Now it’s time for the surprise we told you about. We’ve designed a beautiful eCommerce product page template for you which employs many of the elements we just talked about. Scroll down to see it.

1-ecommerce-product-page-template

We have designed 4 more templates specially for you. Click on the button below to get a free eBook on ’5 eCommerce Product Page Templates to Boost your Sales and Conversions”.

The post 15 Essential Elements of an Effective eCommerce Product Page appeared first on VWO Blog.

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Animating Without jQuery

There’s a false belief in the web development community that CSS animation is the only performant way to animate on the web. This myth has coerced many developers to abandon JavaScript-based animation altogether, thereby (1) forcing themselves to manage complex UI interaction within style sheets, (2) locking themselves out of supporting Internet Explorer 8 and 9, and (3) forgoing the beautiful motion design physics that are possible only with JavaScript.

Reality check: JavaScript-based animation is often as fast as CSS-based animation — sometimes even faster. CSS animation only appears to have a leg up because it’s typically compared to jQuery’s $.animate(), which is, in fact, very slow. However, JavaScript animation libraries that bypass jQuery deliver incredible performance by avoiding DOM manipulation as much as possible. These libraries can be up to 20 times faster than jQuery.

So, let’s smash some myths, dive into some real-world animation examples and improve our design skills in the process. If you love designing practical UI animations for your projects, this article is for you.

Why JavaScript?

CSS animations are convenient when you need to sprinkle property transitions into your style sheets. Plus, they deliver fantastic performance out of the box — without your having to add libraries to the page. However, when you use CSS transitions to power rich motion design (the kind you see in the latest versions of iOS and Android), they become too difficult to manage or their features simply fall short.

Ultimately, CSS animations limit you to what the specification provides. In JavaScript, by the very nature of any programming language, you have an infinite amount of logical control. JavaScript animation engines leverage this fact to provide novel features that let you pull off some very useful tricks:

Note: If you’re interested in learning more about performance, you can read Julian Shapiro’s “CSS vs. JS Animation: Which Is Faster?5” and Jack Doyle’s “Myth Busting: CSS Animations vs. JavaScript6.” For performance demos, refer to the performance pane7 in Velocity’s documentation and GSAP’s “Library Speed Comparison8” demo.

Velocity and GSAP

The two most popular JavaScript animation libraries are Velocity.js9 and GSAP10. They both work with and without11 jQuery. When these libraries are used alongside jQuery, there is no performance degradation because they completely bypass jQuery’s animation stack.

If jQuery is present on your page, you can use Velocity and GSAP just like you would jQuery’s $.animate(). For example, $element.animate( opacity: 0.5 ); simply becomes $element.velocity( opacity: 0.5 ).

These two libraries also work when jQuery is not present on the page. This means that instead of chaining an animation call onto a jQuery element object — as just shown — you would pass the target element(s) to the animation call:

/* Working without jQuery */

Velocity(element,  opacity: 0.5 , 1000); // Velocity

TweenMax.to(element, 1,  opacity: 0.5 ); // GSAP

As shown, Velocity retains the same syntax as jQuery’s $.animate(), even when it’s used without jQuery; just shift all arguments rightward by one position to make room for passing in the targeted elements in the first position.

GSAP, in contrast, uses an object-oriented API design, as well as convenient static methods. So, you can get full control over animations.

In both cases, you’re no longer animating a jQuery element object, but rather a raw DOM node. As a reminder, you access raw DOM nodes by using document.getElementByID, document.getElementsByTagName, document.getElementsByClassName or document.querySelectorAll (which works similarly to jQuery’s selector engine). We’ll briefly work with these functions in the next section.

Working Without jQuery

(Note: If you need a basic primer on working with jQuery’s $.animate(), refer to the first few panes in Velocity’s documentation.12)

Let’s explore querySelectorAll further because it will likely be your weapon of choice when selecting elements without jQuery:

document.querySelectorAll("body"); // Get the body element
document.querySelectorAll(".squares"); // Get all elements with the "square" class
document.querySelectorAll("div"); // Get all divs
document.querySelectorAll("#main"); // Get the element with an id of "main"
document.querySelectorAll("#main div"); // Get the divs contained by "main"

As shown, you simply pass querySelectorAll a CSS selector (the same selectors you would use in your style sheets), and it will return all matched elements in an array. Hence, you can do this:

/* Get all div elements. */
var divs = document.querySelectorAll("div");

/* Animate all divs at once. */
Velocity(divs,  opacity: 0.5 , 1000); // Velocity
TweenMax.to(divs, 1,  opacity: 0.5 ); // GSAP

Because we’re no longer attaching animations to jQuery element objects, you may be wondering how we can chain animations back to back, like this:

$element // jQuery element object
	.velocity( opacity: 0.5 , 1000)
	.velocity( opacity: 1 , 1000);

In Velocity, you simply call animations one after another:

/* These animations automatically chain onto one another. */
Velocity(element,  opacity: 0.5 , 1000);
Velocity(element,  opacity: 1 , 1000);

Animating this way has no performance drawback (as long as you cache the element being animated to a variable, instead of repeatedly doing querySelectorAll lookups for the same element).

(Tip: With Velocity’s UI pack, you can create your own multi-call animations and give them custom names that you can later reference as Velocity’s first argument. See Velocity’s UI Pack documentation13 for more information.)

This one-Velocity-call-at-a-time process has a huge benefit: If you’re using promises14 with your Velocity animations, then each Velocity call will return an actionable promise object. You can learn more about working with promises in Jake Archibald’s article15. They’re incredibly powerful.

In the case of GSAP, its expressive object-oriented API allows you to place your animations in a timeline, giving you control over scheduling and synchronization. You’re not limited to one-after-the-other chained animations; you can nest timelines, make animations overlap, etc:

var tl = new TimelineMax();
/* GSAP tweens chain by default, but you can specify exact insertion points in the timeline, including relative offsets. */
tl
  .to(element, 1,  opacity: 0.5 )
  .to(element, 1,  opacity: 1 );

Footnotes

  1. 1 http://codepen.io/sol0mka/full/jpecs/
  2. 2 http://codepen.io/timothyrourke/full/wojke/
  3. 3 http://codepen.io/GreenSock/full/yhEmn/
  4. 4 http://codepen.io/GreenSock/full/LuIJj/
  5. 5 http://davidwalsh.name/css-js-animation
  6. 6 http://css-tricks.com/myth-busting-css-animations-vs-javascript/
  7. 7 http://velocityjs.org
  8. 8 http://codepen.io/GreenSock/full/srfxA/
  9. 9 http://velocityjs.org
  10. 10 http://greensock.com/gsap/
  11. 11 //velocityjs.org/#dependencies”
  12. 12 http://velocityjs.org/#arguments
  13. 13 http://velocityjs.org/#uiPack
  14. 14 http://velocityjs.org/#promises
  15. 15 http://www.html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/es6/promises/

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Animating Without jQuery

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Proving Returns from A/B Testing – 6 Ways to Keep Your Boss Happy

To gain results from testing, you need to believe in it strongly. You cannot look at testing like other channels or tactics and ask,

“Okay…so, what’s the return from testing this month?”

Testing is a culture, a mindset of optimization. You MUST look at the bigger picture here.

Sometimes you might end up running a series of unsuccessful or somewhat successful tests before you hit gold with a winning test. That test will be your jackpot. The one whose revenue boost will more than make up for the lost time and money you invested in testing the past few months.

The problem here is, you may believe in testing until the end of time, but proving it as a viable investment source can be extremely difficult. When you have nothing much to show for a while, or when you’re spending on testing before you’ve started to gain from it — how do you justify this cost to your boss? Keep him happy with the results and let you continue testing?

Below, I’ve compiled a few ways for you to get the maximum return and justify your testing spend:

1. Let Go of ‘Test One Page Element at a Time’ Rule

Break the rules

I’ve been an advocate of this conventional CRO bite — ‘test one page element at a time’ — for far too long to refute it now. But there are times when it seems best to let it go in favor of pragmatism.

Single element changes often take much longer to achieve statistical confidence. Plus, every test you run will not be a winner. So when you are playing too safe and running only small tests, a lot of time may pass when you do not have much to show for it.

When you make multiple changes at a time, you might miss out on customer learning. But that’s okay. Some changes on the page might increase your conversion rate, and others may reduce it. Get over it! Sometimes it’s the overall positive effect that counts. Remember that!

It’s thus necessary that you break free from this conventional bite of testing wisdom and not be scared of making big changes.

If you spot multiple conversion leaks in a page that needs fixing, go ahead and make a new page that addresses them all; and then test it against the original page.

Small changes do have big impact sometimes, but those are a handful of cases. Most times, you will have to make more than one change to see the drastic difference in the way your visitors behave.

Start with best practices…

If you have a really leaky page from a conversion standpoint, don’t shy away from starting with best practices.

Yes, best practices do not work for everyone. And all of them might not work for you as well. But a lot of them should work for you and it’s a great way to add some quick fixes and have some good lifts to show off.

2. Sort Your Test Priority

Once you’ve completed your end of research and analysis, you’re likely to have tons of hypotheses all ready to put into action. Of course, you cannot try all the tests in one go. To show wins to your boss without much delay, prioritize which tests you can run first and without much friction. Gradually, move towards difficult tests once you’ve gained his confidence.

Wider Funnel’s PIE framework comes handy in deciding test priority. Make a table like the one given below, add hypothetical scores out of 10 for each factor (Potential, Importance, and Ease), find a PIE average for each test idea, and then decide:

PIE framework by WiderFunnel

While some big tests might need extensive assistance from your tech team, there might be others that need a rather daunting approval from the management. By following the PIE framework, way you will smoothly move forward with a sorted testing strategy and first focus your efforts on tests that combine high revenue potential and easy implementation.

Once you’re all pumped up with some good results, you can then stretch for other difficult tests.

3. Create Theme-Based Page-Level Tests

Theme-based tests are my personal favorite. They are a perfect example of hitting two birds with the same stone. You can change multiple things at a time and still get an actionable customer insight from the test. The only twist here is that the changes you make should be based on a particular theme.

A rehab facility chain, Tuscany, for example, tested their original landing page that focused on the extravagance and secluded location of their facility against a new version that emphasized on building trust in the mind of the prospects. This gave them a lift of 220%. Plus, they now understand that trust is a more important concern for prospects than a luxurious facility.

4. Using Test Insights to Up Your Overall Marketing Efforts (Including Offline Campaigns)

Jackpot

Experts often insist that you must look for customer insights in your test results. Many people do not understand why it is so important. So they ignore the reasons why their visitors behave in a certain way, why they buy/didn’t buy from their website. Missing out on these crucial insights mean — they use testing on its face value and will never realize the true potential/benefits of testing.

They fail to see that they can apply these customer learning to improve their overall marketing efforts, including offline communication. Continuing the same rehab facility example above, Tuscany applied the customer learning from their test and adopted the trust-focused approach on their other 300 websites. This gave them a 85% boost in paid search revenue across all 300 websites.

From their landing page copies to customer calls, Tuscany’s entire approach of presenting themselves transformed their business after that.

5. Run Site-Wide Template Tests

Because of the wider impact of these tests, their rewards are also manifold. Even a small win on these template pages can give you a huge lift to rave about. Lemonfree.com conducted a site-wide test on their product template pages, which increased their revenue per visit by 19%.

Apart from the usual category/product page templates, header and navigation tests are some other common site-wide tests you can try. Site-wide tests are also a great solution for those with low traffic count as the cumulative traffic of all template pages should give you enough traffic to get conclusive test results quickly.

6. Stick to Evidence-based Hypotheses

Conducting random tests that are backed by no research/insights or data will only waste your time and money in the long run. You must collect quantitative and qualitative data about your customers as well as your website to formulate smart hypotheses that have a higher probability of hitting the jackpot.

This means you’ll need to find high opportunity pages in Google Analytics for your website. Often high traffic pages with a higher bounce rate, checkout flow pages, sign-up pages, et al are good starting points. Tests run on pages where you land your PPC traffic can also have a high-impact on your revenue.

Next is to understand your customers. Don’t assume that you know what they think. You don’t! User-testing, reading live chat transcripts, and conducting exit surveys, first-time buyer surveys are the most powerful (and quite cost-effective ways) to know “why” people behave in a certain way on your website. Why they buy/don’t buy from you. You can then use these insights for your hypotheses and these will now be an educated guess, rather than an absolute shot in the dark.

Few questions you can ask to understand visitor intent or customer hesitations on your website are:

  • Is there anything holding you back from making a purchase right now?
  • Do you have any questions that you can’t find answers to on our site?
  • What brought you to our site today?
  • Were you able to accomplish the task you came to do?

Survey question

One mistake most companies fall victim to is that they treat testing as a one-off tactic. Companies that recognize conversion optimization as a process and ingrains constant testing in their culture are the ones that see real wins from testing.

What’s Your Take?

Are you stuck in an organization where you’re struggling to make testing a mainstay? What challenges do you face? Let’s hit the comments section and discuss.

Image credit:
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Brentdpayne

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Proving Returns from A/B Testing – 6 Ways to Keep Your Boss Happy