Tag Archives: element

Styling Empty Cells With Generated Content And CSS Grid Layout

A common Grid Layout gotcha is when a newcomer to the layout method wonders how to style a grid cell which doesn’t contain any content. In the current Level 1 specification, this isn’t possible since there is no way to target an empty Grid Cell or Grid Area and apply styling. This means that to apply styling, you need to insert an element.
In this article, I am going to take a look at how to use CSS Generated Content to achieve styling of empty cells without adding redundant empty elements and show some use cases where this technique makes sense.

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Styling Empty Cells With Generated Content And CSS Grid Layout

Enter The Dragon (Drop): Accessible List Reordering

Over the years of being a web developer with a focus on accessibility, I have mostly dealt with widely-adopted, standardized UI components, well supported by assistive technologies (AT). For these types of widgets, there are concise ARIA authoring practices as well as great tools like axe-core that can be used to test web components for accessibility issues. Creating less common widgets, especially those that have no widely-adopted conventions for user interaction can be very tricky.

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Enter The Dragon (Drop): Accessible List Reordering

What Science Can Teach Us About How to Create Viral Content

Think about the last thing you shared on the internet. Maybe it was an insightful video on the political turmoil in a far away country, or maybe it was a funny picture of a cat wearing a bow tie. Either way – you saw it, had an emotional reaction to it and decided to share it with others. But in the process of sharing the latest video, picture or article to your social media feeds – did you ever stop to think about why you shared it? What was your emotional response to the content? What about that response made…

The post What Science Can Teach Us About How to Create Viral Content appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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What Science Can Teach Us About How to Create Viral Content

The Nine Principles Of Design Implementation

Recently, I was leading a training session for one of our clients on best practices for implementing designs using HTML and CSS. Part of our time included a discussion of processes such as style-guide-driven development, approaches such as OOCSS and SMACSS, and modular design. Near the end of the last day, someone asked, “But how will we know if we’ve done it right?”
At first, I was confused. I had just spent hours telling them everything they need to “do it right.

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The Nine Principles Of Design Implementation

HTML APIs: What They Are And How To Design A Good One

As JavaScript developers, we often forget that not everyone has the same knowledge as us. It’s called the curse of knowledge: When we’re an expert on something, we cannot remember how confused we felt as newbies. We overestimate what people will find easy. Therefore, we think that requiring a bunch of JavaScript to initialize or configure the libraries we write is OK. Meanwhile, some of our users struggle to use them, frantically copying and pasting examples from the documentation, tweaking them at random until they work.

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HTML APIs: What They Are And How To Design A Good One

Photoshop Etiquette For Responsive Web Design

It’s been almost five years since Photoshop Etiquette launched, which officially makes it a relic on the web. A lot can happen on the web in a few years, and these past five have illustrated that better than most.
In 2011, everyone was just getting their feet wet with responsive web design. The traditional comp-to-HTML workflow was only beginning to be critiqued, and since then, we’ve seen a myriad of alternatives.

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Photoshop Etiquette For Responsive Web Design

Developers "Own" The Code, So Shouldn’t Designers "Own" The Experience?

We’ve all been there. You spent months gathering business requirements, working out complex user journeys, crafting precision interface elements and testing them on a representative sample of users, only to see a final product that bears little resemblance to the desired experience.
Maybe you should have been more forceful and insisted on an agile approach, despite your belief that the organization wasn’t ready? Perhaps you should have done a better job with your pattern portfolios, ensuring that the developers used your modular code library rather than creating five different variations of a carousel.

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Developers "Own" The Code, So Shouldn’t Designers "Own" The Experience?

Web Development Reading List #128: Firefox 45, A Multi-Colored Font And Better Force-Pushing

Another week comes to an end, with new browser announcements, releases and cool new tools that you might want to check out. I make it short: Have fun reading this week’s reading list and enjoy your weekend!
Further Reading on SmashingMag: A User-Centered Approach To Web Design For Mobile Devices The Elements Of The Mobile User Experience A Guide To Designing Touch Keyboards (With Cheat Sheet)’“) Beyond The Button: Embracing The Gesture-Driven Interface News Firefox 45 is out and now re-evaluates responsive images in srcset on resize or viewport changes.

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Web Development Reading List #128: Firefox 45, A Multi-Colored Font And Better Force-Pushing

The Flexbox Reading List: Techniques And Tools

Flexbox gives us a new kind of control over our layouts, making coding challenges that were hard or impossible to solve with CSS alone straightforward and intuitive. It provides us with the means to build grids that are flexible and aware of dynamic content, and thus, give us the freedom to focus on the creation process instead of hacking our way towards a layout.
To give you a head start into Flexbox and provide you with ideas on how to use it to master common coding challenges, we have collected tips, tricks, and tools that help you get the most out of its power already today.

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The Flexbox Reading List: Techniques And Tools

Generating SVG With React


React is one of today’s most popular ways to create a component-based UI. It helps to organize an application into small, human-digestible chunks. With its “re-render the whole world” approach, you can avoid any complex internal interactions between small components, while your application continues to be blazingly fast due to the DOM-diffing that React does under the hood (i.e. updating only the parts of the DOM that need to be updated).

Generating SVG With React

But can we apply the same techniques to web graphics — SVG in particular? Yes! I don’t know about you, but for me SVG code becomes messy pretty fast. Trying to grasp what’s wrong with a graph or visualization just by looking at SVG generator templates (or the SVG source itself) is often overwhelming, and attempts to maintain internal structure or separation of concerns are often complex and tedious.

The post Generating SVG With React appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Generating SVG With React