Tag Archives: elements

Design Principles: Visual Weight And Direction

Every element on a web page exerts a visual force that attracts the eye of the viewer. The greater the force, the more the eye is attracted. These forces also appear to act on other elements, imparting a visual direction to their potential movement and suggesting where you should look next.
We refer to this force as visual weight and to the perceived direction of visual forces as visual direction.

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Design Principles: Visual Weight And Direction

Design Principles: Connecting And Separating Elements Through Contrast And Similarity

Similarity and contrast, connection and separation, grouped and ungrouped are all ways to describe the varying sameness and difference between elements. Based on the information they carry, we’ll want some elements to look similar, to indicate that they are related in some way. We’ll also want to show that some elements are different and belong to different groups.
Key to showing both is the visual characteristics of elements and their relationships.

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Design Principles: Connecting And Separating Elements Through Contrast And Similarity

Design Principles: Space And The Figure Ground Relationship

If you see graphic design as a process of arranging shapes on a canvas, then you’re only seeing half of what you work with. The negative space of the canvas is just as important as the positive elements that we place on the canvas. [Links checked April/10/2017]
Design is an arrangement of both shapes and space. To work more effectively with space, you must first become aware of it and learn to see it — learn to see the shapes that space forms and how space communicates.

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Design Principles: Space And The Figure Ground Relationship

A Detailed Introduction To Custom Elements

You’ve probably heard all the noise about Web Components and how they’re going to change Web development forever. If you haven’t, you’ve either been living under a rock, are reading this article by accident, or have a full, busy life that doesn’t leave you time to read about unstable and speculative Web technologies. Well, not me.
Web Components are a suite of connected technologies aimed at making elements reusable across the Web.

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A Detailed Introduction To Custom Elements

Smart, Effective Strategies To Design Marketing Campaigns

Ever since I’ve been involved in the Web, I’ve been fascinated by little things that make a big impact. It’s one of the reasons why I started collecting and blogging about these details, which could in some way help others grow an audience. One recurring topic early on was launch and landing pages and the strategies that creators use to expand the reach of their websites, which led to a Smashing Magazine post titled “Elements of a Viral Launch Page.

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Smart, Effective Strategies To Design Marketing Campaigns

CSS3 Transitions: Thank God We Have A Specification!

This article is packed with a number of quirks and issues you should be aware of when working with CSS3 transitions. Please note that I’m not showing any workarounds or giving advice on how to circumvent the issues discussed. Alex MacCaw has already written a very insightful and thorough article on “All You Need to Know About CSS Transitions.”
Whereas Alex wrote about achieving particular effects, I’m going to talk about the technical background, especially the JavaScript-facing side.

This article:

CSS3 Transitions: Thank God We Have A Specification!

Sexy New HTML5 Semantics

Much of the excitement we’ve seen so far about HTML5 has been for the new APIs: local storage, application cache, Web workers, 2-D drawing and the like. But let’s not overlook that HTML5 brings us 30 new elements to mark up documents and applications, boosting the total number of elements available to us to over 100.
Sexy yet hollow demos aside, even the most JavaScript-astic Web 2.0-alicious application will likely have textual content that needs to be marked up sensibly, so let’s look at some of the new elements to make sure that your next project is as semantic as it is interactive.

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Sexy New HTML5 Semantics

Mind Your En And Em Dashes: Typographic Etiquette

An understanding of typographic etiquette separates the master designers from the novices. A well-trained designer can tell within moments of viewing a design whether its creator knows how to work with typography. Typographic details aren’t just inside jokes among designers. They have been built up from thousands of years of written language, and applying them holds in place long-established principles that enable typography to communicate with efficiency and beauty.

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Mind Your En And Em Dashes: Typographic Etiquette

Free Wireframing Kits, UI Design Kits, PDFs and Resources

To mock-up the user interface of a website, software or any other product, you’ll need some basic UI elements. And this is where wireframing kits and UI design kits come in handy. When you want to create a low-fidelity prototype for your projects, you can use these kits to give your idea a certain shape, keeping it abstract and not losing yourself in details.
In this post, we’ve prepared an overview of useful web and mobile user interface kits, handy PDFs and resources that you can use in your projects.

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Free Wireframing Kits, UI Design Kits, PDFs and Resources

Taming Advanced CSS Selectors

CSS is one of the most powerful tools that is available to web designers (if not the most powerful). With it we can completely transform the look of a website in just a couple of minutes, and without even having to touch the markup. But despite the fact that we are all well aware of its usefulness, CSS selectors are still not used to their full potential and we sometimes have the tendency to litter our HTML with excessive and unnecessary classes and ids, divs and spans.

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Taming Advanced CSS Selectors