Tag Archives: engineer

Developing A Chatbot Using Microsoft’s Bot Framework, LUIS And Node.js (Part 1)

This tutorial gives you hands-on access to my journey of creating a digital assistant capable of connecting with any system via a RESTful API to perform various tasks.

Developing A Chatbot Using Microsoft Bot Framework, LUIS And Node.js (Part 1)

Here, I’ll be demonstrating how to save a user’s basic information and create a new project on their behalf via natural language processing (NLP).

The post Developing A Chatbot Using Microsoft’s Bot Framework, LUIS And Node.js (Part 1) appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Source – 

Developing A Chatbot Using Microsoft’s Bot Framework, LUIS And Node.js (Part 1)

json-api-normalizer: An Easy Way To Integrate The JSON API And Redux

As a front-end developer, for each and every application I work on, I need to decide how to manage the data. The problem can be broken down into the following three subproblems: Fetch data from the back end, store it somewhere locally in the front-end application, retrieve the data from the local store and format it as required by the particular view or screen.

json-api-normalizer: An Easy Way To Integrate The JSON API And Redux

This article sums up my experience with consuming data from JSON, the JSON API and GraphQL back ends, and it gives practical recommendations on how to manage a front-end application data.

The post json-api-normalizer: An Easy Way To Integrate The JSON API And Redux appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Jump to original:  

json-api-normalizer: An Easy Way To Integrate The JSON API And Redux

Mobile-First Is Just Not Good Enough: Meet Journey-Driven Design

In a recent sales meeting for a prospective healthcare client, our team at Mad*Pow found ourselves answering an all-too-familiar question. We had covered the fundamental approach of user-centered design, agreed on leading with research and strategy, and everything was going smoothly. Just as we were wrapping up, the head of their team suddenly asked, “Oh, you guys design mobile-first, right?”

Mobile First Is Just Not Good Enough: Meet Journey-Driven Design

Well, that’s a difficult question to answer. While the concept of mobile-first began as a philosophy to help prioritize content and ensure positive, device-agnostic experiences, budgetary and scheduling constraints often result in mobile-first meaning mobile-only.

The post Mobile-First Is Just Not Good Enough: Meet Journey-Driven Design appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Visit site: 

Mobile-First Is Just Not Good Enough: Meet Journey-Driven Design

Internationalizing React Apps

First of all, let’s define some vocabulary. “Internationalization” is a long word, and there are at least three widely used abbreviations: “intl,” “i18n” and “l10n.” All of them mean the same thing.

Internationalizing React Apps

Internationalization can be generally broken down into three main challenges: Detecting the user’s locale, translating UI elements, titles as well as hints, and last but not least, serving locale-specific content such as dates, currencies and numbers. In this article, I am going to focus only on front-end part. We’ll develop a simple universal React application with full internationalization support.

The post Internationalizing React Apps appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

View original post here:

Internationalizing React Apps

GPU Animation: Doing It Right

Most people now know that modern web browsers use the GPU to render parts of web pages, especially ones with animation. For example, a CSS animation using the transform property looks much smoother than one using the left and top properties. But if you ask, “How do I get smooth animation from the GPU?” in most cases, you’ll hear something like, “Use transform: translateZ(0) or will-change: transform.”

gpu-animation-done-right

These properties have become something like how we used zoom: 1 for Internet Explorer 6 (if you catch my drift) in terms of preparing animation for the GPU — or compositing, as browser vendors like to call it. But sometimes animation that is nice and smooth in a simple demo runs very slowly on a real website, introduces visual artifacts or even crashes the browser. Why does this happen? How do we fix it? Let’s try to understand.

The post GPU Animation: Doing It Right appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Follow this link:  

GPU Animation: Doing It Right

Progressive Web AMPs

If you’ve been following the web development community these last few months, chances are you’ve read about progressive web apps (PWAs). It’s an umbrella term used to describe web experiences advanced that they compete with ever-so-rich and immersive native apps: full offline support, installability, “Retina,” full-bleed imagery, sign-in support for personalization, fast, smooth in-app browsing, push notifications and a great UI.

From Google’s Advanced Mobile Pages (AMP) to progressive web apps

But even though the new Service Worker API allows you to cache away all of your website’s assets for an almost instant subsequent load, like when meeting someone new, the first impression is what counts. If the first load takes more than 3 seconds, the latest DoubleClick study shows that more than 53% of all users will drop off.

The post Progressive Web AMPs appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Taken from: 

Progressive Web AMPs

Understanding REST And RPC For HTTP APIs

For the last few years, whenever somebody wants to start building an HTTP API, they pretty much exclusively use REST as the go-to architectural style, over alternative approaches such as XML-RPC, SOAP and JSON-RPC. REST is made out by many to be ultimately superior to the other “RPC-based” approaches, which is a bit misleading because they are just different.

Understanding REST And RPC For HTTP APIs

This article discusses these two approaches in the context of building HTTP APIs, because that is how they are most commonly used. REST and RPC can both be used via other transportation protocols, such as AMQP, but that is another topic entirely.

The post Understanding REST And RPC For HTTP APIs appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Follow this link: 

Understanding REST And RPC For HTTP APIs

Getting Started With Koa 2 And Async Functions

One of the upcoming features of JavaScript that I especially like is the support for asynchronous functions. In this article, I would like to show you a very practical example of building a server-side application using Koa 2, a new version of the web framework, which relies heavily on this feature.

Getting Started With Koa 2

First, I’ll recap what async functions are and how they work. Then, I’ll highlight the differences between Koa 1 and Koa 2. After that, I will describe my demo app for Koa 2, covering all aspects of development, including testing (using Mocha, Chai and Supertest) and deployment (using PM2).

The post Getting Started With Koa 2 And Async Functions appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

This article is from: 

Getting Started With Koa 2 And Async Functions

A Lean Approach To Product Validation


One of the biggest risks of building a product is to build the wrong thing. You’ll pour months (even years) into building it, only to realize that you just can’t make it a success. At Hanno, we see this happening time and time again. That’s why we’ve put together a Lean Validation Playbook.

A Lean Approach To Product Validation

“Lean” in this case means that you’re moving swiftly to figure out what you’re going to build and how you’re going to build it with as few resources as possible. These resources might include time, money and effort. The lean startup methodology is advocated by Eric Reis, who has massively influenced the way we work through his book The Lean Startup.

The post A Lean Approach To Product Validation appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Read More – 

A Lean Approach To Product Validation

The Art Of Layout Testing With Galen Framework


When designing a graphical user interface, there is always an open question: How do we automate testing for it? And how do we make sure the website layout stays responsive and displays correctly on all kinds of devices with various resolutions? Add to this the complications arising from dynamic content, requirements for internationalization and localization, and it becomes a real challenge.

The Art Of Layout Testing With Galen Framework

In this article, I will guide you through an interesting new layout testing technique. Using Galen Framework, I will provide a detailed tutorial for writing meaningful generalized layout tests, which can be executed in any browser and on any device and at the same time used as a single source of truth in your design documentation.

The post The Art Of Layout Testing With Galen Framework appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Visit site: 

The Art Of Layout Testing With Galen Framework