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Monthly Web Development Update 5/2018: Browser Performance, Iteration Zero, And Web Authentication




Monthly Web Development Update 5/2018: Browser Performance, Iteration Zero, And Web Authentication

Anselm Hannemann



As developers, we often talk about performance and request browsers to render things faster. But when they finally do, we demand even more performance.

Alex Russel from the Chrome team now shared some thoughts on developers abusing browser performance and explains why websites are still slow even though browsers reinvented themselves with incredibly fast rendering engines. This is in line with an article by Oliver Williams in which he states that we’re focusing on the wrong things, and instead of delivering the fastest solutions for slower machines and browsers, we’re serving even bigger bundles with polyfills and transpiled code to every browser.

It certainly isn’t easy to break out of this pattern and keep bundle size to a minimum in the interest of the user, but we have the technologies to achieve that. So let’s explore non-traditional ways and think about the actual user experience more often — before defining a project workflow instead of afterward.

Front-End Performance Checklist 2018

To help you cater for fast and smooth experiences, Vitaly Friedman summarized everything you need to know to optimize your site’s performance in one handy checklist. Read more →

News

General

  • Oliver Williams wrote about how important it is that we rethink how we’re building websites and implement “progressive enhancement” to make the web work great for everyone. After all, it’s us who make the experience worse for our users when blindly transpiling all our ECMAScript code or serving tons of JavaScript polyfills to those who already use slow machines and old software.
  • Ian Feather reveals that around 1% of all requests for JavaScript on BuzzFeed time out. That’s about 13 million requests per month. A good reminder of how important it is to provide a solid fallback, progressive enhancement, and workarounds.
  • The new GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) directive is coming very soon, and while our inboxes are full of privacy policy updates, one thing that’s still very unclear is which services can already provide so-called DPAs (Data Processing Agreements). Joschi Kuphal collects services that offer a DPA, so that we can easily look them up and see how we can obtain a copy in order to continue using their services. You can help by contributing to this resource via Pull Requests.

UI/UX

Product design principles
How to create a consistent, harmonious user experience when designing product cards? Mei Zhang shares some valuable tips. (Image credit)

Security

Privacy

  • The GDPR Checklist is another helpful resource for people to check whether a website is compliant with the upcoming EU directive.
  • Bloomberg published a story about the open-source privacy-protection project pi-hole, why it exists and what it wants to achieve. I use the software daily to keep my entire home and work network tracking-free.
GDPR Compliance Checklist
Achieving GDPR Compliance shouldn’t be a struggle. The GDPR Compliance Checklist helps you see clearer. (Image credit)

Web Performance

  • Postgres 10 has been here for quite a while already, but I personally struggled to find good information on how to use all these amazing features it brings along. Gabriel Enslein now shares Postgres 10 performance updates in a slide deck, shedding light on how to use the built-in JSON support, native partitioning for large datasets, hash index resiliency, and more.
  • Andrew Betts found out that a lot of websites are using outdated headers. He now shares why we should drop old headers and which ones to serve instead.

Accessibility

Page previews
Page previews open possibilities in multiple areas, as Nirzar Pangarkar explains. (Image credit: Nirzar Pangarkar)

CSS

  • Rarely talked about for years, CSS tables are still used on most websites to show (and that’s totally the correct way to do so) data in tables. But as they’re not responsive by default, we always struggled when making them responsive and most of us used JavaScript to make them work on mobile screens. Lea Verou now found two new ways to achieve responsive tables by using CSS: One is to use text-shadow to copy text to other rows, the other one uses element() to copy the entire <thead> to other rows — I still try to understand how Lea found these solutions, but this is amazing!
  • Rachel Andrew wrote an article about building and providing print stylesheets in 2018 and why they matter a lot for users even if they don’t own a printer anymore.
  • Osvaldas Valutis shares how to implement the so-called “Priority Plus” navigation pattern mostly with CSS, at least in modern browsers. If you need to support older browsers, you will need to extend this solution further, but it’s a great start to implement such a pattern without too much JavaScript.
  • Rachel Andrew shares what’s coming up in the CSS Grid Level 2 and Subgrid specifications and explains what it is, what it can solve, and how to use it once it is available in browsers.

JavaScript

  • Chris Ashton “used the web for a day with JavaScript turned off.” This piece highlights the importance of thinking about possible JavaScript failures on websites and why it matters if you provide fallbacks or not.
  • Sam Thorogood shares how we can build a “native undo & redo for the web”, as used in many text editors, games, planning or graphical software and other occasions such as a drag and drop reordering. And while it’s not easy to build, the article explains the concepts and technical aspects to help us understand this complicated matter.
  • There’s a new way to implement element/container queries into your application: eqio is a tiny library using IntersectionObserver.

Work & Life

  • Johannes Seitz shares his thoughts about project management at the start of projects. He calls the method “Iteration Zero”. An interesting concept to understand the scope and risks of a project better at a time when you still don’t have enough experience with the project itself but need to build a roadmap to get things started.
  • Arestia Rosenberg shares why her number one advice for freelancers is to ‘lean into the moment’. It’s about doing work when you can and using your chance to do something else when you don’t feel you can work productively. In the end, the summary results in a happy life and more productivity. I’d personally extend this to all people who can do that, but, of course, it’s best applicable to freelancers indeed.
  • Sam Altman shares a couple of handy productivity tips that are not just a ‘ten things to do’ list but actually really helpful thoughts about how to think about being productive.

Going Beyond…

  • Ethan Marcotte elaborates on the ethical issues with Google Duplex that is designed to imitate human voice so well that people don’t notice if it’s a machine or a human being. While this sounds quite interesting from a technical point of view, it will push the debate about fake news much further and cause more struggle to differentiate between something a human said or a machine imitated.
  • Our world is actually built on promises, and here’s why it’s so important to stick to your promises even if it’s hard sometimes.
  • I bet that most of you haven’t heard of Palantir yet. The company is funded by Peter Thiel and is a data-mining company that has the intention to collect as much data as possible about everybody in the world. It’s known to collaborate with various law enforcement authorities and even has connections to military services. What they do with data and which data they have from us isn’t known. My only hope right now is that this company will suffer a lot from the EU GDPR directive and that the European Union will try to stop their uncontrolled data collection. Facebook’s data practices are nothing compared to Palantir it seems.
  • Researchers sound the alarm after an analysis showed that buying a new smartphone consumes as much energy as using an existing phone for an entire decade. I guess I’ll not replace my iPhone 7 anytime soon — it’s still an absolutely great device and just enough for what I do with it.
  • Anton Sten shares his thoughts on Vanity Metrics, a common way to share numbers and statistics out of context. And since he realized what relevancy they have, he thinks differently about most of the commonly readable data such as investments or usage data of services now. Reading one number without having a context to compare it to doesn’t matter at all. We should keep that in mind.

We hope you enjoyed this Web Development Update. The next one is scheduled for Friday, June 15th. Stay tuned.

Smashing Editorial
(cm)


See the original article here: 

Monthly Web Development Update 5/2018: Browser Performance, Iteration Zero, And Web Authentication

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How to Make Your Unbounce Landing Pages GDPR Compliant

You might not wake up each morning thinking about data privacy and security but, like it or not, Facebook’s recent move makes it an issue you can’t dismiss. Long before Mark Zuckerberg sat before congress in the face of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, explaining how Facebook uses personal data, the European Union started getting especially serious about data protection and privacy.

And so, on May 25 2018, the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) goes into effect.

In a nutshell, the GDPR legislation gives everyone in the EU greater privacy rights, and introduces new rules for marketers and software providers to follow when it comes to collecting, tracking, or handling EU-based prospects’ and customers’ personal data.

Moreover, the GDPR applies to anyone who processes or stores data of those in the EU (i.e. you don’t need to be physically located in Europe for this to apply to your business and can incur fines up to 4% of your annual global turnover or €20 million [whichever is greater] for non-compliance).

But Beyond Potential Fines, Here’s Why You Need to Care

On Tuesday April 3rd, Zuckerberg said that Facebook had no plans to extend the GDPR regulations globally to all Facebook users. But, fast-forward a few weeks later and Facebook completely changed its tune, now planning to extend Europe’s GDPR standards worldwide.

This move sets a precedent, showing all of us that no matter where we are in the world, personal data and privacy laws aren’t optional. Compliance is table stakes.

If you’re located in Europe, process lead and customer data from Europe — or just happen to believe in high standards for data privacy and security, this post will help you navigate:

  • What Unbounce has done to become GDPR compliant, and
  • Some of what you need to do to make sure your landing pages, sticky bars, and popups adhere to the new rules.
Note: This post isn’t the be-all-and-end-all on EU data privacy, nor is it legal advice. It’s meant to provide background information and help you better understand how you can use Unbounce in a GDPR compliant way.

Data Protection by Default for You and Your Customers

For several months now, Unbounce has been investing heavily in the necessary changes to be GDPR compliant as a conversion platform. We believe that to build trust and confidence with your customers, you need to make their privacy your priority.

As of the day of GDPR enforcement, you can be sure we’ve got your back when it comes to processing and storing your data within Unbounce, and giving you the tools you need to run compliant campaigns.

To see exactly what Unbounce has been doing, why it matters and where we’re at in development, check out our GDPR FAQ page.

But while we’re a GDPR compliant platform with privacy and security safeguards built into our business practices and throughout our platform, this is only part of the equation. There are still a few things you are responsible for to use Unbounce in a compliant way, including:

  • Obtaining consent from your visitors (lawful basis of processing)
  • Linking to your privacy policy (informing visitors of your data protection policies)
  • Deleting personal data if requested (right to erasure)
  • Encrypting lead data at transit and in rest (using SSL) and
  • Signing a data processing addendum (DPA) with Unbounce

Here’s what you’re gonna want to watch for as you build landing pages, popups, and sticky bars.

Obtaining Consent From Your Visitors

Before collecting someone’s data the GDPR states you must first have a legal basis to do so. There are six lawful bases of processing under the GDPR, but if you’re a digital marketer, your use case will most likely fall into one of the following three:

  1. Consent (i.e. opt-in)
  2. Performance of a contract (eg. sending an invoice to a customer)
  3. “Legitimate interest” (eg. Someone is an existing customer and you want to send them information related to a product or service they already have.)

If you are using Unbounce for lead gen, then you must gather consent via opt-in to collect, use, or store someone’s data. When building your landing pages in Unbounce, you can easily add an opt-in field to your forms with the Unbounce form builder:

Keep in mind: Your visitors must actively check your opt-in box to give consent. Pre-checked checkboxes are not a valid form of consent.

Related But Different: Cookies And The ePrivacy Regulation

In many posts you’ll see Europe’s ePrivacy regulations tied in with GDPR, but they are, in fact, two separate things. While the GDPR regulates the general use and management of personal data, cookie use is core to the ePrivacy regulation (which is why you’ll sometimes see it called the “cookie law”). ePrivacy regulations are still in the works, but it’s certain they will be about visitor consent to cookies on your site.

We know the ePrivacy directive requires “prior informed consent” to store or access information on your visitors’ device. In other words, you must ask visitors if they consent to the use of cookies before you start to use them.

Last year Unbounce launched sticky bars (a discreet, mobile-friendly way to get more conversions), but they do double duty as a cookie bar, notifying your visitors about cookies.

You can design and publish a cookie bar using Unbounce’s built-in template, as shown below, embed the code across all of your landing pages using script manager, then promptly publish to every landing page you build in Unbounce. You can even have it appear all across your website.

Informing Visitors of Your Data Protection Policies

It’s not enough to just obtain consent, the GDPR also requires you to inform your customers and prospects what they are consenting to. This means that you need to provide easy access to your privacy and data protection policies (something Google AdWords has required for ages).

Sharing your privacy and data protection policies easily and transparently can help you earn the trust and confidence of your web visitors. Every visitor may not read through it with a fine tooth comb, but in a web littered with sketchy marketing practices, sharing your policies shows that you’re legit and that you have nothing to hide.

In the Unbounce landing page builder you can have any image, button or text link on your page open in a popup lightbox window. This means that you can link to the privacy policy already hosted on your website in a popup window on-click, and still keep visitors on your page to boost engagement and conversion rates.

This is a great example of how doing right by your customers can also help you achieve your business goals.

Here you can see a button being added to an Unbounce page linking through to a privacy policy. Something you need to do going forward to be compliant.

The Right To Be Forgotten

At any point in time a customer or lead whose data you have collected can request that you erase any of their personal data you have stored. There are several grounds under which someone can make this request and the GDPR requires that you do so without “undue delay”.

As an Unbounce customer, simply submit an email request to our support team who will ensure that all information for a specific lead or a group of leads are deleted from our database.

As part of our ongoing commitment to supporting data privacy and security, we are inspecting alternate solutions to deletion requests, but you can rest assured that even as of today, we will fulfill deletion requests within the time limit enforced by the GDPR.

Preventing Unauthorized Access to Data

Unbounce has supported SSL encryption on landing pages for years, and we’re proud that we made this a priority for our customers before Google started calling out non-https pages as not secure and giving preferential treatment to secure pages.

Presently Unbounce customers can already adhere to the GDPR requirement to process all data securely.

When you build and publish your landing pages with Unbounce, you can force your web visitors to the secure (https) version of your pages, even if they accidentally navigate to the unsecure (http) version.

In the upper right corner you can toggle to force visitors to the secure HTTPS version of your page.

This forced redirect will ensure proper encryption of your visitor lead data in transit and at rest. And as an added bonus, it’ll keep you in Google’s good books and prevent ‘not secure’ warnings in Google Chrome.

Signing a Data Protection Addendum (DPA) With Unbounce

According to the GDPR, when you collect lead information with Unbounce, you are the data controller while Unbounce serves as your data processor. To comply with GDPR regulation when using a tool like a landing page builder or conversion platform, you need a signed DPA between you (the data controller) and the service provider (your data processor).

Without getting too deep into the weeds on this one, let me just say that if you’re using Unbounce, we’ve got you covered and that you can complete a form on our GDPR overview page to get your DPA by email.

Privacy = Trust = Great Marketing

At Unbounce we view data privacy and security as two cornerstones of great marketing. At their core they are about a positive user experience and can help make the internet a better place.

The GDPR puts more control in the hands of users to determine how their information is used. No one wants their personal data falling into the wrong hands or being used in malicious or intrusive ways. Confidence and trust in your brand is at stake when it comes to privacy, so we aren’t taking any chances. Using Unbounce as your conversion platform, you can assure your customers that you take their privacy and data security seriously.

Increased regulation around data privacy may provide short term challenges for marketers as we establish new norms, but long term they can provide a more positive experience for users — something we should always strive for as marketers.

Continued: 

How to Make Your Unbounce Landing Pages GDPR Compliant

How GDPR Will Change The Way You Develop

Europe’s imminent privacy overhaul means that we all have to become more diligent about what data we collect, how we collect it, and what we do with it. In our turbulent times, these privacy obligations are about ethics as well as law.
Web developers have a major role to play here. After all, healthy data protection practice is as much about the development side — code, data, and security — as it is about the business side of process, information, and strategy.

Original link:

How GDPR Will Change The Way You Develop

Monthly Web Development Update 1/2018: Browser Diversity, Ethical Design, And CSS Alignment

I hope you had a great start into the new year. And while it’s quite an arbitrary date, many of us take the start of the year as an opportunity to try to change something in their lives. I think it’s well worth doing so, and I wish you the best of luck for accomplishing your realistic goals. I for my part want to start working on my mindfulness, on being able to focus, and on pursuing my dream of building an ethically correct, human company with Colloq that provides real value to users and is profitable by its users.

See the original article here:  

Monthly Web Development Update 1/2018: Browser Diversity, Ethical Design, And CSS Alignment

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A Sneak-Peek Inside The Southeast Asian Web Community

A few weeks ago, Vitaly Friedman (co-founder of this little magazine) and I had the pleasure to join the Mozilla’s Developer Roadshow, traveling through four countries in Southeast Asia in just two weeks. We visited cities that are buzzing with life and met people who share our passion for the web. Our mission: To get up close with the Southeast Asian web community. We wanted to learn how different local communities are compared to Europe and the US.

This article is from:

A Sneak-Peek Inside The Southeast Asian Web Community

How To Iterate Your Way To A Winning Content-Driven Website

If, like me, you spend most of your days working on content-driven websites, you can feel left out of the cool kid’s party. Best practice like Agile, continual iteration, and user feedback don’t sit quite as well when serving up lots of information, rather than a killer web app.
When I talk about a content-driven site, I am referring to any website whose primary aim is to convey information, rather than complete tasks.

See original:

How To Iterate Your Way To A Winning Content-Driven Website

Copyright Law Essentials All Designers Should Know

As software designers or developers, you have the important task of ensuring that a program works the way it is supposed to while being efficient, user-friendly, and unique. After all the creativity that is poured into making a program work just right, it’s fair to say that a well-designed software program is a work of art.
From a legal perspective, a software program is a complex work that includes both functional and artistic elements.

Continue reading:

Copyright Law Essentials All Designers Should Know

Non-Disclosure Agreements For Developers: What To Know Before You Sign

Most days, your goal as a developer is to design, develop and program awesome software. However, part of the job is also finding new clients, and you don’t want to be caught off guard by unexpected legal documents that come up while you’re establishing new clients.
The most common legal document you will be asked to sign when working on a website or app is a non-disclosure agreement (NDA). If you’re not sure whether to sign an NDA as a developer, this article will guide you to make an educated decision.

More:  

Non-Disclosure Agreements For Developers: What To Know Before You Sign

How To Protect Your Users With The Privacy By Design Framework

In these politically uncertain times, developers can help to defend their users’ personal privacy by adopting the Privacy by Design (PbD) framework. These common-sense steps will become a requirement under the EU’s imminent data protection overhaul, but the benefits of the framework go far beyond legal compliance.
Note: This article is not legal advice and should not be construed as such.
Meet Privacy By Design Let’s give credit where credit is due.

Source:  

How To Protect Your Users With The Privacy By Design Framework

Web Development Reading List #163: The End-Of-Year Wrap-Up

Only one week left until Christmas, and people already start freaking out again. No gifts purchased yet, work isn’t finished either, and suddenly some budget has to be spent until the end of the year. All of this puts us under pressure. To avoid the stress, I’ve seen a lot of people take a vacation from now until the end of the year — probably a good idea.
And while it’s nice to see so many web advent calendars, I feel like I’ve never written a longer reading list than this one.

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Web Development Reading List #163: The End-Of-Year Wrap-Up