Tag Archives: feature

Don’t Settle. Build the Marketing Campaigns of Your Dreams Without a Line of Code

Conquer technical limitations with Zapier and Unbounce

Hi, I’m Corey. Are you an idealistic marketer, like me?

That is—do you plan your marketing campaigns by pretending technical limitations aren’t a thing and just map out the ideal experience you want for your prospects from first impression to final conversion? Like this:

A photo of my actual campaign flow on the whiteboard.

If your whiteboard looks this optimistic, read on. We’ll nerd out together.

After us idealistic marketers are done dreaming about our perfect campaign structure from start to finish, the harsh reality sets in: technical limitations are definitely a thing. When the time comes to figure out how to actually do something a little crazy, like augment lead data or enrich it with extra data pulled from ‘the internet’, things get much trickier. But if you’re dedicated to the campaign you mapped out, you really want to make it happen.

Often, you’ll ask a developer for help and hear, “Sure it’s possible. I’ll just need two weeks to code it up. Log a request and we’ll prioritize it against all the other requests for my genius.”

We both know you’re not logging that request, because it’s not getting prioritized.

Eventually, you run a campaign that looks exactly like what you’ve done before, or what everyone else is doing, because it’s relatively easy for us—lowly marketers—to pull off by ourselves.

It’s infuriating.

Can’t we Execute More Sophisticated Marketing?

Is it too much to ask that we can create whatever the hell we dream up, so we can push the industry forward? To deliver the experience we think could make a difference to our prospects—one they might even enjoy?

Not if we need to rely on devs to help build our lead management or the integrations component of our campaigns for us, unfortunately.

However, I’ve found that more and more often I don’t need to have these futile conversations with developers. Modern martech has brought us tools to help, and the tool that comes up most often for me is Zapier.

Your Marketing on Zapier

Have you ever punched above your weight at work and solved a problem that that you’re totally unqualified to solve? It. feels. so. satisfying. You feel way smarter than you actually are.

I got that feeling when I used Zapier with Unbounce for the first time. I still get that feeling today. If you dream big enough, and can connect the right tools together, you can pull off campaign workflows that feel almost impossible.

Exactly how I felt having used Zapier for the first time.

Most recently, I tried to execute the campaign in the whiteboard photo above (the one above the Dragonball Z meme). The campaign—called Conversion Quest—challenges PPC marketers working in agencies to double the conversion rate of one of their client’s landing pages in 30 days.

When planning this campaign, I wanted to have a prospect fill out the form on a landing page with the current date (when they were “starting their quest”), and their current conversion rate. From there, they’d receive an email confirming their personalized quest goal and deadline by which they’d ideally complete the challenge (The email was to automatically pull in someone’s target conversion rate and their custom due date a month out).

Of course, when I’d planned this flow, there was no technical way to magically include a doubled conversion rate and custom due date directly in each prospect’s followup message. That is until my colleague reminded me of Zapier Formatter, which allows you to manipulate your lead data before it goes into your marketing automation platform (or CRM, or Email Marketing Service, or wherever other tool you can think of). Just 30 minutes later (and without approaching our dev team), I had augmented data going into our marketing automation platform.

Now Conversion Quest runs with custom info in the followup, all thanks to a quick Zap (a preconfigured integration template connecting two or more apps).

Here’s an example of the message I send in that campaign:

Here’s a sample of the email I manipulated data with via Zapier to personalize.

Now, are you going to need to use Zapier so you can build Conversion Quest?

No (that’s my great idea)… But my bet is you’ve got amazing campaign ideas for which Zaps could help you create a consistent (better!) experience for your leads, and help you stop relying on developers. As a bonus, Unbounce now has Integrations Powered by Zapier available right in the builder, so you can do this super quickly, without ever leaving Unbounce.

Here’s just a sampling of the Zaps available right in Unbounce. There are 60+ right in app, and with a Premium Zapier account you can access over 900!

Let’s dig into the versatility for a second.

Leveling up your marketing (without a line of code)

You could use Unbounce’s Integrations Powered by Zapier if…

1. You need to connect a client’s hodgepodge of tools

In this case, you’re a marketing agency that needs to build high-converting lead gen landing pages, overlays or sticky bars that connect to anything and everything your clients use, which could include:

  • Hatchbuck
  • Base
  • Follow Up Boss
  • Agile CRM
  • Pipedrive
  • Salesforce
  • HubSpot CRM
  • Capsule CRM
  • PipelineDeals

A few quick Zaps can connect your lead data to all of the above.

2. You want to use an existing CRM or marketing automation platform, with custom landing pages/Unbounce

If you’re using a tool that requires you to use rigid forms or landing pages, but you’d rather have custom landing pages that look great, convert like crazy and give you more control over the experience, you’d simply Zap together your landing page builder with tools/platforms like:

  • GoToWebinar
  • Marketo
  • Salesforce
  • Pardot
  • MailChimp
3. Your CMS or Marketing Automation tool doesn’t enrich your data for you

With Integrations Powered by Zapier, if you collect a lead in Unbounce, Zapier can enrich the lead’s profile with extra data (using, for example, the lead scoring Zap) en route to wherever you’re storing your leads.

4. Your sales team would like to be notified immediately when a super qualified lead comes in…but they never check their email

For this, you can try sending notifications via the following Zaps:

  • SMS integration
  • Slack
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
5. You’d like to route leads to specific salespeople in your CRM depending on the info a prospect submits in a form

Joe Savich from Altos gave this a try in Unbounce, and had high praise for this email parser Zap:

“It’s pretty nice. The integration powered by Zapier was super easy to setup…I was able to create a lead notification with a condition that, depending on which custom field was chosen, would send that lead to the appropriate sales team. My client thinks I am a magician! I could see this being used a lot going forward.”

Overall, of all the feature releases in my 4 ½ years at Unbounce, Integrations Powered by Zapier is my all time favourite. Zaps from right inside our builder empower marketers to do things you shouldn’t be able to do, without developers. And they make you feel really smart.

If you’re committed to driving our industry forward with some next-level marketing (that may look impossible at first glance), I’d urge you to try zapping some connections together and getting creative. You might surprise yourself, or better yet your boss or clients.

Continue reading: 

Don’t Settle. Build the Marketing Campaigns of Your Dreams Without a Line of Code

Send Your Unbounce Lead Data to 60+ Apps Instantly with New Integrations Powered by Zapier

Introducing Integrations Powered by Zapier

These days the average marketer has been cited to use anywhere from 12 to a whopping 31 tools to build the campaigns of their dreams, but making sure all of these different apps or tools work together like a well-oiled machine is often where things get messy.

For example, you might generate leads via your landing pages, but — depending on your marketing stack and the connections you’ve set up — it’s not always easy to automatically pass, tag and strategically route form data you’ve collected into all the different tools you need to work in (i.e. you might be using Google Sheets for lead tracking, your CRM for sales follow-up, and your marketing automation platform for triggering especially relevant email campaigns).

Maintaining a simple workflow for your lead management is next to impossible if your tools don’t connect and talk to each other properly.

Luckily, all the tools you love can talk to each other

Today at Unbounce, we’re excited to introduce our new Integrations Powered by Zapier.

Now, you can instantly connect your landing page, overlay and sticky bar lead data to over 60+ apps without typing a line of code or ever leaving the Unbounce builder.

Integrations Powered by Zapier

What’s Zapier?

If you’re not already a super fan, Zapier’s the tool over one million people use to connect their favorite web apps together for less busywork and more impressive automation. It’s like the one integration to rule them all – or the tool that makes all the other tools hold hands and play nice.

We’ve seen thousands of Unbounce customers build landing pages, overlays and sticky bars, then set up custom integrations with Zapier to funnel lead data into their other favorite tools like Intercom, Go2Webinar, Autopilot and Salesforce, for example. Today that connection’s even easier.

New: Unbounce's Integrations Powered by Zapier

Goodbye busywork, hello automation

Acting as a handy lead gen concierge, the new Integrations Powered by Zapier help eliminate mundane setup tasks.

With pre-built Zap templates directly in Unbounce and the usual integration set-up tasks automated for you, Zapier helps you get centralized lead management for any campaign in just a few clicks.

Even better? Zapier is a trade secret for leveling up the sophistication of your marketing. Using Zaps to connect your lead generation data with other tools and automate more actions, you can set up elaborate campaigns without needing to build workarounds or “hacks,” or depend on dev resources to build your integrations for you.

The possibilities are endless, but here’s a taste of how a few of our customers are already using this feature to fuel impressive campaigns without relying on IT.

Zap inspiration #1: Enrich your lead data

It’s one thing to generate new leads, it’s another if they get routed to your sales team pronto with extra context (like a lead’s unique preferences) included.

Joe Savitch, SEM and Inbound marketer at digital agency Altos, recently launched a lead gen campaign with a real estate client and wanted leads’ properties of interest included in the info submitted via the form (without the lead having to select manually from a drop down). In knowing which properties leads were expressly interested in, the real estate client’s sales team could follow up with especially relevant outreach.

Not only was Joe able to identify each lead’s specific interest using a lightbox that passed a value from the button to the lead form, but with Unbounce’s new Integrations Powered by Zapier (the “Email Parser” Zap), Joe created a lead notification that routed leads to the appropriate sales team based on which custom field had been chosen:

And here’s an example of the lead notification his team receives:

A sample of the lead notification Joe has automatically sent to the sales team via the Zap. Properties of interest are noted here for the sales team.

Joe’s verdict?

The Integration Powered by Zapier was super easy to setup and execute… My client thinks I am a magician! I could see this being used a lot going forward.

Want to push your lead data to other tools seamlessly? Get more info on the new Integrations Powered by Zapier, and see more Zaps available to you here.

Zap inspiration #2: Get visibility into campaign ROI

Serving many small to medium sized clients, Stefano Apostolakos of digital agency Webistry notes that many of the brands they work with don’t have, or aren’t familiar with sales CRM tools, meaning the agency can have a hard time demonstrating the ROI of the lead gen campaigns they run.

But now, thanks to the PipeDrive Zap directly in Unbounce, all of Webistry’s campaign leads get pushed into PipeDrive (a sales CRM), tagged and positioned appropriately in a client’s sales funnel.

Stefano’s team then runs monthly reports to discover which campaigns, ad groups and keywords achieve the highest CPA (cost per acquisition) to show the client just how valuable the new campaigns have been. Here’s what Stefano had to say about it:

Our customers have been very excited to see the direct impact their campaigns have on the bottom line. Being able to prove the value we bring has helped us to build loyalty, and generate an extensive portfolio of happy, long-term customers.

Want to set up a Zap to better see your ROI? To use Integrations Powered by Zapier, you’ll need a Zapier account and Unbounce. Learn more here.

Go forth and Zap!

This is really just the tip of the iceberg. While Unbounce now contains 60+ Zap templates to choose from right in the builder to get you started, if you have a Premium Zapier subscription, you’ll have access to over 900+ app integrations via Zapier you can make use of in Unbounce.

Whether you want to use one Zap at a time, or go wild with a few at a time (i.e. lead data pushed into Google Sheets, Slack, LinkedIn and more…), today you can finally manage, tag, and re-route all the leads you collect with Unbounce (from right in Unbounce). The only limit is your imagination.

You’ll simplify your campaign workflows, and all of your tools will run smoothly together. Not to mention, you can run far more complex campaigns without the help of IT.

We’re psyched to be the first conversion platform to make Zapier integrations available directly in the builder, and we can’t wait to see what you Zap together.

Originally posted here: 

Send Your Unbounce Lead Data to 60+ Apps Instantly with New Integrations Powered by Zapier

Glossary: Value Proposition

glossary value proposition

A value proposition is what you guarantee or promise to deliver to your potential buyers in exchange for their money. It’s also the main reason why people choose one product over other. If it’s done right, it can give you the competitive edge and help you grow your business. The value proposition is vital to conversion optimization as it allows you to build a perception of the value that a user is getting. So, if you test it, these few sentences might have a significant impact on your conversion rate and sales. What the value proposition does when done right:…

The post Glossary: Value Proposition appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Originally posted here: 

Glossary: Value Proposition

The Silent Landing Page Conversion Killer (And How to Stop It)

When creating a landing page, you’ve likely wondered, “How much copy should I include?” — a question to which copywriters usually reply, “Well, that depends…”

And it really does depend on the complexity of your offer and about a billion other factors.

Crafting concise copy is tough, so it’s only natural that many landing pages contain too many details.

You might be thinking, “Don’t added details help build a persuasive case for your landing page offer?” (Hey, sometimes you have a high-commitment offer on the table and y’gotta include what’cha gotta include.)

Well, yes… and no.

Including too much irrelevant info on your landing pages is dangerous because it dilutes your message, overwhelms visitors and hurts your conversion rate. If your visitors are slammed with excess copy, they can’t quickly determine what you’re offering, identify whether they want your offer or convert with your (buried) CTA.

excess-copy-killing-conversions-650
Don’t stand by and watch your landing page conversions get murdered by excess copy. Image via Shutterstock.

You can often recognize a page suffering from information overload because it’ll use external links to direct visitors to even more info (oof!). Using links this way directs your visitors away from your page and, once visitors navigate elsewhere, you’ve lost a conversion opportunity.

Because excess copy is such a common problem, in this post we’ll explore:

  • How to tell if your landing page suffers from info overload
  • How to distinguish between need-to-know and nice-to-know information, and
  • How to start including nice-to-know info on your landing pages without the visual clutter that hurts conversion rates

But first…

Why your pages might suffer from information overload

Typically, people err on the side of too much copy on their landing pages for the following reasons:

  • The page is trying to be everything to everybody. Imagine if Adobe made a landing page for Photoshop and used just one page to appeal to designers, publishing houses, design schools and potential employees. This would result in including too many benefits. If you want your page to convert, you need to be clear on your persona and their specific needs.
  • You’re not clear on your target audience’s stage in the buyer journey. Is your copy trying to appeal to customers in the discovery phase (those who are encountering your product or service for the very first time), or leads in the evaluation stage (determining if they want to purchase from you or a competitor)? Your audience’s level of familiarity with you will inform the amount of detail you should include.
  • There’s confusion around how much info visitors need to convert. Sometimes offers are complex or high-commitment (like a conference ticket purchase) and you need to include fine details. Ask yourself (and test) which details are absolutely essential to persuade prospects to convert.
  • You’re disregarding web writing best practices. Large paragraphs of text are overwhelming and people don’t read web pages like they do books. Everybody scans text online, so break up your copy into easily digestible pieces.
  • The page contains more than one offer — meaning it’s not really operating as a true landing page with only one CTA). Stick to one single landing page (and a singular goal) for each offer you pitch.

An example of info overload in real life

To help illustrate how a good page and good intentions can become a victim to excess copy, let’s take a look at a real example. Art & Victus, an online monthly food subscription box, set up an Unbounce lead gen landing page to collect subscribers for their service:

Art&Victuswithoughtlightbox

The page’s CTA prompts visitors for their email address in exchange for an access code to the invite-only food service.

Great, right?

But this page has limited conversion potential because it includes so much unnecessary info. Just look at those two massive paragraphs!

Moreover, the curators of the service are featured on the page using external links to their social profiles. If visitors click these links, they leave the page and the opportunity to convert is gone. We’re lookin’ at a classic case of info overload, folks.

The large paragraphs of text are signs that Art & Victus haven’t clearly defined need-to-know info versus nice-to-know info for the target audience of this landing page. Decluttering the page to display absolutely needed info more prominently would help this brand prompt a desire for their subscription service and hopefully increase this page’s conversion rate.

Pro tip: Info overload is often a result of skipping the copy development phase in a rush to build a page. Always write your copy first, then start your design in the your page builder.

Introducing a helpful hierarchy

High-converting landing pages often follow a logical sequence of info that’s designed to persuade. The hierarchy is based on answers your target audience need to know to evaluate the offer on a base level, and these answers are provided in order of their importance (or relevance to the call to action).

While the Art & Victus’ example landing page is packed with seemingly random details on the monthly food themes, their food charity and even their reward points, these details don’t directly contribute to a visitor’s decision to want to sign up to receive a subscription box. The audience of the page needs to see other info first.

When creating copy for your pages, consider the questions your potential customers will ask and the order they might ask those questions in.

If a piece of info is directly relevant to your CTA – explaining the offer, or how to claim your offer – it’s need-to-know info. If it’s info describing an extra of any kind (like Art & Victus’ food themes, a charity your company takes part in, or your loyalty points), it’s likely nice-to-know info that you’ll want to include after your key points are covered.

It’s helpful to rank each piece of copy’s direct relevance to your CTA (like we’ve done below) as a means of deciding where it should be placed in the visual design of your page.

The more relevant something is to your CTA, the closer it should appear to the top of the linear design of your landing page.

For Art & Victus’ offer, the hierarchy might look something like this:

information hierarchy
* Including price is tricky and at your discretion for your industry/offer. You can choose to include it on your pages if you believe visitors need pricing information to convert.

But what about all those nice-to-know details?

On the example page shown above, Art & Victus had a lot of nice-to-know info they wanted to convey, like their reward points, the custom guide included in the box to help you learn about the food, profiles of the individuals preparing the boxes and more.

Luckily, there’s an easy way to strategically sprinkle in nice-to-know info on your landing pages without the visual clutter associated with information overload…

Lightboxes: A remedy for excess copy

Lightboxes are modal windows that open over a landing page, filling the screen and dimming the content behind. They allow you to prominently display content requested by your page visitor (your visitors click a button to prompt them). You can see an example lightbox for a speaker bio below:

lightbox bio

Lightboxes help you add nice-to-know details onto your landing pages (like speaker bios, featured products, your privacy policy or terms of service), all the while keeping your audience’s focus on your CTA. By designing your page with these in mind, you can include information a visitor would otherwise have to navigate away from your page to find.

Art & Victus could make their landing page offer more clear by using lightboxes to feature their nice-to-know information. After addressing all of their must-have info prominently, they could add lightboxes like:

  • “Reward Points”
  • “Also included in your box”
  • “Who curates our boxes?”

They could also use lightboxes to:

  • Outline the three different types of boxes available in their service (i.e. “Intro box,” “Amateur box” and “Expert Box”)
  • Feature the curators’ profiles for those interested (instead of linking out to external profiles and losing potential subscribers).

Each lightbox would be triggered by visitors who want or need extra info before they convert (some will, some won’t), and would help to break up the massive paragraphs on the page.

Start using lightboxes to unclutter your pages

You too can use lightboxes to combat info overload and tidy up your copy.

Here are some examples of nice-to-have content that fits nicely in lightboxes:

  • Speaker bios: Include details about your keynotes or location in a lightbox so visitors don’t navigate away from a potential ticket purchase.
  • Extras and fine details: Extra product features, limitations, terms and contest rules
  • Privacy policies: Every landing page collecting lead info should link to a privacy policy, but you don’t want to link away from your page. Include your policy in a lightbox so visitors don’t veer off-course.
  • leadgenform
  • Lead gen forms – It’s a fairly popular marketing trend to include your contact form for a call to action in a lightbox. This tactic takes advantage of buyer psychology by empowering your visitor to decide when they’re ready to fill out your form. Check out this post to learn more about why you’d want to include a form in a lightbox.

Examine your own pages for potential lightbox opportunities

Start by reviewing your existing landing pages to see where they might be suffering from info overload.

Remember to check if you’re linking out to external pages — this is a sure sign that you’re confusing need-to-know and nice-to-know information.

Start making the distinction between these two info types for your audience, organizing your page with a better information hierarchy, and you’ll have a more streamlined message and more conversions in no time.

Read the article: 

The Silent Landing Page Conversion Killer (And How to Stop It)

101 Elements Of A Complete Product Page

Is there a concept like ‘a complete product page’?

Chances are if you have ever found yourself on a product page you have figured out the basic elements:

  • The Headline
  • The Product Image
  • The Product Specifications
  • Pricing
  • The Call to Action buttons.
  • The Payment methods.

Shouldn’t that be enough to make a sale? The user lands on your product page, a self explanatory title to the product he wants finds him, he reads the specifications (color, size, material, make, model, related features), after a glance he starts to look around for the payment methods. He likes it, presses the CTA button and bam! Sold!  Works like the good old brick and mortar stores, or not?

The better question is; Is there something like complete shopping experience?

The answer is ‘Yes’.

That’s precisely what persuades them to press the CTA button.
Family Guy ; Do Not Press The Button

Put yourself in the customer’s shoes..

  • You get into a retail store to buy pasta, you are greeted by the nice security guy at the door.The store manager smiles at you. You are pointed to the right shelf.
  • You scan through the variety of pasta (Spaghetti, Fusilli, Penne and Farfalle in tempting packaging). One has a free dip to go with it, you take it.
  • On the next shelf you find some dried rosemary, “Why not make it an exotic recipe?” you add it to your cart.
  • Now, you are looking for your preferred brand of ketchup, the staff member arranging goods on the shelves tells you they are out of stock.
  • A lady, another customer, exchanges greetings, casually mentions she loves the Tabasco and the Sriracha from a particular label. You take a bottle each.
  • The sign boards take you to the cash counter.
  • The lady at the cash counter wears a reassuring smile. She suggests you buy the fresh herb instead of the dried rosemary and offers to get it quick for you, you oblige.
  • A little guilt for overspending creeps in, you cancel one of the exotic sauces “I don’t need Sriracaha.”. The friendly lady at the the counter smiles and excludes it.

In analogy, your product page is the retail store. The friendly security guy , the store manager , the staff member, the options, the distractions ,the freebies, the branding ,the other customer, the sign boards, discount coupons, the reassuring lady at the cash counter who cares about your recipe enough to add fresh herbs to it are all product page elements.

Why would you press that button or make a purchase without the complete experience online?

The curious case of Benjamin (pressing the conversion) button. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Persuasion: The Reason Your User Will Press the Button

Subtle and not so subtle psychological factors are at play when persuading people to buy. Cialdini’s six principles of influence govern the product page elements as well. Here is a classification of the functional product page elements listed down for your convenience.

Reciprocity (It’s a Give and Take)

In simple terms tell your consumers you care and they’ll care to buy from you.

‘Hey, we want to save you some money, here’s the coupon for this product in your cart.’

‘If you want to talk we have a discussion board.’

Live chats and availability pop ups make your eCommerce site more interactive and human. Who doesn’t like a considerate seller?

The eager to help staff member at the mart and the lady at the counter know this secret. They are doing their job well by being helpful and responsive.

  1. Add – Ons
  2. Shipping Information
  3. Show Speed Of Results
  4. Industry Feedback
  5. Tools For Rating Reviews
  6. Notify When This Item Becomes Available
  7. Live Chat
  8. Flag Item
  9. Contact Us Link
  10. FAQs
  11. Feedback
  12. Benefits/ Freebies
  13. Discount
  14. Sorting Feature
  15. Store Finder
  16. Track Orders
  17. Email
  18. DataSheet, Brochure Or Manual
  19. Coupon Code Box
  20. Audio
  21. Discussion board
  22. Availability (In stock or out of stock)
  23. Return Policy
  24. Privacy Policy
  25. Search Feature

Related Post: How Badly Does Your Online Shop Need Live Chat?

Commitment (We are Creatures of Habit)

We want to belong to a common set of values, actions or belief. The consumer feels a sense of ownership when he sees ‘My Account’, ‘My shopping history’ mentioned on the product page. A history or an account is his investment into the website and hence a commitment. This commitment has to be reinforced with warranties and insurances under applicable conditions. Remember, if there is a store you visit often you are more likely to buy from them.

  1. Usual Payment methods
  2. Bookmarks
  3. Wishlists
  4. User Account Login
  5. Shopping (Buying) History
  6. Suggestions Based On Your Shopping (Buying) History
  7. Opt-in Form Or Subscription Form
  8. Guarantee
  9. Add this to cart
  10. Terms Of Service Agreement
  11. Insurance
  12. Credited points / Regular customer points
  13. Links to E-wallets/ Bitcoins

If there is a store you visit often you are more likely to buy from them. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Social Proof (Since Everyone I Know is Doing It)

People Looking in the pointed direction ( Social Proof )

82% of consumers trust a company more if they are involved with social media. Belonging comes with acceptance. After commitment the human tendency is to look for validation. Validation on social and eCommerce sites comes with increased trust. If multiple users give rave reviews about an enlisted product people are more likely to consider buying it. Here other elements may include social share buttons which allow people to share and take an opinion on the enlistments they are interested in. That other lady at the sauce shelf shopping for the exotic sauces is the retail store’s social proof without even knowing it.

The page elements to influence by Social Proof are listed here:

    1. Graphs And Charts
    2. Citations and References
    3. Testimonials
    4. Industry Accreditation
    5. Experience
    6. Proof Of Working
    7. Track Record
    8. Proof Of Any Claim Made
    9. Photos And Videos Of The Product In Use
    10. Product Ratings
    11. Product Reviews (and/or Comments)
    12. Item Followers
    13. Trustmarks
    14. Statistics
    15. Seller Rating
    16. Follow seller
    17. Seller Testimonials
    18. “What’s Hot Now” or “What Is Popular Now”
    19. Survey
    20. Approval By Other Organizations
    21. From the makers/author
    22. Social Sharing buttons

Related PostVWO eCommerce Survey 2014: What Makes Shoppers Buy

Authority (We Like being Led)

Authority doesn’t mean you command your users to buy enlisted wares. It means that you create an awe around your products or your brand. How to do that? Has the enlisted product been endorsed by an ambassador? Was the product in news recently? Has it won any kind of recognition or awards? If so mention it, the product is more likely to sell; there’s a halo around it. The same applies to your eCommerce portal/brand name. If you have it, flaunt it!

  1. Formal Expertise
  2. News
  3. Tech Specs with special features
  4. Audio Visual advertisements
  5. Product Endorsement Links
  6. Media Coverage
  7. Brand certification

Authority puts a halo on the product, one must trust what wears a halo. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Likability (Like It…Will Take It!)

Liking makes a strong positive bias. This is not just acceptance this an out and out affirmation of your brand. Liking is an all-encompassing factor. It includes the UX, UI , and product presentations. It also means crazy copywriting that could lure the more adventurous buyers into visiting your website often, thus turning them into the creatures of habit who get committed to buying from you. It could be the underrated convenience that comes with the user interface or the overrated graphics, slides or product videos.

We are not going overboard with the liking factor, Heineken is selling you beer using a ‘pleasantly smiling’ typeface, ever heard of that?

Related PostThe Why And How of Creating ‘Snackable’ Content

Include these product elements to be more likable:

  1. Product Details Or Specifications
  2. Size Information
  3. Color Options
  4. Product Tags
  5. Awards
  6. 360 Degree Views Of Products (Photos And Videos)
  7. Photos And Videos In Different Situations
  8. Step by step Explanation Of Usage Of Product – Photos And Videos
  9. Photos And Videos Of The Product When It Is Working
  10. Sorting Options For Reviews
  11. Similar Items
  12. Options For Gifting This To Someone Else
  13. Units Converter
  14. Social Sharing
  15. Differentiation
  16. Ability To List Products By Different Criteria
  17. Blogs
  18. Certifications
  19. ‘If You Bought This You May Like’ (Cross-selling)
  20. Recently viewed products
  21. Product Description
  22. Tools To Zoom In On The Product
  23. Bundling(Customized looks)
  24. Breadcrumbs
  25. Free Shipping/Benefits.

Scarcity (It’s a Tease)

eCommerce Store Screenshot - Scarcity Tactic

Multiple marketing campaigns promote limited editions to up their sales. The moment you tell your buyers that there are only a few of them left, there is an urge to click that button before anyone else does. ‘We are not telling you to buy this, we are just saying it’s now or never’. Then look at them go for it. But be sure not to create a false sense of urgency, that’s going to hurt your credibility in the longer run.

‘We are not telling you to buy this, we are just saying that it’s now or never.’ Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

  1. Date Added
  2. Spares
  3. Urgency
  4. Discount Timers
  5. Last date of availability
  6. Best deals
  7. Pitch
  8. Must haves List
  9. Best Sellers List

Related PostHow to Use Urgency and Scarcity Principles to Increase eCommerce Sales

Here’s a checklist you would want to pin to your dashboards, we haven’t added any timers .

Get the PDF here file icon

When you are done adding the elements, don’t forget to test them! Comment if you think we missed any product page elements, we are happy to improvise.

The post 101 Elements Of A Complete Product Page appeared first on VWO Blog.

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101 Elements Of A Complete Product Page

101 Elements Of A Complete Product Page (With Downloadable PDF)

Is there a concept like ‘a complete product page’?

Chances are if you have ever found yourself on a product page you have figured out the basic elements:

  • The Headline
  • The Product Image
  • The Product Specifications
  • Pricing
  • The Call to Action buttons
  • The Payment methods

Shouldn’t that be enough to make a sale? The user lands on your product page, a self explanatory title to the product he wants finds him, he reads the specifications (color, size, material, make, model, related features), after a glance he starts to look around for the payment methods. He likes it, presses the CTA button and bam! Sold! Works like the good old brick and mortar stores, or not?

The better question is; Is there something like complete shopping experience?

The answer is ‘Yes’. There are 101 elements to put together on a product page to complete that experience. If you are one of the lazy lot like most, there’s a quick checklist to save at the bottom of this page.

To know how these elements work, stay with us..

Family Guy ; Do Not Press The Button

Put yourself in the customer’s shoes..

  • You get into a retail store to buy pasta, you are greeted by the nice security guy at the door. The store manager smiles at you. You are pointed to the right shelf.
  • You scan through the variety of pasta (Spaghetti, Fusilli, Penne and Farfalle in tempting packaging). One has a free dip to go with it, you take it.
  • On the next shelf you find some dried rosemary, “Why not make it an exotic recipe?” you add it to your cart.
  • Now, you are looking for your preferred brand of ketchup, the staff member arranging goods on the shelves tells you they are out of stock.
  • A lady, another customer, exchanges greetings, casually mentions she loves the Tabasco and the Sriracha from a particular label. You take a bottle each.
  • The sign boards take you to the cash counter.
  • The lady at the cash counter wears a reassuring smile. She suggests you buy the fresh herb instead of the dried rosemary and offers to get it quick for you, you oblige.
  • A little guilt for overspending creeps in, you cancel one of the exotic sauces “I don’t need Sriracha!”. The friendly lady at the the counter smiles and excludes it.

In analogy, your product page is the retail store. The friendly security guy, the store manager, the staff member, the options, the distractions, the freebies, the branding, the other customer, the sign boards, discount coupons, the reassuring lady at the cash counter who cares about your recipe enough to add fresh herbs to it are all product page elements.

Why would you press that button or make a purchase without the complete experience online?

The curious case of Benjamin (pressing the conversion) button. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Persuasion: The Reason Your User Will Press the Button

Subtle and not so subtle psychological factors are at play when persuading people to buy. Cialdini’s six principles of influence govern the product page elements as well. Here is a classification of the functional product page elements listed down for your convenience.

Reciprocity (It’s a Give and Take)

In simple terms tell your consumers you care and they’ll care to buy from you.

‘Hey, we want to save you some money, here’s the coupon for this product in your cart.’

‘If you want to talk we have a discussion board.’

Live chats and availability pop ups make your eCommerce site more interactive and human. Who doesn’t like a considerate seller?

The eager to help staff member at the mart and the lady at the counter know this secret. They are doing their job well by being helpful and responsive.

  1. Add – Ons
  2. Shipping Information
  3. Show Speed Of Results
  4. Industry Feedback
  5. Tools For Rating Reviews
  6. Notify When This Item Becomes Available
  7. Live Chat
  8. Flag Item
  9. Contact Us Link
  10. FAQs
  11. Feedback
  12. Benefits/ Freebies
  13. Discount
  14. Sorting Feature
  15. Store Finder
  16. Track Orders
  17. Email
  18. DataSheet, Brochure Or Manual
  19. Coupon Code Box
  20. Audio
  21. Discussion board
  22. Availability (In stock or out of stock)
  23. Return Policy
  24. Privacy Policy
  25. Search Feature

Related Post: How Badly Does Your Online Shop Need Live Chat?

Commitment (We are Creatures of Habit)

We want to belong to a common set of values, actions or belief. The consumer feels a sense of ownership when he sees ‘My Account’, ‘My shopping history’ mentioned on the product page. A history or an account is his investment into the website and hence a commitment. This commitment has to be reinforced with warranties and insurances under applicable conditions. Remember, if there is a store you visit often you are more likely to buy from them.

  1. Usual Payment methods
  2. Bookmarks
  3. Wishlists
  4. User Account Login
  5. Shopping (Buying) History
  6. Suggestions Based On Your Shopping (Buying) History
  7. Opt-in Form Or Subscription Form
  8. Guarantee
  9. Add this to cart
  10. Terms Of Service Agreement
  11. Insurance
  12. Credited points / Regular customer points
  13. Links to E-wallets/ Bitcoins

If there is a store you visit often you are more likely to buy from them. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Social Proof (Since Everyone I Know is Doing It)

People Looking in the pointed direction ( Social Proof )

82% of consumers trust a company more if they are involved with social media. Belonging comes with acceptance. After commitment the human tendency is to look for validation. Validation on social and eCommerce sites comes with increased trust. If multiple users give rave reviews about an enlisted product people are more likely to consider buying it. Here other elements may include social share buttons which allow people to share and take an opinion on the enlistments they are interested in. That other lady at the sauce shelf shopping for the exotic sauces is the retail store’s social proof without even knowing it.

The page elements to influence by Social Proof are listed here:

    1. Graphs And Charts
    2. Citations and References
    3. Testimonials
    4. Industry Accreditation
    5. Experience
    6. Proof Of Working
    7. Track Record
    8. Proof Of Any Claim Made
    9. Photos And Videos Of The Product In Use
    10. Product Ratings
    11. Product Reviews (and/or Comments)
    12. Item Followers
    13. Trustmarks
    14. Statistics
    15. Seller Rating
    16. Follow seller
    17. Seller Testimonials
    18. “What’s Hot Now” or “What Is Popular Now”
    19. Survey
    20. Approval By Other Organizations
    21. From the makers/author
    22. Social Sharing buttons

Related PostVWO eCommerce Survey 2014: What Makes Shoppers Buy

Authority (We Like being Led)

Authority doesn’t mean you command your users to buy enlisted wares. It means that you create an awe around your products or your brand. How to do that? Has the enlisted product been endorsed by an ambassador? Was the product in news recently? Has it won any kind of recognition or awards? If so mention it, the product is more likely to sell; there’s a halo around it. The same applies to your eCommerce portal/brand name. If you have it, flaunt it!

  1. Formal Expertise
  2. News
  3. Tech Specs with special features
  4. Audio Visual advertisements
  5. Product Endorsement Links
  6. Media Coverage
  7. Brand certification

Authority puts a halo on the product, one must trust what wears a halo. Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

Likability (Like It…Will Take It!)

Liking makes a strong positive bias. This is not just acceptance this an out and out affirmation of your brand. Liking is an all-encompassing factor. It includes the UX, UI , and product presentations. It also means crazy copywriting that could lure the more adventurous buyers into visiting your website often, thus turning them into the creatures of habit who get committed to buying from you. It could be the underrated convenience that comes with the user interface or the overrated graphics, slides or product videos.

We are not going overboard with the liking factor, Heineken is selling you beer using a ‘pleasantly smiling’ typeface, ever heard of that?

Related PostThe Why And How of Creating ‘Snackable’ Content

Include these product elements to be more likable:

  1. Product Details Or Specifications
  2. Size Information
  3. Color Options
  4. Product Tags
  5. Awards
  6. 360 Degree Views Of Products (Photos And Videos)
  7. Photos And Videos In Different Situations
  8. Step by step Explanation Of Usage Of Product – Photos And Videos
  9. Photos And Videos Of The Product When It Is Working
  10. Sorting Options For Reviews
  11. Similar Items
  12. Options For Gifting This To Someone Else
  13. Units Converter
  14. Social Sharing
  15. Differentiation
  16. Ability To List Products By Different Criteria
  17. Blogs
  18. Certifications
  19. ‘If You Bought This You May Like’ (Cross-selling)
  20. Recently viewed products
  21. Product Description
  22. Tools To Zoom In On The Product
  23. Bundling(Customized looks)
  24. Breadcrumbs
  25. Free Shipping/Benefits

Scarcity (It’s a Tease)

eCommerce Store Screenshot - Scarcity Tactic

Multiple marketing campaigns promote limited editions to up their sales. The moment you tell your buyers that there are only a few of them left, there is an urge to click that button before anyone else does. ‘We are not telling you to buy this, we are just saying it’s now or never’. Then look at them go for it. But be sure not to create a false sense of urgency, that’s going to hurt your credibility in the longer run.

‘We are not telling you to buy this, we are just saying that it’s now or never.’ Tweet: 101 Elements of a Complete Product Page. Read more at https://vwo.com/blog/101-elements-product-page/

  1. Date Added
  2. Spares
  3. Urgency
  4. Discount Timers
  5. Last date of availability
  6. Best deals
  7. Pitch
  8. Must haves List
  9. Best Sellers List

Related PostHow to Use Urgency and Scarcity Principles to Increase eCommerce Sales

Here’s a checklist you would want to pin to your dashboards, we haven’t added any timers.

Get the PDF here file icon

When you are done adding the elements, don’t forget to test them! Comment if you think we missed any product page elements, we are happy to improvise.

The post 101 Elements Of A Complete Product Page (With Downloadable PDF) appeared first on VWO Blog.

This article is from: 

101 Elements Of A Complete Product Page (With Downloadable PDF)

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RICG Responsive Images For WordPress

I recently teamed up with Mat Marquis of the Responsive Images Community Group to help integrate responsive images into the WordPress platform. We decided to refactor a plugin that I had built several months ago, hoping that it would lead to a more useable and performant solution.

After months of pull requests, conversations on Slack and help from WordPress’ core team, we’re finally ready to share what we’ve been working on. You can download and install RICG Responsive Images1 from WordPress’ plugin directory, while keeping track of our development progress on GitHub2.

What Does The Plugin Do?

WordPress hasn’t changed the way it outputs the img tag in quite some time. And although there are plenty of ways to hook into WordPress’ native functions and alter the img snippet, doing so can be overwhelming for beginners and non-theme developers alike. Compound that with the complexity of Picturefill and of the srcset specification, and WordPress users have had few options for implementing a clean and properly functioning responsive images solution.

To solve this problem, we set out to build a plugin that gives users responsive images as soon as the plugin is installed, with no extra effort needed. No admin setting, media uploading configuration or coding is required. The plugin comes with one dependency3, a polyfill for browsers that don’t yet support native responsive images. Removing this file is completely optional and will not affect the functionality of the plugin, as long as the user has a modern browser.

As soon as an image is uploaded through the media interface, WordPress automatically creates three variations of the image at different sizes. When the plugin is activated, adding “Featured” and content images to a post will return WordPress’ standard image markup, with an added srcset attribute4. We’re using the srcset attribute because it’s the easiest attribute for both developers and users to add. While the picture element provides the user with a richer set of options5, we felt that the srcset attribute makes the most sense as an out-of-the-box solution. It’s also best to use when you’re focusing on resolution-switching more than art direction6 (more on that later in the article).

<a href="http://ricg.dev/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/image.jpg"><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6" src="http://ricg.dev/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/image.jpg" srcset="http://ricg.dev/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/image-150x150.jpg 150w, http://ricg.dev/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/image-300x300.jpg 300w, http://ricg.dev/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/image-1024x1024.jpg 1024w, http://ricg.dev/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/image.jpg 1800w" alt="a cool responsive image" width="1800" height="1800"></a>

The plugin is designed to be backwards-compatible, meaning that images added before the plugin was installed will be responsive when added to a post or “Featured Image” section. This is because it uses the image sizes previously defined by WordPress and the active theme’s functions.php file. The image ratio will be maintained throughout the srcset array, meaning that images differing from the aspect ratio of the initial uploaded image will be left out.

Theme developers can use the plugin to place responsive images wherever they’d like by using the tevkori_get_srcset_string() function, which takes an image’s ID and size as parameters.

<img src="myimg.png" <?php echo tevkori_get_srcset_string( 11, 'medium' ); ?> />

There’s also a tevkori_get_srcset_array() function that takes the same parameters and returns an array of srcset values for the specified image.

How Does The Plugin Work?

Most of the functionality happens when an image is dropped into WordPress’ WYSIWYG editor. Because all of the resized images will have been created during the uploading process, the only thing left to do is create an array containing the URLs of the available images in various sizes, as well as their dimensions. This array is then filtered to remove the image sizes with aspect ratios that don’t match the ratio of the full-sized image.

The array is created by calling the wp_get_attachment_image_src() function and storing the results. At the same time, we use wp_get_attachment_metadata() to retrieve the same results but for every possible variation of the image. Next, the ratio is calculated by multiplying each image’s width by the result of the initial image’s height divided by the initial image’s width. If that result matches the initial image’s height, then the image will be pushed into the final array, to be returned by the tevkori_get_srcset_array() function.

The tevkori_get_srcset_string() function calls tevkori_get_srcset_array() and places the result inside of the srcset attribute. A filter is applied to the image_send_to_editor function, where a regular expression is used to place the result of the tevkori_get_srcset_string() function directly after the src attribute in the image. The same process occurs for featured images, with a filter being applied to the post_thumbnail_html function.

If the image size is changed in the post’s editor, then the plugin will detect the change and update the srcset value accordingly. This ensures that the correct image ratio is always maintained. To enable this functionality, we’re using JavaScript to hook into the wp.media object7 and recalculating the srcset attribute by running the same image-ratio calculations defined in tevkori_get_srcset_array(). Before starting on this project, I was unaware of the wp.media object and its useful functionality. Because not much documentation for it exists, explaining in detail how we’re using it might be helpful. As it turns out, you can listen for an image-update event in the post’s editor by adding an event listener to the wp.media object.

wp.media.events.on( 'editor:image-update', function( args ) 
  var image = args.image;
  //more function logic
);

With this function, a theme developer can access every image as soon as it has been updated in the post’s editor. You can also take advantage of Underscore8, which is used as a dependency by the media uploader to edit image data on the fly. In the case of our plugin, we’re using a helpful Underscore utility to get our image-size ratios once the editor:image-update event has been fired.

// Grab all of the sizes that match our target ratio and add them to our srcset array.
_.each(sizes, function(size)
  var softHeight = Math.round( size.width * metadata.height / metadata.width );

  // If the height is within 1 integer of the expected height, let it pass.
  if ( size.height >= softHeight - 1 && size.height <= softHeight + 1  ) 
    srcsetGroup.push(size.url + ' ' + size.width + 'w');
  
});

To learn more about how we hook into the wp.media object, be sure to look at the code in wp-tevko-responsive-images.js9.

The sizes Attribute

Currently, this plugin doesn’t add a sizes attribute10 to complement the srcset attribute. The reason is that we initially recognized that we could never predict what those sizes would need to be, because they depend on how the user’s theme is styled. While we are working on a solution to this issue, we’re encouraging all users to include a sizes attribute on their own, either manually or via another WordPress plugin, such as wp-lazysizes11. One thing to note is that the responsive images specification has recently changed, and use of the w descriptor must now be followed by a sizes attribute. Omitting the sizes attribute will render the markup technically invalid, while still falling back to a default size of 100vh.

What About Features X, Y And Z?

While much more can be done with responsive images, you’ve probably noticed a few use cases that this plugin doesn’t cover. The first thing that we’re usually asked about is a feature for art direction. Art direction refers to loading differently styled images at different breakpoints — whether that means entirely new images or the same image cropped or focused differently. This feature would require use of the picture element, which in turn would mean a lot more markup to generate the final image.

Adding this feature to WordPress would be impossible without the addition of a fairly complicated interface in WordPress’ media uploader, because the user would need to be able to define all breakpoints and then select images to be loaded in when those breakpoints are reached. Our goal for this plugin is to allow for a basic implementation of responsive images, with absolutely no configuration needed by the user. So, we’ve decided to omit this feature. We will, however, do our best to allow art direction to work side by side with our plugin as we expand the API for theme developers.

Lazy-loading and image compression are two other features that we have no plans to implement, simply because they fall beyond the scope of a more or less “default” solution for responsive images. Again, we aim to make the addition of these features possible for theme developers who use our plugin via a feature-rich API.

What’s Next?

While the plugin is available for everyone to download and install, we’re actively working to make it better. So, users can expect frequent updates, resolved issues and an all-around better functioning plugin as time goes on. We’re planning to add more features, such as the sizes attribute and hooks that allow theme developers to further customize the plugin.

Another feature we have yet to consider is ratio descriptors like 2x and 3x for “Retina” use cases. Better documentation and support are coming soon as well. Eventually, we’d like to see this plugin become a part of WordPress’ core, which means that it will stay minimalist, admin-less and easy to use.

(il, al, ml)

Footnotes

  1. 1 https://wordpress.org/plugins/ricg-responsive-images/
  2. 2 https://github.com/ResponsiveImagesCG/wp-tevko-responsive-images
  3. 3 http://scottjehl.github.io/picturefill/
  4. 4 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2013/08/21/webkit-implements-srcset-and-why-its-a-good-thing/
  5. 5 http://alistapart.com/article/responsive-images-in-practice#section4
  6. 6 http://css-tricks.com/responsive-images-youre-just-changing-resolutions-use-srcset/
  7. 7 http://codex.wordpress.org/Javascript_Reference/wp.media
  8. 8 http://underscorejs.org/
  9. 9 https://github.com/ResponsiveImagesCG/wp-tevko-responsive-images/blob/master/js/wp-tevko-responsive-images.js
  10. 10 http://ericportis.com/posts/2014/srcset-sizes/#part-2
  11. 11 https://github.com/aFarkas/wp-lazysizes

The post RICG Responsive Images For WordPress appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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RICG Responsive Images For WordPress