Tag Archives: following

How To Make A Drag-and-Drop File Uploader With Vanilla JavaScript

It’s a known fact that file selection inputs are difficult to style the way developers want to, so many simply hide it and create a button that opens the file selection dialog instead. Nowadays, though, we have an even fancier way of handling file selection: drag and drop.
Technically, this was already possible because most (if not all) implementations of the file selection input allowed you to drag files over it to select them, but this requires you to actually show the file element.

Read this article:  

How To Make A Drag-and-Drop File Uploader With Vanilla JavaScript

“Maybe Later” – A New Interaction Model for Ecommerce Entrance Popups

I’d guess that over half of the e-commerce stores I visit use entrance popups to advertise their current deal. Most often it’s a discount.

What is an Entrance Popup and What’s Wrong With Them?

They are as they sound. A popup that appears as soon as you arrive on the site. They’re definitely the most interruptive of all popups because you’ve not even had a chance to look around.

I get why they are used though because they work really well at one thing – letting you know that an offer exists, and what it is. And given high levels of competition for online dollars, it makes sense why they would be so prolific.

The intrusion isn’t the only point of frustration. There’s also the scenario where you arrive on a site, see an offer appear, you find it interesting and potentially very valuable (who doesn’t want 50% off?), but you want to do some actual looking around – the shopping part – before thinking about the offer. And when you’re forced to close the popup in order to continue, it’s frustrating because you want the offer! You just don’t want it right now.

So, given the fact that they are so common, and they’re not going anywhere anytime soon, and they create these points of frustration, I’ve been working on developing a few alternative ways to solve the same problem.

The one I want to share with you today is called “Maybe Later”.

“Maybe Later” is a Solution to Increase Engagement and Reduce Frustration

As you saw in the header image, instead of the now classic YES/NO popup – the one that gets abused by shady marketers (Technology isn’t the Problem, We Are.) – “Maybe Later” includes a third option called, you guessed it!

The middle option gives some control back to the shopper.

It’s more than just a third button, here’s how it works (I’ll refer to the sketch opposite):

  1. The popup appears when you enter the site. You can choose “No” to get rid of it, “Yes” to take advantage of it, or “Maybe Later” to register your interest but get it out of your way.
  2. When you click “Maybe Later” a cookie is set to log your interest.
  3. Now while you are browsing the rest of the site, a Sticky Bar – targeted at the cookie that was set – appears at the bottom (or top) of the page, with a more subtle reminder of the offer, so that you know it there and ready if you decide to take advantage of it.
  4. If you decide against the offer, you can click “No thanks” on the Sticky Bar, the cookie is deleted, and the offer is hidden for good.

The core purpose of this idea is to put the control back with the shopper while creating an effective method for the retailer to engage with you, with your permission.


Follow our Product Awareness Month journey >> click here to launch a popup with a subscribe form (it uses our on-click trigger feature).


Visual Hierarchy on Popup Buttons

When you have more than a single button, it’s important to establish visual design cues to indicate how the hierarchical dominance plays out. For you as a marketer, the most important of the three buttons is YES, MAYBE LATER is second, and NO is the least.

You can create a better user experience for your visitors by using the correct visual hierarchy and affordance when it comes to button design. In the image below, there is a progression of visual dominance from left to right (which is the correct direction – in Western society). Left is considered a backward step (in online interaction design terms), and right is a progression to the goal.

From left to right we see:

  • The NO button: is designed as a ghost button which has the least affordance and weight of the three.
  • The MAYBE LATER button: gains some solidity by increasing the opacity
  • The YES button: has a fully opaque design represented by the primary call to action colour of the theme.

You can achieve a similar level of dominance by making the secondary action a link instead of a button, which is a great visual hierarchy design technique. What I don’t like is when people do this, but they make the “No thanks” link really tiny. If you’re going to provide an option, do it with a little dignity and make it easy to see and click.

See the “Maybe Later” Popup-to-Sticky-Bar Model in Action

Alrighty, demo time! I have a few instructions for you to follow to see it in action. I didn’t load the popup on this page as it’s supposed to be an entrance popup and I needed to set the scene first. But I’ll use some trickery to make it happen for you.

Follow these instructions and you’ll see “Maybe Later” in action:

Please note: this is desktop only. Reason being is that Google dislikes entrance popups on mobile. Sticky Bars are the Google-friendly way to present promos on mobile, so they work, but the combo isn’t appropriate.

  1. Visit this page (opens in new window).
  2. Click the “Maybe Later” button and the popup will close.
  3. Refresh that page and you’ll see a Sticky Bar with the same offer appear at the bottom.
  4. Come back to this page.
  5. Refresh this page and you’ll see the Sticky Bar here too.
  6. Click “No thanks” to get rid of it when you’ve had enough :D

Here’s the entrance Popup you will see:

Maybe Later - A New  interaction model for ecommerce entrance popups

And the Sticky Bar you will see following that:

How to Use “Maybe Later” on Your Website

If you’d like to give it a try, follow the instructions below in your Unbounce account. (You should sign up for Unbounce if you haven’t already: you get Landing Pages, Popups, and Sticky Bars all in the same builder).

You can also see what Popups and Sticky Bars look like on your website by entering your URL on our new Live Preview Tool.

“Maybe Later” Setup Instructions

Caveat: This is not an official Unbounce feature, and as such is not technically supported. But it is damn cool. And if enough people scream really hard, maybe I’ll be able to persuade the product team to add it to the list. And please talk to a developer before trying this in a production environment.

Step 1: Create a Popup in Unbounce

Step 2: Add “Maybe Later” Script to the Popup

In the “Javascripts” window located in the bottom-left.

Add the following script “Before the body end tag”, replacing “lp-pom-button-50” with the id of your “Maybe Later” button, and unbounce.com with your own domain.

document.getElementById("lp-pom-button-50").onclick = function() 
parent.postMessage(JSON.stringify('later'), 'https://unbounce.com');

Step 3: Set URL Targeting on Popup

Set up the URL targeting for where you want the popup to appear. I chose the post you’re reading right now (with a ?demo extension so it would only fire when I sent you to that URL).

Step 4: Set Cookie Targeting on Popup

Set up the cookie targeting to “Not show” when the “Maybe Later” cookie is present. The cookie is set when the button is clicked. (You’ll see how in step 9).

Step 5: Create a Sticky Bar in Unbounce

Step 6: Add “Maybe Later” Script to the Sticky Bar

Add the following script “Before the body end tag”, replacing “lp-pom-button-45” with the id of your “No Thanks” button, and unbounce.com with your own domain.

document.getElementById("lp-pom-button-45").onclick = function() 
parent.postMessage(JSON.stringify('laterForget'), 'https://unbounce.com');

Step 7: Set URL Targeting on Sticky Bar

Set up the URL targeting for where you want the Sticky Bar to appear. This might be every page on your e-commerce site, or in my case just this post and another for testing.

Step 8: Set Cookie Targeting on Sticky Bar

Set the Trigger to “Arrival”, Frequency to “Every Visit”, and Cookie Targeting to show when the cookie we’re using is set. (You’ll see how it’s set in the next step).

Step 9: Add “Maybe Later” Code to Your Website

This is some code that allows the Popup and Sticky Bar to “talk” to its host page and set/delete the cookie.

// On receiving message from the popup set a cookie
window.onload = function() 
function receiveMessage(e) 
var eventData = JSON.parse(e.data);
// Check for the later message
if (eventData === 'later') 
document.cookie = "mlshowSticky=true; expires=Thu, 11 May 2019 12:00:00 UTC; path=/";

if (eventData === 'laterForget') 
document.cookie = "mlshowSticky=; expires=Thu, 01 Jan 1970 00:00:00 UTC; path=/;";

}
// Listen for the message from the host page
window.addEventListener('message', receiveMessage);
}

Step 10: Enjoy Being Awesome

That’s all, folks!


What Do You Think?

I’d love to know what you think about this idea in the comments, so please jump in with your thoughts and ideas.

Later (maybe),
Oli

p.s. Don’t forget to see what Popups and Sticky Bars look like on your website with the new Live Preview Tool

View original: 

“Maybe Later” – A New Interaction Model for Ecommerce Entrance Popups

Maximizing The Design Sprint

Following a summer of Wonder Woman, Spiderman, and other superhero blockbusters, it’s natural to fantasize about having a superpower of your own. Luckily for designers, innovators, and customer-centric thinkers, a design sprint allows you to see into the future to learn in just five days what customers think about your finished product.
As a UX consultant and in-house design strategist, I have facilitated dozens upon dozens of design workshops (ranging from rapid prototyping sessions to, of course, sprints).

View post: 

Maximizing The Design Sprint

Don’t Settle. Build the Marketing Campaigns of Your Dreams Without a Line of Code

Conquer technical limitations with Zapier and Unbounce

Hi, I’m Corey. Are you an idealistic marketer, like me?

That is—do you plan your marketing campaigns by pretending technical limitations aren’t a thing and just map out the ideal experience you want for your prospects from first impression to final conversion? Like this:

A photo of my actual campaign flow on the whiteboard.

If your whiteboard looks this optimistic, read on. We’ll nerd out together.

After us idealistic marketers are done dreaming about our perfect campaign structure from start to finish, the harsh reality sets in: technical limitations are definitely a thing. When the time comes to figure out how to actually do something a little crazy, like augment lead data or enrich it with extra data pulled from ‘the internet’, things get much trickier. But if you’re dedicated to the campaign you mapped out, you really want to make it happen.

Often, you’ll ask a developer for help and hear, “Sure it’s possible. I’ll just need two weeks to code it up. Log a request and we’ll prioritize it against all the other requests for my genius.”

We both know you’re not logging that request, because it’s not getting prioritized.

Eventually, you run a campaign that looks exactly like what you’ve done before, or what everyone else is doing, because it’s relatively easy for us—lowly marketers—to pull off by ourselves.

It’s infuriating.

Can’t we Execute More Sophisticated Marketing?

Is it too much to ask that we can create whatever the hell we dream up, so we can push the industry forward? To deliver the experience we think could make a difference to our prospects—one they might even enjoy?

Not if we need to rely on devs to help build our lead management or the integrations component of our campaigns for us, unfortunately.

However, I’ve found that more and more often I don’t need to have these futile conversations with developers. Modern martech has brought us tools to help, and the tool that comes up most often for me is Zapier.

Your Marketing on Zapier

Have you ever punched above your weight at work and solved a problem that that you’re totally unqualified to solve? It. feels. so. satisfying. You feel way smarter than you actually are.

I got that feeling when I used Zapier with Unbounce for the first time. I still get that feeling today. If you dream big enough, and can connect the right tools together, you can pull off campaign workflows that feel almost impossible.

Exactly how I felt having used Zapier for the first time.

Most recently, I tried to execute the campaign in the whiteboard photo above (the one above the Dragonball Z meme). The campaign—called Conversion Quest—challenges PPC marketers working in agencies to double the conversion rate of one of their client’s landing pages in 30 days.

When planning this campaign, I wanted to have a prospect fill out the form on a landing page with the current date (when they were “starting their quest”), and their current conversion rate. From there, they’d receive an email confirming their personalized quest goal and deadline by which they’d ideally complete the challenge (The email was to automatically pull in someone’s target conversion rate and their custom due date a month out).

Of course, when I’d planned this flow, there was no technical way to magically include a doubled conversion rate and custom due date directly in each prospect’s followup message. That is until my colleague reminded me of Zapier Formatter, which allows you to manipulate your lead data before it goes into your marketing automation platform (or CRM, or Email Marketing Service, or wherever other tool you can think of). Just 30 minutes later (and without approaching our dev team), I had augmented data going into our marketing automation platform.

Now Conversion Quest runs with custom info in the followup, all thanks to a quick Zap (a preconfigured integration template connecting two or more apps).

Here’s an example of the message I send in that campaign:

Here’s a sample of the email I manipulated data with via Zapier to personalize.

Now, are you going to need to use Zapier so you can build Conversion Quest?

No (that’s my great idea)… But my bet is you’ve got amazing campaign ideas for which Zaps could help you create a consistent (better!) experience for your leads, and help you stop relying on developers. As a bonus, Unbounce now has Integrations Powered by Zapier available right in the builder, so you can do this super quickly, without ever leaving Unbounce.

Here’s just a sampling of the Zaps available right in Unbounce. There are 60+ right in app, and with a Premium Zapier account you can access over 900!

Let’s dig into the versatility for a second.

Leveling up your marketing (without a line of code)

You could use Unbounce’s Integrations Powered by Zapier if…

1. You need to connect a client’s hodgepodge of tools

In this case, you’re a marketing agency that needs to build high-converting lead gen landing pages, overlays or sticky bars that connect to anything and everything your clients use, which could include:

  • Hatchbuck
  • Base
  • Follow Up Boss
  • Agile CRM
  • Pipedrive
  • Salesforce
  • HubSpot CRM
  • Capsule CRM
  • PipelineDeals

A few quick Zaps can connect your lead data to all of the above.

2. You want to use an existing CRM or marketing automation platform, with custom landing pages/Unbounce

If you’re using a tool that requires you to use rigid forms or landing pages, but you’d rather have custom landing pages that look great, convert like crazy and give you more control over the experience, you’d simply Zap together your landing page builder with tools/platforms like:

  • GoToWebinar
  • Marketo
  • Salesforce
  • Pardot
  • MailChimp
3. Your CMS or Marketing Automation tool doesn’t enrich your data for you

With Integrations Powered by Zapier, if you collect a lead in Unbounce, Zapier can enrich the lead’s profile with extra data (using, for example, the lead scoring Zap) en route to wherever you’re storing your leads.

4. Your sales team would like to be notified immediately when a super qualified lead comes in…but they never check their email

For this, you can try sending notifications via the following Zaps:

  • SMS integration
  • Slack
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
5. You’d like to route leads to specific salespeople in your CRM depending on the info a prospect submits in a form

Joe Savich from Altos gave this a try in Unbounce, and had high praise for this email parser Zap:

“It’s pretty nice. The integration powered by Zapier was super easy to setup…I was able to create a lead notification with a condition that, depending on which custom field was chosen, would send that lead to the appropriate sales team. My client thinks I am a magician! I could see this being used a lot going forward.”

Overall, of all the feature releases in my 4 ½ years at Unbounce, Integrations Powered by Zapier is my all time favourite. Zaps from right inside our builder empower marketers to do things you shouldn’t be able to do, without developers. And they make you feel really smart.

If you’re committed to driving our industry forward with some next-level marketing (that may look impossible at first glance), I’d urge you to try zapping some connections together and getting creative. You might surprise yourself, or better yet your boss or clients.

Continue reading: 

Don’t Settle. Build the Marketing Campaigns of Your Dreams Without a Line of Code

5 Real-Life Popup A/B Tests That Will Help Boost Your Conversion Rate (Based on Actual Case Studies)

5 tests

Do you think your popups are converting at their highest potential? I’m guessing that unless you’ve been testing them to figure out what makes your audience tick, then probably not. Luckily, you can figure that out by, well,..testing of course :). And if you’re wondering what to assess first, I have some suggestions. As Head of Customer Success at WisePops, an intelligent popup builder, I’ve reviewed hundreds of A/B tests. Based on this experience, I’ll share 5 popup A/B tests which can make a difference for your future and existing campaigns (spoiler: one of our customers almost tripled the number…

The post 5 Real-Life Popup A/B Tests That Will Help Boost Your Conversion Rate (Based on Actual Case Studies) appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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5 Real-Life Popup A/B Tests That Will Help Boost Your Conversion Rate (Based on Actual Case Studies)

Why Spending $1,000 on Instagram Influencer Marketing is Worth It

instagram influencers

You might have noticed that influential Instagrammers are doing a lot of promotions for brands relevant to their niche. Being such a visual platform, Instagram may be the best platform for you to run your influencer marketing campaign. Maybe you’re tempted to try it out, but you’re not too keen on investing in a platform that you’re not sure would deliver results. So let’s take a look at some of the reasons why it’s worth it to spend your marketing dollars on Instagram influencer marketing. You’ll Reach a Massive Audience While Facebook still dominates social media usage, Instagram is the…

The post Why Spending $1,000 on Instagram Influencer Marketing is Worth It appeared first on The Daily Egg.

Continue reading – 

Why Spending $1,000 on Instagram Influencer Marketing is Worth It

The Crazy Egg A/B Test Planning Guide

A/B Testing, or “Split Testing” as it is also known, can be one of the most useful and powerful tools available for CRO, when used correctly. Without careful planning and analysis, however, the potential benefits of an A/B test may be outweighed by the combined impact of errors, noise and false assumptions. For these reasons, we created The Crazy Egg A/B Test Planning Guide. Our user-friendly guide provides a roadmap through the A/B test planning process. In addition, it serves as a convenient way to record and store your testing history for future review. What is an A/B Test? If…

The post The Crazy Egg A/B Test Planning Guide appeared first on The Daily Egg.

See original article here: 

The Crazy Egg A/B Test Planning Guide

How to Create More Actionable PPC Reports (That’ll Improve Your Landing Page Strategy, Too)

Once upon a time, “Pay-Per-Click (PPC)” referred to a digital marketing practice where companies were charged each time somebody clicked on their search engine ads.

But with the rise of social, display and programmatic platforms, PPC marketing has expanded to involve more than search engines alone. These days, PPC specialists run paid campaigns across a variety of channels, and while the territory has changed, the reporting tactics haven’t.

Why your PPC reports aren’t awesome

You’re not alone if you find that the following things are holding you back from the advanced PPC reporting of your dreams.

1. The same words are used for different things

Most PPC specialists still end up pulling the same reports about the same quantitative metrics from Google Analytics. The problem is that different platforms (Facebook Audience Insights, Google AdWords Dimensions tab, Google Analytics, Bing Reporting) speak different languages.

Each platform’s PPC attribution models are different, their user data tracking is different, even some of their definitions are different.

Just look at how we measure “clicks.” On Adwords or Bing, a “click” means someone clicked from an ad through to your website. Meanwhile on Facebook, a “click” could mean clicking from an ad through to your Facebook page, your website, or just reacting to the ad itself.

Cbc GIFs - Find & Share on GIPHY

With different platforms and tools telling you different things, it’s pretty easy to make inaccurate conclusions about your PPC performance.

2. Your reports rely purely on baseline metrics

Tactics and terminology aside, these quantitative metrics don’t paint the full qualitative picture. Seeing that your click-through rates have increased doesn’t necessarily explain why.

If you saw that the cost of bread went down one day, you wouldn’t blindly assume that production of wheat got cheaper overnight. You would look into the expiry date, the shelf date and examine the product to try to understand the story behind the numbers.

So what do your metrics actually mean, and how can they help you drive more qualified traffic to your site? We’re here to help you generate insights from your PPC reports and show you how PPC performance can impact your landing page strategy.

How to Build PPC Reports that Actually Are Awesome

You want your PPC reports to provide takeaways that you can use to optimize your campaigns. There are a few measures you can take, together or on their own, to better understand your campaign performance.

Determine a baseline and track conversions by channel

Surprise, surprise! A conversion is one more metric that differs by channel. This is partly because each platform has a different attribution model, and partly because users have different intentions and behaviours per platform.

For example, cost-per-clicks (CPCs) tend to be cheaper on Bing because there is less competition and a higher conversion rate due to an older demographic:

bing keywords example

On the other hand, it’s easier to max out impression share and budget on Bing because there is less overall search volume compared to Google:

Google keyword example

Similarly, a user landing on your website through a non-branded keyword is less likely to convert than someone clicking through a branded keyword. It can be even harder to identify intent through social platforms, as users scrolling through feeds may come across your ad and engage out of interest but not be ready to convert.

Establishing platform-specific KPIs is an essential step to ensure you know what success looks like on every channel.

Qualify your visitors and monitor by segment

Given that each individual user’s intention varies by platform, it’s important to target your ads where they will be best received.

Instead of assuming every interaction is equal, use your platform insights to identify key audience groups and segment for target personas.

Monitor how your paid traffic fluctuates overall and by target audiences:

  • How do your audiences convert differently across various platforms?
  • How do you measure success differently between your branded and non-branded search campaigns?
  • How are you targeting different user segments through social campaigns?

A great way to identify whether you’re attracting relevant traffic is by keeping a close eye on your Search Query Report in AdWords and Bing. This report allows you to see exactly what people typed into the search engine when your ad appeared, so that you can adjust your keywords accordingly.

Track absolutely everything

Are you noticing an abnormal bounce rate or reduced number of sessions week over week through a specific source or medium? Setting up event tracking through Google Tag Manager can help you better understand on-site behavior and create custom metrics.

Your primary conversion may be an e-commerce purchase, but that doesn’t mean newsletter sign ups aren’t valuable. Tracking micro-conversions can give you a clearer idea of how people are engaging with your site and where there might be gaps in information.

At our Call to Action conference, Dana DiTomaso advocated for Google Data Studio as a great way to combine all your data into custom reports and dashboards.

If you’re doing cross-channel online advertising (which you no doubt are), it’s important to be able to see all your metrics visualized in one place. It makes it easier to draw analyses and gather insights to then share with colleagues or clients.

PPC Reporting + Landing Pages = Even More Awesome

Of course, it’s not enough to just put your conversions and KPIs into a beautiful report — it’s what you do with your PPC insights that matters.

Let’s say you spent years learning how to make smart investments. You met with stockbrokers, studied the market and opened a brokerage account. Would you expect money to just start rolling in? Of course not — because you actually have to invest to see results.

Similarly, in order to make the most of your PPC insights, you have to act on them.

Begin by applying insights from your PPC metrics into your landing pages. You want to customize your landing pages to meet the needs of your key audiences so you can give users exactly what they’re looking for.

To this end, Dynamic Text Replacement (DTR) can be used to sync up search queries to the landing page.

In this example of a landing page for a music school, the instrument type is swapped out depending on which ad is clicked.

Say a website sells furniture. If one user searches for “modern leather sofas” and another for “comfortable leather couches,” the ad copy for each result should reflect the search language.

The ads could then take users to the same landing page, but DTR would generate different titles or subheading text accordingly to match these original search terms. Everything else on the page may be the same, but both users would feel like they found exactly what they were looking for. This keeps landing pages hyper-relevant (and high-converting), and saves hours of redundant work.

Want to preview how you can use DTR to ensure relevance from ad to landing page? Try it out.

Google cares about the relevance of landing pages to ads, and has recently introduced more in-depth Quality Score metrics within the AdWords interface.

This makes it easier to see exactly what is affecting your Quality Score and which area you should improve on, whether it be ad relevance, landing page experience or expected CTR.

By syncing up your ads and landing pages, you can provide a frictionless experience to users and increase conversions.

Strong landing pages can also improve PPC performance as they increase Quality Score and landing page relevance, which lowers your CPC and increases ad ranking. This way, the users receive information that is highly relevant to what they are searching for.

Now to put a now on it

When all is said and done, landing pages should be A/B tested so you know which on-page factors lead to higher conversion rates. That way, your next PPC campaign can be informed by your landing page results, and your future landing pages can be informed by your PPC campaign performance. If that’s not a beautiful full circle, then we don’t know what is.

Source article – 

How to Create More Actionable PPC Reports (That’ll Improve Your Landing Page Strategy, Too)

How to Improve Your PPC Reporting (And Your Landing Page Strategy, Too)

Once upon a time, “Pay-Per-Click (PPC)” referred to a digital marketing practice where companies were charged each time somebody clicked on their search engine ads.

But with the rise of social, display and programmatic platforms, PPC marketing has expanded to involve more than search engines alone. These days, PPC specialists run paid campaigns across a variety of channels, and while the territory has changed, the reporting tactics haven’t.

Why your PPC reports aren’t awesome

You’re not alone if you find that the following things are holding you back from the advanced PPC reporting of your dreams.

1. The same words are used for different things

Most PPC specialists still end up pulling the same reports about the same quantitative metrics from Google Analytics. The problem is that different platforms (Facebook Audience Insights, Google AdWords Dimensions tab, Google Analytics, Bing Reporting) speak different languages.

Each platform’s PPC attribution models are different, their user data tracking is different, even some of their definitions are different.

Just look at how we measure “clicks.” On Adwords or Bing, a “click” means someone clicked from an ad through to your website. Meanwhile on Facebook, a “click” could mean clicking from an ad through to your Facebook page, your website, or just reacting to the ad itself.

Cbc GIFs - Find & Share on GIPHY

With different platforms and tools telling you different things, it’s pretty easy to make inaccurate conclusions about your PPC performance.

2. Your reports rely purely on baseline metrics

Tactics and terminology aside, these quantitative metrics don’t paint the full qualitative picture. Seeing that your click-through rates have increased doesn’t necessarily explain why.

If you saw that the cost of bread went down one day, you wouldn’t blindly assume that production of wheat got cheaper overnight. You would look into the expiry date, the shelf date and examine the product to try to understand the story behind the numbers.

So what do your metrics actually mean, and how can they help you drive more qualified traffic to your site? We’re here to help you generate insights from your PPC reports and show you how PPC performance can impact your landing page strategy.

How to Build PPC Reports that Actually Are Awesome

You want your PPC reports to provide takeaways that you can use to optimize your campaigns. There are a few measures you can take, together or on their own, to better understand your campaign performance.

Determine a baseline and track conversions by channel

Surprise, surprise! A conversion is one more metric that differs by channel. This is partly because each platform has a different attribution model, and partly because users have different intentions and behaviours per platform.

For example, cost-per-clicks (CPCs) tend to be cheaper on Bing because there is less competition and a higher conversion rate due to an older demographic:

bing keywords example

On the other hand, it’s easier to max out impression share and budget on Bing because there is less overall search volume compared to Google:

Google keyword example

Similarly, a user landing on your website through a non-branded keyword is less likely to convert than someone clicking through a branded keyword. It can be even harder to identify intent through social platforms, as users scrolling through feeds may come across your ad and engage out of interest but not be ready to convert.

Establishing platform-specific KPIs is an essential step to ensure you know what success looks like on every channel.

Qualify your visitors and monitor by segment

Given that each individual user’s intention varies by platform, it’s important to target your ads where they will be best received.

Instead of assuming every interaction is equal, use your platform insights to identify key audience groups and segment for target personas.

Monitor how your paid traffic fluctuates overall and by target audiences:

  • How do your audiences convert differently across various platforms?
  • How do you measure success differently between your branded and non-branded search campaigns?
  • How are you targeting different user segments through social campaigns?

A great way to identify whether you’re attracting relevant traffic is by keeping a close eye on your Search Query Report in AdWords and Bing. This report allows you to see exactly what people typed into the search engine when your ad appeared, so that you can adjust your keywords accordingly.

Track absolutely everything

Are you noticing an abnormal bounce rate or reduced number of sessions week over week through a specific source or medium? Setting up event tracking through Google Tag Manager can help you better understand on-site behavior and create custom metrics.

Your primary conversion may be an e-commerce purchase, but that doesn’t mean newsletter sign ups aren’t valuable. Tracking micro-conversions can give you a clearer idea of how people are engaging with your site and where there might be gaps in information.

At our Call to Action conference, Dana DiTomaso advocated for Google Data Studio as a great way to combine all your data into custom reports and dashboards.

If you’re doing cross-channel online advertising (which you no doubt are), it’s important to be able to see all your metrics visualized in one place. It makes it easier to draw analyses and gather insights to then share with colleagues or clients.

PPC Reporting + Landing Pages = Even More Awesome

Of course, it’s not enough to just put your conversions and KPIs into a beautiful report — it’s what you do with your PPC insights that matters.

Let’s say you spent years learning how to make smart investments. You met with stockbrokers, studied the market and opened a brokerage account. Would you expect money to just start rolling in? Of course not — because you actually have to invest to see results.

Similarly, in order to make the most of your PPC insights, you have to act on them.

Begin by applying insights from your PPC metrics into your landing pages. You want to customize your landing pages to meet the needs of your key audiences so you can give users exactly what they’re looking for.

To this end, Dynamic Text Replacement (DTR) can be used to sync up search queries to the landing page.

In this example of a landing page for a music school, the instrument type is swapped out depending on which ad is clicked.

Say a website sells furniture. If one user searches for “modern leather sofas” and another for “comfortable leather couches,” the ad copy for each result should reflect the search language.

The ads could then take users to the same landing page, but DTR would generate different titles or subheading text accordingly to match these original search terms. Everything else on the page may be the same, but both users would feel like they found exactly what they were looking for. This keeps landing pages hyper-relevant (and high-converting), and saves hours of redundant work.

Want to preview how you can use DTR to ensure relevance from ad to landing page? Try it out.

Google cares about the relevance of landing pages to ads, and has recently introduced more in-depth Quality Score metrics within the AdWords interface.

This makes it easier to see exactly what is affecting your Quality Score and which area you should improve on, whether it be ad relevance, landing page experience or expected CTR.

By syncing up your ads and landing pages, you can provide a frictionless experience to users and increase conversions.

Strong landing pages can also improve PPC performance as they increase Quality Score and landing page relevance, which lowers your CPC and increases ad ranking. This way, the users receive information that is highly relevant to what they are searching for.

Now to put a now on it

When all is said and done, landing pages should be A/B tested so you know which on-page factors lead to higher conversion rates. That way, your next PPC campaign can be informed by your landing page results, and your future landing pages can be informed by your PPC campaign performance. If that’s not a beautiful full circle, then we don’t know what is.

Continued:

How to Improve Your PPC Reporting (And Your Landing Page Strategy, Too)

Playing With Color: Vibrant Options For Apps And Websites

(This is a sponsored post). Color is one of the most powerful tools in a designer’s toolkit. Color can draw attention, set a mood, and influence the user’s emotion, perception and actions. When it comes to the web and mobile app design, this is definitely a time of vibrant colors. Designers use vibrant colors to focus people’s attention on important elements and to make their designs memorable.
In this article, I’ll summarize a few popular techniques of using vibrant colors in web and mobile design.

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Playing With Color: Vibrant Options For Apps And Websites