Tag Archives: goals

15 Steps to Create a Successful Event Marketing Campaign

event marketing

We know what events are. We know what marketing is. But when these two words come together, the whole becomes greater than the sum of its parts. Event marketing is a versatile and impactful marketing channel that is increasingly becoming more critical across various industries. According to Forrester Research, events make up 24% of the average CMO’s B2B marketing budget. This trend seems to be growing, with projections showing that 3.2 million global professional events will be taking place annually by 2020. Statistics like these should come as no surprise. In a digital age where consumers are inundated with multiple…

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15 Steps to Create a Successful Event Marketing Campaign

In a Pinch? Here Are 4 Fast Acting Tactics to Meet Your Growth Goals Every Month

hit your goals

Want to make sure you never miss a monthly growth goal? Perhaps you need a boost right now to get the month moving in the right direction? Then, you’ve come to the right place. Big companies like Facebook and HubSpot have lofty growth goals and continue to meet them every month. But, exactly how do they do it? Planning of course. That is, planning ahead consistently to meet their goals and then planning for the occasional situation when they need to scrape together their resources and make ends meet. I call this having an ace in the hole. This is…

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In a Pinch? Here Are 4 Fast Acting Tactics to Meet Your Growth Goals Every Month

Cut Through the Confusion in Google Analytics By Looking At These 12 Numbers Only

google analytics 12 metrics

Google Analytics is one of the best platforms for tracking almost any metric you can think of. And it’s completely free. That’s why marketers and even seven-figure companies all over the world use it. However, because it’s free, there are a few tradeoffs you have to make. One of those tradeoffs? You have to give up some user friendliness for affordability. Make no mistake: Google Analytics can go super deep. You can use it for some advanced applications, like finding out where users are abandoning the shopping cart. But if you’ve ever looked at Google Analytics before, you may have…

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Cut Through the Confusion in Google Analytics By Looking At These 12 Numbers Only

[Gifographic] Better Website Testing – A Simple Guide to Knowing What to Test

Note: This marketing infographic is part of KlientBoost’s 25-part series. You can subscribe here to access the entire series of gifographics.


If you’ve ever tested your website, you’ve probably been in the unfortunate situation of running out of ideas on what to test.

But don’t worry – it happens to everybody.

That’s of course, unless you have a website testing plan.

That’s why KlientBoost has teamed up with VWO to bring to you a gifographic that provides a simple guide on knowing the what, how, and why when it comes to testing your website.

21-vwo-website-testing2

Setting Your Testing Goals

Like a New Year’s resolution around getting fitter, if you don’t have any goals tied to your website testing plan, then you may be doing plenty of work, with little results to show.

With your goals in place, you can focus on the website tests that will help you achieve those goals –the fastest.

Testing a button color on your home page when you should be testing your checkout process, is a sure sign that you are heading to testing fatigue or the disappointment of never wanting to run a test again.

But let’s take it one step further.

While it’s easy to improve click-through rates, or CTRs, and conversion rates, the true measure of a great website testing plan comes from its ability to increase revenue.

No optimization efforts matter if they don’t connect to increased revenue in some shape or form.

Whether you improve the site user experience, your website’s onboarding process, or get more conversions from your upsell thank you page, all those improvements compound into incremental revenue gains.

Lesson to be learned?

Don’t pop the cork on the champagne until you know that an improvement in the CTRs or conversion rates would also lead to increased revenue.

Start closest to the money when it comes to your A/B tests.

Knowing What to Test

When you know your goals, the next step is to figure out what to test.

You have two options here:

  1. Look at quantitative data like Google Analytics that show where your conversion bottlenecks may be.
  2. Or gather qualitative data with visitor behavior analysis where your visitors can tell you the reasons for why they’re not converting.

Both types of data should fall under your conversion research umbrella. In addition to this gifographic, we created another one, all around the topic of CRO research.

When you’ve done your research, you may find certain aspects of a page that you’d like to test. For inspiration, VWO has created The Complete Guide To A/B Testing – and in it, you’ll find some ideas to test once you’ve identified which page to test:

  • Headlines
  • Subheads
  • Paragraph Text
  • Testimonials
  • Call-to-Action text
  • Call-to-Action button
  • Links
  • Images
  • Content near the fold
  • Social proof
  • Media mentions
  • Awards and badges

As you can see, there are tons of opportunities and endless ideas to test when you decide what to test and in what order.

website-testing
A quick visual for what’s possible

So now that you know your testing goals and what to test, the last step is forming a hypothesis.

With your hypothesis, you’re able to figure out what you think will have the biggest performance lift with the thought of effort in mind as well (easier to get quicker wins that don’t need heaps of development help).

Running an A/B Test

Alright, so you have your goals, list of things to test, and hypotheses to back these up, the next task now is to start testing.

With A/B testing, you’ll always have at least one variant running against your control.

In this case, your control is your actual website as it is now and your variant is the thing you’re testing.

With proper analytics and conversion tracking along with the goal in place, you can start seeing how each of these two variants (hence the name A/B) is doing.

a_b-testing
Consider this a mock-up of your conversion rate variations

When A/B testing, there are two things you may want to consider before you call winners or losers of a test.

One is statistical significance. Statistical significance gives you the thumbs up or thumbs down around whether your test results can be tied to a random chance. If a test is statistically significant, then the chances of the results are ruled out.

And VWO has created its own calculator so that you can see how your test is doing.

The second one is confidence level. It helps you decide whether you can replicate the results of your test again and again.

A confidence level of 95% tells you that your test will achieve the same results 95% of the time if you run it repeatedly. So, as you can tell, the higher your confidence level, the surer you can be that your test truly won or lost.

You can see the A/B test that increased revenue for Server Density by 114%.

Multivariate Testing for Combination of Variations

Let’s say you have multiple ideas to test, and your testing list is looking way too long.

Wouldn’t it be cool if you could test multiple aspects of your page at once to get faster results?

That’s exactly what multivariate testing is.

Multivariate testing allows you to test which combinations of different page elements affect each other when it comes to CTRs, conversion rates, or revenue gains.
Look at the multivariate pizza example below:

multivariate-testing-example
Different headlines, CTAs, and colors are used

The recipe for multivariate testing is simple and delicious.

multivariate-testing-formula
Different elements increase the combination size

And the best part is that VWO can automatically run through all the different combinations you set so that your multivariate test can be done without the heavy lifting.

If you’re curious about whether you should A/B test or run multivariate tests, then look at this chart that VWO created:

multivariate-testing-software-visual-website-optimizer
Which one makes the most sense for you?

Split URL Testing for Heavier Variations

If you find that your A/B or multivariate tests lead you to the end of the rainbow that shows bigger initiatives in backend development or major design changes are needed, then you’re going to love split URL testing.

As VWO states:

“If your variation is on a different address or has major design changes compared to control, we’d recommend that you create a Split URL Test.”

what-is-split-testing-explained-by-vwo

Split URL testing allows you to host different variations of your website test without changing the actual URL.

As the visual shows above, you can see that the two different variations are set up in a way that the URL is different as well.

URL testing is great when you want to test some major redesigns such as your entire website built from scratch.

By not changing your current website code, you can host the redesign on a different URL and have VWO split the traffic between the control and the variant—giving you clear insight whether your redesign will perform better.

Over to You

Now that you have a clear understanding on different types of website tests to run, the only thing left is to, well, run some tests.

Armored with quantitative and qualitative knowledge of your visitors, focus on the areas that have the biggest and quickest impact to strengthen your business.

And I promise, when you finish your first successful website test, you’ll get hooked on.

I know I was.

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The post [Gifographic] Better Website Testing – A Simple Guide to Knowing What to Test appeared first on VWO Blog.

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[Gifographic] Better Website Testing – A Simple Guide to Knowing What to Test

A 4-Fold Approach to Increasing Conversion Rate on your Website

The problem with a traffic graph that’s going upward is that it’s not determinant of the number of customers. You can keep investing in traffic acquisition strategies until the cows come home, but that won’t yield any tangible results if you don’t optimize your website for conversions.

But how do you go about adopting conversion optimization and increasing conversion on your website?

A formalized conversion optimization program works like this:

  1. Researching into the existing data and finding gaps in the conversion funnel
  2. Planning and developing testable hypotheses
  3. Creating test variations and executing those tests
  4. Analyzing the tests and using the analysis in subsequent tests

In this post, we are going to run you through the ways to increase conversion rate through this scientific process:

Fold 1 – Digging Deep into Research

Research is needed to figure out your current situation and which among the existing processes need to be changed, or completely removed. Here are some steps that you can start with.

  • Finding the Current Conversion Funnel and Leaks
  • Performing Qualitative and Quantitative Data Analysis
  • Setting Goals that Prioritize ROI

Find the Current Conversion Funnel and Leaks

First and foremost, it is imperative to take stock of your current performance and workflows. You can apply an as-is analysis to gather insights on the current conversion rates, user’s journey, and the leaks in the conversion funnel.

Begin with the mapping of your company’s conversion funnel. You can visualize specific sequences in which users are becoming paying customers. This process will help you create a blueprint of how “strangers” can be turned into “promoters.”

Build Customer Journey to Increase Conversion Rate
Source

Peep Laja, conversion optimization expert and founder at ConversionXL has put together a step-by-step guide to creating user flows that are truly consumer-oriented.

In addition to identifying user flows, it is also important to study whether these are working. Are you experiencing churn in an area where you don’t expect to see it? Are you noticing less churn than you originally expected? Is your conversion funnel measuring the full customer journey or is it potentially missing a step?

Eric Fettman, developer of GoogleAnalyticsTest.com, a free resource for Google Analytics training and GA Individual Qualification preparation, makes some interesting observations on conversion funnels and customer journey:

  • Funnels help you visualize the process by providing a step-by-step breakup of the conversion data and churn.
  • User flow analysis helps your company understand points of customer confusion, and refine web copy and product positioning that affect your customer behavior. This analysis also highlights any “bugs” in the sequence that you may not have previously caught.

Perform Qualitative and Quantitative Data Analysis

After finding the workflow and gaps, the next step is to dive deeper into their causes. You can do this by researching on the What, How, and Why or what is often called the Simon Sinek’s golden circle:

Research to Increase Conversion Rate
Source
  • WHAT are users doing on your website
    This includes quantitative analysis of the amount of traffic landing, dropping off or converting from different pages of your website. You can use tools like Google Analytics (GA) for this purpose.
  • HOW are they behaving
    Now that you know a certain number of people are landing on your website, it’d next be useful to know what they are doing there. For instance, if they’re clicking a link or CTA, scrolling down, filling a form, or the like. Various visitor behavior analysis tools like heatmaps, visitor recordings, and form analysis can help achieve this.
  • WHY are they behaving that way
    You can also find out why your users are performing the way they are by qualitative on-page surveys and heuristic analysis.

Set Goals that Prioritize ROI

After peeking into the gaps with your conversion strategy, you should set clear goals for optimization.

It is important to arrive at a quantified expected conversion rate because that gives your testing efforts a direction. Otherwise, you might end up improving the conversion rate on a page by 1% and sit cozy without realizing its actual potential.

You can use benchmarking studies to decide the improvement you can expect through the proposed change. MarketingSherpa defines the following benchmarks for conversion rate optimization:

Conversion Rate Benchmarking

You should find the main goals of your business, based on the current strategy. What are you focused on now? Is it the total users acquired, is it the number of photos uploaded, or is it the revenue generated?

Whatever it is, you want to focus on something that’s neither too soft (“increase brand recognition”) nor too tactical (“increase page views per session”).

Fold 2 – Planning your A/B Tests

Based on this research, you should next plan your A/B tests to increase your conversion rate.

By now, you should have received enough insights to make an educated guess about what changes to your pages or funnel can bring about a desired change.

Construct a Strong Hypothesis

A structured hypothesis paves the direction for your optimization efforts. Even if the hypothesis fails, you can retrace your steps and correct it wherever it went wrong. Without this structured process, optimization efforts may go astray and lose their purpose.

At its core, a hypothesis is a statement that consists of three parts:

You believe that if we [make a change], we expect [a desirable result] because of [corresponding research].

Here’s an example of a good hypothesis.

I believe moving trust signals closer to the billing form will result in 5% more checkouts because the 56% bounce rate from that page could be due to lack of confidence.

For more information, read this post on building strong testing hypotheses.

Prioritize Your Hypotheses

After you have a list of testing hypotheses, the next step is to zero in on the hypothesis to test first. Here is a list of prioritization frameworks such as:

For detailed knowledge, you can read the post on prioritizing A/B testing hypotheses.

Fold 3 – Executing A/B Tests to Increase Conversion Rate

After the planning, it’s time for application. The plan that you’ve charted to optimize your business process needs to be deployed.

Which Type of Test to Run

A/B, Split, and Multivariate are not different alternatives to do a task. These are methods to do different tasks, so choosing any of these should depend entirely on the task at hand.

Split testing (or split URL testing) is used when:

  • Design needs major changes to the original page such that creating a separate page (housed on a different URL) is easier.
  • Back-end changes are necessary.
  • Pages to be tested already exist on different URLs.

Multivariate testing is used when multiple changes are proposed for a single page and you want to test each combination of these changes.

You should opt for an A/B test when the variations are few and not distinct.

How Long Should You Run the Test

You also need to decide the test duration before you start running the test.

The test duration is dependent on the number of visitors your website receives and the expected conversion rate you are looking for. You can use this free test duration calculator to find the duration you should run your tests for.

After you’re clear on these, you can begin creating variations and start running your tests.

Fold 4 – Analyzing Test Results

To conclude, you should also be able to check and analyze test results. This will arm you with information that you can not only apply to the current pages but also use as future learning.

No matter what the result—positive, negative, or inconclusive—it is imperative to delve deeper and gather insights.

When you are analyzing A/B test results, check if you are looking for the correct metric. If multiple metrics (secondary metrics along with the primary) are involved, you need to analyze all of them individually.

You should also create different segments from your A/B tests and analyze them separately to get a clear picture. The results you derive from generic, non-segmented testing will may lead to skewed actions.

Look at how experts derive insights from A/B Test results in this post.

Your Thoughts

How do you increase conversion rate on your website? Write to us in the comments below.

cta2

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A 4-Fold Approach to Increasing Conversion Rate on your Website

Rand Fishkin’s 5 Simple Experiments for Improving SEO Health

Improve your site's SEO health
Content not ranking on Google? Nurse it back to SEO health with Rand’s five experiments. Image via Shutterstock.

What do you do to get fit, lose weight or improve your overall health? You snack on fewer candies and munch a few more salads. Maybe even hit the gym. Then you cross your fingers and hope to reap the fruits of your labor.

Us marketers tend to adopt a similar approach when working towards our goals. When we want to optimize our content for search, we may “stuff in a few keywords” and “add some internal and external links” to our website.

Somewhere down the line, we expect to see our website creep up in Google. It may… but it may not. And with all the time we spend crafting thoughtful content to drive our business objectives, what’s the point if NO ONE FINDS IT?

The reality is that we — fitness fanatics, marketers, hell, human beings —  assume we know what work is required to achieve our goals. But how can we be sure to get the results we want when our actions are based on what we think works rather than what we know works?

According to Rand Fishkin, co-founder of Inbound.org and self-proclaimed “Wizard of Moz,” the key to achieving results is to run experiments, track our work (not just our progress) and find out what helps get the results we want. And of course, reiterate on the work that brings success.

During his talk at the Call to Action Conference, Rand walked us through five simple SEO experiments that can help us measure the input that creates our desired results. And lucky for you, we walk you through each one below.

So, are you ready to improve your SEO health? On your marks, get set, GO!

Experiment 1: Bolster internal linking

SEO marketers from far and wide recognize that linking to various pages on your website can help improve your Google ranking. Someone lands on your website and will happily delve deeper and deeper through a clever web of internal links, all the while boosting your website’s credibility. Good times… right?

Well, it depends. We can’t just assume that stuffing our webpages willy nilly with internal links will push us up the ranks — even if it seemed to work a dream for someone else. We need to experiment to find out if and how internal linking affects our Google ranking.

Step 1. Choose the webpage you want to rank higher for (a.k.a. your target page). This may be an important page that currently isn’t ranking well. In Rand’s case, he wants his “Keyword research tool” page to rank higher.

Step 2. Decide which term(s) you want your target page to rank for in Google. Then bring up the pages on your website that Google considers to be the most important for this search term by searching in Google for [the term you want your target page to rank for] + [:] + [website name]. As per Rand’s example, he wants his target page to rank for “keyword research tool”. So he would run a search for [keyword research tool] + [:] + [moz.com]”, as per:

Slide from Rand Fishkin’s CTA Conf talk. Click for full size.

Step 3. Find out if you’ve already linked to the target page in these pages. If not, add a link:

Slide from Rand Fishkin’s CTA Conf talk. Click for full size.

Step 4. After a predefined amount of time (e.g., two weeks, one month, etc.), track the outcome. Did the target page’s rank drop, improve or stay the same?

If the specific action of adding internal links to your target page positively affects the page’s ranking, repeat the action to boost your other website pages.

Rand’s buddy Shaun Anderson from Hobo Web carried out this experiment over a month. Check out his results:

Slide from Rand Fishkin’s CTA Conf talk. Click for full size.

Just 10 days after he added internal links to his target page, the page shot up the rankings. And when he removed the links later on, it shot back down again.

Experiment 2: Create new content targeting long-tail keywords

Long-tail keywords are the new(ish) kid on the SEO block. They’re keywords of at least three words and are more specific than your regular keyword. Think “soccer boots for kids” rather than a simple “soccer boots”. They’ve also been proven to drive more qualified traffic to websites and therefore increase that all-important conversion rate.

You may have already started optimizing your webpages with these babies (brownie points to you). But it’s now time to start testing out their impact to see if they’re really improving your page rankings.

Step 1. Type in a keyword phrase you want to rank for into a keyword research tool such as Moz’s Keyword Explorer, Uber Suggest or Google Keyword Planner (you’ll need to set up a free account for the latter).

Step 2. Once the results are up, identify long-tail keywords that have low volume, low difficulty and high opportunity. You’re looking for a volume and difficulty level of anything less than around 30, and an opportunity level of 80+. In Rand’s example, “geek gadgets for her” and “cool unique electronic gifts” are good options.

Slide from Rand Fishkin’s CTA Conf talk. Click for full size.

Step 3. Create and publish helpful content that targets your chosen long-tail keywords. Use the keywords in the page headline and make sure your content directly relates to the keywords.

Step 4. Track the outcome over time. Hopefully, a couple of weeks or months down the line, you will see a result as good as this one:

long-tail2
Slide from Rand Fishkin’s CTA Conf talk. Click for full size.

Experiment 3: Turn mentions into links

If you’re doing good business, people are likely to be saying good things about your brand on the web. If these mentions don’t link to your website, you’re missing out on a prime backlinking opportunity, which can help boost your website’s SEO. Let’s see how you can turn simple brand chatter into into fuel for your search engine ranking.

Use Google’s date query ranges to research mentions of your company, brand or product on the web. (You could also invest in a tool like Mention, talkwalker or Moz’s Fresh Web Explorer to receive mention alerts.)

Step 1. In the Google search bar, enter the search terms you want to find mentions for. In his example, Rand searched for “keyword explorer moz”.

mentions1
Slide from Rand Fishkin’s CTA Conf talk. Click for full size.

Step 2. Next, tell Google how far back you want to search. Either select the date range from the drop down list (shown above), or manually enter the number of days by simply replacing the last number at the end of the URL:

mentions2
Slide from Rand Fishkin’s CTA Conf talk. Click for full size.

Step 3. In the pages that Google pulls up, look for keyword mentions that don’t link back to your website:

mentions3
Slide from Rand Fishkin’s CTA Conf talk. Click for full size.

Step 4. This next step requires a bit more creativity. To get that keyword backlinking to your site, you’ll need to contact the mentioner. You could email them or reach out to them on social media and ask them to link back to your website from these pages.

mentions4

Step 5. Once that backlink has been in place for a few weeks, have a look at your webpage’s ranking. Has it changed?

Experiment 4: Test new titles and headlines

Title element testing has shown to be a rather effective way to optimize web content for clicks. It’s definitely worth experimenting with these short but important nuggets of text. They can be the difference between a user clicking on a webpage or skimming past it, uninterested.

Step 1. Identify the pages of your website that use the templated language for titles and headlines, for example:

titles2
Slide from Rand Fishkin’s CTA Conf talk. Click for full size.

Step 2. It’s time to find out: Are people searching for the keywords in the headlines of these pages? Or are there more popular keywords you could use? Use a keyword planner tool to find the most commonly searched keywords related to your page topic.

titles3
Slide from Rand Fishkin’s CTA Conf talk. Click for full size.

Step 3. Update the pages in question with your new, more popular keywords.

Step 4. Analyse any changes after a predefined amount of time.

UK-based online marketing agency Distilled did this for their client concerthotels.com. They changed the title and H1 used across a bulk of webpages from:

Title: <<Location>> Hotels, NY | ConcertHotels.com

H1: <<Location>> Hotels

to:

Title: Hotels near <<Location>> Rochester, NY | ConcertHotels.com

H1: Hotels near <<Location>>

As the graph below shows us, they reaped some seriously impressive results:

titles1
Slide from Rand Fishkin’s CTA Conf talk. Click for full size.

Experiment 5:  Add related keywords to your pages

Think you can rank well for a keyword without any related keywords on the same page? Don’t underestimate the power of context, especially when dealing with Google. When you talk about SEO on your website, Google expects you to mention search engines, ranking, keywords, etc. Try adding some related keywords to your content and the search engine big dog may well thank you by upping your webpage’s ranking.

Step 1. Choose the webpage you want to optimize. Identify what the page is about and decide on the most fitting keyword.

Step 2. Find terms that Google associates with this keyword. Use a tool like nTopic or Moz’s related topics tool to get a list of related keywords.

relatedkeywords
Slide from Rand Fishkin’s CTA Conf talk. Click for full size.

Step 3. Work these new keywords into your webpage’s content, making sure that they sound natural when you read over the text.

Step 4. As always, make sure you measure your results! Has your webpage climbed the rankings after a few weeks or months?

Conclusion

No-one would deny that classic analytics — analyzing the results of our actions — is totally essential for tracking marketing progress. But when it comes to understanding which marketing actions work, we need a different approach.

We simply must stop assuming we know what work will help us achieve our goals. By not only measuring the results, but also experimenting and measuring the actions that you take, you can figure out exactly what you need to do to move the SEO needle, time and time again.

Follow this link – 

Rand Fishkin’s 5 Simple Experiments for Improving SEO Health

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What does Evolutionary Site Redesign in action look like? Like this.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

TL;DR: After 7 months of testing with weBoost, an electronics manufacturer, their website looks radically different and the company has seen an over 100% lift in their year-over-year conversion rate. This is evolutionary site redesign (ESR) at work. Read the full case study here.

The company

weBoost homepage
The hero section from weBoost’s (current) homepage.

Our partnership with weBoost began in the summer of 2015. weBoost is an ecommerce retailer and manufacturer of cellular signal boosters. These boosters provide stronger, more reliable cellular signals while simultaneously enhancing the user’s ability to receive and transmit data.

The goals

Beyond the goal of simply increasing ecommerce sales, the weBoost team was looking to fuel their entire marketing program. In order to do that, weBoost executives were also hoping to gain customer insights through WiderFunnel’s proven conversion optimization process: the Infinity Optimization Process™.

At the outset, there were several questions that weBoost was looking to answer through a partnership with WiderFunnel:

  1. What kind of information do we need to provide about our products in order to make the sale?
  2. Are our customers well-informed for the most part, or do they need more technical, descriptive details about our products?
  3. What user flow results in the best conversion rate?
  4. How can we learn about our customers to fuel marketing efforts across the company?

The results

After 7 months of testing, the weBoost website looks dramatically different and the company has seen a lift of over 100% in their year-over-year conversion rate.

The insights achieved along the way have allowed weBoost to broaden their further up-funnel programs as well as boost e-commerce sales. The benefit of conversion optimization, then, is not just about direct sales, but increased brand awareness and overall growth.

And this is only the beginning.

Mike St Laurent

The testing we’ve done with weBoost is a perfect example of evolutionary website redesign (ESR). Their website looks radically different than it did when our partnership began, and it’s converting at a much better rate.

Michael St Laurent, Optimization Strategist, WiderFunnel

How did we do it?

In this case study, you’ll read about several tests we’ve run on 3 key areas of the weBoost site: the homepage, the product category page, and the product detail page. We have been able to redesign the entire website iteratively, based on statistically significant wins on each of these pages: this is evolutionary site redesign in action.

ESR works by implementing a system of continuous A/B split testing throughout an entire website and digital marketing. Rather than relying on gut feeling and flawed intuition, website decisions are made against the crucible of customer actions.

Check out the full case study for the specifics:

  • A shortened weBoost homepage sees huge success
  • A well-intentioned layout change on the category page goes south
  • A stronger scent trail on the product detail page leads to a 27% increase in completed orders

…and more!

Jamie Elgie

WiderFunnel delivers Wilson Electronics [weBoost] a cadence and quality of A/B testing that is game-changing for our brand. Direct sales increases are enabling us to increase our spend on other advertising because of the known performance return. That in turn is driving our overall brand awareness. Put simply, WiderFunnel does not just help us sell directly; it is rocket fuel for our entire cross-channel marketing program.

– Jamie Elgie, Chief Marketing Officer, weBoost

Read the full case study here

Learn more about how the weBoost website underwent a dramatic transformation through evolutionary site redesign (and how it’s now converting at a much better rate). Read the full case study here.

The post What does Evolutionary Site Redesign in action look like? Like this. appeared first on WiderFunnel Conversion Optimization.

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What does Evolutionary Site Redesign in action look like? Like this.

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Measuring an Inbound Campaign through the Conversion Funnel

If you thought measuring the success of your inbound campaign is a tedious job, well don’t worry, you are not alone. According to a study conducted by Hubspot, 25% of marketing professionals admitted to ‘proving ROI’ as the biggest challenge they face.

Inbound marketing challenges

For measuring success, it is important to understand that the effectiveness of an inbound campaign is the collective result of various activities. Let’s have a look at how we can evaluate the success of an inbound campaign across various stages of the conversion funnel.

Inbound Funnel

Measuring the Inbound Campaign at Top of the Funnel (ToFU)

The primary objective of your activities at ToFU is to attract a greater share of the target market. Hence, all metrics at this stage must focus on what percentage of the audience are you reaching out to. Here’s a list of what you should measure:

  • Growth in Traffic
    You know your inbound campaign is doing well if the number of visitors to your website increases during the campaign period. A simple way to keep track of this is through Google Analytics. Follow this path in Google Analytics to see the growth in your visitor traffic: Reporting -> Audience -> OverviewWebsite traffic

    Another important factor you should keep in mind while analyzing website traffic is the percentage of new vs returning visitors. Repeat visitors indicate visitor loyalty to your website. A low rate of repeat visitors means that your inbound campaign does not offer long term benefit to users.

    Visitor comparison

    In order to keep activities in line with the objectives, you must focus on maintaining a higher percentage of new visitors at ToFU. You can focus on generating greater visitor loyalty during later stages of the funnel.

  • Sources of Traffic
    Besides growth in traffic, you must also keep in mind where your visitors are coming from. Analyzing traffic sources tells if your SEO efforts are bringing fruit. A good chunk of organic traffic is indicative of well performing keywords. On the other hand, referral traffic helps you gauge the effectiveness of your link-building efforts. You should keep an eye on the ‘referring urls’ to develop a greater understanding of the sources of traffic. Follow this path in Google Analytics to have a look at the referral traffic on your website: Reporting -> Audience -> Overview -> Referral TrafficReferral traffic
  • Social Reach
    The most popular metric to track for social performance is the wide reach of your social channels. These can be easily assessed by tracking the number of ‘likes’ on your Facebook page, number of ‘followers’ on Twitter or LinkedIn. However, these numbers in absolute terms do not make much sense for measuring success. So instead of simply looking at the number of ‘likes’ on your Facebook page, try and analyse how these ‘likes’ have grown over a period of time. Have your likes seen a sudden upward trend during a certain campaign? A comparison of growth trends will help you understand performance in a better way. Follow this path on your Facebook page to view the ‘likes’ trend for your page: See Insights -> Likes -> Net Likes

    Social reach

    You can go through this article for tips on how you can drive your social leads through the sales funnel.

  • Blog Views and Social Shares
    Analyzing individual blog posts helps you differentiate between a good post and a bad one. By continuously monitoring the views and shares of individual posts over a period of time, you will be able to identify patterns so as decide what kind of posts work best for you. Keep in mind that a highly viewed post might not result in good engagement (comments) and shares. Have a look at how our post on ‘Snackable Content’ gathered popularity on various social channels.

    Blog shares

  • Email Click Through Rate
    CTR is the most important metric of analysing e-mail marketing campaigns. A high CTR indicates that your message is clear and relevant for the target audience. However, the ideal CTR varies from one type of message to another. For example, newsletter e-mails sent to an opt-in list would have a higher CTR than a promotional message sent to the same set of customers. Hence you should define the target CTR for each form of e-mail and try achieving that for each campaign.

    Email metrics

Measuring the Inbound Campaign at Middle of the Funnel (MoFU)

Once you have attracted a large chunk of your target audience towards your offering, the next important step is to keep the audience hooked to your offer until they make the final decision to buy. Here’s what you should do to analyse whether your inbound campaign is going to help generate qualified leads or not:

  • Social Engagement
    Analyse your social media properties to see if your audience is engaging with you or not. Facebook provides its users with a ‘Talking About This’ score which measures the level of engagement on your page.

    Facebook page engagement

    In addition, you can also measure the engagement on individual messages on your Facebook page using Facebook insights. Follow this path to view the post wise engagement on your Facebook page: See Insights -> Posts -> All Published Posts

    Social engagement on Facebook

  • Lead Generation and Conversion
    Conversion rates need to be tracked for various channels of your inbound campaign. At a broad level, you must link all your campaigns to a pre-defined goal (based on your conversion objective) and see which inbound campaign is performing the best according to your goals. Follow this path in Google Analytics to see the goal conversion rate for your campaigns: Reporting -> Acquisition -> Campaigns -> Conversions (All Goals)

    Goal conversion

    If you are using your blog as an inbound channel, the call-to-action (CTA) on your blog becomes an important metric to measure success. The CTA helps drive viewers of your blog to take the required action.

    Blog CTA

  • Visitor to lead ratio
    Attracting visitors from a channel is of no use unless these visitors are taking the required action on your landing page. The visitor to lead ratio is defined as the percentage of visitor who converted to a lead. You can calculate this percentage for all you inbound channels and thus analyse which one is giving the best results.Visitor to lead Conversion = Leads Generated / Total Visitors
  • Bounce Rate and Time on Page
    You can measure the level of engagement on your blog by tracking the average time spent on the blog and the bounce rate. A high bounce rate indicates that your are not attracting the right kind of audience to your blog.

    Bounce rate

All said and done, we would all agree that measuring the performance of your inbound campaign is probably as important as executing it in the first place. The key to success lies in finding out the best way to do it. ‘Coz if you don’t measure it, you will never be able to say that it works! Have you defined measurement criterion for your inbound campaign? Do share your insights with us.

Image Credits
Impulse Creative

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Measuring an Inbound Campaign through the Conversion Funnel