Tag Archives: graphic

Universal Principles Of User Experience Design

(This is a sponsored article.) As designers working in an ever-changing field, it’s important that we develop an understanding of the timeless design principles that underpin everything we do. In the second article in my series for Adobe XD, I’ll explore the foundations that enable us to establish some universal principles of UX.
These principles, which should sit at the heart of everything we design and build, are critical and will stand the test of time:

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Universal Principles Of User Experience Design

Quick Wins For Improving Performance And Security Of Your Website

When it comes to building and maintaining a website, one has to take a ton of things into consideration. However, in an era when people want to see results fast, while at the same time knowing that their information online is secure, all webmasters should strive for a) improving the performance of their website, and b) increasing their website’s security.

Quick Wins For Improving Performance And Security Of Your Website

Both of these goals are vital in order to run a successful website. So, we’ve put together a list of five technologies you should consider implementing to improve both the performance and security of your website.

The post Quick Wins For Improving Performance And Security Of Your Website appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Quick Wins For Improving Performance And Security Of Your Website

Building Inclusive Toggle Buttons

Some things are either on or off and, when those things aren’t on (or off), they are invariably off (or on). The concept is so rudimentary that I’ve only complicated it by trying to explain it, yet on/off switches (or toggle buttons) are not all alike. Although their purpose is simple, their applications and forms vary greatly.

Building Inclusive Toggle Buttons

In this inaugural post, I’ll be exploring what it takes to make toggle buttons inclusive. As with any component, there’s no one way to go about this, especially when such controls are examined under different contexts. However, there’s certainly plenty to forget to do or to otherwise screw up, so let’s try to avoid any of that.

The post Building Inclusive Toggle Buttons appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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Building Inclusive Toggle Buttons

How New Font Technologies Will Improve The Web

Words are the primary component of content for the web. However, until a short while ago, all we had at our disposal were but a few system fonts. Adding to that, those system typefaces weren’t necessarily coherent from operating system to operating system (OS).

How New Font Technologies Will Improve The Web

Fortunately, Windows, macOS and Linux made up font-wise, and since then, all modern fonts have been compatible across those OS’. There’s no question, the future of web typography looks promising.

The post How New Font Technologies Will Improve The Web appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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How New Font Technologies Will Improve The Web

How To Create A Sketch Plugin With Front-End Technologies

UX design hasn’t been the same since Sketch arrived on the scene. The app has delivered a robust design platform with a refreshing, simple user interface. A good product on its own, it achieved critical success by being extended with community plugins.

How To Create A Sketch Plugin With Front-End Technologies

The open nature of the Sketch plugin system means that anyone can identify a need, write a plugin and share it with the community. A major barrier is stopping those eager to take part: Designers and front-end developers must learn how to write a plugin. Unfortunately, Objective-C is difficult to learn!

The post How To Create A Sketch Plugin With Front-End Technologies appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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How To Create A Sketch Plugin With Front-End Technologies

Learn From The Best: An Interview With Product Designer Michael Wong

mizko portrait

Here at Crazy Egg, we’re infatuated with design. Graphic design, product design, UX, UI – all of it. And of course, there are a handful of designers that we really admire. Michael Wong is one of them. You can see Michael’s skill right away when you come face-to-face with his work. And since Michael is a product designer, you can bet your you-know-what he’s released some of his own products. Check out bukketapp.com We decided to reach out to Michael to ask him a few questions. What’s the best skill to have as a UX designer in today’s world? How…

The post Learn From The Best: An Interview With Product Designer Michael Wong appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Learn From The Best: An Interview With Product Designer Michael Wong

Eye-Catching App Icon Design: How To

Creating that singular piece of graphic design that users will first interact with each time they encounter your product can be intimidating. A beautiful, identifiable and memorable app icon design can have a huge impact on the popularity and success of the app. But how exactly does one make a “good” app icon? What does that even mean? Fear not, I’ve put together some tips and advice to help answer these questions and to guide you on your way to designing great app icons.

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Eye-Catching App Icon Design: How To

Design For Developers

The blank Photoshop document glows in front of you. You’ve been trying to design a website for an hour but it’s going nowhere. You feel defeated. You were in this same predicament last month when you couldn’t design a website for a project at work. As a developer, you just feel out of your element pushing pixels around.
How do designers do it? Do they just mess around in Photoshop or Sketch for a while until a pretty design appears?

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Design For Developers

Are You Missing this Vital Ingredient In Your Content Strategy?

How to focus content
Focused content… infinitely better than blurry content. Image via Shutterstock.

Let’s be honest.

Running a business blog is hard.

Deadlines loom. Good writers are hard to find. And even the good ones will miss deadlines or disappear when you need them most.

The result is often content for content’s sake.

You end up publishing a post that isn’t the quality you’d like. Or a post that’s only “sort of” related to your brand’s message, products and offers.

There’s no harm, right?

Wrong.

One of the least talked about but most critical elements of a strong content marketing plan is focus. Those posts that are almost on-topic or loosely related to your brand message can actually dilute your brand and confuse people about what you do, not to mention negatively impact your SEO.

Like it or not, you must focus your content, and that takes commitment and discipline from everyone involved.

To put it bluntly, great writing isn’t the hallmark of successful content marketing.

Focus is.

It’s time we get back to the basics. A strong blog focus will make the entire content creation process easier — and get you the results you’ve been looking for.

The impact of a loose blog focus

I get it. Talking about focus is easy. Finding your focus is hard.

That’s why you see high-traffic, industry-recognized blogs that still lack focus. When they started out, they didn’t know what their focus was. They were doing what we’ve all done, trying out different topics until they found what worked.

At some point, they have to focus. As do you. Because not focusing your content does more harm than good.

Lack of focus muddies your brand

What do you sell? What’s your site about? If your content doesn’t have a tight focus, you’ll hear these questions a lot.

That’s because there’s a disconnect between your content and your offers.

Content marketing is much more than branded publishing. It’s attraction marketing. If it’s doing its job, it should call out your best prospects and weed out everyone else. It should reflect your values, your voice and your brand promise.

Teabox may be taking a loose-focus approach that, over time, could muddy their brand. Below, I’ve taken screenshots of three recent posts. The first two posts are good. But look at the third one.

Teabox example of on-topic blog content
Teabox example of on topic blog content
Teabox example of on-topic blog content

This is a good example of what I’m talking about. By creating a While It Steeps category, Teabox opened the door to blog about other topics, from music to literature.

Right now, that may work. It’s definitely a creative approach to content — adding variety and human interest to the blog. But if I only look at the blog, I have to wonder what Teabox is about. Do they sell tea, or are they a media company?

Off-topic content creates negative SEO

Off-topic posts may be entertaining, but they can seriously undermine your SEO strategy. Your audience may see the connection, but search engines won’t.

Teabox’s music and literature posts are a good example.

From a content perspective, these posts are engaging and creative for existing visitors. But they’re not likely to attract new tea drinkers.

For instance, the post “In Music: Yin and Yang” is an audio file of Schubert’s Impromptu no.2 in E flat major, Op.90 and has the keywords “classical music” and “schubert.”

The post “The Entertainer” is an audio file of The Entertainer and has the keywords “scott joplin” and “ragtime.”

Are these really the keywords a tea vendor should rank for?

By pursuing these keywords, Teabox is telling search engines that it’s as much a music blog as a tea blog. These posts won’t likely win a page-one rank in SERPs for the music files, and they won’t attract tea drinkers at all.

So what’s the point?

A blog is your best source for organic traffic, but you need to attract qualified traffic. The only way to do that is to keep your posts on topic.

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Unfocused content makes it harder to leverage for sales

Here’s where the rubber meets the road. To leverage your content for sales, you need to be able to make offers that are relevant to your posts.

Think about Teabox’s music posts. They’re likely to attract visitors who love the arts but have no interest in tea. These people aren’t prospects and won’t respond to tea-related offers. Not only is it okay to exclude them, it’s for the best.

Besides, from a conversion standpoint, traffic from non-tea-drinkers will dilute the effectiveness of any promotion Teabox wants to make.

As Brian Massey says in his book, Your Customer Creation Equation,

“There are two ways to increase your conversion rate:

  • Get more visitors to take action, or
  • Bring in fewer unqualified visitors.

Which strategy is more important? To get the high conversion rates you want, you must master both.”

There’s a degree to which content is advertising for your brand. You promote it in social media and optimize it for search — why? To attract traffic. But not any traffic. The point is to attract qualified traffic that will fall in love with your brand and respond to your offers.

To do that, your content needs to be meaningful for your business and your audience. It can entertain, persuade, educate or convert, but it needs to do that for your best prospects — not the web as a whole.

Distilled content guide
Image via Distilled.

This graphic shows you the possibilities when it comes to creating content. Notice that you can use a wide variety of formats. But don’t take that as license to create content on a wide variety of topics.

Again: Your content should create interest in your brand and curiosity about your offers, which means it needs to be highly focused on the topics related to your products.

So how do you find your content focus?

Sometimes your focus is baked into your brand. Teabox’s focus is tea.

But sometimes it isn’t so obvious. If that’s the case for you, these three steps can give you a head start.

1. Start with your products

If your content focus isn’t obvious, you need to reverse engineer it, starting with your top products/services or your core message. If you had to pick one “umbrella topic” that covers everything you do, what would it be?

That’s your core topic.

Next, jot down the supporting ideas and/or topics that you generally talk about when presenting your core message. These should be the topics or ideas that help you stand out from the competition.

If you aren’t sure, try answering these questions as you think about it:

  • What do you do that’s unique to your brand?
  • Why do you do it?
  • How do you do it?
  • Who do you do it for?

2. Tighten even more

Based on your products, the discussions you have with customers and the answers to the questions above, list two to five topics that are central to your brand.

For instance, Neil Patel’s QuickSprout talks about traffic and conversion. SEO used to be its core topic, but since search algorithms have changed, it now revolves mostly around content.

Quicksprout blog

The blog doesn’t use categories, but if it did, they would probably be content, traffic, and conversion.

In most cases, you only want two to five supporting ideas. Your umbrella topic (core message) should be the main topic of all your content. That’s “what you talk about” as a brand.

Your supporting ideas should be the categories of your blog. Any topic or idea that falls outside this list should be considered off limits.

Remember Seinfeld’s Soup Nazi?


Yeah. You need a content Nazi for your brand. Identify a handful of topics that relate to your brand offering, and then tighten the focus of your content so your content attracts your best prospects — and no one else.

3. Keyword research

Once you know the topics you’re going to focus on, you’re ready to pick the keywords you should rank for. My favorite tool for this is Ahrefs — using one tool, you can do keyword, content and competitor research, making it easy to pick your target keywords.

Keep in mind, if you’re in a competitive industry, you may not be able to rank on Page 1 of Google for the generic topic you cover, but you can rank for long-tail keywords or for related keywords.

Ahrefs gives you the keyword difficulty (KD) for each keyword, so you know how accessible it is. For example, “content,” “marketing,” and “content marketing” may be so competitive that you’d have a hard time ranking for them, but “define content,” KD of 36, might be accessible.

Ahrefs keyword difficulty

To clarify, keyword difficulty is a score that ranges from zero to 100, with 100 being the most difficult. The KD that’s right for you depends on your domain authority and number of backlinks, or referring domains, you’ve acquired. According to Ahrefs, to rank well for a KD of 10, you should have backlinks from 10 different websites, and to rank for a 90 KD keyword (such as “content” from the screenshot above), you’d need backlinks from 756 different websites.

Bottom line, with a tighter content focus, you can pick a cluster of keywords you’d like to rank for and begin creating content that could help your brand show up in the SERPs.

It won’t happen overnight, but by focusing your content, you have a much better chance of succeeding.

Now do it

The number one complaint I hear from content marketers is, “We’re doing everything we’re supposed to do and it isn’t working.”

If you aren’t getting the results you need, the issue may not be style or format or even writing quality. It may simply be that you aren’t focused enough in the topics you cover.

Onsite and off, you need a tight focus for your content.

It’s tempting to create off-topic content simply to meet your next deadline or entertain your visitors. Don’t do it!

Find your focus and stick with it. A clear focus allows you to create higher quality content with less effort — and finally get the results you’re looking for.

What about you? Have you successfully found your blog focus? What’s your biggest challenge with narrowing the focus of your content?

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Are You Missing this Vital Ingredient In Your Content Strategy?

12 Colorful Months And Seasons Illustrations [Freebie]

Time goes by fast, so today we’d like to share a colorful freebie to remind ourselves to appreciate each and every month of the year. Have you stopped to smell the pink blooming trees in March, or pluck plenty of fruits in the generous month of August, or enjoy the falling colorful leaves in rainy November?
Every month of the year comes loaded with unique energy, so that it can give us inspiration and ideas, and then leave so many special memories behind.

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12 Colorful Months And Seasons Illustrations [Freebie]