Tag Archives: hardware

Why Your B2B Needs Account Based Content Marketing & How You Should Do It

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Content Marketing Institute’s 2017 report stated that over 60% of B2B marketers saw more success from their content marketing efforts this past year. What does this mean? It means – as so many of us have stated before – that Content is King. When it comes to digital marketing, there is truly no better way to convey value and transparent authority to your users. However, even if the majority of B2B search marketers are reporting strong growth stats, there is still a large discrepancy between how our content performs in theory and how it performs in reality. Ironically, content marketing…

The post Why Your B2B Needs Account Based Content Marketing & How You Should Do It appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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Why Your B2B Needs Account Based Content Marketing & How You Should Do It

Web Development Reading List #185: Safari 11, New Edge Build, Chrome 59, And CSS Optimization Insights

This week was full of great browser vendor news: Safari 11 was announced with long-awaited features such as WebRTC and tracking protection, and a new Edge build with new CSS features is now available, too. But the past few days also had some valuable articles up their sleeves: about implementing HTTP/2 push, using datetime-local, and slimming down your CSS, for example. I collected everything in this reading list for you, so you don’t miss out on anything.

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Web Development Reading List #185: Safari 11, New Edge Build, Chrome 59, And CSS Optimization Insights

How To Prototype IoT Experiences: Building The Hardware (Part 1)

The world is constantly evolving with frameworks, such as the Internet of Things (IoT) and virtual reality (VR). These and many others are opening opportunities to rethink how we approach prototyping: They introduce avenues to marry the digital software with the tangible aspect of the overall user engagement.
This two-article series will introduce readers of different backgrounds to prototyping IoT experiences with minimum code knowledge, starting with affordable proof of concept platforms, before moving to costly commercial offerings.

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How To Prototype IoT Experiences: Building The Hardware (Part 1)

App Development Showdown: Why You Should Care About Revisiting The Native Vs. Hybrid Debate In 2017

Back in 2007, the world met the iPhone for the very first time. After Apple’s product debut, it took less than six months for work to begin on PhoneGap, which would become one of the first and most adopted frameworks for hybrid mobile app development — that is, for apps written simultaneously for multiple platforms using HTML, CSS and JavaScript, rather than coded in native languages.
When compared with the prospect of learning an entirely new language and development environment in order to program iOS (and soon Android) apps, the appeal of this type of development to the already huge population of web developers in the world was palpable.

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App Development Showdown: Why You Should Care About Revisiting The Native Vs. Hybrid Debate In 2017

How To Implement Off-Canvas Navigation For A Responsive Website

The varying viewports that our websites encounter on a daily basis continue to demand more from responsive design. Not only must we continue to tackle the issues of content choreography — the art of maintaining order and context throughout the chaotic ebb and flow of the Web browser — but we must also meet the expectations of users. They’re not sitting still. [Links checked February/21/2017]
With the likes of Firefox OS (Boot to Gecko), Chrome OS and now Ubuntu for phones — an OS that makes “Web apps” first-class citizens — delivering native app-like experiences on the Web may become a necessity if users begin to expect it.

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How To Implement Off-Canvas Navigation For A Responsive Website

It’s Not All Doom And Gloom On The Web

In this article I’d like to discuss the changes happening on the Web and argue that its future is not as problematic and endangered as a lot of people make it out to be. The article is based on the talk I’ve presented at the Smashing Conference a couple of days ago, and you can also see the slides and watch the screencast. [Links checked & repaired March/16/2017]
I have been developing websites professionally for the greater part of the last 15 years, and written quite a few books and a lot of articles.

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It’s Not All Doom And Gloom On The Web

Designing For Device Orientation: From Portrait To Landscape

The accelerometer embedded in our smart devices is typically used to align the screen depending on the orientation of the device, i.e. when switching between portrait and landscape modes. This capability provides great opportunities to create better user experiences because it offers an additional layout with a simple turn of a device, and without pressing any buttons.
However, designing for device orientation brings various challenges and requires careful thinking. The experience must be as unobtrusive and transparent as possible, and we must understand the context of use for this functionality.

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Designing For Device Orientation: From Portrait To Landscape

Let’s Play With Hardware-Accelerated CSS

If you’re a developer of mobile Web apps, then you’ve heard this before: Native apps perform better than Web apps.
But what does “perform better” mean? In the context above, performance is usually about measurable aspects such as loading time and responsiveness to user interaction. But more often than not, statements about performance lie within the realm of animations and transitions and how smooth they are. [Links checked February/21/2017]

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Let’s Play With Hardware-Accelerated CSS

The Medium Is The Message

Since the early days of communication, humanity has been captivated by the methods it uses to convey and preserve information. How we communicate with each other defines who we are and constitutes so much of what makes a culture and an individual unique.
Over the centuries, we have seen media evolve across a wide array of channels, from print to radio to television to the Internet. Each one of these channels, or media, has its own unique characteristics, much like the people who use them.

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The Medium Is The Message

The Future Of Content Delivery – How Print Loves Web

A recent power cut highlighted the fragile and dated way I access content on the Web. I sit in front of a computer which has a number of hardware elements like a keyboard, mouse and monitor — all connected to a black box which houses a number of other smaller more complicated bits of hardware. To access content on the Web, I rely on all of these layers working, not to mention the parts outside of my control-like cabling and remote servers.

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The Future Of Content Delivery – How Print Loves Web